The following biographies are from "History of Hennepin County and the City of Minneapolis [Minnesota]". By George E. Warner, in 1881. Only the biography sections and selected 'incidents' are included in this file.

The page numbers correspond to the city and township sections as listed in the table of contents:

* Note: there are separate listings for the 'town of Minneapolis' and the 'city of Minneapolis'

Richfield - pages 212 - 221; Bloomington - pages 222 - 230 ; Eden Prairie - pages 231 - 237; Minnetonka - pages 238 - 246; Excelsior - pages 247 - 256; Minnetrista - pages 257 - 262; Independence - pages 263 - 268; Medina - pages 268 - 277; Crystal Lake - pages 278-284; Brooklyn - pages 285 - 293; Osseo - pages 294 - 297; Champlin - pages 298-301; Dayton - pages 302 - 306; Hassan - pages 307 - 310; Greenwood - pages 311-316; Corcoran - pages 317-321; Maple Grove - pages 322-328; Plymouth - pages 328 - 338; town of Minneapolis - pages 339 - 353; town of Saint Anthony - pages 353 - 356; city of Minneapolis - pages 357 - 662

These pages were scanned and may contain errors created during the transfer of the data, especially the dates.

Page 216

George W. Baird

is a native of Pennsylvania, born April 16th, 1835. In 1857 he removed to Minnesota and purchased the farm of 120 acres which he now occupies, located on section 18. In the spring of 1860 he imported the first Spanish Merino sheep brought into the State. He sold the first fleece of fine wool in Minneapolis receiving 95 cents per pound for the same. He is at present giving his whole attention to fine Cotswold and Lincoln grades, and received first prizes at the Minneapolis Exposition of 1880. He was married October 11th, 1865, to Miss Sarah G. Gates, a native of Vermont.

Page 216

John E. Booth

was born in Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, May 12th, 1832. He remained in England, engaged in the manufacture of fancy woolen goods, until 1854, when he came to the United States and located in New Jersey. He remained in that State about six months and removed to Albany, N. Y. Thence in March, 1855, to Brooklyn, and from there to Toronto, Canada. In 1856 he removed to Boston, thence to Philadelphia where he was married to Mary Beaumont, who died in the fall of the same year.

In 1858, his health failing, he returned to England, where he was engaged as florist for eleven years. In 1859 he was married to Mary Morrell, and in 1870 he returned to America, and came directly to Minneapolis, engaging as florist and gardener for Wyman Elliott. After remaining with him eighteen months, he leased the grounds and hot houses for five years and carried on the business for himself. In 1877 he purchased three acres of ground at Minnehaha, which he laid out and improved as a landscape garden. This garden is valued at $10,000. In 1880 he leased the Minnehaha hotel and grounds, and is now conducting the same. The children are: Herbert M., Annie J., Frederic E., and Arthur C.

Page 217

James A. Bull

was born in Jefferson county, New York, February, 1834. He remained there with his parents, until 1859 when he came to Minnesota, and settled on the farm he now occupies. He owns 158 acres of fertile land and has improved it, until it now ranks among the best farms in this town. Mr. Bull was married in 1856, to Mary E. Comstock, who bore him one child, Mary L. Mrs. Bull died in the winter of 1865. He was married again in 1867, to Miss Amy L. Cooper; has four children: James H., Alvah M., Coates P. and Anna B.

Page 217

Frederick Bush

was born in Stockhausen, Prussia, December 12th, 1849. He remained in his native country until 1869 when he emigrated to America. He came to Minnesota, and settled in Richfield, Hennepin county, December, 1869, owns 15 acres on section 15, Township 28, Range 24, where he has a pleasant home.

Page 217

John Carey

is the owner of 93 acres of land on sections 8 and 9,Richfield Township, 45 acres being under cultivation. He was born in Tipperary, Ireland, June 14, 1826, and remained there until nearly 20 years of age, when he came to America. Resided in New Jersey one year, thence removing to Maryland, where he remained until 1855,when he came to Minnesota and purchased the farm he has since occupied. Was married to Ann Regan, a native of Ireland, in 1854. They have had twelve children, ten now living: Lizzie, James, Mary, Maggie, John, Nora, Jeremiah, William, Patrick, Agnes.

Page 217

C. C. Chase

was born in Haverhill, Mass., May 16th, 1844. Resided in his native state until 1874, when he came to Hennepin county, purchased twenty acres of land on section 15, town of Richfield, where he conducts a market garden. Mr. Chase is a practical gardener, and has been quite successful in the business.

Page 217

George Code

owns 200 acres of land, of which fifty acres are cultivated, the balance meadow and woodland. He was born in Carlow county, Ireland, October 29th, 1824. Was engaged in farming in his native country until 1849, when he emigrated to Canada, locating at Ottawa, where he engaged in farming and lumbering for seven years. In 1856 he came to the United States, coming directly to Minneapolis, where he resided until 1863, when he purchased the land he now owns in Richfield, and has since been engaged in farming. Was married October 27th, 1859, to Grace Watt, a native of Ontario, Canada. She was born May 15th, 1836. They are the parents of six children: Robert F., George A., Mary, William, Elizabeth, and Joseph W.

Page 217

Mary Copley

is the owner of eighty-two acres of land, forty acres under cultivation. Was born in Ireland, March 21st, 1837. Remained in her native country until 1860, when she came to New York City, and thence to Boston, where she remained three years. In 1863, removed to St. Paul, where she resided until 1868, when she married Mr. Copley. and has since resided on the farm she now occupies.

Page 217

Cornelius Couillard

one of the old settlers of Richfield, was born at Frankfort, Maine, October 31st, 1818. At the age of seventeen, learned the trade of tanner and currier, following it eight years; then worked in a ship yard. In April, 1854, came to St. Anthony, and engaged in carpenter work, and on the old suspension bridge. In August 1854, he made a claim of 160 acres, in Richfield; 1855, removed with his family, and has since resided there. The whole quarter section has been brought under cultivation. He was Married, Sept. 11th, 1884, to Nancy J. Couillard, of Maine, who died October 6th, 1875. They had nine children: Ellen M., Ellery A., Amanda M., died August, 1839; Annie A., died August 17th, 1877; Malonah, died March, 1849; Adelbert H., Emma D., Charles A., Fred. L.

Page 218

George W. Cummings

a native of Maine, was born April 8th, 1853. Engaged in farming until 1867, when he came with his parents to Bloomington, Hennepin county. At the age of twenty-one, he embarked in dairy business. In 1878 he bought the land he now occupies. His dairy business has been quite successful. Was married to Miss Alice Gilchrist. Dec. 25th, 1875. They have three children: Arthur A., George H., and Ruth W.

Page 218

William J. Duggan is the owner of 245 acres of land, 130 is plow land, the balance woodland and pasture. He was born in Tipperary, Ireland, in 1838; came to America with his parents, in 1847, residing in Illinois until 1853, when he came to Hennepin county, and has since resided on the farm he now occupies. This farm was pre-empted by his father in 1853. In 1862 he was one of Capt. Northups company who went to the relief of Fort Ridgely. Was married January 21st, 1871, to Cordelia Kyte, by whom he has four children: Mary, Katie, Maggie, John.

Page 218

William M. Ewing

was born in Canada in 1816. Learned the trade of wagon maker, and served the government during the rebellion in Canada. In 1848, removed to New York; remained one year; thence to Michigan. In 1851 he came to Minnesota, assisted in the survey of Maple Grove township, and in naming it. In 1857 he removed to Osseo, and was the first secretary of the corporation. In 1862 he removed to a farm in the town of Brooklyn, and resided there eight years. He enlisted in Company C of the Mounted Rangers, serving as clerk in the Quartermaster's department, until the company was disbanded. Was married in 1840, to Myra Rogers; by her he had five children, two of whom are now living. He has been married three times; has four children living, Charles Arkland, Alice Myra, Francis Cordelia and Mary Adelma.

Page 218

Patrick Fogarty

was born in Ireland in 1840; came to this country in 1857, and settled in Richfield township. He was four years in the employ of the government, driving team. In 1862 was with General Sibley on his Indian Expedition. Purchased the farm on which he has since resided, in 1865. He now has thirty acres under cultivation. Was married in January, 1869, to Bridget Carrol, by whom he has had seven children, Mary, Maggie, Ellen. Bridget, Willie, Annie and Denis.

Page 218

George Fortwingler

a native of Germany, was born November 23d, 1823. He came to this country in 1854, resided in Ohio one year, and in 1855 removed to St. Paul where he remained till 1866, when he removed to Bloomington, Hennepin county. Kept a hotel at Nine-Mile Creek for two years, then purchased the farm he now resides on. Was married in 1855, to Miss A. Reisslei a native of Germany, by her he had four children, George and Caroline, twins, Julius and Julien, twins. His wife died and he again married; his second wife was Miss A. Renz, by whom he has three children, Amelia, Mary, Otillia.

Page 218

John F. Gilmore

was born in Ohio, December 2nd, 1816. While young he accompanied his parents to Illinois and resided in that state, occupied in reaching school until 1839, when he went to Mississippi and engaged in the same vocation. In 1845 he removed to Newport., Kentucky, where he was engaged in the nursery business for six years. In 1871 he came to Minnesota, residing at Faribault two years, engaged in the nursery business. He came to Hennepin county in 1873 and has since resided in Richfield. Was married Dec. 3d, 1872, to Miss Belle McClure. Their children are Molly and William.

Page 218

Herman J. Gjertsen is a native of Norway, born October 29th, 1826. He followed farming and fishing in his native country until 1868 when he emigrated to America, settling in Isanti county, Minnesota. Came to Richfield in 1870 and in 1878 he bought 81 acres where he now resides. Married Albertina Olson of Norway in 1851. Family record is: Nels P., John C., Ole J., Henry J., Louis C., Assoria M., Eunice T., Sophia J., George H. Three children have died.

Page 218

Michael Gleeson

was born in Ireland in 1810, and came to this country in 1846. Landed in New York and went to Massachusetts where he resided until 1855, When he came west and settled in Hennepin county. He made a claim of 160 acres, which he has since increased by purchase to 278 acres. He was married in 1852 to Mary Bolden, of Ireland. They have had nine children, Michael, James and John, twins, Thomas, Mary Ann, Daniel, Bridget, Cornelius, William.

Page 219

Charles Haeg

was born in Germany, July 13, 1819. He learned the trade of cabinet maker, served three years in the German army, and in 1844, emigrated to the United States. Enlisted at Milwaukee, Wis., in September, 1845. Mr. Haeg enjoys the distinction of being a veteran of the Mexican war, serving under General Scott during the continuance of the war. In 1848 he was stationed at Fort Snelling, and, after a stay of six months was removed to Fort Ridgely. In 1851 he received his discharge, and in September of that year made a claim about five miles north of St. Anthony, living there until 1853, when he came to Richfield. In 1865 he purchased the farm on which he has since resided. Was married in 1856, to Mary Walter who died in 1866, leaving five children. Married for his second wife Albertina L. Adleman, by whom he has seven children all living.

Page 219

Andrew N. Hall

was born in Maine November 1st, 1835. Remained with his parents until 1865 when he came west and located at Minneapolis, residing there until 1862, when he returned to Maine and enlisted in Company B of the 28th regiment Maine Infantry, serving one year. In 1866 he returned to Minneapolis, and purchased a farm of 72 acres in the town of Richfield. Resided in the city until 1872, since which time he has lived on his farm. Was married in 1875, to Eliza Caley. Their children are Albion and William.

Page 219

James Hawkes

was born in Yorkshire, England, May 6th, 1820. In 1844 he came to America. In 1854 he came to Minnesota and preempted a farm of 120 acres in Richfield, where he resided until his death. Mr. Hawkes formed one of the Company who in 1862 marched to the relief of Fort Ridgely under Capt. Northrup. In 1863 he enlisted in the First Minnesota Infantry, and served in the First Battalion until discharged in 1865. He was with his company in several of most severe engagements of the war, and was wounded June 1864, for which he received a pension. He was married in 1839 to Mary Ann Holdsworths. The family record is: Harriet, Henry Thomas, David H., John W., Emma J., Alfred, Charles Lincoln. Five children have died. Mr. Hawkes came to his death in Minneapolis Sept. 29th, 1880 by a fall from his wagon. He was one of the pioneers of Richfield, and was respected by all who knew him.

Page 219

Jesse Haywood

is a native of England, born May 10th, 1840. Remained in England, engaged in the Manufacture of woolen Goods until 1872, when he came to America, landed at Quebec, thence by lake to Duluth, going from there to Clay county, Minnesota, where he purchased a half section of land. In 1874 he came to Hennepin county, and has since been engaged as florist with Mr. Booth, at Minnehaha.

Page 219

Franz J. Heiss

was born in Germany, October 19th, 1835, and there learned the trade of carpenter. Emigrated to this country in 1855, and to Minnesota in 1859, locating on a farm in Brown county. In 1861 he enlisted in the Sixth Minnesota, and served until the discharge of the regiment, in 1865. He purchased eighty acres of land in Richfield, in 1875, and has since resided there, in the pursuit of farming. In 1871 he was married to Salomey Souder, a native of Germany. Their children are: Frank D., Amelia, Charlie, Katie, and Willheim. Frank D. died in 1875.

Page 219

Charles Hoag

one of Richfield's representative men, and a pioneer of Hennepin county, was born June 29, 1808, in New Hampshire. After receiving such education as the common schools of his native town afforded, he attended the Wolfboro Academy and Friends' Boarding School, at Providence, R. 1. At the age of sixteen he began teaching, and followed that profession for twenty-seven years, thirteen of which he was engaged as Principal of a Grammar School in Philadelphia. In 1852 he came to Minnesota; taught school in St. Anthony two terms. In May, 1852, he made a claim of 160 acres of land, in what is now the city of Minneapolis; was a member of the first town council, and to him is due the honor of giving to the city its beautiful and appropriate name, Minneapolis. He was the second treasurer of Hennepin county, and has held many positions of public trust. Is an ardent Odd Fellow, and served one term as Grand Master of the Minnesota Grand Lodge. He claims to be the oldest Odd Fellow in the state. Has also occupied the position of President of the Agricultural and Horticultural Societies. In 1857 he purchased the farm he now occupies, which is known as the "Diamond Lake Farm," and removed to it in 1865. Mr. Hoag was County Superintendent of Schools from 1870 to 1874. Has one daughter by his first wife, married to Charles H. Clark, who is in the revenue service. Mr. Hoag's first wife died in 1871, and in March, 1873, he was married to Susan F. Jewett, of Solon, Maine.

Page 220

Laura Holman

was born in the State of Vermont in 1817. In 1855 she came to Minnesota. In 1848 she was married to N. Butterfield who was drowned in Lake Minnetonka in 1859. She settled with her husband in Minnetonka in 1855 and remained there until 1861 when she removed to the farm in Richfield where she has since resided. In 1860, was married to L. Holman. He was killed in 1871, being run over by a heavy load of wood. Mrs. Holman has one son by her first husband, Frank J. Butterfield.

Page 220

Orrin Hubbard

was born in the State of New York, April 5th, 1835. In 1854, moved to Janesville, Wisconsin, where he remained for eleven years, eight of which he passed in the employ of the American Express Company. Enlisted in 1862 in the 12th Wisconsin Battery and served until his discharge in 1865; participating in many of the hardest fought battles of the Rebellion. In 1865 he accepted a position as conductor for the C. M. & St. P. Ry. Co., and has since been engaged in that vocation. In 1877 he bought a farm in the town of Richfield and has improved it until it is now one of the finest farms in this part of the county. He was married in January, 1866, to Harriet E. Beaumont. They have had four children, Mary C., Nellie B., Sarah R., deceased, Hattie, died February, 1877. He resides in Minneapolis at 916 Sixth Avenue South.

Page 220

E. F. Irwin

is a native of New York, born in Erie county February 2d, 1840. In 1855 he came with his parents to Minnesota, settling in the town of Richfield. Was occupied in various pursuits until 1862 when he joined the company commanded by Captain Northup for the relief of Fort Ridgely. In 1865 he bought the farm he has since occupied, and has improved it until it ranks among the finest farms of the town. Was married October 1st, 1867 at Iowa City, Iowa, to Martha J. Bortland. They have one son. John Bortland, born February 16th, 1874.

Page 220

Leopold Kiesel

was born in Baden, Germany, December 12th, 1825. He came to the United States in 1852, and to Minnesota in 1856. Entered a claim near Chaska, and after living there three years removed to Bloomington. In 1864 he bought a part of the farm he now occupies in Richfield. Now owns 220 acres, 150 acres being cultivated. Was married in 1856 to Madeline Leppet, who has borne him five children.

Page 220

Edward E. King

was born at Peabody, Mass., August, 1st, 1836. Came to Minnesota in 1857 and purchased the farm he now occupies. At the time he came to Richfield there was but little improvement and few settlers. He has since built a substantial barn and fine dwelling house at a cost of $6,000. Married in Nov. 1863., Annie N. Couillard, who died August 17th, 1877. His second wife was Miss Katie R. Woodman who was born December 22d, 1857.

Page 220

John Kyte

is the owner of 316 acres of land, 75 acres under cultivation. He was born in Ireland in 1817 and came to this country in 1845. After residing in various places in the Eastern States, he came to Minneapolis in 1855. Pre-empted a quarter section of land, bought as much more, and has since been engaged in farming. Has five children, all of whom are married.

Page 220

Michael Maloney

was born in the County of Galway, Ireland, November 20th, 1845; came to New York in 1852, and two years later removed to Wisconsin, where he resided for fifteen years. August 1862, enlisted in a Wisconsin regiment, and served three years under Generals Sherman and McPherson. He was discharged August, 1865, and four years later removed to Minnesota, and has since resided in Richfield, where he owns 160 acres of land. He was married November, 1877, to Albertina Erickson. They have one daughter, born December 31st, 1878.

Page 220

Merriman McCabe

was born in the state of New York, December 12th, 1843; came with his parents to Minnesota in 1853, and has since resided in the town of Richfield. In 1862, he was with Captain Northrup on the Fort Ridgely expedition. John McCabe, his father, was born in Ireland in 1808; came to America, and resided in the state of New York until 1858, when he came west and Pre-empted a farm in Richfield, where he remained until his death, which occurred in May, 1878; he was married to Harriet Toles, who bore him six children, Mercy., Merriman, Emily, Mary, Amelia and Elnoria.

Page 220

George Millam

was born in Scotland August, 1849. He came to this country in 1859 and ten years later to Hennepin county. He has, since coming to Richfield been engaged as miller in the Edina Mills. In 1872 was married to Miss Margaret Jibb, a native of Scotland. Following is the family record: Charles A., born August, 1878; Lily F., born April, 1875, died at the age of three years; Annabella, born May, 1877; and Rosella, born April, 1879.

Page 221

Howard C. Odell

was born at Monticello, Indiana, October 17th, 1853, and came with his parents to Minnesota in the fall of 1856 and located in the town of Richfield. He is the son of George Odell who has a farm on section 27. Howard is employed during the winter in Minneapolis and in the summer season turns his attention to farming. Was married October 14th, 1880, to Miss Fannie Stanchfield, of Tama City, Iowa.

Page 221

Thomas Peters

was born in England, October 7th, 1848. His father being a shoemaker, Thomas engaged in the same business while in England. In 1873 he emigrated to this country, coming directly to St. Paul. Engaged in farming in Ramsey and Dakota counties until 1876, when he came to Minnehaha, and was employed at the hotel two years; thence to Hudson, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in a hotel for one year; then returned to Minnehaha, and has since been employed at the hotel. In Oct., 1871, was married to Kate Weaver. Their residence is near the junction of Minnehaha Creek with the Mississippi.

Page 221

D. N. Place

was born in New York city, January 18th, 1844. At the age of fourteen, he shipped as seaman, and followed that vocation for eighteen years. Came to Minnesota in 1869, and for three years was engaged in the real estate business; then returned to the pursuit of sailing, and served as mate on a voyage to Japan. Then served four years as Purser and one year as Captain of the schooner Leader, trading on the Pacific coast; was married April 15, 1874, to Frances M. Benjamin. They have had two children, one now living, Charles E. L.

Page 221

Patrick A. Ryan

a native of Ireland, was born in 1831, and carne to this country in 1847. Resided in Pennsylvania and Ohio until 1854 when he came to Minnesota, first settling on a homestead in the town of Hassan, Hennepin county. In 1868 he sold his farm and remove Saint Anthony where he resided until 1874 when he purchased the farm he has since occupied in the town of Richfield. Married Julia Quinn in 1867.

Page 221

Edward A. Scales

was born in Townsend, Massachusetts, April 13th, 1853, and remained in his native town engaged in coopering until 1874 when he came to Minnesota and engaged in farming at Minnehaha. In 1876 he purchased five acres of land and has since given his attention to market gardening.

Page 221

Gilbert Sly

was born in the State of New York November 4th, 1798, and remained in his native state engaged in farming until 1866 when he came west and purchased of James Davis the farm he now occupies in the town of Richfield. Was married in 1822, to Sarah Crane a native of Massachusetts. They have had twelve children, five of whom are now living, Mary E., Fidelia, Elisha, Paulina and W. H.

Page 221

J. L. Smiht (Smith ?)

was born in Holstein, Denmark, July 28th, 1850. In 1873 he emigrated to this country and came directly to Minnesota locating on section 14, Richfield, where he has since been engaged in farming.

Page 221

Freeman B. Smith

was born in Vermont, July 15th, 1822. He removed to Champlain, N. Y., where he resided until 1852. For four years he held the office of postmaster. In 1852 he went to California and was engaged in gold mining for one year. From 1860 till 1867, he was in the revenue service at Virginia City, Nevada. In April, 1878, he came to Minnesota and has since been engaged in conducting the farm of his brother-in-law, Orrin Hubbard, in the town of Richfield. In 1846 married to Sarah E. Beaumont. She was born in New York, Sept. 24, 1824.

Page 221

James Stansfield

was born in the State of New York, September 3d, 1828. At the age of fifteen he went to sea and followed that occupation until 1849, when he passed one year as steward on the Hudson River steamboats. In 1850 went to California, and remained five years. Came to St. Anthony in 1855 and engaged in furnishing supplies to steamboats until 1862, when he engaged in the restaurant business, which he continued in Minneapolis until 1859, when he engaged in real estate business, and has followed the same extensively. In 1872 he purchased the farm in Richfield which he has since occupied. In 1856 he married Susan Wagner. They have three children living: Frank H., Charles L., and Ella B.

Page 228

Mrs. Margaret Brosseau

was born at Leech Lake, Minnesota, October 15th, 1826, and is the daughter of Peter and Louisa Quinn. Her whole life has been passed in the vicinity of Fort Snelling. Her early life was spent among the Indians and traders who frequented the fort. She, by this association, became familiar with the Sioux, Chippewa and French languages in addition to English. She attended school at the fort and at Mr. Pond's missionary school. In 1846 she was married to S. J. Findley, of Prairie du Chien, a clerk in the Sutler's store at Fort Snelling. Mr. Findley kept the ferry and lived in a house, still standing, on the east bank of the Mississippi River, near the new bridge at the fort. There he died November 8th, 1855, leaving his wife and three children. Two of these children are now dead, and the third, the only survivor, is Mrs. A. E. Scofield of this town. Mrs. Findley remained at Fort Snelling until 1857 when she, married F. X. Brosseau and settled on her farm in Bloomington where she now resides. From 1862 - 1872 they lived in St. Paul, but returned at the latter date and have since lived in their old home. There were two children by the last marriage, James L. and Francis X.; both are dead.

Page 228

Samuel Augustin Goodrich

was born in Benson, Vermont, September 19th, 1827. In 1832 his parents moved to Du Page county, Illinois. He there attended school, and in due time entered Knox College, Galesburg. His health would not permit him to complete his course and he left college. In 1852, in company with others, he came to this town and made a claim where his family now resides. In 1854, and again in 1856, he visited Illinois. During the last visit he married, at Chicago. His wife was a Miss Adams, a native of Enosburgh, Vermont, born March 18th, 1830. She came to Chicago, in 1854. Mr. Goodrich was the first assessor for Hennepin county, and held the office of Justice of the Peace. He died Nov. 21st, 1865. There were six children. Mrs. Goodrich still resides on the old homestead.

Page 228

William Chadwick

as born in England, Nov. 11th, 1824. He came to America with his parents in 1829, and settled in Quebec, where they remained until 1832. They then removed to Kingston, where William attended school until fifteen. He was employed afterwards on the steamboats of the St. Lawrence, and canal boats on the Rideau canal, until twenty-two, when he married, bought a farm, and lived on it seven years. He then lived one year in Kingston before coming to Minnesota. He came here in 1854, and settled on his present farm in 1869. He married Miss Elizabeth Morris in 1845. She was born in England, January 15th, 1827, and ten children, of whom eight are living, followed the marriage. Robert, Mary A., Hector, Emma J., Clara J., George F., William A., and Eddie.

Page 228

J. L. Ancel

was born in France, January 22d, 1822; served as a soldier seven years in France; married to Miss Zelie Genevry in 1850; emigrated to America in 1852; remained a short time in New York; removed to Connecticut, and staid four years; returned to New York, where they remained until 1857, when they removed to Minnesota, and located in Bloomington. In 1874, purchased a farm on section 17; sold, 1878 ; rented the farm on which he now lives the same year; has purchased 160 acres in section 19. They have five children.

Page 228

T. T. Bazley

was born in England, November 28th, 1828; settled in Canada, 1842; moved to Minnesota, 1852; on his present farm in 1853; married, September 8, 1857, to Miss Catherine Miller, from Ireland, who died, November 10th, 1859; married again, September, 1862, to Miss Nancy Stinson. He tried to enlist as a soldier, but was rejected. Children are, Phebe, Kate, Jennette, Tom, Josephine, Lillie J.

Page 228

John Brown

was born in England, September 21, 1838; came to America in 1847. His father enlisted in the 3d Inft. of U. S. Regs., and went to Mexico, his family accompanying him. In 1849, the regiment was ordered to Fort Snelling, where Mr. Brown remained until 1853, when they settled on a farm in this town. John, in 1863, enlisted in Company D, 1st Minnesota Regiment; was in the first Bull Run battle; mustered out in 1864. The same summer he was sent as a scout to Dakota. Part of 1865 in the Quartermaster's department in Virginia. In the fall of 1865, married Anna M. Ames, of Bloomington, and settled on his present farm. They have three children, John A., Cora N., and Walter J. Mr. Brown has a good farm valued at $5,000.

Page 229

H. D. Cunningham

one of the early settlers of the state, was born in Augusta county, Virginia, December 13th, 1822. Came to Minnesota in 1856. Settled in Nicollet county and followed farming. Married Miss Mary Ellison in 1857. In 1858 went to Yellow Medicine and took charge of the schools of the Dakota Mission, where he remained until the spring of 1865, when he moved to Minneapolis and engaged in the flour and feed business. Located on his present farm in 1874. Held the office of town supervisor three years, school director and treasurer for two years, and is now in the employ of the American Tract Society as colporteur.

Page 229

Joseph Harrison

was born in Ireland, 1815. Emigrated to Canada in 1818. Settled in Kings ton. Married in 1840 to Miss H. Cook, of Kingston. Had thirteen children, nine of whom are living: Cecilia, Amelia, Elizabeth A., Martha J., Frances May, Charlotte, William A., Harriet M., Clement D., Hulda C., Abbie, Eva, Edith Hope. Came to Minnesota in 1854, and moved to his present home in 1874. Has held the office of town supervisor and school director for several years. Has land valued at $7,000.

Page 229

J. W. Kelley

was born in Williamsburg, N. Y., June 4th, 1836. Removed to Oneida county in 1856. Married in 1859 to Miss C. Joice. Enlisted in 1862 in Co. A, 117 N. Y. Regt, 2d division, and was engaged in many hard-fought battles under Generals Butler, Gilmore, and Terry. Mustered out in 1866. Returned to Oneida same year. Moved to Iowa in 1869, and to Minnesota and b4s present farm in 1874. They have four children. Mr. Kelley is mail carrier from Minneapolis to Richfield, Bloomington, and Bloomington Ferry.

Page 229

J. H. Kirk

was born in Maryland, September 28th, 1827. Went to Ohio in 1834. Moved to Sargents Bluff, Iowa, 1849; to Anoka county, Minnesota, May, 1851. Married in 1859 to Miss Mary G. Smith, who was born in Vermont, May 28th, 1834. They settled on their present farm in 1866. Have no children, but have given homes to three friendless girls and one boy. His land is valued at $3,200.

Page 229

John Le Borius

was born in Germany in 1844. Came to America and settled in St. Paul in 1854. Spent most of his time until 1861 traveling as cook and waiter with parties looking for and locating claims. Employed by the government as wagon-master and blacksmith. Was with Gen. Sibley's expedition against the Indians in 1868. On his return was employed at Fort Snelling. In 1868 made another trip with Gen. Mercy into Dakota and the British possessions, inspecting the forts. In 1869 made a trip with Gen. Hancock, inspecting forts and locating new ones. 1870 took the Fort Snelling ferry and run it four seasons. 1877 took charge of a large farm in Mower county. Married, Dec. 1879, Miss L. M. Frank.

Page 229

Jeremiah Mahoney

born in Ireland in 1818. Came to America in 1839. Enlisted in 1840 in the U. S. Army, as Quartermaster Sergeant, and was ordered to Florida under Genl. W. S. Harny, to gather the Seminole Indians and take them to the reservation in Arkansas. Stationed at Fort Gibson four years. Ordered to Mexico in 1846. Was through all the battles of the Mexican war under Gen. Scott. Ordered to Fort Snelling, and appointed Ordnance Sergeant, where he remained until the post was sold to Franklin Steele. Married in 1853 to Anna Nevin. Moved to his present farm in 1858. In 1861, enlisted in the First Minnesota Regiment as Commissary Sergeant. Received the appointment of Head Clerk and Cashier in Quartermaster's Department, Alexandria, Va. In 1864 returned to his home. They have one child living, Martha A. Town Supervisor one year, and Justice of the Peace two years.

Page 229

W. J. McAfee

proprietor of Bloomington Flour Mills, was born in Ireland May 8, 1840. Came to St. Johns, N. B., 1843. Learned of his father the millwright and machinist trades. Engaged in the manufacture of lumber, ten years. In 1868 moved to St. Paul and opened the City Iron Works; 1869, took a partner, in 1871, dissolved and took in his brother, Hugh J.; 1877, bought present property, erected his mill, which, with the improvements made from time to time, makes it a first class country mill. Married in 1865 to Miss M. E. Spencer, of St. Johns, N. B. They have had six children.

Page 230

Thomas Oxborough

was born in England, April 20, 1814. His mother died in 1823. From that time he was obliged to earn his own living. Married in 1852 to Miss Sarah Parish. Came to America in 1852 and settled in St. Clair, Mich. In 1853, moved to Minnesota, and located on his present farm. Put up a small shanty on his claim, without doors or windows. Indians were numerous, sometimes two hundred, would gather around, but did no harm. Has two children, Mathew and Anna. He has land valued at $6,000, also a large livery stable on First street, Minneapolis, valued at $8,000.

Page 230

Abram Palmer

born in Rutland, Vermont, October 9th, 1825. At an early age he moved to Saratoga county, New York. In 1847, married to Miss A. Snow. Moved to Illinois in 1850, and to DeKalb county in 1853. Spring of 1857 moved to Minnesota, and settled on their present farm; had seven children, Wilber, James, Mary B., Emily, Henry, Laura and Abram F. Has been Town Supervisor six years, Assessor five years.

Page 230

J. T. Palmer was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., August 11th, 1834. Learned cabinet makers trade at Ballston Spa. In 1851 moved to Dekalb county, Illinois. Married in 1856 to Miss Mary E. Patterson, of Pennsylvania. For six years he was master carpenter on the St. P. & P. R. R. Settled on his farm in 1870. Have five children living, Charles B., Robert P. Willie P., Mary C., and Josie L. Land valued at $5,000.

Page 230

Wilber Palmer

was born in Saratoga county, N. Y., 1822. Moved to DeKalb county, Illinois, in 1850. Came to Minnesota in 1859, and on his present farm in 1860. Married in 1844 to Miss Margaret Gray, of Saratoga. He enlisted in the Mexican war, Company E, Third Regiment Infantry, and served through the war. Mustered out in 1848. Married again in 1853 to Miss Phebe Hedges, of Canada. Has eight children living. Land valued at $3,000.

Page 230

P. M. Petterson

was born in Sweden, March 6th, 1818. Came to America in 1854. Moved from New York to Minnesota in 1855, and settled in Dakota county. Moved to his present farm in 1866. Married in 1845 to Miss Gustava Johnson. Divorced in 1873. Married again in same year to Miss H. Johnson. Have four children: Albert, Charles T., Anna M. and Ida.

Page 230

J. D. Scofield

was born in Cortland county, N. Y., August 29th, 1828. Moved to Seneca county, in 1847. Engaged in the lumber trade until 1849 when he came to Saint Paul. Moved to Washington county in 1861, and remained until 1853, when he was married to Miss Sophia Cook. Settled on his present farm same year. Had four children: Charles E., Lester H., Alice M., and Florence. Wife died September 22, 1861. Married again April 14th, 1865, to Miss C. S. Damon. They have had three children: Cora E., Mabel V., and Carl S. Supervisor for five years. One of the charter members of the Farmers' Grange, organized in 1874.

Page 230

F. G. Standish

born in Benson, Vermont July 10, 1834. Moved to New York in 1836. To Illinois in 1848. To Minnesota in 1856. Made a claim seven miles west of Rockford, Wright County, in 1858. Drafted in 1862, and furnished a substitute. Sold his farm same year and moved to tells town. Married in 1863 to Miss C. Harrison, and settled on his present farm in 1868. Have four children. He was one of the volunteer company that went to Fort Ridgely in 1862.

Page 230

Garritt Van Ness, Jr.

born in Canada, February 23, 1836. Came to Minnesota and settled in Bloomington in 1865, and on his present farm in 1875. Married in 1862 to Miss Mary Morris. He is a carpenter and boat builder by trade. Keeps a sportsmans station, acting as guide, and furnishing boats for duck hunting. June 29, 1877, a cyclone passed over his place and destroyed every building he had. Land valued $2,500.

Page 230

Wm. West, Jr.

born in England, February 28, 1847. Came to America and settled in New York in 1852. Went to Will county, Illinois, in 1856. To Anoka county Minnesota in 1866, where his father preempted a farm which he still owns. Married in 1872 to Miss Mary Kell of this township. Moved to his present farm in 1868. They have three children, Leona, Fannie, G., Ewing W. Land valued at $2000.

Page 233

Anderson Family

Prominent among the early settlers here are the Andersons, three generations of whom are now living in the town, and number upwards of one hundred. Robert Anderson was born in Knocknabossett, county Cavan, Ireland, in 1824. Remained with his father until the age of twenty-six, being employed in milling and farming. In 1850 came to America, arriving at Galena, Illinois, November 5th, where he spent four years farming. Came to Minnesota, April, 1854, first stopping in Bloomington, then to Eden Prairie where he has since resided. February 1850, married Miss Mary J. Hill, daughter of John and Elizabeth Hill, of Ireland. From this union nine children were born; Those now living: John H., Samuel G., Robert J., Mary J., Anna E., Joseph M., Margaret E. and Agnes E. When he came to this region there was but one store in Minneapolis on the west side, and no settler between Fort Snelling and Bloomington except Rev. Gideon H. Pond and one French family. Into this wilderness he brought his family by way of the Minnesota River on the rickety little steamer Iola. This little craft became partially disabled on the way up, obliging the, passengers to carry wood and water to keep her in motion. This pastime was indulged in several times during the journey from St. Paul, to the general annoyance of the passengers. Mr. Anderson has been prominent in matters of education, temperance and Christianity; now has a son in the University fitting for the ministry.

Page 234

William Anderson

was born January 1st, 1837, in North Ireland. When sixteen years old, his father, a prosperous cottager, and mill owner, died and in 1854 William came with the family to America, settling in Jo Davies county, Illinois, where he attended school one year, then went to Galena to work in a store, where he remained until the fall of 1855, when he came to Minnesota crossing the Mississippi at Fort Snelling, and went to Eden Prairie. His mother made a home-stead claim of the farm he now occupies, on section 13 and 14, where she lived to see the third generation of her family; 103 grandchildren and l3 great grandchildren. She died in March, 1878. William Anderson married Miss Rachel Mitchell, April 28th, 1858. They have eleven children; Harvey, Martha A., Lizzie E., Ida B., Fannie, Loretta H., Jennie L., Julia M., Alfred W., Arthur H. H., and Alice. P., He has been active in educational and religious matters and largely interested in the erection of the three churches in the township. Was one of a few who hewed and hauled the logo for the first school-house in his district in 1856. Two of his children are now attending the High School in Minneapolis.

Page 234

James Anderson

was born in the same town in Ireland, as his brothers Robert and William. His early life, like that of his brothers, was devoted to milling and farming. In 1852 he came to America. Lived one year in Hanover, Illinois. In 1858 came to Minnesota and located where he has since lived, on section 14. In common with other pioneer settlers, he staked out his "claim," which he subsequently secured by pre-emption and entry. In the spring of 1854 brought his family from Illinois, coming from St. Paul on the steamer Iola. Was married February 26th, 1852, to Miss Sarah Hicks, of Cavan county, Ireland. Have had nine children, Robert H., Eliza J., John W., Thomas, Matilda, James, David H., Robert, and a son who died in infancy.

Page 234

John H. Anderson

was born at Camp Creek, near Galena, Illinois, November 7th, 1850. When four years of age he came with his parents to Eden Prairie and remained with his father until the age of twenty-three, receiving a common school education, with one term at the graded school in Excelsior. Married January 2d, 1874, to Miss Ida E., daughter of Aaron and Matilda Gould. Has two children. Edward W., and Jennie G. Owns a good farm one mile east of Eden Prairie station.

Page 234

William V. Bryant

for many years a resident of Eden Prairie, was born in Saco, York county, Maine, March 21st, 1821. Is a lineal descendant of Stephen Bryant, of the old Plymouth colonies, and of the same family line with William Cullen Bryant. His father, John Bryant, was a seafaring man, and died in 1820. At the age of thirteen, William went to Salem and learned the saddlers' trade, remaining until 1836, then sought adventure upon the ocean, his first service being with Commodore M. C. Perry, of the steamer Fulton, the first steamer built by the U. S. government. Also sailed on the ships Admiral and Henry Clay; was three years on the whaler America, in Pulaski Bay, Prussian possessions. During eighteen years of ocean life, visited many places of historic interest, sailing around the world, and encountering many thrilling adventures and remarkable preservations. In 1852, abandoned ocean life and in May, was married to Miss Hannah Shepherd, of Boston, Mass. Six children have been born to them, Sarah L., Blanche M., Martha A., William M., Rose A., and John M., only four of whom are living. Came to St. Paul in July, 1852; remained one year, then removed to St. Anthony, remaining there for eight months, then removed to his present location.

Page 235

Nathaniel Brown

has been a resident of Minnesota since 1855, and of Hennepin county since 1874. Was born in Franklin county, N. Y., Nov. 9th, 1825, and in early childhood accompanied his parents to Indiana, from which place the family removed to Fulton county, Illinois, in 1840. Soon after this, his father died and he went with the family to Des Moines county, Iowa, where he remained on a farm for about nine years. March 10th, 1853, married Miss Harriet N. Van Nice. Have had eight children, seven of whom are living: Rosa Belle, Stephen B., Frank A., Clara L., Sadie, Oscar H., and Charles L. He entered the army in 1864, enlisting in Co. A., 4th Minn. Inf. Veterans. Was with the regiment through Sherman's march to the sea. Received his discharge at Louisville, Ky., in 1865. Returned to his family in Scott county, where he had removed from Iowa in 1855, remained there until 1874; when he sold his farm and located at his present place.

Page 235

James A. Brown

is a native of Cavan county, Ireland, where he was born, July 8, 1849. His father , who was a farmer, kept him at school until sixteen years of age. In the fall of 1866 the family came to America, locating near Galena, Illinois, and the following year, removed to Eden Prairie. In 1875, bought the farm he now lives on, five miles east of Shakopee, on the north bank of the Minnesota river. Married Miss Mary A. Dean, March 21, 1877; have two children, Edward J. and William R. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the Presbyterian church and take a lively interest in educational matters.

Page 235

William O. Collins

who figures conspicuously in the early history of Eden Prairie, is a native of Canada. , Was born December 6, 1812. Until eighteen years of age remained with his parents, on the farm, and when twenty years of age went to Vermont, remaining there one year, then to New York, learning the carpenter's trade, following it for two years. Returned to Canada and married Miss Isabella Latta, December 27, 1836. Of eight children the result of this union, three are now living. Entered the British army in 1837, during the Rebellion in Canada, and remained in her Majesty's service two years. Removed to Massachusetts in 1842, remained two years, went back to Canada where he remained until 1854, when he sought a home in the West, locating in Hennepin county in 1855, on the farm where he now lives. In 1866 his buildings, valued at $3,000, were destroyed by fire. Mr. Collins is a member of the M. E. Church and still active in all public affairs.

Page 235

James Clark

was born March 17, 1836, in Donegal county, Ireland, and came with his parents to America in 1843. The journey here was one of extreme peril, and well-nigh proved fatal. The steamer they embarked on, encountered a severe storm and was beached on the Isle of Man; sailed to Liverpool, and from there to America, landing at New York, August 1843, located in Brooklyn, where, after leaving school, James was engaged in carpenter work until 1855, when the family came to Minnesota, settling in Eden Prairie. James remained in St. Paul, at his trade for about two years, after which he went to New York and in 1861 married Miss Prudence Sterritt, who bore him ten children, all living except one. Returned to Minnesota in 1862 and, leaving his family here, went South and was employed at his trade in the Quartermaster's Department of Maj. General Thomas' command, In 1864, went to Illinois in the employment of the Chicago and Alton R. R. Co. April 1865, went to St. Louis, and Sedalia, Missouri, returning to his family in October. In 1868 went to Tennessee, remained there sixteen months. After the death of his father, in 1878, he settled on the old homestead, where he has since remained.

Page 235

John Cavanaugh

was born in King's county, Ireland, June, 1831, and lived with his father until twenty-two years of age; came to America; spent one year on Long Island, then tried the fortunes of the sea, sailing on the "James Adgers" and the "Nashville," plying between South Carolina and New York. After this, spent two years at Cooperstown and in 1857 came to St. Paul; from there to Shakopee, where he remained eighteen months. 1868, married Miss Ellen Moriarty. Twelve children have been born to them. The living are: George S., John R., Henry, Mary L., James O., Charles A., Eugene F., and Ellen A. In 1858, purchased the farm where he now lives, which is pleasantly situated north of Lake Riley.

Page 236

William F. Hulbert

was born in Pittsfield, Michigan, in 1837; removed with his parents to Ann Arbor in 1854; attended school one year, then engaged in farming until 1861, when he came to Eden Prairie, and bought a tract of land. In the fall returned to Michigan, and in December, 1863, married Miss Rachel Booth, of Lodi, Michigan, who has borne him two children. Has been active in educational matters, and several times a member of the town board. His pleasant farm residence, is about one mile from the station of Eden Prairie.

Page 236

William J. Jarrett

was born September 14th, 1823, in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania; attended the Moravian school until fifteen years of age. In 1838, removed to Allentown, and engaged in farming until 1840 ; went to Philadelphia as currier, for a short time; thence to Mauch Chunk, following the same trade until the spring of 1867, when be, came to St. Anthony, and engaged his brother in the Jarrett House, for a short time; thence to Eden Prairie. While in Pennsylvania, married Miss Susan Detwiler, of Mauch Chunk; has had six children, five of whom are living. Has been a been a member of the town board several times.

Page 236

H. E. Lowell

is a native of New Hampshire. Born in Sullivan county, February 6th, 1825. Received an academic education, attending school at West Boylston, and completed his studies at Wilbraham, Mass.. Was principal of the Academy at Colebrook, Ct., for two years. In 1853 came to Hudson, Wis., thence to St. Paul, where he engaged in dairy business with L. C. Collins. In the spring of 1854 he made a homestead claim in Carver county, in the town of Chanhassen, and engaged in farming and stock-raising until 1863; sold, and moved to Excelsior, spending six years in the employ of the Northwestern Life Insurance Co. Then went to fruit-growing. After a few years of experimental culture, enlarged his business by purchasing the farm on which he now lives, one and a half miles southwest from Eden Prairie Station. Planted ten acres to trees, and has been very successful in developing some choice varieties of apples and small fruits. Married, in 1852, Miss Maria Holman, of Wilbraham, Mass. Had five children, four now living.

Page 236

Andrew W. Mitchell

was born in Bally Bay, Monaghan county, Ireland, February 14th, 1831. Came with his father's family to America in 1852, arriving at New Orleans May 1st. Came from there to St. Anthony by steamer. In July his father made claims in Eden Prairie, upon which they settled in the fall. His father died January 10, 1866. The subject of this sketch was married September 10, 1857, to Miss Francis Anderson. They have five children, Elizabeth A., Andrew W. Jr., Martha J., Fanny and Henry H. Their pleasant rural home is in the central part of the town, and north of Staring Lake.

Page 236

Thomas Ohm

was born in Germany, February 10th, 1829, lived with his parents until the age of fifteen, and came to America in 1848, stopped in Milwaukee a short time; thence to Galena, Illinois, where he remained for two years. Came to Minnesota in 1861; located in Carver county, afterwards removed to Eden Prairie. Was married June, 1856, to Miss Mary Basler of Illinois. They have had eleven children; six are now living: Chas. T., Mary A., Alfred H., John H., Mary M., and Anna L. He enlisted August, 1864, in Company F, 11th Minnesota Volunteers, was in General Thomas' command eleven months; returned in 1865, when he sold his farm in Carver county and bought land adjoining his Eden Prairie home on section 6.

Page 236

William B. Paine

was born in Somerset county, Maine, September 10th, 1814. He lived with his father, and attended school until he reached the age of twenty-one. In 1855, he came to Minnesota, and preempted the farm on which his son Ezra now lives. He has owned several tracts of land in Eden Prairie. In March 1840, he was married to Miss Rosanna Kempton, of Maine; she died in l868. They had six children, three of whom are now living.

Page 236

Peter Ritchie

was born in Canada, October 19, 1828. At the age of twenty-two, went to Collinwood and engaged in mercantile business, then removed to Pickering, and established a wholesale cigar house. Married Miss Margaret Kidd in l854. Have had eight children, seven of whom are living. Came to St. Paul in the fall of 1856, remained there during the winter, then settled in what is now Acton, Meeker county, which town he named. This town has since become noted as the place where the first blood was shed in the Indian massacre of 1862. Went to Canada this year on account of the Indian outrages, and returned in 1864. Lived in Scott county six years. Rented the farm he has since bought, situated on Minnesota river, where he does quite a freighting business, using his own barge.

Page 237

Matthew O. Riley

was born in Ireland in 1880. Attended school until fifteen years of age. Came to America in the spring of 1845. Worked in a cotton factory in Lowell, Massachusetts; also on the Meredith Bridge public works, then to farming in Massachusetts until 1852, when he came to Minnesota. Went from St. Paul to Sauk Rapids on the steamer Governor Ramsey. Returned to St. Anthony, spending some time in the St. Charles Hotel, then running a ferry-boat at Fort Snelling. In 1853 located where he now lives. Married Miss Elizabeth Austin, July 22d, 1858. Had five children, three now living: James F., Elizabeth, and Margaret. Mr. Riley is one of the oldest settlers of the county.

Page 237

Jonas Staring

born in Herkimer county, Now York, May 6th, 1809. His father died when he was eight years old, and the family located in Lewis county, New York, where he followed farming for ten years. Carried on a grocery for two years at Little Falls, New York. Went to boating on the Erie canal, captain of the Erin, a freight and passenger boat. Bought and run the packet boat Ann Allen, four seasons. Sold out, went to Indiana, and run a boat on the Wabash & Erie canal. His health failing he returned to New York. At Utica he established a large clothing house, employing 380 persons. Came to Minnesota in 1854, bought his present location, built a house, the first frame in the town, and soon moved his family here. Married Miss Hannah De Voe in 1833. Had five children, two now living: Myron S. and Mary A.

Page 237

John H. Staring

was born in Martinsburgh, N. Y., August 26th, 1830. At nine years of age, removed to Jefferson county, where he remained until twenty-one years of age. Went as sailor on the brigs "Manchester," "Northern Light" and "New York." Came to Eden Prairie in 1856, remaining there for five years, and in Minneapolis one year. Married Miss Margaretta Brewster, April 28th, 1861, by whom he had nine children, six now living: Matilda M., Nettie. F., Cora A., Ada M., Sarah J. and John R.

Page 237

Barnard C. Stewart

was born in St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 8, 1856. His father came to Minnesota when Barnard was one year old and bought the farm on which he now lives on section twenty-seven. Attended school until eighteen.. November 12th, 1879, married Miss Addie Cooper, of Bloomington. They have one child, Mary J.

Page 237

C. B. Tirrell

was born September 25th, 1836, in Androscoggin county, Maine. He received his education at the Lewiston Fall Academy. At the age of eighteen he came to Minnesota, and in the summer of 1855, taught one term of school in St. Anthony. After this he came to Eden Prairie, and taught the first winter school in the town, during the winter of 1855-56. In the fall of 1855, his father came to Eden Prairie, and preempted the farm now owned by Chesley. In 1858, he went to Shakopee, began the study of law, and was admitted to the bar, March, 1860. He practiced with L. L. Baxter, in Chaska, and in 1861 enlisted in Company C, First Minnesota Infantry, and served until discharged for disability, in 1864.

Page 237

E. A. Tuckey

was born in Chenango county, N. Y., August 17th, 1826. At twenty-one started for the Northwest, visiting Detroit, Chicago, Galena and Mackinaw. Returned to New York and worked at the carpenter trade until he came West in 1855 and settled in Scott county. Remained there fourteen years; then went to Lake Crystal and was engaged in business about two years. In the mean time, bought his present place on section twenty-seven, Eden Prairie. Served three year's in Company A. Fourth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, participating in the battles of Corinth and Iuka, in the siege of Vicksburg, and in Sherman's march to the sea. Returned home in the fall of 1864. Married Miss Marcina Baxter, of Steuben county, N. Y., in 1850. Ten children have been born to them, eight of whom' are now living: Selah P., Zella M., Ann M., Emma M., Abbie A.. Ida R., Edson N. and Harry H.

Page 237

Jacob Wolf

was born in Prussia in 1828, and came to this country in 1847. After various business ventures in the East he visited the Northwest and in 1854 came to Minnesota and located on his present farm in 1855. Has been twice married, his union with his present wife occurring in 1875. Has three children by his present wife and three by his first. His residence is on section twenty-six.

Page 242

Samuel Bartow

born in Ohio, April 18th, 1818. When nineteen, bought a farm in Monroe county. Lived there until the fall of 1849, when he located in Bartholomew county, Indiana. Lived there three years, teaching school part of the time, then went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and St. Louis, Mo.; from there by steamer to St. Paul and to Minnetonka. Made a claim to the farm on which he now lives, located on the south shore of Lake Minnetonka. Married in 1839 to Mary McKenney. They have five children. He has held the office of county commissioner and has been prominent in the affairs' of the town.

Page 242

Robert W. Bartow

born in Monroe county, Ohio, May 10th, 1845. In 1849 moved to Indiana, then to Council Bluffs, Iowa. Came to Minnesota in 1852, and worked with his father on the farm, then bought the one on which he now lives. Married Miss E. M. Page, July, 1869, who died March 17th, 1879. Has two children: Horace B. and Robert W.

Page 242

Joseph Bren

born in Bohemia, October 19th, 1828. Married September 28th, 1850, to Miss Anna Phillipi, of Bohemia. In 1854, came to America. Lived in Gallatin, Racine county, Wisconsin, one year. Came to Minnetonka and located where he now lives. Has a fine farm. They have eight children: Joseph, Frank, John, William, Josephine, Edward, Benjamin, George.

Page 243

Frank Bren

was born in Bohemia, March 26th, 1838. Came to America in 1854, and settled in Minnetonka; in 1858, bought the farm on which he now lives, situated two miles from Hopkins Station. Enlisted August 22d, 1864, in company E, Independent Battallion Cavalry. Discharged May 1st, 1866. Married September 26th, 1870, to Josephine Miller. Have eight children, Anna, Frank, Alice, Joseph, Samuel, Daniel, Rosa, and Elizabeth.

Page 243

Thomas C. Bryant

was born in Maine, December 10th, 1843. In 1856 he came to Saint Paul, spent one year, then went to Ohio. Enlisted in company B, Third Ohio Veteran Volunteer Cavalry. Mustered out at Nashville, Tenn. Returned to Ohio and turned his attention to coopering. April 19th, 1868, married Amelia Hanford. Came to Minneapolis in 1872, and worked at cooperage till 1878, when he came to Minnetonka and worked at his, trade one year longer. Then he bought the farm on which he now lives.

Page 243

Alanson G. Butler

was born in Hallowell, Maine, December 30th, 1816. When 23 years old went to New York, and remained there three years. Worked five years in the lumber regions of Pennsylvania. In 1856, came to Minneapolis, stayed one year, then went to Wright county and opened a farm. Lived on it till 1875, when he came to Minnetonka where he has since lived, and for the last two seasons, carried on the dairy business. September 22d, 1853, married Louisanna Marsh, of Pennsylvania. They have one child, Minnie May.

Page 243

John M. Chastek

born in Bohemia, February 24, 1837. In 1854 came to America. Lived in Racine county, Wisconsin, till 1855, when he came to Minnetonka, and in 1864 bought the farm on which he now lives. Enlisted in Company E, Hatch's Battallion, Minnesota Volunteers. Was mustered out at Fort Snelling in 1866. Married Annie Pribyl, of Wisconsin, March 17, 1868. They have seven children, Apolona, Anna, John, Frank, Emil, Petrolina and George.

Page 243

Joseph H. Chowen

was born May 1, 1831, in Monroe, Wyoming county, Penn. Lived there twenty-three years, then came to Minnesota and located the farm he now lives on in Minnetonka. He established a nursery in the spring of 1880. Married Jane Fuller, March, 1859, who died September 1872. In 1873, was married to Caroline E. Gunn. He has seven children, four by his first wife.

Page 243

William S. Chowen

born in Green county, N. Y., June 22d, 1826. Moved to Wyoming county, Pennsylvania. At twenty years of age, he went to White Haven, and engaged in lumbering; followed it for eight years, and one year lumbering in Virginia. Came to Minnesota in 1858, and located the farm in Minnetonka on which he now lives. Helped build the first school house in the town. In 1857, was elected to the first Legislature of the state, and introduced the Agricultural School bill and a memorial to Congress for an agricultural land grant, for college purposes. Both bills were passed while he was in the House. Enlisted, August, 1864, in Co. F. Eleventh Minn. Inf., with the rank of Sergeant. Stationed at Nashville and Gallatin, Tennessee. Mustered out, 26th of June, 1865, at Fort Snelling. Has been several times chairman of town board. Married, May 25, 1865, to Mary M. Frear; have six children.

Page 243

Salmon R. Churchill

born in Trumbull county, Ohio, February 23d, 1823. Lived there twenty-one years, and learned the shoemaker's trade. Came to Minnesota in 1856, and located where he now lives. Enlisted in 1861 in the Second Company Minnesota Sharpshooters, and was mustered out in 1862, on account of disability, at Washington, D. C. Health improved, and he enlisted again in Co. F, Eleventh Minn. Inf. On September 4th, 1850, he married Sarah Hoagland. They have had four children. Two are now living.

Page 243

T. Connolly

born in Ireland in 1842. Came to Minnesota in 1860, stopped in St. Paul short time, and went to Georgetown in the employ of the Hudson Bay Company for two years, when the Indians compelled the company to leave. In 1868 went to Lake Winnipeg, as trader for the Hudson Bay Company; returned to St. Paul 1864, and to Minneapolis in 1867 and worked five years lumbering. Then as patrolman on the police force for three years, court officer one year, and captain one year. In 1878 he was appointed Superintendent of Hennepin county Poor farm Married Anna Kelley in 1867. They have three children, two boys and one girl.

Page 243

William Dobson

born in England, February 14, 1837, came to America in 1857 and to Minnesota, stopping in St. Paul until 1861, when he enlisted in company D, Second Minnesota Infantry; was at the battles of Shiloh and Corinth, served four years, mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, July 1865. Returned to St. Paul, and lived there until 1871, when he located on the farm where he now lives. Married, August 1866, to Anna Vernon. They have four children.

Page 244

Daniel E. Dow,

born in Maine, January 25, 1831, lived there twenty-one years, then came to St. Anthony, Minnesota, and worked at black-smithing for two years ; preempted land on Lake Calhoun, sold it, and located the farm on which he now lives. In 1880 visited the old home in Maine. Married Mrs. Belinda Hamilton , September 6,1855. They have three children now living.

Page 244

Edward H. Eidam

born in Germany 1839. Came to America when young, and moved from place to place. In 1853 came to Fillmore county, Minnesota. Lived there five years, then moved to Decorah, Iowa, and went to school. Married Susan Bender, December 31, 1860. In 1867 came to Minneapolis. Lived there a year, then moved to Minnetonka, and worked at coopering till 1877, when he opened the store now owned by him. He has three children now living.

Page 244

Fernando Ellingwood

was born in Maine, October 27, 1840. Lived there twenty years then came to St. Anthony. From there to Anoka where he lived ten years. 1865 went to Lake George and built a planing lath and shingle mill. Run it for three years, and in 1868 sold out; moved to Spencer Brook, Isanti county. Bought a saw mill, and in 1870, built a grist mill. Is now sole proprietor. It was the first mill in that county. Was postmaster five years, and county commissioner three. Married, November 30, l859, Ellen Carson. Have three children living.

Page 244

Joseph H. Empenger

was born in Bohemia January 19th, 1847, and came with his parents to America, in 1858, settling in Minnetonka township, where he has followed farming. He held the office of assessor for six successive years, ending in 1878. Was elected justice in 1879, and held through the following term, on account of his successor failing to qualify. He married Anna Miller, November 22, 1871. She was born in Bohemia in 1849. They have four children: Emily E., Edward, Anna and Joseph.

Page 244

A. N. Gray

was born in Duchess county, New York, August 29th, 1824. In 1880, moved with parents to Pennsylvania, and engaged in farming until eighteen years of age, when he engaged in lumbering, also learning the trade of millwright. He came to Minnesota in 1853, and settled in Minnetonka township. In August, 1864, he enlisted in Company B, Eleventh Inf., serving in the Commissary Department. He was the first Overseer of Highways in the township after its organization, and member of the town board in 1861-62-63. Married Susan A. Chowen, in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, May 30th, 1847. They have had eleven children. Those living are L Alcester E., Phoebe C., Sybilla H., Ernest W., Willie E. and Jessie W.

Page 244

Capt. N. H. Harrison

born in Petersburgh, Virginia, in 1822. Moved to Hennepin county in 1855, and settled on what is now known as "Harrison Bay," Upper Lake Minnetonka, and remained there eleven years. Went to Excelsior for about two years, and then returned to the Upper Lake, where he has since lived. Is a ship carpenter by trade, having built the steamers "Mary" ,"May Queen," and "City of Minneapolis," and the sail boat "Coquette." Was one of the first white settlers on Upper Lake Minnetonka.

Page 244

John S. Harrington

born in Canada East, August 11th, 1815. Moved to Western Reserve, Ohio, where he attended school. Then traveled through a part of Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. In 1854, came to Minnetonka, and made a claim to the farm on which he now lives, known as "Lake Side Home." Has been a member of the town board several times. Married Minerva Hoagland, December 23d, 1842. Has six children now living.

Page 244

William Hoagland

born in Trumbull county, Ohio, December 16, 1824. Learned the tailor's trade, then turned his attention to farming. In the spring of 1862 came to Minnetonka, Minnesota, where he has since lived for most of the time; now furnishes hotels with supplies. Married Joanna Wakefleld, February 27, 1845. They have seven living children.

Page 244

J. R. Jackson

born in Ulster county, New York, March 1846, and came with his father to St. Paul. Mr. Jackson was one of the first businessmen in the place. He made one of the first claims where Minneapolis now stands. John R. enlisted in 1863, in Company F, First Minnesota Cavalry, served fourteen months, was mustered out at Fort Snelling in 1865. Married Lucretia H. Miller of Hennepin county; they have five children living.

Page 245

Gustavus V. Johnson

born in Clayton county, New York, March 2nd, 1845; learned the trade of ship building. In 1868 enlisted in Company M, 14th New York heavy artillery, and was mustered out September 1865, at Rochester. The same fall came to Chicago, worked at ship building, then to Fox Lake, Wisconsin, and did carriage making a number of years. Sold out and went to Winona, then to La Crosse, where he was engaged in boat building four years, thence to White Bear Lake, following same business three years, then to Lake Minnetonka and established a large boat building business. Married Elizabeth Buffett, Sept. 23, 1869. Have two children living.

Page 245

John Kokesh

born in Bohemia January 5, 1830. When twenty-three years old married Josephine Kostlan. Came to America in 1868, and settled in Minnetonka, and in 1869, bought the farm on which he now lives. Has ten children.

Page 245

George Ley

born in Wisconsin October 17, 1848. Came to Minnesota in 1857. Settled in Scott county; remained there until 1864, when he went to Montana and engaged in mining five years. Returned and married Lena Spungmann, July 18, 1872. Have three children. In, 1873 worked for the Minneapolis & St. Louis R. B. Co., and in 1880, bought the farm where he now lives.

Page 245

Charles Lyons

born in Appleton, Maine, June 11, 1852. In 1871 went to Rockland. Spent two years, then to South Adams, Mass. Was there three years then went to Charleston, S. C., and to Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky. Came to Minneapolis in 1876 and worked at coopering. In 1879 came to Minnetonka, and has since done cooper work for the Minnetonka Mill Company.

Page 245

David Locke

born in Virginia, April 13, 1808. Moved to Ohio, and in 1833 married Harriet A. Stafford, who has borne him ten children. In 1837 went to Indiana, and run the Rockford flouring mill several years. From that to railroad building. Came to Minnetonka in 1855, and made a claim. Returned to Indiana. In 1865 came to Hastings, and in 1866 settled his family in Minnetonka, where he resided until his death, April 16th, 1877.

Page 245

John McGenty

born in Ireland, 1805. Came to America in 1847. Lived in Vermont three years. Then went to Illinois and worked three years. In 1855, came to St. Paul then to Minnetonka, and located the farm on which his sons, Dennis and James, with their mother, now live. Died, Sept., 1877, aged 72 years.

Page 245

Ernst Meyer

born in Prussia, October 22, 1858, and moved with his parents to Germany, where he learned the machinist and miller's trade. In 1876, came to America, and worked in the mills at Hazleton, Iowa; also at Elgin, and Clayton county, Iowa. In 1878,came to Minnetonka, and worked for the Minnetonka Mill Company. Parents now live in Holstein, Germany.

Page 245

John P. Miller

born in Pennsylvania, May 11, 1809. In 1831, married Rachael Parks, who died in 1837. Lived in Lancaster, Ohio, three years; then went to Crawford county, and engaged in the hotel business. In 1848, went to Rockford, Illinois, and entered grocery business. In 1849, came to Minnesota. Kept a boarding house in St. Paul, and helped to fit up the hall for the first legislative session. Went to Minnetonka in 1853 and made a claim. He afterwards bought a farm on which he now lives. August, 1844, married Catherine Didie. They have three children.

Page 245

Charles D. Miller

born in Ohio May 14th, 1845. When four years old, came with his parents, to Minnesota. Attended the first school taught in Hennepin county, in the old Government House, near the Government Mill. August, 1864, enlisted in Co. F, Eleventh Minn. Inf. under Capt, Plummer. Was mustered out at Fort Snelling, in 1865. In May, 1876, married Emma J. Hawkes, of Hennepin county. They have one child.

Page 245

Frank L. Miller

born in St. Paul, Minnesota, October 10th, 1850. When he was two years old his father moved to the farm in what is now Minnetonka. Received his education in the public schools, and has, with his father and brother, made a good farm.

Page 245

George C. Phillips

born February 28, 1828, in Almond, N. Y. In 1848, established a cooper shop. Run it seven years. In 1854 went to St. Paul, then to Minneapolis. Helped finish the old American House. In 1855 made claim to the farm, on which he now lives. February 28th, 1854, married Abigail Smith. Enlisted, 1864, in Co. F, Eleventh Minn. Inf. Was with Gen. Thomas at Nashville, Tenn., and discharged at St. Paul.

Page 246

James K. Robertson

born in Scotland, May 14, 1839. Served an apprenticeship of seven years at machine and engineering work. Run a locomotive on the Glasgow & Southwestern R. R., Scotland, then an engine for Baird Bros. 'Great Iron Works', Scotland. In 1865 came to America. Was engineer in the coal regions of Pennsylvania. Went to Nova Scotia in 1866. Started a tobacco factory in Dartsmouth. Sold it, and in 1876 came to Minneapolis, to work for Camp & Walker. Then came to Minnetonka, and now runs the engine in the mill. July 12, 1861, married Ellen Park, of Scotland. They have seven children.

Page 246

Alfred B. Robinson

born in Vermont, May 1, 1815. Went to Whitehall, N. Y., enlisted in Company I, First U. S. Regular Infantry. Joined his regiment at Prairie du Chien, Wis. There three years. Then ordered to Florida under Col. Zachariah Taylor. Remained there five years. Ordered to Fort Snelling in 1842. Was there until 1845, when he was discharged. Came to Minnetonka in 1853, and in 1855 located where he now lives. In 1861 enlisted in Company A, Third Minnesota Volunteers. Was discharged and enlisted again in Company B, Sixth Minnesota Volunteers. Mustered out, October 1865. He married Celesta Caddet, who died in 1878. He is the father of three children. Two now living.

Page 246

Frederick Rohlftng

born in Prussia, Dec. 29, 1823. Came to America in 1844. Lived in St. Louis until 1855, when he came to Minnesota and located the farm on which his widow and family now live. Married Wilmina Telgman, of St. Louis, 1866, and returned to his home in Minnetonka. They have five children now living. Mrs. B. is an active member of the church, and now superintendent of the Sabbath-school. Mr. Rohlfing died November 16th, 1878.

Page 246

Edward D. Shanton

born in Ohio, March 4th, 1839. Learned the miller's trade. Was superintendent of the Shanesville flouting mills for three years. In 1867 he came to Minneapolis and run the Island Mills, Summit Mills, North Star Mill, and the Galaxy Mills. In 1878 went to Minnetonka, and has since had charge of the mills there. In 1862 enlisted in Company H, 73d Indiana Infantry. Was in several battles and taken prisoner at Cedar Gap, Georgia, taken to Belle, Island, and after a time exchanged. Mustered out at Nashville, Tenn. Married in 1860 to Margaret Schultz. They are the parents of eight children.

Page 246

Bayard T. and Bernard G. Shaver

twin brothers, and first white children born in Minnetonka, August 12tb, 1853. Here the brothers have lived with their parents, and received their education at the second school organized in the county. Bayard has given his attention to teaching, and Bernard to millwright and carpenter work. Bayard cast the first vote of any native born man in the township. They live on the oldest farm in the town.

Page 246

Eldridge A. Shaver

was born in Pennsylvania September 27th, 1849, and came to Minnesota when he was a boy. Landed in Minneapolis, stopped with Col. Stevens a few weeks, then came to Minnetonka City. Remained there till 1853 when his father made the claim on which Eldridge now lives. Married Mary S. Tull, April 26th, 1874. Two children have been born to them.

Page 246

Sarah C. Shaver

was born in Greene county, N. Y., July 5, 1824. Married James Shaver September 27th, 1849. In 1851 Mr. Shaver came to Minnesota. In 1852 his family came, when he made a claim and settled on the south shore of Lake Minnetonka. Their two sons were the first white children born in the township, and the first native born voters, and their mother the first white woman to settle in the town. Mrs. Shaver and son Bayard attended the Centennial Exposition, and remained in the east three years.

Page 246

George M. Stankard

was born in Ohio, June 27th, 1857. Learned the miller's trade. Went to Toledo and worked in the South Toledo Mills. In 1877 he moved to Niles, Michigan. Worked in River Side mill till October, 1877, when he came to Minneapolis. Worked in the Pillsbury mill until 1878, then for Croswell and Syme at Long Lake as head stone dresser. In 1880 took the same position with the Minnetonka Mill company.. His father and family live in Ohio.

Page 246

Knight H. Whipple

born in Foster, Providence county, R. I., July 29, 1836. Went to Providence, worked at the mason's trade for several years. July 1855, came to Minneapolis, lived there three years, helped build the first brick house in the town, built the residence of Rev. Gideon Pond at Bloomington. In 1859 made a trip to Red River, 1864 bought the place on which he lives. During the Indian massacre, was Quartermaster under Col. Stevens, at Glencoe. October 1862, married Sarah Fuller. He is the father of one child.

Page 252

L. A. Austin

born in Norway in 1851, emigrated to America in 1869 and settled at Morris, Minnesota; he remained there until 1870, then moved to Minneapolis and lived six years, then settled on Lake Minnetonka. He was married in 1873, to Bessie Larson of Litchfield. They have one child, Ida.

Page 252

E. A. Babcock

born in Washington county, Vermont, in 1832. Moved with parents to Worcester, Massachusetts, remained there three years; settled finally in Newport, New Hampshire, until 1839, when they removed to Enfield, remaining there until 1864; he then moved to Excelsior, Minnesota. Married in October, 1864, to Emily L. Erskine, of Wayne county, Michigan. They have two children living. His father, Augustus Babcock, came to Hennepin county in 1854.

Page 252

H. H. Beers, born in Addison county, Vermont, 1834, moved to Mower county, Minnesota, in 1872, and remained there until 1877, when he moved to Deadwood and remained until he settled in Excelsior in 1878, and started the "Appledore House." He has been married twice. His first wife died in Mower county. Married for second wife, Miss M. Eddy of Vermont.

Page 252

A. P. Beeman

born in Maine, 1828, lived at Lewiston, and Lowell, Mass., seven years. Visited many parts of the world, spending some time in Australia. Moved to Excelsior in 1853, where he has since resided. Enlisted in 1863 in Company D, Second Cavalry. Served two years, was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1865. Married in 1851 to Louisa M. Midgley, of Montpelier. Is proprietor of a Sorghum machine of Madison Manufacturing Company's patent crusher and Stubbs pans, with capacity for 150 gallons per day.

Page 252

A. Bonjour

born in Switzerland, 1835, emigrated to America in 1872. Settled in Chanhassen, Carver county, Minnesota, where he remained for two years, when he moved to Excelsior, where he has since resided.

Page 253

A. D. Burch

born in St. Lawrence county, New York. September, 1843. Moved to Michigan in 1870, remained there until 1873. Came to Excelsior, Minnesota, in 1878. Attended the Wesleyan Seminary in St. Lawrence county, N. Y., graduated in the law department at Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1869. He followed teaching several years; the present term is his third one at Excelsior as principal of the graded schools. Married in 1870 to Lotta Johnson, of New York. Two children have been born to them.

Page 253

J. H. Clark

born in Bennington, Vermont, 1830. Moved to Wyoming county, N. Y., thence to DeKalb county, Illinois. Married Susan Dudley in 1848; went to California in 1849; returned in 1850 ; went again, and returned to Illinois in 1851, where he remained four years, removed to St. Anthony, Minn.; thence to Wayzata, being one of the first settlers; in 1856 preempted the land on which Long Lake village now stands; in the year 1858, moved to Excelsior, and in 1860 returned to Illinois and located in Henry county; in 1862 enlisted in 112th Illinois regiment, serving as Sergeant, promoted to Lieutenant by Governor Yates, had entire command of the company for two years; was wounded it Atlanta, absent from command only about four months; joined the company at battle of Franklin. On dispersion of Hood's army joined Sherman's command at Goldsboro, North Carolina, and was mustered out at' Greensboro, and honorably discharged at Chicago, July 3, 1865, returning to his family in Henry county, where he remained until the spring of 1867, when he returned to Excelsior. Has been honored with all its offices. He represented his district, in 1877-78, in the House. He is the father of eight children, seven now living.

Page 253

Elijah Carson

born in Somerset county, Maine, 1806 ; lived there thirty years ; moved to Chicago and remained one year. All his family died there excepting one daughter; moved to Bloomington, Illinois, and remained four years ; settled in Excelsior, Minnesota, in 1855, and has lived here ever since excepting four years in California. Married in 1866 to, Maria Wilson of Excelsior.

Page 253

Daniel Connor

born in Ireland, 1823, moved to America in 1849, and settled in New York where he remained two years; moved to Elgin, Illinois, and worked at shoemaking five years; moved to Delavan, Wis., and lived five years, then removed to Excelsior, Minnesota, and settled on the banks of Lake Minnetonka. He began keeping summer boarders in 1863, at Long View House, once known as the Water Cure site. Enlisted in Independent Rangers, as 2nd Lieutenant, serving as Captain Co. H, state Militia. Married in 1872 to Mary Ann Nifort.

Page 253

Fritz Dittfach

born in Germany, 1843. Emigrated to America in 1869, and settled at Winona, where he remained about one year, then to Rushford, and worked two years as second miller, and two years as first miller. Worked in the Anchor mill at Minneapolis a short time; then took charge of May's mill at Excelsior. Has been married twice. His present wife was Janett Miller, of Rushford. He has had four children; three are now living.

Page 253

Enos Day

born in St. Albans, Vermont, in 1800. Lived there twenty-one years, then moved to Franklin county, New York. Married to his third wife, Lucinda Simonds, in 1833. Moved to St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1856, and to Excelsior the same year. Died in 1874. His wife died in 1872.

Page 253

George E. Day

born in Franklin county, New York, in 1845. Lived with his parents until their death, excepting the time spent in the army. Enlisted August 14, 1862, in Company B, 9th Minnesota Volunteers. Served three years, and was discharged at Fort Snelling. Married in 1877 to Mrs. Stoddard, daughter of C. J. Westlake. They have one child.

Page 253

Alcibiades Day

born in Franklin county, New York, 1839. Enlisted in Company E, 113th Illinois and died in the hospital at Memphis, Tennessee, in the spring of 1862.

Page 253

William H. Ferguson

born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1816. Emigrated to America in 1825, and settled in Maryland. Married in 1845 to Lydia Dale Esty. Taught school in Rockland county, New York, five years, and was railroad agent in Chemung county five years. Moved to Minnesota in 1854, and settled on what is now known as Ferguson's Point. His house was the resort for the Indiana. He was drowned November 22d, 1867. They had two children. Mrs. Ferguson was married in 1862 to Frederick Holtz, of Prussia, who enlisted in Company G, 4th. Minnesota Volunteers, in November, 1861, and was wounded at Corinth, Mississippi, in July, 1862. Died at Minneapolis, January 16th, 1869.

Page 254

P. M. Gideon

was born in Champaign county, Ohio in 1820. Lived there twenty-one years, then moved to Clinton, Illinois; from there to Excelsior, Minnesota, in 1853, where he found plenty of Indians, and but half a dozen families of whites around the lake. He is superintendent of the state experimental fruit farm, founded in 1878. He began fruit growing in 1854. His efforts have been experimental, and have been to his entire satisfaction, he is now one of the most successful fruit growers in Minnesota. Married Wealthy Hall, January 2d, 1849. They have seven children.

Page 254

Silas Howard

was born in Providence county, Rhode Island, in 1804. Was engaged in the coal and wood trade in the East until he came to Minnesota in 1858, and took, under the homestead law, what is now known as Howard's Point, located on upper Lake Minnetonka. Married in 1845 to Lydia Reed. One child was born to them - Simeon, born in 1846. Came to Minnesota with his parents, and lives on an adjoining farm. He was married in 1870 to Adeline Kibbey. They have had three children, two now living.

Page 254

A. H. Hopkins

born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1837. Moved to Hennepin county in 1854, and located near Hopkins Station. Married in 1859 to Susan C. Wood, of Providence. Returned in the same year to the old home. In 1861 came to Excelsior, and has since made it his home. Enlisted in 1862 in Company B, 9th Minnesota Volunteers, serving one year under Gen. Sibley among the Indians; then under Generals Smith and Sturgis, in the war of the Rebellion, two years. Was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1865. Is a member of the Old Settlers' Association. They have four children now living.

Page 254

Andrew Hoiby

born in Norway, in 1846. Came to America in 1868, and settled in Minneapolis, working at his trade until he moved to Excelsior, in 1878, and established his present business, blacksmith and wagon-maker. Has been married twice. First wife died in Norway. His second wife was Bertha Delle, of Excelsior, whom he married in 1878.

Page 254

L. C. Hilton

born in North New Castle, Maine, where he lived for twenty-two years, when he came to Minnesota, and settled at Princeton. Enlisted at Red Wing, in Company F, 6th Minnesota Volunteers. Served in the company about one year; then was transferred to the invalid corps, and was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling. Returned to Princeton, remained there until 1877, then bought his present farm on Lake Minnetonka. Married Lucretia Garlinghouse, in 1871. Is the father of four children, all living.

Page 254

William Harvey

born in Scotland, 1813. Moved to America in 1850. Settled in Broome county, N. Y., then moved to McLean county, Illinois. Came to Hennepin county in 1854, and took a claim in Excelsior, on which he has since lived. Married 1835, in Scotland, to Isabel Miller. Had one child that died in Scotland.

Page 254

J. J. Harrison

born in Erie, Pennsylvania, 1848. Moved to Juneau county, Wisconsin, where he lived until he came to Minnesota in 1874, settling in Excelsior in 1877. In 1878 he bought the blacksmith shop which he is now operating. Married in Juneau county, Wisconsin, to Abbie Dutton. They have three children living.

Page 254

August Hay

born in New York city, 1850. Moved to Minneapolis in 1867, and embarked in the meat business, which he followed until 1880, when he located at Excelsior in the same business. Married in 1877 to Caroline Thaler, of New York City. Is the father of one child.

Page 254

Jesse L. Jellison

born in Ellsworth, Maine, 1845., Moved to Springfield, Illinois; moved to Minneapolis when thirteen years old, which has been his home since. Enlisted in company E, Eighth Minnesota, in 1862. Served a few months, when he enlisted again in Hatch's Battallion, in 1863, and served against the Indians. Was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1866. Married in 1871 to Elldora Fuller. They have four children.

Page 254

W. B. Jones

born in Madison county, New York, 1828. Moved and located in Saint Anthony in 1855, then to Excelsior in 1856. Took a claim, and in 1860 started a store. Was Postmaster for eighteen years, Has been twice married, the first time in 1850; the second in 1876 to Mary H. Moore.

Page 255

A. W. Latham

born on Massachusetts Bay, 1845. Came to Minneapolis in 1865, and taught school two years. Served a short term in the war of the rebellion. Married in 1867, to Miss D. W. White. They have five children. He started a nursery in 1870, and now has five acres appropriated to grape culture. The stock of this nursery is secularly adapted to the climate of this state and Manitoba.

Page 255

W. H. LeVan

born in Columbia county, Ohio, 1844, where he lived until eighteen years of age, when he moved to Washington county, Illinois. There he remained, except a short time spent in Ohio, until 1874, when he came to Excelsior. Married in 1866, to Miss A. A. Way, of Jefferson county, Illinois. They have five children.

Page 255

R. K. Luce

was born in Oneida county, New York, 1839. He lived there until twenty-six years of age, then moved to Saint Joseph, Michigan, and was engaged in the fruit business until 1878, when he moved to Minneapolis. July 15th, 1880, came to Excelsior and engaged with Augustin Thompson. Married in 1865, to Elizabeth Dixon, of Oneida county, New York. They have one child.

Page 255

T. McArty

born in Washington county, Indiana, 1820. Lived in different parts of the state until 1854, then moved to Carver county, Minnesota. He was married to Harriet A. Thompson, of Elkhart county, Indiana, in 1848. He enlisted in the New York Rifles in 1864, was taken prisoner at Cold Harbor and taken to Andersonville Prison, where he died from ill treatment in 1865. They have five children. Mrs. McArty was born in Wayne county, Indiana, and now lives at Excelsior.

Page 255

R. B. McGrath

born in Oxford county, Maine, 1831. Moved to Lewiston Falls in 1850, and worked at carpentering. In 1861 he went to Chicago, then to Dubuque, Iowa, where he remained until 1863. He then came to Excelsior. Was the first white settler at this point, and built the first log cabin. Enlisted in Company D, Second Cavalry, in 1863, and was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1865. Married to his first wife in 1856. She died in 1858. Married again in 1866, to Nellie Midegly. They have two children.

Page 255

O. C. Meaker

born in Monkton, Harrison county, Vermont, 1835. When nine years of age he went to Barre, Washington county, where he lived eleven years, learning the moulder's trade and working at the same. Moved to Minnesota and settled in Excelsior in 1871, and has since resided here, acting as Chairman of town board one year and Justice of the Peace two years. Married Mary Hale, of Stowe, March 4th, 1856.

Page 255

E. D. Newell

born in Essex county, New York, 1848. Moved with parents to Prescott, Wisconsin and remained until 1877. Came to Minneapolis in May, 1879, and in June of same year moved to Excelsior and established his present millinery and ladies' furnishing store, the first one of the kind in the town. Married in 1871 to Edla D. Cook, of River Falls, Wisconsin. Their two children have passed to the better land.

Page 255

E. H. Page

born in Penn Yan, Yates county, New York, 1842. Moved with his parents to Litchfield county, Connecticut, and lived there until 1867, when he moved to Excelsior, Minnesota. In 1875 he married Ellen H. Pease, a widow whose husband established the Pleasant Grove House, which they have enlarged to double its former capacity. They have four children.

Page 255

E. R. Perkins, M. D.

born in Orleans county, New York, 1843. Received his medical education at the Hahnemann Homeopathic Medical College of Philadelphia. First commenced the practice of medicine at Excelsior, May, 1878. Came to the state in 1854. Married in 1864 Julia A. Chase. Enlisted in 1861 in Company D, Second Regiment Infantry. Discharged honorably at Nashville, Tennessee. They have four children.- Louis, Willie, Gracie and Edna.

Page 255

C. E. Prince

born at Windsor, Berkshire county, Mass., in 1856, and resided there until 1862, when he moved to South Adams, and remained until 1874, then moved to Green Lake county, Wisconsin. In 1875 came to Excelsior, Minnesota, where he has since lived. Has been in the employ of L. F. Sampson and C. May, as book-keeper, and is now engaged with A. Thompson.

Page 255

L. P. Sampson

was born in Franklin county, Maine, 1848, and lived there until he came to Saint Anthony in 1853, where he resided until 1864. He then settled in Excelsior. In 1876 established himself in mercantile business. Appointed Postmaster in 1878, which office he now holds. He enlisted in company D, First Minnesota Infantry, May, 1861. Was wounded at the battle of Antietam, and Honorably discharged at Uplin, Chester county, Pennsylvania, in the hospital in 1863. Enlisted again in Battery H, First Minnesota Heavy Artillery, as First Sergeant, in 1865, and served until close of the war. Married July, 1865, to Eliza Spaulding. Have six children.

Page 256

Harvey E. Scott

born in Orleans county, Vermont, 1824, Came to Minnesota in 1865. Enlisted in company E, First Minnesota Infantry, and served under General McClellan for three years. Honorably discharged at Washington, D. C., in 1864. Wounded and taken prisoner at Savage's Station. Spent 23 days at "Libby prison." Exchanged at City Point and transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps. Came to Excelsior, and located where he now lives. Married in 1869, to Mary E. Murray. They have three children.

Page 256

Silas A. Seamans

born in Providence county, R. I., in 1823. Moved and lived in Windham County, Conn. when eighteen years old, returned to Rhode Island, and came to excelsior in 1854. When he first came here, there were but two houses in the town. He took a claim, and has been engaged in farming until the last few years, which have been spent at his trade as painter. He enlisted in company B, Ninth Minnesota Volunteers, and served among the Indians. He has married twice, the second time to Elizabeth Cole of Excelsior.

Page 256

Rev. C. B. Sheldon

born in Williamstown, Berkshire county, Mass., in 1821. Graduated at William's College in 1847, then entered the Western Reserve Theological Institute, where he remained three years. First pastoral charge gas at Republic, Seneca county, Ohio. Remained there until 1855 when he started for River Falls, Wis. with his own private conveyance, traveling a distance of over one thousand miles to Prescott, Wis. where he learned another minister had been appointed for River Falls and that the conference had recommended him to Excelsior, Minn.. He at once started for that place, and reached it November 16, 1855, where he found six houses, and a church membership of thirty-seven. Preached his first sermon in the sitting room of the hotel. After that held meetings in Pease's Hall for three years. Married in 1847 to Mary K. Prentice, of South Canaan, Conn. They have eight children living.

Page 256

William Simpson

born in New Brunswick, in 1837, where he remained until 1865, when he settled at Excelsior, opened the Excelsior House, which he conducted for two years; then took the White House, which he has enlarged to accommodate about ninety guests. Married, in 1869, to a daughter of Pardon Sherman, of Indiana.

Page 256

G. A. Slater

born in Champaign county, Illinois, in 1843. Came to Minnesota in 1865. Settled in Carver county, lived there until he moved to Excelsior, where he has since resided. In 1880, opened the Slater House, which he has enlarged to accommodate fifty guests. Married in 1867, to Miss R. C. Thompson. They have three children.

Page 256

Z. D. Spaulding

born at Pomfort, Vermont, in 1821. Moved to Sullivan county, New Hampshire; lived there twenty-two years, and moved to Burrellville, R. I., where he learned the machinists' trade. Came to Minnesota in 1854. Settled near Excelsior, experiencing many hardships, having to grind corn in a coffee mill. Married his third wife, Nancy J., daughter of Amasa and Anna Seamans, in 1875. Mr. Spaulding remembers the Indian raid of 1862, very distinctly. At that time many of his neighbors removed to Minneapolis.

Page 256

P. H. Turner

born in Kennebee, county, Maine, in 1838. Came to Minnesota in 1856, and settled in St. Anthony, where he conducted the harness business. Also opened a shop in Minneapolis, managing both at the same time. He then spent four years in Anoka county, farming. In 1876, located in Excelsior, and opened the only harness shop in town. Married, in 1876, to Beulah Philbrook. Have two children.

Page 256

Augustin Thompson

was born in Somerset county, Maine, in 1847, and came to Minnesota in 1863. Located in Minneapolis. In 1874 he engaged in the drug and fancy goods business, which in 1879 he removed to Excelsior, and has since conducted a general merchandise business. Married, January 15th, 1871, to Miss E. Nettie Parker, of Minneapolis. She was the fifth white child born in Hennepin county.

Page 261

Richard Ball

was born in England, August 29 1819. He lived with his father, who was a member of Parliament, 12 years. At the age of nineteen he went to New Zealand, spent five year there merchandizing. Returned to England and went to Australia, spent ten years there, doing very successful mercantile business. Returned to England and established a large mercantile and farming business until 1876, when he emigrated to America, and settled on the farm where three of his sons now live. In the spring of 1880 he bought the Delano Flouring and Saw mill which he is now improving to make it the best mill in Wright county. He now lives at Delano village. Was married in England to Miss Elizabeth Masters. They have eight children.

Page 261

Frank Carman

was born in Ohio, and came to Minnesota with his parents in 1823. He enlisted in Company D, Sixth Minnesota Infantry in 1862 and served until mustered out at Fort Snelling in 1865. He was married to Miss Adelia Moore of Hennepin county, March 22, 1868, and the year following, located at the pleasant home in Mound city where he has since resided. They have four children; Herbert, James, Mabel and Della. Mr. Carman is engaged in running a steam freight boat, between Mound City and Wayzata on Lake Minnetonka.

Page 261

Allen W. Clark 

was born in Cataraugus county New York, March 22, 1830. His father died July 4, 1852, leaving Allen to care for the family which he did faithfully. He was engaged in blacksmithing until 1866, when he came to Minnetrista, where he has since divided his time in farming and blacksmithing. In 1870, his shop was destroyed by fire, and in 1877 his house was burned; after each disaster he rebuilt. He was married November 2, 1854, to Miss Abigal R. Merriman., of N Y. They have two children.

Page 262

Ashbel Ingerson

was born in Jefferson county, New York, September 19, 1827. At the age of eighteen he went to Georgia and remained three years teaching school. He spent four years as civil engineer in New York state, and came west in 1855. Remained in Indiana one year, and then came to Steele county, Minnesota. In 1858 was elected county surveyor. In 1862 he enlisted in the Fifth Minnesota, and served ten months, participating in several battles; he was then transferred to the signal service and discharged in 1865. He was clerk in the United States Treasury department for two years, and in 1867 settled in Hennepin county. He was engaged four seasons on government surveys in northern Minnesota. He represented his district in the house in 1875, and has taken an active part in public affairs. In 1880 he removed to his present home, "Aralia," on the west bank of Minnetonka. He married Sarah A. Chase in 1857, and they have had six children.

Page 262

Aaron Merriman

was born in Unadilla, Otsego county, New York,, July 12th, 1801. When twelve years of age he moved with the family to Alleghany county, New York. Married, March 8th, 1821, to Miss Charlotte Taylor. They have seven children living. He spent most of his time in milling and farming, up to 1866, when he came to Minnetrista. Mr. Merriman died, September 15th, 1876.

Page 262

Warren Merriman

was born in Alleghany county, New York, February 16th, 1823. He lived with his parents until eighteen years of age, when for one year he worked on the Erie canal, then worked at the carpenter and joiner trade for about twenty-two years. In 1862 he settled in Minnetrista. May 28th, 1864, enlisted in Co. I, Sixth Minn. Inf. Served one year and was mustered out at Montgomery, Alabama. Married Miss Rhoda Clark December 31st, 1864. Had four children. The living ones are Anor A. and Joseph A.

Page 262

Eugene Merriman

was born in Alleghany county, New York, March l7th, 1850. He worked on the farm with his father, till 1866, when with his parents he came to Minnetrista, and settled. Married June 21st, 1871, to Miss Lorena Cook. They have four children

Page 262

Francis McCullough

was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, March 22d, 1843. He lived in Chautauqua county, New York, six years, and in Alleghany two years In 1852, went to McKean county, Pennsylvania. In December, 1861, enlisted in Co. F, 1st Pennsylvania Rifles; served until 1864, when he was appointed by General, Meade, 2d Lieut. of Co. I. 190th Penn. Inft. He was taken prisoner at Weldon R. R., August 19th, 1864, and kept in Libby Prison two months, also, at Saulsbury Prison, one month; then to Danville, and back to Libby Prison again; in one month was paroled, and taken to Annapolis hospital, Maryland. Returned home on a furlough, joined his regiment again, and after Lee's surrender, was mustered out at Washington, June, 1865. In the fall, he came to St. Anthony, Minnesota. April 30th, 1868, was married to Miss Susan J. Jennings. They have six children: Mary P., Francis E., Frederick J., William E., Ellanora J., Lucy A. The family moved to their present home on Jennings Bay, Lake Minnetonka, in 1868.

Page 262

Eliza J. Roemer

the subject of this sketch, was born in Lincoln, Maine, March 26th, 1831, and came with her parents, W. S. and Matilda Stinson, in 1849, to St. Anthony, Minnesota. January 27th, 1850, she married W. M. Dwinells, of Ramsey county, who was one of the first brick makers in St. Paul, where he died, June 19th, 1875. In 1876, the widow and family came to Minnetrista. She has three children living, Charles, C., Clara B., and Emma J. July 9th, 1877, Mrs. Dwinells married W. H. Roemer, who was born, April 21st, 1850, in Pike county, Pennsylvania, and commenced photographing at thirteen years of age, then learned the harness trade, and followed other pursuits until 1868, when he came to Minnetrista. They have a fine home, three miles south of Maple Plain.

Page 262

William T. Whitehouse

was born in Brooklyn, New York, January 12th, 1852. Married in 1872, to Miss Mary Major. He did a large business in boots and shoes at Troy, till 1876, then moved to St. Paul, and engaged in the same business. In 1877, he bought the place where he now lives. In 1878, moved his family to what is now called "Maple Shade." He organized the Minnetonka Navigation Company in 1880. He intends to have the largest fleet of steamers on Lake Minnetonka.

Page 265

Henry Astrope

was born in Canada, in 1839, and came with his parents to Minnesota in 1855. He returned to Canada three years later, and remained one summer, then came again to Minnesota. In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company F of the Second Regiment, and reenlisted in 1863, serving until discharged for disability, in January, 1865. He has since drawn a pension. He was married in 1873, and has two children.

Page 265

W. W. Budd

a native of Ohio, was born in Preble county, in 1833. In early life he removed with his parents to Indiana, and in 1855, he engaged in the lumber trade, which he followed for two years. In 1863 he enlisted in the Ninth Indiana Light Artillery, served two years, participating in ten engagements. In 1865 he came to Independence, bought and cleared the farm he now occupies. He married Emeline Cunningham, of Polk county, Indiana, In 1855. They have five children; Ella F., Anna C., Lilly M., William S., and Charles J.

Page 266

Samuel Briley

was born in Canada, in 1835, and came to Minnesota in 1865, locating in Dodge county, where he remained until 1871, then removed to Minneapolis. In 1876 he removed to this town where he has since resided. He was married, in 1858, to Jane Delahuut, by whom he has had six children, all living, with the exception of one, who died in Minneapolis.

Page 266

J. D. Brandon

was born in Jefferson county, Indiana, August, 1851, and in 1856 came with his parents to Hennepin county, locating at Maple Plain, where he now resides, on the farm secured by his father. He is engaged in farming, and dealing in lumber and railroad ties. He was married, May 14, 1876, to Belle C. McDonald. Ida M. and Charlie F., are their children. His father, Moses Brandon, died May 14th, 1880. His mother is still living, and a member of his family.

Page 266

John Cleven

has been a resident of Independence since 1872. He was born in Norway in l842, and came to America, locating in Minneapolis, in 1870, remaining there until he removed to his present home. He married Miss Inger Regene, in 1871. Clara B., James and Emma, are the children, aged respectively, six, four, and one and a half years.

Page 266

H. C. Dickey

is a native of Nova Scotia, and came to St. Anthony, in 1865, where for ten years he worked at carriage making. In 1875 he removed to Maple Plain, where he continued carriage and wagon making, and now does a thriving business.

Page 266

Johan Histed

was born in Sweden, in 1821, and in 1861 came to America, locating at Long Lake, Hennepin county, where he remained two years. He then removed to the town of Independence and leased a farm which he held until 1873, when he purchased the farm on which he now lives. He was married, in 1844, to Anna Hemmingson, of Sweden. Their children are: Hannah, aged 34; Peter, 32; Charles J., 30; Matilda, 24; and Josephine, 20. Charles J. Histed married Mary Moline in 1878. They have one child, Almer.

Page 266

John Hillstrom

was born in Sweden, in 1849, and emigrated to America in 1870. After a short residence in New York and eight months in Michigan, he came to Minneapolis and worked in a lumber mill until 1876, when he removed to Maple Plain. In 1877 he bought the farm he now lives on. He married Miss Clara M. Johnson, who was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1855. The children are: Jennie, aged four years, and Hannah, aged two.

Page 266

Henry Jackson

is a native of England, born in Chatham, in 1821. He came to New York while young, and engaged in the manufacture of cutlery and surgical instruments, until he reached the age of twenty-one. He then removed to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and was engaged in the boot and shoe trade until 1856, when poor health forced him to retire. He then came west and located near Lake Minnetonka. He was one of the voters to elect the first Town Board of Minnetonka, and put on the first shingle roof in town, using shingles of his own make. In 1862, he purchased his present home in Independence, where he has since resided. In 1862, he married Mrs. Stimson. They have one child, Edwin W., aged seventeen. Mr. Jackson enlisted in the 6th Minnesota Infantry, August, 1862; was discharged June, 1868. He was drafted in 1864, and served about four months.

Page 266

William Manning

a native of Ireland, was born in 1826, and came to America at the age of thirteen. He resided in New York and Albany, engaged as laborer until 1861, when he enlisted in the 31st Indiana Volunteers. He was wounded at Fort Donaldson, and discharged after an active service of two and one-half years. After his return from the army, he went to Pennsylvania, and in 1868 came to Minneapolis, where he remained one year then came to Independence, and cleared the farm he has since lived on. He married Miss Dugan, soon after leaving the army. Their children are: William, Jr., Katy, Thomas, and Charlotte.

Page 266

Samuel Moore

was born in Park county, Indiana, in 1832. He learned the trade of carpenter, at which he worked until 1858, with the exception of two years in mercantile business. He then came to Minnesota and located in the town of Independence, where he has since been engaged in the pursuit of farming and carpenter ,work. He married, in l865, Miss Nancy Wasson of park county, Indiana. They have six children: Jerome C., Florence A., Roscoe, Sophronia, John L.. and Effie V.

Page 267

John H. McGary

was born in Montgomery county, Kentucky, May 2d, 1842, and went with his parents to Indiana the same year. In 1855 they came to Minnesota and located in Independence. He remained with his parents until 1864, when he enlisted in the, Eleventh Regiment and served one year. He was married September 3d, 1866, to Mrs. Eliza Brandon, by whom he has three children: Ruth A., Katy W. and Omar Ray. Mr. McGary has held the offices of Assessor and Town Treasurer for nine years. His father, who died August 13th, 1879, was prominent among the early settlers of Hennepin county.

Page 267

N. Moline

was born in Chisago county, Minnesota, in 1855. In 1870 he removed to Minneapolis and remained there for six years, then came to Independence, and with his father purchased a farm of 160 acres in section thirty-six. His post office address is Maple Plain.

Page 267

R. M. Mills

is a native of Henry county, Indiana, where he was born in 1845. In 1854 he removed to Kentucky and remained three years, then returned to Indiana. In the fall of 1863 he enlisted in the Ninth Indiana Cavalry, and served until the fall of 1865. He then came to Minnesota and purchased a farm in the town of Independence. This farm, located on section twenty-two, was entered by Job Moffat, and was the first claim taken within the present limits of the town. He married Miss Maria Batdorf in June, 1866. They have one child, William D., born January 3d, 1868.

Page 267

C. W. O'Leary

a life-long resident of Hennepin county, was born in Minneapolis in 1859. He attended the schools of that city, and in 1871 removed with his parents to this town. His father died in 1876, and since that time he has lived with his mother at the old home on section eighteen, and carried on the farm. His post office address is Delano, Wright county.

Page 267

John Pagenkopf

is a native of the State of Illinois, and was born December 23d, 1857. In July, 1861, he came with his parents to Independence, and has since resided in this town. On the 19th of March, 1878, he was married to Miss Carrie Horsch, who has borne him one child, Freddie, born January 23d, 1879.

Page 267

Daniel S. Styner

was born in Pennsylvania, July 8th, 1815. He married Margaret Rheene, in 1843. In 1856 he came to Minnesota, and preempted 160 acres of land on section 26, in what is now the town of Independence, where he has since resided. He is one of the pioneers of this town, and was a member of the first Town Board. He has since held many offices of trust. The house he built, on his arrival here in 1856, was the first to have a shingle roof. The Indians, who passed back and forth at that time, gave him the title of the "Dutch Squire." Of his children, Mary L., Julia E., and Charles, came here with their parents; Cora was born while Minnesota was a Territory, and Frank after its admission as a state.

Page 267

Frank Shrewsbury

was born in 1855, in Indiana, and came with his parents to Minnesota the same year. They located at what is now Maple Plain, where he grew to manhood, and in 1875 married Allie Ingerson. They have two children, Mand and Mabel. Mr. Shrewsbury is a farmer, and lives on the farm preempted by his father. His mother is still living.

Page 267

G. W. Smith

is a native of Jefferson county, New York, born November 14th, 1816. In 1864 he came to Minnesota, locating at Saint Cloud, where he remained one year, then engaged in mercantile business in Minneapolis, until 1870, when he bought the store of J. D. Perkins, at Maple Plain, and has since resided there, conducting a general merchandise store. Mr. Smith received his appointment as postmaster at Maple Plain, in 1870, and has since held that office. He is also a Justice of the Peace, which office he has filled since his first election, in 1875. He is the oldest postmaster on this line of railroad. His children, who were born in Jefferson county, New York, are Mary Jane, wife of J. E. Bell, cashier of the Hennepin County Savings Bank. Minneapolis; Charles H., bookkeeper in the same bank, and William A., who died in Minneapolis, in 1869. He has a son who was born in Hennepin county; Lyndon B., six years of age.

Page 267

Adam Tautges

was born in Prussia, in 1847, and came to America in 1868. He came directly to Minnesota, and located in Medina township, where he remained with his parents until 1876, when he bought the farm he now occupies in this town. He married Miss Mary Wagner, in 1877. They have one child, Anna, aged two years.

Page 268

Peter Tautges

was born in Prussia, in 1856, and came to this country with his parents, in 1868. He located on his present farm in 1879. He was married to Sophia L. Hofflin, in 1877. Their children are Mary A., aged two years, and William A., aged one year.

Page 268

A. Weidenbach

also a native of Prussia, was born in 1833, and emigrated to this country in 1858. He came at once to Hennepin county and has cleared a good farm on section three. He is a teacher, and justice of the peace. In 1865, he married Miss Cacilia Bukorwsky. Adolph, Cacilia, Harmon, John, Amelia, Mary, Lucy., and Edward, are their children. His post office address is Rockford, Wright county.

Page 268

John Williams

a native of New York, was born in 1818. From that state he went to Indiana, where he remained until 1855, when he came to Independence, and preempted a claim of 160 acres. He was the second man who moved into this town, and has since resided here. In 1848, he enlisted, and served one year in the Mexican war. James, Allie, Harvey, Moses, George, and Imogene are children by his first marriage. His present wife was a Miss Wright, to whom he was married in 1873.

Page 268

George Washington

was born in Virginia, in 1843, and remained there until 1849, when he removed with his parents to Tennessee, and in 1863 came to Minnesota. He was married in 1879, to Phoebe Yancey, by whom he has one child, Willie, born, March 21st, 1880. Mr. Washington is engaged in farming, and is the owner of eighty acres of land on section fifteen.

Page 272

David Archibald

was born in Nova Scotia, in 1845, and moved with his parents to Hennepin county. He enlisted in 1861, in Second United States Sharpshooters, afterwards attached to First Minnesota Regt., and served three years; was wounded at Cold Harbor, and remained for six months in the hospital at Alexandria. He was honorably discharged at St. Paul, in 1865.

Page 272

William Archibald

was born in Nova Scotia, in the year 1811. He moved to Hennepin county in 1855, and made a claim where he has since resided. He is one of the founders of the Liberal League Society, is its President and most active member. In 1834 he married Diana C. Hutchinson. They had ten children. Mrs. Archibald died in 1863.

Page 272

A. C. Bailey

was born in Ohio, in 1840. He was educated at Westminster College. In 1862 he enlisted in the First Ohio Independent; served over three years, and was honorably discharged, in 1865, at Gallipolis. The same year he moved to Minnesota, and settled in Medina, where he has since resided. He married Hattie M. Parrish in 1867. Three children have been born to them.

Page 272

S. Barnes

was born in Maine, in 1826. He settled in Medina in 1855, and lived there until 1880, when he removed to Oregon and settled near Portland. When he came to Hennepin county he had but fifty cents. The first year he cleared three acres and planted it to corn, but was scourged with the grasshoppers, and was obliged to support his family by making ox yokes and axe handles.

Page 273

E. S. Barnes

a native of Maine, was born in 1845. He settled in Hennepin county, in 1855. In 1861 he enlisted in the Second Minnesota Sharpshooters, afterwards Company L, First Minnesota Volunteers, served three years, was wounded at Vicksburg and was in thirteen engagements, under Generals -McClellan and Burnside. He is part owner of a saw mill, also proprietor of a Sorghum mill, capacity one hundred gallons per day. He has a farm of 184 acres and half interest in 300 more. In 1867 he married Martha K. Reynolds. They have two children.

Page 273

Charles Barkow

was born in Germany, in 1826, and emigrated to America in 1852. He worked at harness making in Cleveland, Ohio, two years, and two years in Oberlin. In 1861 he settled in Hennepin county. Enlisted in company A, Fourth Minnesota Volunteers in 1864, and was honorably discharged in 1865; the same year he married Caroline Sekoggv. They have eight children living.

Page 273

J. D. Bayer

was born in Nova Scotia, in 1832. He lived there until 1877, then moved to Boston, Massachusetts, for two years, thence to New York; he then came to Hennepin county and settled in 1880. Worked on farm thirty years, then learned the carpenters trade. He was superintendent of the Orphan's Home, in Halifax, his wife acting as matron, having charge of it for seven years. His marriage with Elizabeth A. Brown, occurred in the year 1860.

Page 273

Peter Berens

a native of Germany, was born in 1829. He removed to Hennepin county in 1855, having lived one year in Illinois, and settled near Long Lake, being at that time farther west than any other settler in this part of the county. He has since lived here.

Page 273

Alden P. Bills

was born in Oneida county, New York, in 1818. In the year 1865 he moved to Hennepin county, settling at Lake Independence. He moved here in a lumber wagon, building bridges as he went. Arriving at his farm, they put up a stove, and ate their first meal on a dry goods box. Game was plenty at that time, and they did not suffer for food. Mrs. Bills was chased by a panther, that came so near she could distinctly hear its steps. Mr. Hills married Jeanette Purcell, of Ohio. They have two children now living.

Page 273

C. W. Burchfield

was born in Pennsylvania in 1815. He moved to Wisconsin in 1855, and came to Hennepin county in 1856. He worked in St. Anthony as carpenter, carrying provisions on his back to his family in "Lenz;" went six miles for twelve bushels of potatoes, and gave half to have them hauled home; built his first log house in 1856. He is one of the fathers of Medina; married in 1842, to Christina Frantz. They have five children living.

Page 273

A.' Burchfield

was born in 1847, and came to Hennepin county with his parents. He is the inventor of the U. S. Military Portable Forge, a very ingenious and useful contrivance; when ready for moving, it is mounted on wheels, with fireplace, forge, tool box and fan bellows, a model of completeness. Mr. Burchfield has commenced manufacturing, and selling state rights.

Page 273

Peter Boucher

pastor of St. Anna French Catholic Church at Lenz, was born in the Province of Quebec, July 5tb, 1821. He was educated for the priesthood at the College of Quebec. In 1847 took charge of Sherbrook Church, remaining two years. Then eleven years at Matane, five years at St. Alphonse, and one year at St. Raphael. Thence to Jefferson, D. T., where he remained until 1880, when he took charge of the St. Anna Church.

Page 273

L. K. Campbell

a native of Maine, was born in Washington county in 1852. When quite young he moved to Winnebago county, Wisconsin; was educated at Omro, and has followed teaching for the past eight years. He came to Minneapolis in 1878 and taught school in Crystal Lake, Richfield and Medina.

Page 273

I. A. Christlieb

was born in Pennsylvania, in 1834. Moved to Medina in 1855, preempted 160 acres and bought for cash as much more. He experienced many hardships, paying exorbitant prices for everything, and was compelled at times to live on sour corn meal. The grasshoppers came and destroyed everything; many of his neighbors left, and he would have been obliged to do the same, but for the means he brought with him. During the Indian outbreak he sent his family to Minneapolis to keep them from the murderous Sioux. Has been Town Clerk and Supervisor for seventeen years, and member of School Board sixteen years. He married Susie Baird, of Springfield, Ohio, in 1859. They have two children.

Page 274

B. F. Christlieb

was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, October 10th, 1836. He came to Medina in 1859, and until 1864 was engaged as local surveyor and engineer. He was then in the employ of the St. P. & P. k. R. for several years. In 1870, under Chief Engineer Spaulding, he assisted in locating the first five miles from N. P. Junction. Has been connected with other roads, among them the Lake Superior & Miss., the St. Paul & Duluth and the Minneapolis & St. Louis. In 1873 he was compelled to abandon his profession on account of poor health. In 1877 he formed a partnership with A. Lydiard in mercantile business at Long Lake. He has been prominent in local politics. Has been a candidate for the Legislature on the Democratic ticket several times; has also been Town Clerk, and was elected Treasurer in 1880.

Page 274

Alex. Dickey

was born in Nova Scotia, in 1850. Moved to Bristol county, Massachusetts, where he lived until 1861, when he came to Hennepin county, and settled at Parker's Lake. He spent two years in the Black Hills. In 1880 associated himself with Robert Logan in the meat business, at Long Lake.

Page 274

R. B. Dickey

was born in Nova Scotia, in 1842. He was engaged in milling in his native country. In 1868 came to Hennepin county, and finally settled at Long Lake. He is now Deputy Sheriff; was clerk of Medina four years, and was also census enumerator. In 1865 he married Barbara Stephen. They have four children now living.

Page 274

Henry Faue

a native of Germany, was born in 1826: Emigrated to America in 1851; he lived on Long Island three years, then moved to Hennepin county in 1854, and located where he now resides. Enlisted in Company H Third Minnesota in 1864. Served one year, and was honorably discharged at St. Paul. Married in Germany to Louisa Gust, in 1849; have eight children, Louis, John, Lizzie, Henry, Annie, Mena, Jennie, and William.

Page 274

Allen T. French

was born in Ohio, in 1818. Came to Hennepin county in 1854, and made a claim on Crystal bay, Lake Minnetonka. In 1862 he moved to Minneapolis, and engaged in business until 1875, when he again returned to his home on Crystal Bay and has since resided there. In 1857 he suffered much from the Indians and grasshoppers, the latter eating everything outside, and the former begging everything inside. Married Martha Gibson, in 1852. They have two adopted children.

Page 274

Allen Grave

was born in Kent county, Delaware, in 1811. He came to Hennepin county in 1855, and settled near Long Lake; at that time the country was thinly settled. In 1857 he suffered much from the ravages of the grasshoppers. He married in 1833, Mary Teas, of Wayne county, Indiana. They have six children now living.

Page 274

B. C. Haines

was born in New Jersey, in 1820. Moved to Ohio and Pennsylvania; then came to Hennepin county in 1855, and made a claim in Medina. In 1863 he returned to Pennsylvania, and remained there until 1868, when he removed to his farm in Medina, and has lived there since. Married Lucy Ann Counselman, of Pennsylvania, in 1850. Six children have been born to them.

Page 274

J. O. Hamel

was born in Quebec, in 1839. He was educated at the Seminary of Quebec, the oldest College in the town. In 1857 he moved to Minnesota and settled in Hennepin county, near what is known as Lenz. When he came it was a wilderness. In 1863, he went to Montana; returned in 1868, and established his store at Long Lake; the first one in this part of the county; the post office of Lenz was transferred to him at that time.

Page 274

Charles W. Hoagland

came west with his parents, in 1862, and after remaining in the vicinity of Long Lake, a short time, decided to make further explorations; after several changes he returned to Minnesota in 1872, and settled near Long Lake, where he has since resided. He remained with his parents until August, 1880, when he entered the store of Christlieb & Lydiard. He is Lodge Deputy of Long Lake Lodge No. 65, I. O. of G. T.

Page 274

Louis K. Hoagland

a native of Ohio, was born in Trumbull county, in 1852. He moved to Hennepin county, and settled at Wayzata. In 1876, he came to Long Lake, and in 1877 began milling, with the North Star Mill B. Married to Annie John son, in 1876. They have two children.

Page 275

Jacob Huntsberger

was born in Pennsylvania, in 1844. He enlisted in 1861, in Company H, 87th Pennsylvania. Served nearly four years; participating in fifteen engagements; was taken prisoner at Winchester. Exchanged and transferred to the Army of the Potomac, and was honorably discharged in 1865, when he came and settled in Medina. Married, in 1866, to Charlotte Arthur. Six children have been born to them.

Page 275

M. Huntsberger

was born in Pennsylvania, in 1834. He moved to Hennepin county, in 1865, and settled in Medina. In 1877, started wagon making at, Long Lake, having learned the trade at Council Bluffs, Cumberland county, Penn. He worked on the first building in Long Lake.

Page 275

Charles Johnson

was born in Maine, 1816. He moved to St. Anthony in 1852, remained there until 1855, when he went to Nebraska; was gone four years; returned and spent two years in Carver county; moved to Minneapolis, for one year, and then came to Long Lake, where he has since resided. When he first came here there were only two houses, and nothing but forest where now is the centre of the village. He married Miss E.F. Barnes, in l870. They have one child.

Page 275

Karl Kassube

was born in Prussia, in 1822. He emigrated to America in 1854; came to Hennepin county the same year, and made a claim of 160 acres; all he had to work with was a grub hoe. In 1849 he married Miss F. Dralle, of Germany. They have six children living.

Page 275

Wm. C. Kassube

a native of Germany, was born in 1853. He emigrated to America in 1855, and settled in Hennepin county. Married, in April, 1879, to Minnie Schulz, of Wright county. They have one child, born April 21st, 1880.

Page 275

Leonard Lenzen

was born in Germany, in 1825. Emigrated to America and moved to Hennepin county in 1856, settling, where he has since resided. He was the first postmaster of Lenz, which position he held, for eleven years. The office was named in honor of him. He enlisted in 1864, in Company E, 5th Minnesota, and was honorably discharged in 1865. Mr. Lenzen married Susanna Roscop, in 1857. They have ten children living.

Page 275

Peter G. Lindner

was born in Germany, in 1826. He emigrated to America in 1854, and worked at shoemaking in New Orleans until 1856, when he moved to St. Paul. The following year he came to Medina and made a claim. He is now engaged in grape culture. Married, in 1855, to Caroline L. H. Greve. They have no children living.

Page 275

R. Logan

a native of Nova Scotia, was born in 1836. He moved to Parker's Lake, Hennepin county, in 1867, and engaged in the meat business. In 1873 he moved to Long Lake, and continued in the same business. In 1862 he married Susan J. Archibald, They have six children.

Page 275

A. R. Loranger

was born in Quebec, in 1850. He was educated at Three Rivers College and Lennoxville Medical College, where he graduated under some of the best Canadian physicians and surgeons. Came to Hennepin county in 1879, and is now practicing medicine. He was married in 1876, to Albina Galinas, of Three Rivers.

Page 275

A. J. Mayers

was born in France in 1822. He emigrated to America in 1867, and settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, remaining there about five years. He then came to Minnesota, and lived in Minneapolis until 1878, when he moved to Long Lake, where he now resides. In 1875 he married Sarah Raphel. One child has been born to them.

Page 275

P. Magnus M. Mayr

a native of Bavaria, was born In 1820. He was educated for the priesthood in the University of Munich. In 1845, he emigrated to America. He was ordained at Pittsburgh, and his first charge was at St. Cloud, Minnesota. Afterward, he had charge of several churches in Wright and Hennepin counties, but failing health obliged him to abandon them for the less laborious one at Chaska, Carver county, where he remained for seven years. He was also for seven years at New Trier. In 1879 he took charge of the Catholic Church in Medina.

Page 275

George Maxwell

was born in Virginia, in 1829. Moved to Hennepin county in 1855, and made a claim where he now lives. He was married in Illinois, to, Miss Slane, and returned in 1856, bringing with him the first wagon used west of Wayzata. His wife camped on Lake Minnetonka until he could build a shanty. They have twice moved away, but now have settled in Medina permanently.

Page 275

J. P. Meurer

a native of Germany, was born in 1833. He emigrated to America in 1855, and worked at his trade, plate printing and engraving, in New York, for about two years; then went to St. Paul; remained there until 1859, when he moved to Hennepin county. Enlisted in 1864, in Co. H. 3d Minn.; was honorably discharged in 1865, and returned to his farm. He has filled the offices of Clerk, Supervisor, and Assessor in the town of Medina, where he has since resided.

Page 276

Peter Miller

born in Prussia, 1833, emigrated to America and lived in Illinois for two years. Moved to Hennepin county, in 1855, and made a claim in Medina; has held the office of chairman of town board for four years. Married to Margaret Shaussen in 1867 ; Enlisted in Company B, Independent Battallion, Minnesota Volunteers, 1864; honorably discharged at Fort Snelling, 1866.

Page 276

P. Parrish

was born in Erie county, New York, in 1814. He moved with his parents to Genesee county, and at the age of twenty-two years went to Geauga county, Ohio, thence to Camden, Ohio, in 1841, and engaged in railroading. He came to Hennepin county in 1858, and bought the farm on which he now resides. Married Laura A. Van Valkenburg in 1839. They have four children, Lemira, Charles Henry, Hattie M., Carlos F.

Page 276

Romain Pouliot

a native of Quebec, was born in 1836. He came to Hennepin county and made a claim; built a small log house and began to clear his farm. He enlisted in Company H, Heavy Artillery, and was discharged at Fort Snelling in 1866. He married in 1857, Eugenia Hamel. They have eleven children living.

Page 276

George Reiser

a native of Germany, was born in 1816. Moved to America, settled in Boston, Massachusetts, and worked at bronzing for eleven, years. In 1855 he settled in Medina, Hennepin county. He was a member of the first board and suggested the name which the town now bears. He married in 1845, Mary Ann Letzkus. They have seven children.

Page 276

Joseph B. Reiser

was born in East Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1846. Moved to Hennepin county in 1855, and settled where he now lives. He is the son of George Reiser, one of the pioneer settlers of this part of the county. In 1869 he married Julia Prelwitz. They have six children.

Page 276

Andrew J. Rosander

a native of Sweden, was born in 1850. He emigrated to America in 1872, and located at Castle Rock, Dakota county, Minnesota; moved to Anoka, then to Wisconsin for a short time, thence to Minneapolis and engaged in brick making in 1878. Married in 1880 to Hannah C. Johnson. Mr. Rosander has now rented the ".Medina House" at Long Lake for a term of years.

Page 276

Anton Schaar

was born in Germany, in 1821. Moved to America in 1848, and settled in Hennepin county ten years later. He bought a farm, built a log house, and cleared two acres the first year; has now cleared it up and built a nice house. His last marriage was to Elizabeth Boetel. They have four children now living.

Page 276

Joseph Schaar

was born in Germany, in 1821, and is a twin brother of Anton. He came to this country one year later than his brother, and they have lived together since that time, he having bought land near Anton's farm. In 1862, he enlisted in Minnesota Mounted Rangers, serving one year, then in Company D, 2d Minnesota Cavalry. He was in several engagements, and was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling, in 1864.

Page 276

Dr. A. W. Shuck

was born in Pennsylvania, in l837. When fourteen years old he began to work at carpentering; followed it for two years. Was also engaged in teaching. He attended two courses of lectures at the Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati, and one course at Newton's Clinical Institute. He commenced the practice of medicine in 1859. In 1861 he entered the army, serving in the medical department of the army and navy for three and a half years. He moved to Benton county, and practiced medicine from 1866 to 1878, when he went to Lake Minnetonka. He now resides at Long Lake, enjoying a large practice. He married Mattie A. McClannahan. They have seven children.

Page 276

H. Shumacher

a native of Prussia, was born in 1824. Emigrated to America in 1853. Moved to Scott county, Minnesota, in 1855. Finally settled in Independence, made a claim, and lived on it for eight years, then came to Medina. He enlisted in 1864, in Company F, 11th Minnesota Volunteers. Was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling, in 1866. Married Miss M. Geigerman. They have eleven children now living.

Page 276

Mark H. Sheppard

was born in Quebec, in 1820. Moved to England and from there to the Isle of Man. He was educated at King Williams College, served his time at the Royal Infirmary, Liverpool, and passed examination in the London College of Surgeons. He has traveled extensively. For a time he was surgeon on the Black Ball Line, sailing between Liverpool and New York, and practiced medicine in Nova Scotia for ten years. In 1868 he went to Parker's Lake, and thence to Princeton, where he practiced medicine five years. He then came to Long Lake, and has since resided here. In 1866 he married Catherine A. McCloud.

Page 277

W. A. Spafford

a native of Quebec, was born in 1825. He came to Hennepin county in 1853 and preempted a farm near Hopkins Station; lived there two years; then in 1855 moved to Medina, bought a claim and sold it three years later; he then located on the Lydiard property which he sold in 1862 and moved to where he now resides. The grasshoppers attacked him in 1856; and in 1862, the Indians obliged him to move his family to Minneapolis for safety.

Page 277

Henry Stubbs

was born in Ohio, in 1806. He moved to Minnesota in 1856, and made a claim in Medina, where he now resides. At that time Minneapolis had but one or two stores; Medina people had to go there to mill for some years. The first school in this town was held in an old log blacksmith shop on Mr. Stubbs' place. He was the first postmaster at Tamarac, afterwards changed to Long Lake.

Page 277

J. D. Stafford

was born in Indiana, in 1842. Came to Minnesota and settled in Medina, in 1861. He enlisted in 1862, serving part of the time among the Indians, the balance of the time South. He was at the siege of Fort Blakely on Mobile Bay for fourteen days. Was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1865. Married Ella Styner in 1869. They have three children.

Page 277

C. R. Stubbs

was born in Ohio, in 1845. He came with his parents to Hennepin county, and has since resided here. Mr. Stubbs married, in 1869, Esther White. They have four children. He owns a Sorghum Mill, Stubbs' Patent, Pans, and Excelsior Machine, capacity 150 gallons per day, two horse power.

Page 277

Gibson Teas

was born in Delaware, in 1809. He moved to Wayne county, Indiana, in 1818; thence to Hennepin county, Minnesota, in 1856, and settled near Starvation Point, Lake Minnetonka. In 1858, he sold all his effects but land, for a twenty dollar gold piece, and moved to Indiana. Married Miss D. Stafford in 1859, and returned to Hennepin county in 1861, experiencing many hardships. In 1862, expecting hourly to be attacked by Indians, they loaded their goods into a spring wagon, and left, but afterwards returned to the farm, where they have since remained.

Page 277

J. Turnham

was born in Illinois, in 1850; moved to Minnesota and settled in Medina. He is the owner of Turnham's Sorghum Mill, built in 1877, and located on his farm three miles from Long Lake; capacity one hundred gallons per day. He raises five to ten acres of cane per year, making about 1,000 gallons, besides manufacturing for other parties. Mr. Turnham married Ellen McKeneff in 1875. She has borne him two children.

Page 277

J. D. Twist

a native of New York, was born in Madison county. He moved to West Virginia, thence to Ohio, thence to Indiana, and in 1867 came to Medina, where he has since resided. He has one of the largest and most complete sorghum mills in the county, producing about 150 gallons of syrup per day, equipped with Stubbs & Sons patent pans, and all under cover. He married Elizabeth Lynch. They have five children living.

Page 277

E. F. Walsh

born in Nova Scotia, in 1827. He settled in Hennepin county in 1856, and took a claim where he now lives. Married in 1855, to Mary Gilman. They have six children, Lahelia, Burke, J. D., Ida May, Eda Mary and Frank.

Page 277

A. W. Wamboldt

born in Nova Scotia, in 1851. He moved to Hennepin county in 1863, and learned the cooper's trade in Minneapolis. He went to Florida, and lived two years, then returned to Medina, where he has since resided, excepting a short time in Meeker county. He was married in 1880, to Miss Ida M. Walsh.

Page 277

Dr. S. J. Wooster

was born in Lenawee county, Michigan, in, 1850. He came with his, grandparents to Long Lake, Minnesota, and learned thoroughly the prescription part of the drug business, with George Savoy, of Minneapolis, and was associated with C. A. Bundy in the drug trade. He studied medicine with Dr. Karl Bendeke, of Minneapolis; graduated at Keokuk College of Physicians and Surgeons, receiving medical advice from some of the best physicians in America. He then located at Long Lake. In 1876 he married Margaret Jordan. One child has been born to them.

Page 281

John Berg

was born in Sweden, July 16th, 1846. He worked on a farm until fifteen, in a flouring mill ten years, and at carpenter work two years. He came to America, arriving at Red Wing, Minnesota, in May, 1868, when he went to brick-making. In 1871 he was employed by the Minneapolis Brick Company. In 1872, he was in Bismarck, brick-making. In 1874-1876 worked for Union Brick Company, in Minneapolis. In the fall of 1876, worked for R. C. Todd. In 1879-1880, was a partner with Johnson Brothers. He married Miss Clara C. Anderson, of Minneapolis, January, 1875. They have three children. Charles E., F. Alida and Oscar T.

Page 281

John C. Bohanon

was born August 23d, 1817, in Alexander, Maine, where he followed the lumbering business until 1851, when he came to St. Anthony. March 26th, 1852, he moved to the land he now occupies, section 4, and was the second man who settled here. He has been engaged in farming and lumbering since he came to Minnesota. Married, in 1840, Miss Lucretia McKenzie, of Calais, Maine. January 11th, 1853, his wife died, and was the first white adult buried in this town. . November 19th, 1856, he married Sophia H. Longfellow. Nine children are living: S. L., Charles, and H. Willard, by his first wife; John L., Annie T., Frederick N., James M., Sarah B., and Ira B., by second marriage.

Page 281

H. H. Boughton

was born August 25th, 1846, in Lorain county, Ohio, and moved with his parents to Nauvoo, Illinois; from there to Galena, and learned the milling trade; thence to Prescott, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1873, when he went to Minneapolis. He remained there until 1878, engaged in milling. He was then employed at the Crystal Flour Mill, at Shingle Creek, where he has since remained. August 14th, 1872, he married Miss Farnsworth, of River Falls, Wisconsin. They have two children: Etta and Ella.

Page 281

G. W. Brookins

a native of Vermont, was born December 12th, 1827. He remained there until 1856, farming summers and teaching winters. He came to Minnesota in 1856 and settled in Wright county, engaging in farming and engineering. Enlisted in the Third Minnesota Infantry, mustered out in 1864, and served in the commissary department one year. In 1865 he came to Crystal Lake, remaining here until 1872, when he went to Minneapolis in the lumber business, and from that to the well and pump business. In 1880 he again moved to Crystal Lake on his own land in section two. Married in 1867, Miss Zilpha A. Atwood, of Vermont, They have three children: Anna, Clara and Freddie.

Page 281

D. C. Crandall

was born at Lake George, Warren county, New York, November 22d, 1820, where he lived till manhood, and was occupied in lumbering. He moved to Minnesota in 1855, and located where he now lives, and preempted the same in 1861. Married, in 1844, Miss Julia Myers, of Lake George, New York. They have three children living: James, Eugene and Vernon.

Page 281

Major J. H. Donaldson

was born September 5, 1835, in Muskingum county, Ohio, his parents being natives of Virginia, who came to Ohio at an early day. In 1856 he married Miss Cochran of the same county and State, came immediately to Minnesota and located a claim, near where is now the village of Farmington, then a wilderness. He remained there until the breaking out of the war, when he entered the Fourth Minnesota infantry, as private; soon after received a commission as Lieutenant, and was sent at once to Fort Ripley, where he held command during the winter of 1861-1862. In the spring of 1862 he went south, and joined the army immediately after the battle of Shiloh, and helped drive Beauregard's army into Corinth. Was on the staff of General Sanborn, during, and prior to, the siege of Vicksburg vicinity. He received the commissions of First Lieutenant, Captain and Major during his service. On leaving the service, he returned to his home, and with Governor Wm. R. Marshall opened one of the largest arms in the state, where he remained for three years. He then removed to St. Paul, and opened a Real Estate office, at the same time conducting his farm. In 1877, removed to Minneapolis where he dealt in real estate. In 1880, purchased is present residence at Shingle Creek. Has been county commissioner of Dakota county, and Representative of the same. Is still in the Real Estate business. Office in Pence Opera House block, Minneapolis.

Page 282

Josiah Dutton

was born at Charlestown, New Hampshire, September, 1822, and three years after removed with his parents to Essex county and then to Warren county, New York. There he lived until 1853, when he came to Minnesota and three months after, preempted the land on which he now lives, containing 126 acres, all under cultivation. Married Miss D. C. Clark, of Vermont, March 12, 1843. They have had four children, two now living; A. C. and Jesse V.

Page 282

David Ellsworth

was born in Chenango county, New York, July 28, 1820. In 1836 he moved to Syracuse, where he learned the tanner's trade, following it for some time. He then embarked in the mercantile business, until 1867, when he came to Minnesota, and settled on the land he now occupies. October 7, 1845, he married Miss Caroline Wales, who died May 22, 1849, leaving two children, Mary and Caroline. The latter died in infancy. His second wife was Miss Euphemia Stevens. Martha A., Margaret D., Ameliaa B., Frederick J., George W., David F. and Edward H., are children by second marriage.

Page 282

Rufus Farnham

was born in Washington county New York, February 2, 1822, and remained there following the lumbering business, until he me to St. Anthony, Minnesota, October 23, 1849. He followed lumbering until 1853, when he located on his present farm. In February 1849, he married Miss Eliza J. Gillespie, of Baring, Washington county, Maine. They have had twelve children, eight of whom are living.

Page 282

George Giebenhain

was born in Germany, March 29, 1827. He came to America in 1850; lived in New York state two years; went to Illinois, and remained about three years. In 1855 he came to Crystal Lake, Minnesota, and located where he now lives. He has 270 acres, 130 under cultivation. In 1864 he enlisted in Co. F, 5th Minn. Vol. Inf., and served till the war closed. He was in the two days battle at Nashville; went into it with 300 men, and lost 135. In 1855, he married Miss Margaret Schofield, of Crystal Lake. They have had twelve children, ten of whom are living; Louisa, Albert, Nicholas, William, Charles, Katherine, Peter, Edward, Frank and Eldina.

Page 282

R. H. Hasty

was born in York county, Maine, December 12th, 1823. Came to Minnesota in 1849, and settled in Stillwater, where he followed he lumbering business till June 14th, 1862, when he enlisted in the Sixth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and was appointed Lieutenant by Gov. Marshall. He crossed the plains with General Sibley in his campaigns against the Indians. On returning, charge was given film of the convalescent department at Fort Goodhue. He was appointed Drill Sargent to the drafted men at Fort Snelling; was relieved July, 1864, and joined his regiment at Helena, Arkansas. Before leaving, Gov. Marshall appointed him Lieutenant. At Helena he found half of the officers sick, which obliged him to do double duty. He was taken with fever, obtained sick leave, and came to Minnesota. He was honorably discharged in 1865, and again engaged in the lumbering business, until 1880. He is now manufacturing brick in Crystal Lake.

Page 282

F. L. Holway

was born November 11th, 1836, at Machias, Washington county, Maine. He followed farming and lumbering till 21 years of age. In 1857 he went to Saint Paul, for a short time, then went to Afton, Minnesota, and engaged in farming. In 1859 he went to Saint Anthony, and worked on a contract for railroad ties, a few months; then came to Crystal Lake to work on a farm; after which he was employed in various ways in Minneapolis until 1868, when he came to his present farm in Crystal Lake, built a house, and moved into it in 1871. Mr. Holway married Ellen Shepard, of Plymouth, Minnesota. Two children have been born to them, Howard and Marcia. In 1864 he enlisted in Company F, of the Eleventh Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Plummer, and served till the close of the war. He has held several town offices.

Page 283

Jacob Kesler

was born July 4th, 1820, in Mercer county, Pennsylvania. In 1842 he went to Keokuk, Iowa, and on his arrival had but half a dollar in money. Took a trip to New Orleans in the winter of 1845. Settled for a time in Kentucky, opposite Cincinnati; then rented the Mansion House at Newport, Kentucky, and boarded the 16th regiment until it left for Mexico. For three years he managed hotels in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1851, went to Fort Recovery, Ohio, and engaged in farming for three years. During this time he cleared, with his own hands, sixty-five acres. Moved to Union City, Indiana, in 1854, and went into the grocery business; also dealt largely in grain. In 1863 he came to Minnesota, and settled in Brooklyn, and opened a farm of 700 acres, where he remained nine years; then removed to Minneapolis, and engaged in the real estate business. In 1876 he built his present elegant home, and removed to it. He was married to Miss Orinda Nichols, of Campbell county, Kentucky, October 27th, 1846. They have had two children, only one is living. In the winter of 1868-1869, he opened the first regular pork-packing house in Minneapolis.

Page 283

Philip Kuch

a native of Germany, was born in 1831. Came to America in 1850, and located in Erie county, Pennsylvania. Followed the butcher business until 1855, when he went to St. Anthony, and remained four years; then moved to a farm near Medicine Lake. In 1861 he returned to the city, and in 1864 started for Idaho with a number of men, under Capt. Fisk, of St. Paul. When near the foot of the Black Hills they were attacked by Indians, and were surrounded by them for twenty days, when help came from General Sally, at Fort Rice. Thirteen were killed; the rest returned to the Fort. He returned home and bought his present homestead in 1865. He married Miss Elizabeth Schafer, in 1856. They have seven children: Lizzie, Henry, Katherine, Leopold, Susan, Marie, and Gracie.

Page 283

W. G. McKnight

was born in Nashville, Tenn., January 27, 1853. Moved to Christian county, Missouri, where he lived until 1873, when he went to Indiana. In 1875 he went to Yankton, Dakota, and opened a boarding house; then went to the Black Hills and remained until 1879, when he came to Crystal Lake, and has since been a stock dealer here.

Page 283

W. R. Medcalf

born in Licking county, Ohio, in 1842. In 1852 he moved to Crawford county, Illinois, and remained till 1866, when he came to Crystal Lake where he now lives, and is extensively engaged in fancy gardening and the cultivation of choice fruits. On the 25th, of January 1866, he was married to Miss A. H. Carr. Their children are: Ulysses Grant, Com A. and Effie A.

Page 283

Francis Morrison

was born in Windsor, Vermont, in 1813. At thirteen years of age he moved to Stowe, where he continued for some time. In 1847 he commenced work on the Vermont Central Railroad and worked four years. In 1851 he went to Indiana and took a contract on New Ogden and Michigan City Railroad. In 1852 came to St. Anthony, and at once located 153 acres in what is now Demmon & Morrison's addition, and paid the first money into the Government Land Office at Minneapolis. He has been extensively engaged in lumbering, in the mean time building a mill at Clearwater. In 1854 he was President and Superintendent of the Mississippi Bridge Company, and had charge of building the first suspension bridge across the river; he and Mr. Griffiths the engineer, were the first to cross it in a carriage. Mr. Morrison was also Superintendent of the masonry for the new bridge. Since coming here he has been largely identified with the building up of the city.

Page 283

S. D. Morrison

was born December 30th, 1882, in Washington county, Maine. He lived there till 1856, then came to Minneapolis and followed the carpenters trade until 1870, when he moved to Crystal, then two years later returned to Minneapolis. In 1874 he moved again to Crystal Lake and followed dairying two years. Since then he has been manufacturing brick in the largest establishment in this county, and is one of the leading citizens of the town.

Page 283

H. Oswald

was born in Switzerland, March 17th,1832. Came to America in l854 and settled in West Virginia. In 1855 he moved to Illinois, and the following March came to Minneapolis and embarked in mercantile business, following it until 1858, when he was appointed toll-keeper at the upper bridge, holding the position until 1862; he again entered mercantile life and followed it until 1872, when he bought the mills in Crystal Lake which he has conducted since. He was twice elected alderman in Minneapolis.

Page 284

W. P. Peterson

was born in Sweden, in 1842. He attended school until fifteen years of age, then learned the trade of carpenter and joiner, and emigrated to America in 1864, settling in Carver, Minnesota, where he stayed one year. He then removed to Minneapolis, and commenced the manufacture of brief on the Champlin Road, three miles north of Minneapolis. He is now doing a large business there, under the firm name of Peterson & Benson.

Page 284

P. W. Reidhead

a native of Maine, was born in Hancock county, October 26th, 1844. He lived there until 1860 when he came to Minneapolis; remained four years and then returned to Maine. In 1866 he came back to Minnesota and settled on the farm owned by his father in Crystal Lake. He married, in 1865, Miss A. M. Kincaid. They have had four children. Mr. Reidhead's father came to this county about 1849 and remained until his death.

Page 284

A. D. Shoop

was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, November 10th, 1837. He started in life for himself in 1859, near the old homestead, where he farmed until 1865, when he came to Minnesota and rented several farms. He is now living on the farm owned by, J. K. and H. G. Sidle, in Crystal Lake. On September 22d, 1856, he married Miss Emeline Hoke. Their four children are William, James, Charles and Mary.

Page 284

Peter Schuller

a native of Prussia, was born August, 1828. Came to America in 1852, and worked in St. Louis as stone mason until 1855, when he came to St. Paul. In 1857 he made his pre-emption of 160 acres in Crystal Lake. He takes a great interest in fruit growing, has now three acres of orchard. He has held every office in town but clerk, has also been county coroner. Married in 1856, Miss Mary Gellner. They have ten children living: Barnard, Susan, Lizzie, Peter, Charles, Margaret, Mary, John, Hubert and Mathias.

Page 284

J. P. Shumway

was born in Windham county, Connecticut, June 1830. He remained there, engaged in farming, until 1855, when he came to Minnesota and located a claim near Crow River. In 1856 he bought the land where he has since lived. In the fall of 1864 he enlisted in the Eleventh Minnesota Infantry, and served until the close of the war. Mr. Shumway has been Treasurer of Crystal Lake for the past three years. In 1859 he married Louisa A. Russ, of Chaplin, Connecticut. To them have been born two children.

Page 284

Leonard Wagner

was born in Prussia in 1822. In 1848 he emigrated to America, came to Wisconsin and worked in a saw mill. In 1852 removed to St. Anthony, remained there one year, then went to Crystal Lake. Mrs. Wagner was the first white woman in that vicinity. In 1852 Mr. Wagner was married to Margaret Bauenfeind. They have eight children: Maggie, Elizabeth, Heinrich, Eldena, Eleanora, George, Edwin and Adelia.

Page 284

Charles Witt

a native of Germany, was born in 1827. He came to America in 1852, settled in Cleveland, Ohio, and engaged in the meat business. In 1854 he went to Superior City, and thence to Duluth ; which at that time had but two houses. In 1856 he went to Ontonagon, Michigan, then came to Minneapolis in 1867, and opened the "Lake Superior Market," and operated it until 1879, when he started his large stock yard and slaughter house, corner Second street and Twenty-Sixth Avenue north.

Page 284

Anton Wolf

a native of Prussia, was born in 1830. He came to America in 1861, and in company with others went to Georgetown, on the Red River; remained there three months, then went to St. Cloud, Minnesota, thence to St. Paul, where he remained about three years, then went to Medina, where he married Mrs. Elizabeth Meurer Hilger. For a time he was at Minneapolis working in a lumber yard; he also kept the "Harmonia House" and the "Washington House." In 1875 he came to Crystal Lake and erected the hotel of which he is now proprietor. He has one child, Joseph.

Page 284

William Zirbes

was born in Germany, March 24, 1836. Came to America in 1858 and to St. Anthony. He bought the farm where he now lives ; it is beautifully located on Twin Lakes. In 1864 he enlisted in company E, Eleventh Minnesota Infantry Volunteers, and served till the close of the war. In 1866 he was married to Miss Kate Staffes. Their children are Fannie and Julia.

Page 288

James Archer

born in Washington county, New York, in 1822. He lived there fourteen years; then moved to Lake county, Illinois, and engaged in farming until 1854; then he went to Dakota county, Minnesota, and remained until 1865, when he went to Minneapolis, and started in the livery business, which he followed for seven, years. He then moved to Northfield, and built the Archer House. In 1878 he returned to Minneapolis, and in 1880 bought, and moved to his, present location. Married to second wife, Sarah D. Mouser, in 1873. They have three children.

Page 288

Levi Brigham

born in Canada East, January 18th, 1820. At nine years of age he moved to Burlington, Vermont. Remained there about six years; then went to Worcester, Massachusetts, and lived until 1855, when he came to Minnesota, and took a claim in Hennepin county. This he sold, and bought 140 acres two miles north of Osseo. Married, in 1843, to Miss Mary Cadora, of Massachusetts. They are the parents of four children.

Page 289

Otis H. Brown

was born in Hampshire county, Massachusetts, in 1811. He lived there nine years; then moved to Niagara county, New York. At the age of seventeen, he went to Pennsylvania, and engaged on the Pennsylvania Canal for sixteen years, when for a time he ran steamboats on the Ohio River. In 1854 he came to Hennepin county, took a claim near Osseo, sold it, and now owns a small place near the village. He settled here before the government survey, and was chairman of the Board that named Maple Grove.

Page 289

Thaddeus C. Capron

was born in Bristol county, Massachusetts, in 1821. He lived there until 1850; moved to Waterbury, Connecticut. In the spring of 1854 he came to Hennepin county, and settled in Minneapolis. In 1874, bought the farm oil which he now lives. Married, in 1847, to Adelia Prince, of Maine. They have had seven children, five of whom are now living.

Page 289

E. H. Chandler

was born in Oxford county, Maine, in 1839. He moved to Minnesota in 1854, and settled in Minneapolis where he remained for eight years; then he removed to Osseo. Enlisted in 1861 in Co. D, 1st Minn. He was crippled for a short time at the first battle of Bull Run; he served three years, and was discharged at Fort Snelling. He was married in 1865, to Sarah Curtis. They have five children living.

Page 289

S. P. Chipman

a native of Maine, was born in Oxford county in 1823. He lived there thirty years, his occupation being farming. He moved to La Fayette county, Wisconsin, for three and one-half years; then to Ripley county, Indiana, where he remained eleven years. In the spring of 1868 he came to Hennepin county; in the fall he was appointed superintendent of the county poor farm, and had charge of it for about four years. He finally settled in Litchfield, Meeker county, and was engaged in wheat buying for eight years. In 1880 he bought his present farm and located in Brooklyn. He enlisted in Co. A, 83d Ind. Inf. as Captain, in August, 1862; was twice wounded at Vicksburg, May 19, 1863. The first wound was from a spent ball, which struck him in the forehead; was soon after struck in the foot, and taken to the hospital, where he remained until he could be taken home. He was granted a furlough until able to take his place, when he was promoted to Lieutenant Col. of the 83d. He was honorably discharged at Huntsville, Alabama, April 26, 1864. In 1854, he was married to Achsa Cutler, of Franklin county, Maine. They have had three children. One is now living.

Page 289

Andrew J. Coulter

was born in Washington county, Maine, in 1830. He spent three years on a coasting vessel, and one year in California. Came to Minnesota in 1855 and took a claim on Rum River which he sold in 1856. He lived three years at Minneapolis; took a claim it Fort Snelling and held it until 1866, when he came to Brooklyn and bought 305 acres. He now has 146 acres. Married in 1854 to Lois M. Johnson. They have six children.

Page 289

N. Crooker

born in Limerick, York county, Maine, in 1826. At eleven years of age he moved with his parents to Oxford county, Maine. He spent some time in Massachusetts, and May 10th, 1854, came to St. Anthony. He bought a claim in Brooklyn on which he has since lived. He was married in 1853 to Esther A. Reidhead. Their children are: John and Charles. Mr. Crooker was one of the first settlers in the eastern part of the town.

Page 289

Henry Curtis

was born in Cook county, Illinois, October, 1844. He came with his father in 1855 to Brooklyn, where he has since made his home. Enlisted in 1862 in Company D., Sixth Minnesota. Served three years and was honorably discharged in 1865 at Fort Snelling. Married in 1869 to Susie E. Thayer. They have two children.

Page 289

John M. Durnam

was born in New Brunswick, April 11th, 1820. In 1844 he moved to Bangor, and engaged as contractor and builder for about four years. From there he went to Lewiston, in the same business. In 1852, he came to Minnesota, and settled in St. Anthony. In the fall of 1852, in company with Mr. George T. Vail, he started the first sash and door factory in St. Anthony. Followed this business for two years. In the fall of 1854 he moved to his claim, seven miles above Minneapolis; rented it in 1867, and returned to Minneapolis. He built a residence there, and lived in it for four years; then went to his farm for a short time, and again returned to Minneapolis, where he built another house, and lived there five years. Then, in 1876, he went back to the farm to live. He has been Justice of the Peace and Supervisor. In 1853, he was married to Louisa M. Reidhead. She has borne him five children: Maurice M., George A., Jessie, A. B., and De Witt C. Jessie and De Witt C. died in infancy.

Page 290

W. H. Gaslin

was born in Maine, December 8th, 1813. He lived there until 1853, when he moved to Ohio, and engaged in railroad contracting. In 1854, moved to Kentucky, where he was largely engaged in building railroads. In 1862 he bought horses for the government. He came to Minneapolis in 1866, engaged in business, and continued, until 1875; then went in the book trade, firm of Gaslin, Wales & Co., and remained until January, 1878, when he moved to his present residence on the Mississippi, twelve miles north of Minneapolis. Married, in June 1835, to Harriet Monk, of Maine. They have adopted two children; only one is now living.

Page 290

W. H. Goodrich

was born in Carroll county, New Hampshire November 21st, 1844. When ten years of age he came to Hennepin county with his father, who took a claim in Brooklyn, and was afterward killed by a falling tree. W. H. bought eighty acres in Brooklyn, in 1865. He was married in July 1864, to Mary A. Gibbs. They have five children: J. Albert, William A., Eugene H., Eva L. and Milo E.

Page 290

W. H. Goodwin

was born in New Brunswick, June 4th, 1812. He moved with his parents to Calais, Maine, where he lived until he came to Hennepin county, in 1851, and took a claim in what is now the center of the city of Minneapolis. He lived there sixteen years. In 1867 he moved to his present location at Brooklyn Centre. Married to Susan H. Fletcher, August 16th, 1845. They have three children living: A. J., Harriet A. and Bertha F.

Page 290

John W. Goodale

born in Liverpool, July 24th, 1803. Came to America when seven years of age. Lived in New Brunswick a short time; then went to Maine. Finally settled in Brooklyn, in 1853, and has since made it his home, with the exception of three years spent in Crystal Lake. Married in Penobscot county, Maine, in 1831, to Nancy R. Willis. Nine children have been born to them, four of whom are now living.

Page 290

M. A. Green

a native of Pennsylvania, was born July 22d, 1818. When twenty-one years of age, he moved to Belleville, Illinois, where he , worked at saddlery and farming. He enlisted in 1846, for the Mexican war, in Company G, second Illinois, served one year, and was wounded at the battle of Buena Vista. In 1862 he settled in Brooklyn, Minnesota, where he has since lived. Married in November 1847, to Margaret Jared. They have eight children living: Alexander N., Duff D., Benjaman E., Mary E., Sarah C., Margaret O., William.H. and Frederick A.

Page 290

C. W. Harrison

born in Essex county, New York, in 1825. He remained there engaged in farming until 1871, when he came to Minnesota, and settled in Minneapolis, being part of the time in the lumber trade, and finally moved to his farm in Brooklyn. Married in 1852, Ruth A. Stickney. They have two children, Abbie A. and Clifton D. Abbie was married January 1877, to William Sloan; Clifton married Elva Moscript in 1879.

Page 290

Asa Howe

born in Washington county, Maine, in 1819. He lived there until 1853, when he came to Hennepin county, and bought a claim of one hundred and sixty acres, near what is now known as Brooklyn Centre. Mr. Howe was married in 1834.

Page 290

C. R. Howe

was born in Washington county, Maine, in 1848 ; moved with his parents to Hennepin county, in 1853, where he has since resided; was appointed postmaster of Brooklyn Centre in 1873, and opened a stock of general merchandise at that place in 1875; married in 1871, to Clara M. Butts. Two children have been born to them.

Page 290

Sylvanus Jenkins

was born in Vermont, March 6th, 1818,and lived there twenty years. He then moved to Washington county, Maine, and lived thirteen years. He was married in 1840, to Eunice R. Noyes. Came to Hennepin county in 1851, and his family followed in 1852, He took a claim on Jenkins Prairie; sold it in 1865, and moved to Dakota county, and bought 1,000 acres; sold this also, and now lives near Farmington, Minnesota. They have seven children.

Page 291

N. H. Jenkins

was born in Caledonia county, Vermont, in 1820. He lived there twenty-three years; lived in Washington county, Maine, eight years; engaged in teaching part of the time. In 1851 he came to St. Anthony, Minnesota, and lived about two years, when he took a claim on Jenkins Prairie; he lived there fourteen years, then sold it, and moved to Minneapolis, where he lived two years. In 1869 he moved to Brooklyn. He was married in 1850, to Emily R. Hanson. They have five children living.

Page 291

Oscar A. Kelly

born in Adrian, Michigan, in 1853. Moved with his parents to Hennepin county in 1853. His father who took a claim near Osseo, was born in Ireland, moved to Canada in 1847 and finally settled in this county in 1854. Oscar was married to Jessie M. Meddey in March, 1879. They have one child.

Page 291

Jacob Longfellow

one of the oldest settlers of Brooklyn, was born in Washington county, Maine, October 6th, 1811. He resided in his native state engaged in lumbering until 1850, when he came to St. Anthony, and in 1853 moved to what is now Brooklyn, and entered his claim. Mr. Longfellow states that in early days, at a Fourth of July picnic at St. Anthony, the whole community was present and the total number was less than one hundred. He was married in 1838, at Machias, Maine, to Jane Getchell. Their children are four boys and four girls, all living in the west. Mrs. Longfellow died in the spring of 1880. Mr. L. is a hale old man, and in the enjoyment of good health.

Page 291

S. W. Merrill

born in Carroll county, New Hampshire, August 17th, 1843. When eighteen years old he came with his parents to Brooklyn, Minnesota. His father died here in 1862, and his mother in June, 1871. He enlisted August, 1862, in Company A, Ninth Minnesota Infantry Volunteers. Served among the Indians one year, then went south, being gone one year and seven months. He was taken sick at Rolla, Missouri, and was honorably discharged at Jefferson Barracks, March 31st, 1865, when he returned to his farm where he has since resided. Married in 1865 to Emma Pomeroy. They have three children living: Georgie A., Albert J. and Fred.

Page 291

Jacob Myers

born in Pennsylvania, 1808, where he lived until he moved to Hennepin county, Minnesota, May, 1866, and settled in Brooklyn. Married June 8th, 1836, to Susan M'Cammon; had seven children, two of whom died in service during the rebellion. Peter was taken prisoner at Drury's Bluff, sent to Andersonville and died in prison June 23d, 1864. John was killed at the battle of Hatcher's Run, February 6th, 1865. Five children are now living.

Page 291

J. W. Norris

born in Lincoln county, Maine, April 20th, 1840. Made that his home until 1855, then followed the sea until 1861, and came with the family the same year to Hennepin county. August 1864, enlisted in Company F, Eleventh Minnesota Infantry, and served until honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1865, when he settled on the farm he now owns. Married in November 1869, to Seleda Longfellow. They have four children: James A., Alice R., Jacob L. and Mary F.

Page 291

Robert W. Norris

born in Lincoln county, Maine, May 23, 1848. He lived there until seven years of age. His father, Captain Joseph Norris, being a sea captain, he went on the ocean with him for six years. The family came to Hennepin county in 1861. Robert, married Lizzie Longfollow, February 8th, 1855. They have three children, William F., Daniel W. and Robert W.

Page 291

George W. Pomeroy

born in Penobscot county, Maine, in 1838. He lived there eighteen years, and moved with his parents to Anoka county, Minnesota, stayed there four years, and located in Brooklyn in 1862. He was married the same year to Mary M. Talcot. They have one child. Mr. Pomeroy enlisted in Company A, Ninth Minnesota Infantry, in 1862; was taken prisoner at Guntown, Mississippi, June 11th, 1864, and was confined at Andersonville three months, Savannah and Camp Lawton three months and at Florence three months; was sent to Parole Camp, Saint Louis, received a furlough for thirty days, and was honorably discharged in 1865; since which time he has made Brooklyn his home.

Page 291

Seth P. Pribble

born in Kennebec county, Maine, June 13, 1832. He lived there fifteen years, then in Essex county a few years, and then returned to his parents home for two years. In 1858 he located in Brooklyn, Minnesota. In 1864 he enlisted in Company F, Eleventh Minnesota Infantry, and served until honorably discharged at Fort Snelling, in 1865. Married Mary A. Smith in 1861. They have four children. Charles A., Mary E., Evaline E. and Edith E.

Page 292

George W. Savage

born in Lenawee county, Michigan, in 1844. He lived there until 1861, when he enlisted in Company F, Eleventh Michigan Infantry, and served three years. He lost two fingers at the battle of Mission Ridge, and was wounded in the left thigh by a minnie ball at Atlanta. He was honorably discharged at Chattanooga, Tennessee, November 24th, 1864. In the year 1865 he came to Minnesota, and located near Osseo. He has married twice, and has had four children. His present wife was Sarah Whitney, whom he married in 1876.

Page 292

Christian Schreiber

born in Prussia, March 17, 1834. Came to America in 1856, and settled in Cook county, Ill., and engaged in the lime trade. In 1858 he located in Meeker county, Minnesota, took a claim, but abandoned it in 1860, and came to Brooklyn, where he now has 240 acres. He has been Town Supervisor and school officer. Married in 1862 to Dora Lent. They have five children living: Matilda, Minnie, Mary, Emma and Otto C.

Page 292

George Setzler

a native of Germany, was born in 1832. He came to America in 1847, and settled in Huron county, Ohio, and worked there eleven years at the cooper's trade. In 1859 he came to Minnesota and settled in Maple Grove, where he lived ten years; then sold, and located in Brooklyn near Osseo, where he now lives. Married in 1866, Mary Cahm. They have eight children.

Page 292

Robert J. Smart

born in Penobscot county, Maine, in 1840. Enlisted August 16, 1861, in company B, Eighth Maine. He was wounded by a minnie ball, in the right side, May 20, 1864, which kept him in the hospital until October, when he joined his company at Harrison, Virginia. Was honorably discharged June 27, 1865. Came to Minnesota in 1867, and located in Minneapolis, for three years, then bought a farm in Brooklyn where he has since resided. Married in 1867, to Hattie Carr.

Page 292

A. J. Smith

born in Lenawee county, Michigan, in 1844. He came to Hennepin county in 1854, and now lives on the claim taken by his father. He was clerk in the Paymaster's Department in the summer of 1864; was on the boat when it was attacked by Guerrillas, and D. C. Smith was killed at Fort Randolph. He was elected to represent his district in the House in 1876, and re-elected in 1878. He married in 1864; in 1867, Mrs. Smith died, leaving two children. In 1869 he married Georgia I. Russel. They have had five children, four are now living.

Page 292

George H. Smith

was born in Albany, New York, in 1843, and moved with his parents to Lenawee county, Michigan, where he lived until eleven years of age; he then came to Hennepin county, his father taking a claim in Brooklyn. He enlisted in 1861, in Co. D, 1st Minn., and served until honorably discharged at Falmouth, Virginia, in 1863. Married the same year, to Frances I. Thomas, who died in 1876. They have three children living.

Page 292

Harris N. Smith

was born in Piscataquis county, Maine, in l830. Here he lived for four years, then moved with his parents to Penobscot county, and remained there until he went to St. Anthony, in 1850. In 1855 he came to Brooklyn, and took a claim, upon which he has since resided. Married in 1857, to Mary J. Flanders. They have two children living.

Page 292

Edward Spafford

was born in Orleans county, Vermont in 1852, and lived there twenty-one years. He was educated at the Normal School of Randolph. In 1874 he moved to Rock Island, Illinois, where he taught school two years then came to Brooklyn, Minnesota, in 1876, and taught school three years. In 1879 was married to Belle, Ryan, of this town.

Page 292

William Stevens

was born in Nova Scotia, in 1820, and lived there until twenty years of age; then resided in Aroostook county, Maine, four years, engaged in lumbering. Came to Minnesota in 1850, and went into lumbering on Rum River. At the expiration of one year he entered a store in St. Anthony, where he remained for three years. In 1854 he began trading at Mille Lacs Post, where he remained for eleven years, and in 1865 settled on his present location in Brooklyn. Married, May 20th, 1865, to Ellen Smith. They have had five children. Those now living are: William W., Robert, Elthea, Clifton and Laura G.

Page 292

A. A. Thayer

was born in Lenawee county Michigan, December 28th, 1848. He lived there until he came to Minnesota with his parents, in 1854. Enlisted in Company C, 7th Minnesota, February 11th, 1865, and served until the close of the war. Was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling, August 16th, 1865. Married his second wife, Carrie Hill, in 1877. They have one child, Elsie May. Mr. Thayer's first wife bore him two children: William and David L.

Page 293

J. J. Tschudy

a native of Switzerland, was born in 1832. Came to America in 1861, and located in Peoria county, Illinois. Remained there only four months; then came to Minnesota, and. settled in Maple Grove. In 1869 he removed to Brooklyn. He is now treasurer of school district No. 33. Married Mary Hanser for his second wife. He has three children: Jacob, John and Mary ; the two former by his first marriage.

Page 293

W. W. Wales Jr.

was born in North Carolina, in 1828. He moved with his parents to Wayne county, Indiana, and when nine years of age, removed to Hancock county, thence to Henry county, where they remained seven years; then returned to Hancock county and remained five years. In 1853 he came to Hennepin county, and took a claim in Brooklyn township and has since resided here. In 1861 he was married to Miss Sarah E. Gant. They have two children, Flora Helen and Laura Elvina.

Page 293

C. H. Ward

was born in Merrimac county, New Hampshire, in 1833. He moved to Hennepin county in 1854, and took a claim in Brooklyn; he now has two hundred acres. In 1875, he was elected county Commissioner, took his seat in 1876, and has held the office for five years; was also Assessor for three years. Married in 1855, to Mrs. M. A. Ward. They have two children.

Page 293

Thomas Warwick

a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, was born December 26th, 1826. Moved with his parents to Nova Scotia, where he lived until seventeen years of age; was lumbering in New Brunswick two years, and in Penobscot three years. Went to St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1850, coming to St. Paul by steamer from Dubuque, Iowa. On arriving at St. Paul, chartered a lumber wagon to bring himself and family to St. Anthony. He then went to exploring pine lands, and engaged in the lumber trade for seven years; was one season on Rum river, and two on the St. Croix and Chippewa, he now lives on a claim eight miles north of Minneapolis. Married Mary E. Smith.

Page 293

George Wethern

was born in Somerset county, Maine, in 1841, and lived there seventeen years; came to Minnesota in 1858, and enlisted August 14, 1862, in Company A, Ninth Minnesota Infantry; served until October, 1863, under General Sibley against the Indians, then went south; came back and was honorably discharged in St. Paul, July 1865. He went to Pierce county, Wisconsin, for one year, then returned to Hennepin county. In March, 1867, he married Amanda Wilson, and located in Pierce county, Wisconsin, in 1868; but returned to Minnesota in 1875 and settled in Brooklyn, where he has since resided. They have had six children, four are now living.

Page 293

Dr. A. D. Williams

was born in Bennington county, Vermont, in 1826. He moved with his mother to Eaton county, Michigan, and lived there twelve years. Received his collegiate and theological education at Rochester University, and Theological seminary at Rochester, New York, graduating from the University in 1855, and the Seminary in 1857. He then took charge of Smyrna, Michigan, Baptist church, and was next Pastor of Almont Baptist church for six years. In 1866 he came to Faribault, Minnesota, engaging in home missionary work with different churches until 1870; then came to Brooklyn and was pastor of the Baptist church here and in Maple Grove for two years. He studied medicine and began to practice Homeopathy at Almont, Michigan. He has practiced medicine at Brooklyn Centre for the past seven years. Dr. Williams was married in 1857, to Helen M. Gaskin, of New York. They have two children living.

Page 293

John Williams

was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1851, and lived there until 1862. He came to Hennepin county in 1868, and settled in Brooklyn, where he has since resided. In 1875 he married Ida M. Thomas of this county; they have three children.

Page 293

Christian Wolter

a native of Germany, was born September 22, 1836. He came to America, in 1863, and enlisted the same year in company A, Hatches Independent Battalion Minnesota Volunteers, and served against the Indians nearly three years ; was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling. In 1866 he came to Osseo, where he now resides; has 200 acres of land. Married in 1867 to Francis Zimmerman; they have five children: Leopold, Rosa, Dora, William and Lillie.

Page 296

H. C. Black

born in New Hanover county, North Carolina, in 1845. He learned the trade of wagon making. In 1875 he came to Hennepin county, settled in Osseol and established a wagon shop, taking E. H. Chandler as partner; this partnership was dissolved in 1879, and Mr. Black prosecuted the business alone until 1880, when he took two partners. In 1868 he was married to Julia Hancock. They have five children now living.

Page 296

Seneca Brown

born in Rutland county, Vermont, in 1826. Moved to Niagara county, and lived eighteen years, then to Lenawee, Michigan, where he learned the wagon and carpenter's trade. He came to Hennepin county, and settled in Maple Grove. Established his wagon shop in Osseo, in 1876. In 1854 he married Elizabeth Willetts. They have four living children.

Page 296

Eli Haviland

was born in Lenawee county, Michigan in 1836. He came to Hennepin county in 1857, settled near Osseo and started blacksmithing here in 1859. He enlisted in 1862 in Company F, Minnesota Mounted Rangers; served nine months and was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling. He sold his interest in the shop and began farming, followed it a short time, and then was engaged in mercantile business for one year in Osseo; he afterward went back to his old trade in Champlin for three years, and finally located at Osseo in 1879. He was married in 1855 to Lavina Lee. They have two children living.

Page 296

Chancy Haviland

was born in Lenawee county, Michigan in 1843. When the war broke out he enlisted in Company A, Fourth Michigan Cavalry. Was under Grant and Sherman, and was with the latter in his march to the sea. He was honorably discharged at Nashville, Tennessee in 1864, and re-enlisted in the Third Michigan Light Artillery, Battery C, and served till the close of the war. He was in Washington at the Grand Review, and was honorably discharged at Detroit, Michigan. He went to Indianapolis, Indiana, learned the profession of railroad engineer and followed it for eight years. Came to Minnesota and settled in Champlin, where he worked as engineer; also in Anoka in the same business, and finally settled in Osseo. In 1861 he married Martha Powers. They have one child living: Etta.

Page 296

John Hechtman

a native of Germany, was born in 1828, and came to America in 1832. He settled in Erie, Pennsylvania, and lived there until 1849, when he went to California for two years; returned to Erie, and in 1857 came to Minneapolis. When the war broke out he was in Pennsylvania looking after his oil interests; he enlisted with the three months men, afterwards with the three years men in the Eighty-third Pennsylvania regiment; was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness in 1864, and honorably discharged at Harrisburgh, September 1864. He established the present general store at Osseo in 1865. Married his second wife, Augusta Schmidt in 1869, by whom he has had five children. Two sons were born to him by his first wife; both are now in Colorado.

Page 296

Rev. A. Ladriere

was born at Levis, near Quebec, in 1826, and was educated at Quebec Seminary. He was assistant at St. Thomas Parish one year, also at Levis one year, then three years at St. Roch, and was pastor at St. Fabian fifteen years ; then at Isle Verte five years; He came to Osseo in 1876, and took charge of the St. Louis church at this place.

Page 297

E. Lefebvre

born in the province of Quebec, in 1845, and lived there twelve years; then moved to Clinton county, New York, and learned the shoe trade, which business engaged most of his time until he came to Osseo, in l865. In 2873, he established his present stock of general merchandise, having clerked here for eight years, previous to that time. He was married in 1869 to Celina Normandin. They have three children.

Page 297

S. N. Pavitt

was born in London, England, in 1830, and came with his parents to America in 1832. He went to the province of Quebec, and remained there until 1846, when he moved to New York City, and learned the harness trade. He came to Minnesota in 1855; located in the harness trade at Minneapolis. In 1862 he enlisted in Co. B, 6th Minn. Vols. and served nearly three years, being honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1865. October, 1867, he came to Osseo, and started his harness shop. He has since resided here. Married in 1857, to Adeline Buck. They have three children now living.

Page 297

N. J. Pinault, M. D.

was born in the province of Quebec, in 1848, where he lived until 1877. Received his collegiate education at Rirnouski and St. Anne; graduated an M. D. at the University Laval, Quebec, receiving the first prizes from the faculty, prize Seivell and prize Morrin of 1874. His diploma from the University Laval is also from the Royal College of Surgeons, of London. After his studies he made an extensive tour in Europe, and while there had great opportunities to perfect his education. He first practiced medicine at Rimouski. In 1877 he came to Osseo, and has since followed his profession here.

Page 297

J. T. Pribble

a native of Maine, was born in 1830; moved to Hennepin county in 1855, and settled in Brooklyn. He was educated at Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine. In 1861 he was elected County Superintendent of Schools, and held the office six years. He has been principal of Osseo graded school for eight years. In 1854 he married Elmira E. Norris, of Maine. Five children have been born to them.

Page 297

Nelson Rougier

was born in Montreal, in 1813. At the age of three years he removed with his parents to Kankakee, Illinois; thence to Belle Prairie, Minnesota, in 1856. Ten years later he came to Osseo, and started a wagon shop. He was married in 1833, to Rosa Begnoche, of Canada. They have five children living.

Page 297

Fritz Schmidt

Was born in Germany, in 1851. Came to America in 1867, and settled at Osseo, Hennepin county, Minnesota. He built the International Hotel, in 1874. It is two stories high, with a capacity for thirty guests. He owns and conducts it. He married, in 1875, Sophia Oswald.

Page 297

De Witt Clinton Smith

born in Orleans county, New York, in 1825. He lived there about twenty years; then went to Adrian, Michigan. He was married, at Addison, Michigan to Melissa E. Shepard, in 1874. In 1857 he came to Hennepin county, and bought a farm near Osseo. He enlisted, in 1861, in Company D, 1st, Minnesota, and was appointed second Lieutenant. After the first Bull-Run battle he was promoted Captain of the company. He was severely wounded at the battle of Antietam. Mrs. Smith, after many heroic efforts, found him at Hagerstown, Maryland, and succeeded in bringing him to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. After resting a few weeks they came home, and he was honorably discharged shortly after. He was appointed State Librarian by Governor Miller, and while Librarian was appointed Major of the Pay Department. He was finally killed at Fort Randolph, the boat being decoyed into that point by a party of guerillas, who shot and killed him. One child was born, Eugene A., living near Benson.

Page 297

David B. Thayer

was born in Seneca county, New York, in 1822. In 1847 he moved to Lenawee county, Michigan, and married Catherine Warren. He came to Hennepin county in 1854, and settled near Osseo, on a claim of 160 acres, which is still owned by Mrs. Thayer. Mr. Thayer died at Osseo, August 31, 1873. Four children were born to them. A. A. Thayer, their son, enlisted in 1863, in 7th Minn., as drummer boy, when 16 years old; being taken sick at, Montgomery, Alabama, he returned home, and was honorably discharged.

Page 297

E. Wellman

was born in Dayton, Hennepin county, Minnesota, in 1855. He learned the blacksmith trade with Eli Haviland at Osseo. On November 3d, 1878, he was married to Delora Haviland, who was born in Maple Grove, Minnesota. They have one child: Lorissa.

Page 300

Colby Emery

one of the oldest settlers in Champlin, was born in 1822, in Oxford county, Maine, where he resided, with the exception of some time passed in the hotel business in Boston and New York, until 1853, when he came to Minnesota. He at once preempted a claim of 160 acres, and has since resided in this town engaged in farming. He now owns 120 acres of fine land. He was married, July 2,1855, to Ruth Blaisdell, of Tamworth Iron Works, Carron county, New Hampshire. She died, January 1875. The family record is, James R. born in 1856; Charles B., 1857; Zenus B. 1863, died 1870; Anna G., born 1869.

Page 300

William Fullerton

was born at Hopewell, Maryland, in 1819. His parents removed to Pennsylvania when he was two years of age, and he remained there until 1833, when he removed to Ohio, residing in Lower Sandusky four years, and in Lucas county, until 1866, employing himself in carpenter work and farming. In the spring of 1864, he enlisted in Company G, First Ohio Sharpshooters, and was afterwards attached to the 60th Ohio. He was wounded in the hand, losing a finger at Petersburgh, Virginia, in 1864; and was honorably discharged at Washington, D. C., in 1865. In 1866 he came to Champlin where he has since resided. He was married in 1848, to Martha Crosby, of Ohio. They have four children.

Page 300

J. B. Hinkley

was born in Geauga county, Ohio in 1818. He received his education at the Genesee Western Seminary, near Rochester, New York, graduating in 1839. He then began teaching winters, passing his summers on a farm. In 1854 he came to Hennepin county, and resided in Minneapolis one year, then removed to Dayton township where he took a claim of 160 acres near Diamond Lake, remaining there nine years. In 1857 and 1858 Mr. Hinkley was a member of the legislature, during which time, Minnesota was admitted as a state. He held the office of County Commissioner a number of years, and had charge of the county poor farm for three years, dating from 1864. He then returned to Minneapolis where he remained until 1878, when he came to Champlin and has since resided here, engaged in farming. Mr. Hinkley has held the office of justice of the peace, excepting a short time, since he came to this county, and was census enumerator of Dayton township in 1880. He was married in 1844 to Miss S. S. Moore. They have two children.

Page 301

Robert H. Miller

is a native of Oxford county, Maine, where he remained until twenty-three years of age; then removed to New Hampshire. He was married in Conway, New Hampshire, January, 1848, to Sarah R. Hill, and removed to Waterford, Maine, where their only living son, Orange S., was, born September 6th, 1849. In 1852, Mr. Miller came to St. Anthony, Minnesota, where he remained one year, thence to Anoka and after a few months residence there, made a claim on the west side of the river in what is now Dayton. In 1856 he came to Champlin and bought a number of town lots, also the hotel now owned by Mr. Thorndyke, which he conducted for seven years. When he first came to Minnesota he made a squatters claim, on the west side of the river, the present site of Minneapolis. Mr. Miller learned the trade of carriage maker, in Maine, which business he engaged in for many years in Champlin. He held the office of post-master from 1860 to 1867. The son, Orange S., resides with his parents. He was married to Miss Mary E. Wiley. They have one son.

Page 301

G. D. Miars

is a native of Nova Scotia where he was born in 1816. At the age of eleven years he went to sea and followed that occupation fourteen years. He then resided in Canada three years, and in Maine, where he was engaged in farming. He came to Hennepin county in 1856 and purchased a claim of eighty acres in the town of Crystal Lake. In 1866 he removed to Anoka county, and three years later came to Champlin, where he has since resided, engaged in the pursuit of farming. He was married in 1852, to Syrene Pratt, a native of Penobscot county, Maine. They have had nine children, eight of whom are living.

Page 301

Turner Pribble

was born in Kennebec county, Maine, July 4th, 1836. At the age of twenty, he came to Hennepin county, locating in the town of Brooklyn. In 1860 he purchased a farm of fifty-five acres, which he disposed of in 1865, and the next year bought forty acres in the same town. He resided in Brooklyn until 1877, excepting the time he was absent in the army. In April, 1861 he enlisted for three months, and re-enlisted November, 1861 in the First Minnesota Infantry. At Petersburg, Virginia, he was taken prisoner and held ten months. He was honorably discharged July 20th, 1865. He came to Champlain in 1877 and has resided here since, engaged in farming. He was married in 1870, to Leila A. Coy, who was born in Maine in 1851. They have one child, Martha Irene born in 1875.

Page 301

J. W. Reeves

was born in Butler county, Ohio, in 1842, and remained in his native state until 1865, when he came to Minnesota, and located in Ramsey county, near St. Paul. In 1877 he came, to Champlin, purchased a farm of forty acres, and has since resided in this town. In 1863 Mr. Reeves enlisted in Company D, 2d Ohio Heavy Artillery, and served until honorably discharged, in 1865, coming west the same year.

Page 301

J. H. Trussel

is a native of New Hampshire, born in New London, Merrimac county, September 26th, 1828. He resided in his native town ten years, then to Wilmot, N. H., and remained there until twenty-one years of age, when he went to Concord, and remained five years. In the fall of 1855, he came to Hennepin county, and made a claim of 160 acres in Brooklyn. Remained on it one year; then removed to Champlin, where he has since resided. In 1871, he sold his farm in Brooklyn. He has held the office of Supervisor several times, also Assessor and Treasurer. Married in 1857, Mary E. Hill, who was born in Carroll county, New Hampshire in 1831, and came with her parents to this county in 1853. They have bad five children, three of whom are living.

Page 305

William Dugas

one of the pioneers of Hennepin county, was born at Three Rivers, Canada, .May 17th, 1809. He learned the trade of millwright, and at the age of twenty-two went to New York city, then started for Africa, engaging as ship-carpenter. At New Orleans he abandoned the trip, as his ship did not sail. He then came up the Mississippi river to Saint Louis, thence to Chicago, and after a stay there of four years, went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, via the Missouri river, with Bourbonais, who had charge of the Pottawattamie Indians. Then returned to Chicago, and had charge of a crew of men on the canal then being opened there. Three years later, he removed to Galena, Illinois, and then went to Prarie du Chien, Wisconsin, where he married Sophia Stromm, who died twenty-one months later, leaving one child, Charles, who is now town clerk of Dayton. In the spring of 1844 he removed to Saint Paul, where he remained over two years, and married in January 1846, Miss Susanna Raiche. The same year he made a claim at Saint Anthony, near Cheever's claim, which he afterwards sold to Franklin Steele. He returned to Saint Paul in May, 1849, and was elected to the Territorial Legislature the following fall. After remaining in Saint Paul two years, engaged in the hotel business, he sold out, returned to Saint Anthony, and established a ferry about half a mile above the present upper bridge. He and others, procured a charter for a bridge, but it was not built. In 1867 he sold the ferry and moved to Bottineau Prairie, and engaged in farming until 1866, when he removed to Dayton, where he has since resided. His second wife bore him three children, two of whom are living: John, aged twenty-three, and Louis, aged twenty-one.

Page 305

Nicholas Engel

was born in Prussia, in 1820. Learned the trade of shoemaking. He was drafted into the army at twenty, and served two years. He emigrated to America in 1852, and settled at Port Washington, Wisconsin, working at Ms trade. Moved to Plattsmouth, Nebraska, in 1858, and followed his trade. In 1875, went to Frankfort, Wright county, and in 1876 came to Dayton. Has held the office of Justice of the Peace for two years. Married, in 1863, to Catharine Schluentz. They have had five children, four are now living.

Page 305

F. Gamache

born in Canada, in 1830. Moved to Michigan in 1850, and engaged in mining, three years. He located on his present farm in 1854. Married in 1852, Margaret Gandrow, who died in 1864. He was married again, in 1867, to Julia Lambert. They have had eight children. He has been Town Supervisor and School Director. He is one of the pioneers of this town. His was the first team brought to Dayton.

Page 305

R. R. Hurlbut

born in Vermont, in 1830. Followed railroading when young. He was married in 1852, to Mary Stebbins, and moved to Minnesota in 1855. Located in Hassan for one year; thence to Dayton, where he engaged in mercantile business for two years. Located where he now lives in 1870, a fine location in Wright county, opposite Dayton. Purchased, in 1878, one-half interest in the Dayton Flour Mills, which, with his farm, occupies his entire attention. He has two children: William F. and Rodman R.

Page 305

William F. Hurlbut

son of R. R. Hurlbut, was born in Vermont, in 1853. He remained with his parents until 1870, when he entered the State University at Minneapolis, at the same time taking a commercial course. Returned to Dayton in 1874 and purchased a half interest in the Dayton Flour Mills, and also carried on a general merchandising business in connection with his milling. In 1880 he married Jennie E. Nixon, of Pennsylvania.

Page 306

N. McNeil

was born in Scotland, in 1830. In 1831 he emigrated with his parents to America. He moved to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1852, and worked three years in the Navy Yard. Moved to Minnesota in 1856, and lived in St. Paul one year, when he moved to Dayton and worked seven years for Lyman Dayton. In 1863, joined Gen. Thomas' command, was mustered out in 1865, and returned to Dayton and engaged in the stock business. He married, in 1857, Sarah Sweeney. They have had nine children. Mr. McNeil held the office of Supervisor ten years, and was Constable for seven years.

Page 306

Charles Mayer

was born in Germany in 1818, where he taught school for twenty years. He emigrated to America in 1856, and settled in St. Bernard, Ohio, and taught school two years; then taught eight years in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, four years at Utica, and three years in Jefferson City, Missouri. He is the organist at the Catholic church in Dayton, and also teaches music. Married the first time, in 1842, to Veronica Seiberlich, who died in 1856. Married again to Kate Oberle. He has six children living.

Page 306

George Slater

born in England, in 1821. Emigrated to America, and settled in Gloversville, Fulton county, New York, in 1824. Worked at glove-making for twenty years. Moved to Minnesota, and settled in Dayton, in 1856, and commenced the manufacture of gloves and mittens. Enlisted in Company C, Independent Battalion, under General Hatch, in 1864, and was ordered to the frontier. Was mustered out in 1865. Returned to Dayton, and opened his farm. His health failing, he purchased the hotel which he now keeps. Married, in 1845 to Catharine Kelly. They have four children now living. Mr. Slater found many relics near the junction of the Crow and Mississippi rivers, which indicated that there had been, at some time, a French or Spanish settlement at that point.

Page 306

Abraham Twombley

was born in Canada, in 1808. Moved to Champlain, New York. Lived there several years. Married, at twenty-two, to Rosabel Rose. He moved to Bottineau Prairie in 1857, and lived with his wife in a tent three months. Sold his first claim on the Prairie, and bought one in the woods, where he has since lived. Mr. and Mrs. T. Celebrated their golden wedding, November 8th, 1880. They have 108 children and grandchildren.

Page 306

E. H. Robinson

a native of Gardiner, Maine, was born in 1829. He remained with his parents on the farm, until seventeen years of age; then learned the mason's trade. In 1849, he, with his brother, moved to Wisconsin, and worked at his trade during the summer, and in the pineries through the winter. In the fall of 1850, he returned to Maine, and the following year, his father and family moved to Wisconsin, locating in Portage county. In the spring of 1853, E. H. came to Minneapolis, and purchased twenty-five dollars worth of goods, which he hired a Frenchman to take up to the mouth of Crow River, in a canoe. They reached their destination in two days, and found but one white man, John Veine, of whom he secured the use of a log cabin for his store. He opened a trade with the Indians, whose reservation was on the west side of Crow River. In the spring of 1854, he succeeded in purchasing Veine's claim, which included the site of the present village of Dayton. Mr. Veine left, and Mr. Robinson was for ten months alone with the Indians, at whose hands he came near losing his life, on several occasions. He sold John Baxter one-half interest in his store, and in 1855, they sold Lyman Dayton, of St. Paul, an undivided interest in a portion of their land. In I856, they sold Mr. Dayton an interest in the water-power and land adjoining. In the fall of 1856, they erected a steam sawmill near the mouth of Crow River. Soon after, Mr. Robinson bought his partner's interest in the store, and in 1857, bought his interest in the mill. He then sold to Mr. Dayton his entire interest in the water-power, and the following spring, sold his stock of goods. In the fall of 1858, he purchased another stock of goods, and in 1861, took as partner in the milling business, Frank Crocker, and continued thus two years, when he bought Crocker's interest, and in 1866, sold the entire establishment to a firm who failed, and the mill was taken away. In 1870, he built a new steam saw-mill near the site of the old one. In 1877, he sold the mill to H. A. Bennett, and it was burned the following year. Mr. Robinson's wife was Mrs. Sarah Gilson of New York, whom he married in 1856. They have had three children; George H., Horace R. and Frank L.

Page 310

Aaron Hoag

A native of New Hampshire, was born in 1806. In 1835 he moved to Bangor, Maine, and followed teaming for twelve years; then he bought a farm at South Gardner, which he occupied for six years. In 1858 he came with his youngest daughter to Minnesota, prospecting and in 1859 bought part of the land he now lives on. The same year his family sold out and joined him. He married in 1830, Annie Wiggins. They have four children. His son Charles lives with him and was married December 1877, to Mary A. Inveen. Their children are George and Ida.

Page 310

Horatio Hawkins

a native of England, was born in 1827. He learned the trade of shoemaking. In 1853 he emigrated to America, moved to Minnesota and settled in Crystal Lake. In 1856 he came to Hassan, and in 1858 made a claim, where he has since lived. In 1864 he enlisted in Eleventh Minnesota, Company G, went south and was discharged in June, 1865. He was married in England to Martha Powell, in the year 1850. They have five children living.

Page 310

Jasper Hawkins

was born in England, in 1829. He emigrated to America in 1853, and moved directly to St. Anthony, where he worked as clerk eighteen months, for John G. Lennon. In 1854 he bought a claim in Crystal Lake, and held it fifteen months. Made a claim in Hassan in 1855, and has since lived here. In 1862 he enlisted in Ninth Minnesota, Com any B, was clerk in Quartermasters department a few months, and was then ordered to General Commandery Central District of Missouri; joined his regiment as clerk for Col. Marsh, until discharged at Davenport, Iowa, in 1865. He was married in 1869, to Alice M. Mattey. Four children, have been born to them.

Page 310

Freeman D. James

was born in Chautauqua county, New York, in 1822, where he lived twenty-seven years, much of the time engaged in lumbering. He went to California in 1853, met with considerable success, and returned to New York. In 1855 he came to Minnesota and settled in the town of Hassan, where he now lives. He has served the town as supervisor and constable. In September, 1864, he enlisted in Second Battery, Minnesota volunteers, was mustered out in July, 1865, at St. Paul, and returned o his farm. He married, in 1843, Mary B. Strong, who died February, 1876, leaving three children. Mr. James has done much for the cause of education.

Page 315

Martin Conzet

a native of Switzerland, was born in the year 1829, and emigrated to America in 1847. He worked at the carpenter's trade in Dubuque, Iowa, six years, removed to St Anthony in 1853, and worked at carpentry and cabinet-making until 1856, when he kept a boarding house. The same year he made a claim, where he now lives. He was elected constable at St. Anthony in 1855, and held the office two years; has held the office of town assessor ten years. At the Wright county fair, the family made forty-three entries and received eleven premiums. He was married in 1852, to Elizabeth Beauchlein. They have seven children.

Page 316

W. W. Hall

was born in Quebec, Canada, in 1832 ; moved to Minnesota in 1855, and settled on a farm in Independence; sold it in 1866, and bought the one he now occupies. During the Indian troubles he moved to Rockford and worked on the stockade, which was built for protection of the settlers. He assisted in organizing the town of Independence, and held the office of supervisor for two years, and one year in Greenwood. He is now manufacturing amber cane syrup. Married in 1854, to Harriet Bishop. They have nine children.

Page 316

Adam Hohenstein

Was born in Germany, in 1832, and emigrated to America in 1850. He was engaged three years in the baker's trade in New York; worked at farming in McHenry county, Illinois, three years; then moved to Minnesota in 1856, and located on his present farm. He has been town supervisor eleven years, town clerk seven years, and treasurer two years. He was drafted in 1864, and ordered to Company A, Third Minnesota; was mustered out in 1865. He was married in 1858, to Caroline Glaser. They have seven children living.

Page 316

George Hohenstein

was born in Germany in 1848, and came with his parents to this country four years later. They remained in Now York until 1854, when they removed to Illinois, and in 1861 came to Minnesota, and located on their present farm. He was married in 1873, to Miss Louisa Bechtle, of Germany. They have four children: Ida, Martha, Louisa and Christian. Mr. Hobenstein has held the office of constable for eight years.

Page 316

Carl Hafften

was born in Germany in 1828. H is father died in 1849, and in 1852, Carl went with his mother to Canada. In 1857, they moved to Minnesota, and settled in Greenwood, where he has since lived. He has a fine farm located near lakes Hafften and Scheudel. He has been engaged, for the past five seasons, in the manufacture of Amber Cane Syrup, turning out from eight hundred to one thousand gallons per year. In 1852, he married Maria Holtz of Germany. They have had sixteen children. Those living are: Charles, August, John, William, Louis, Albert, Robert, Emma, Frederick, Matilda, Henry and Mary.

Page 316

John Jacobs

one of the early settlers of this county, is a native of Wales, born in 1835. He emigrated to the United States, with his parents, in 1843, and located in Oneida county, New York, where his father died. He removed to Wisconsin in 1851, and engaged in lumbering until 1858, when he removed to Minneapolis, Minnesota. He enlisted in Comp. B, 6th Regt. Inf., and served against the Indians until 1864, when he went South, where he was taken sick, and mustered out. He was married in 1864, to Miss Matilda McKinley of Wright county. They have had four children, three of whom are living: William, Nettie and Belle. Lizzie R. died. Mr. Jacobs has held the office of town supervisor, two years.

Page 316

John O'Mera

was born in Vermont, in 1828. He moved to Minnesota in 1857, stopped in Minneapolis one year, and locating on his present farm in 1859, turned his attention to stock raising, to some extent. He has been town supervisor two years; Clerk fifteen years, and school clerk eighteen years. In 1855 he married Miss F. M. Emory. They have seven children.

Page 316

Albert Roberts

a native of Maine, was born in 1844. He enlisted in 1862, in Company C, twentieth Maine Regiment, was in the battles of White Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg and Cold Harbor. At the latter place he received a gun shot wound in the face, carrying the ball for nearly two months before it could be extracted. He graduated at Eastman's Commercial College, Poughkeepsie, New York, in 1866. Moved to Minnesota and settled on his present location. He has been chairman of the Board of Supervisors two years, assessor eight years, and was enumerator in 1875 and 1880. He married in 1868, Isabella M. McKindly. They have four children living.

Page 316

Ephriam Sipe

was born in Pennsylvania, in 1848. He moved to Minnesota in 1857, and remained with his parents until 1880, when he located on his present farm. He has held the offices of town supervisor one year, school director five years, and is Justice of the Peace at the present time. His school advantages were limited to a period of fifteen months, but by close application he has gained knowledge sufficient to fill the different offices with credit. In 1880 he married Margaret Husted, of Corcoran, who was born April 29th, 1863.

Page 319

Robert Adcock

A native of Norfolk, England, was born in 1827. He emigrated to America in 1849, and lived in Boston, Massachusetts, six years; he moved to Minnesota in 1855, made one of the first claims in Corcoran, and is now the oldest living settler in the town. In 1855 he was married to Margaret Burk. They have six children: Thomas F., Mary E., George W., John, Ruth M. and James.

Page 320

Octave Boucher

was born in Quebec, Canada, in 1842. He lived there until twelve years of age. In 1856 he came to Minnesota with his parents, who took a claim in Plymouth. He enlisted in 1863, in Hatch's Battallion, Company B, Minnesota Volunteers, and went north during the Indian outbreak, stayed three years, and was discharged at Fort Snelling in 1866. He bought the farm, in 1867, where he now lives. The same year he married Delaina Greenwood, by whom he has had five children.

Page 320

Patrick B. Corcoran

is a native of Ireland, where he was born in 1825. During the Irish famine he occupied the position of Government relief officer. In 1847 he emigrated to America; went to Maine and stayed about two years. In 1849 he went to New York, where, for five years he was engaged as sawyer in a lumber mill; while there, he lost his right hand. In 1855 he came to Minnesota and after prospecting for a time, located where he now lives. He was one of the first settlers in this town, which was named for him. In 1863 he started a store, and has been post master since that time. He built a new store in 1867, to accommodate his increasing business. Mr. Corcoran has filled the offices of Justice of the Peace for fourteen years, and Town Supervisor twelve years; he also organized and taught the first school in the town. Married in 1851, Anna Freehan. They have eight children.

Page 320

William Corcoran

a native of Cork county, Ireland, was born in 1821. In 1847 he came to America, landed in Boston, Massachusetts, and lived there two years; moved to Buffalo, New York, and stayed one year, then moved to Minnesota in 1855, and located in Corcoran, where he now lives. He has filled all offices of trust in the town. In 1854 he was married to Catherine Crawford, by whom he has had five children, four are now living. In 1863 Mrs. Corcoran died, and in 1866 he married Mary Burke.

Page 320

Dennis Daniel

was born in Montreal, Canada, in 1825. In 1842 he, moved to Vermont where he worked ten years at farming. In 1852 he went to Canada again and stayed one year. Came to Minnesota in 1853, and worked on the river at Stillwater three years, then went to Arkansas, and was engaged in lumbering three years. He moved to St. Paul and stayed from 1859 to 1866, when he came to Corcoran and bought the farm on which he now lives. He was married in 1854, to Mrs. Mary Hennesee, who had three children.

Page 320

Joseph Degardins

was born in Quebec in 1835, where he lived for seventeen years, when he went to Bangor, Maine, and worked at lumbering two years. In 1854 he moved to Minnesota and worked in the woods until the spring of 1855, when he came to Corcoran and made a claim in section 19 ; sold part of it and made another on section 26, where he now lives. He enlisted in a Minnesota regiment in 1862, and served three years against the Indians, was discharged at Fort Snelling. July 1861, he was married to Miss T. Scott. They are the parents of six children.

Page 320

Moses Dufour

was born in Quebec, Canada, in 1832, and lived there eighteen years. In 1851 he went to Maine and worked at lumbering five years, to St. Anthony in 1856, went up the river and worked in the pineries five years, after which he spent seven years among the Chippewa Indians as interpreter for traders. In 1870 he bought the farm where he now lives. Married Rosette Lasart, by whom he has had five children.

Page 320

Joseph Dupont

a native of Montreal, Canada, was born in 1831. He lived there seventeen years, when he moved to Vermont and stayed eight years. In 1856 he came to Minnesota, and made a claim in Corcoran, where he has since resided. He was married in 1859 to Angelina Fortin. They have six children now living. In 1863, Mr. and Mrs. Dupont visited their native home, remaining about ten months.

Page 320

Hugh Keran

born in Ireland in 1818, came to America in 1849, landed in New York and stayed there until 1850, when he went to Buffalo. In 1856 he moved to Minnesota, and bought the farm he now lives on. He married, in 1862, Margaret Branagan, by whom he has had two children.

Page 320

John McDonnell

is a native of Waterford county, Ireland, where he was born in 1835. He emigrated to America in 1852, and settled in Orange county, New York; remained there two years, then went to Wisconsin and lived one year; from there he came to Minnesota and made a claim in Corcoran, in 1855. He lived in Minneapolis in 1856, and in 1857 went to his claim, where he has since resided. He held the office of town supervisor one year, and town treasurer seven years. He married, in 1856, Sarah Crawford, by whom he has had ten children.

Page 321

Francis Morin

was born in Quebec, in 1826, and lived there twenty years. He moved to Lake Superior in 1846, worked in the copper and iron mines for three years, and then returned to Quebec. In 1851 he moved to St. Anthony and stayed four years, when he came to Corcoran and has since resided here. He was married in 1863 to Alice O'Hearn. He is the father of seven children.

Page 321

Joseph Morin

was born in Montreal, in 1810. He lived there thirty years; went to Michigan in 1840, stayed about one year, then worked four years at Lake Superior as shipwright. Married, in 1844, Lissette Landeau. In 1845 he started for Minnesota, with a birch bark canoe; and accompanied by his wife, followed the Black river fifteen days, then they packed their things and he carried the canoe, on foot, to the St. Croix river, which they reached in one day; they followed it to the Mississippi, thence to St. Paul, where they remained eleven years. Moved to Corcoran in 1856, and have since resided here. They have nine children.

Page 321

David Noonan

a native of Ireland, was born in 1820. He lived there thirty years, and came to America in 1850. He went to Philadelphia, where he remained six years, then removed to Iowa for one year, and in 1857 came to Corcoran, where he has since resided. Married in 1863 to Margaret Hayes. They have one daughter.

Page 321

Jacob Oswald

was born in Pennsylvania, October 1850. He lived there six years, and in 1856, moved to Minnesota with his parents, with whom he lived until seventeen years of age, when his father bought a farm for him and his brother. In 1873 he bought the farm he now lives on. He married in 1873, Caroline Kothrada, by whom he has four children.

Page 321

Christian Ranking

was born in Prussia, in 1835. He lived there twenty-four years; moved to America in 1859, and settled in Corcoran, where he now resides. He was drafted in 1865, into the Second Minnesota Regiment and was discharged at Washington, at the close of the war. In 1860 he married Katrine Heagleman. They have ten children living.

Page 321

Frederich Reinking

a native of Prussia, was born in 1827. He emigrated to America in 1847; stopped in Baltimore five months, then went to Pittsburg and remained seven years, working on a steamboat. In 1856 he moved to St. Paul, thence to Corcoran where he has since lived. His wife was Charlotte Schafer; by her, he has had eleven children, eight of whom are now living.

Page 321

Fred Schuette

was born in Hanover, in 1826, where he lived twenty-one years. He came to America in 1854, resided in Pittsburg eleven months and moved to Minnesota in 1855; stopped a short time in St. Paul, then came to Corcoran, which has since been his home. In 1863 he joined the Third Minnesota Regiment, went south with it and was gone sixteen months. He married Minnie Schomaker in 1852,by whom he has one son.

Page 321

F. W. Webb

was born in England, in 1849, and lived there twenty-one years. He emigrated to America in 1870, and settled in Corcoran where he has since resided. He has built a substantial farm house valued at $1,000. In the fall of 1872 he returned to England, and married Elizabeth Barrows; he returned the following spring with his wife to his home in Corcoran. They are the parents of two children.

Page 321

Peter Weinand

a native of Germany, was born in 1838. He emigrated to America in 1852, and settled in Wisconsin; removed to Minnesota in 1856, and in 1858 bought the farm in Corcoran on which he has since lived. In 1877, he was elected representative from the twenty-seventh district, and has held every position of trust in his town. He married, in 1864, Mary Swagert, by whom he has six children.

Page 321

August Westphal

was born in Prussia, in 1831, He was educated in his native land; graduated from the College of Bromberg, and followed school teaching for twelve years. Enlisted, in the German army in 1851, and served three years in Berlin. He emigrated to America in 1864, settled in Milwaukee and taught school. In 1866 he came to Minnesota, and finally settled in Corcoran. Married in 1866 to Emily Long, by whom he has had fourteen children.

Page 324

Henry Abel

was born in Essex county, Now York, May 8th, 1924. He lived there twenty-three years, and in Hillsdale, Michigan, four years. Married Ann E. Lobdell, in 1850; she died in 1852. He came to Minnesota in April, 1854, and took a claim in Maple Grove, where the town house now stands. He did the first mason work this side of St. Anthony. He made a claim and sold it; then, made another; sold that, and took the one he now lives on; built a log house ten feet square and covered it with bark, using the same material for floor and tables. In 1858, he was married to Sarah M. Brown, who died in 1861. He married his third wife, Sarah Weaver, in 1862. Mr. Abel built a new house, which, with contents, was destroyed by fire in 1870. He is the father of four children. His third wife died in October, 1880.

Page 325

A. O. Angell

was born in Bridgewater, Vermont, in 1834. He moved with his parents to Michigan, then to Ohio, and in 1854, came to Minnesota, and made a claim in Maple Grove. June 8th, 1865, he married Mary Atkinson. They have two children living. He lived in his cabin covered with bark and with floor of basswood slabs, until 1858. Mr. Angell helped to cut the first road leading from Osseo to Rice Lake.

Page 325

J. H. Briggs

was born in Smyrna, Chenango county, New York, April 19th, 1828. He came to Minnesota, and located in Maple Grove in 1855. Married Jane A. Faulkner in 1852. They have six children. The first year he came, he had to carry provisions on his back from St. Anthony to his home, a distance of sixteen miles. At that time, Minneapolis had but two houses. Mr. Briggs is one of the oldest settlers in this town.

Page 325

William Brooks

was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, December 6th, 1826. He remained with his parents twenty years. Lived in Wisconsin eight years, and came to Minnesota in 1857, locating in Maple Grove, where he now lives. In 1852 he married Mary A. Carter, who died in December, 1861. His second wife was Sarah L. Jenneson. The first eight years that he was here, he lived in a log house that was covered with red oak shakes, and had a floor of split basswood.

Page 325

Octave Caron

a native of Canada, was born in 1836. He lived there seventeen years; then came to Minnesota, and worked on a farm; also at the Sioux Agency. In 1855 he went to Shakopee. He ran a ferry for two seasons, at Mendota. Enlisted in 4th Minnesota, Company E. Was in Sherman's march to the sea, and was honorably discharged in 1865. He has lived in Maple Grove since 1878. In 1859 he married Philomene Le Duc. They have nine children living. He owns land in Brooklyn, and Wheatland, Rice county.

Page 325

O. R. Champlin

born in Chenango county, Now York, January 8th, 1832, and came to Maple Grove in 1854. He married Miss H. M. Bosworth, in 1857. The first winter he passed in this county, the Winnebagoes gave him some trouble. He built his house in the woods, using wooden troughs for shingles. Mr. Champlin was in Stearns county during the Indian outbreak. Nearly all the people left the country, excepting his family and a young man named Warner.

Page 325

John Cook

was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1820. When fifteen years of age, he had learned the bakers' trade; came to America in 1849, stopping a short time in Now York and Buffalo. In 1850 he went to DuPage county, Illinois, and remained five years. He married Mrs. Mary Ann Hardy. Came to Minnesota in 1855 and settled in Maple Grove. They have ten children living. Mrs. Cook died June 1st, 1876.

Page 325

Patrick Darmody

was born in Tipperary, Ireland, in 1825. Came to America, stopping a short time in New Orleans and Cincinnati, landed in Minnesota May 24th, 1855, and settled in Maple Grove. He married Ellen Peters, July 19th, 1855. There are six children living. Mr. Darmody died December 5th, 1879.

Page 325

Patrick Devery

a native of Ireland, was born in 1818, and lived with his parents twenty-one years. He then came to America; stayed in Ohio a few months, and in New York ten years. Came to Minnesota and settled in Maple Grove, October 1854; he made a shanty of rough boards a bedstead of hickory poles, and used, a dry-goods box for a table. Mr. Devery is the father of eleven children.

Page 325

Fredrick Ebert

was born in Germany, 1816, came to Illinois in 1817. Married October 10th, 1848, to Julia Ostrath, of Macon county, Illinois, and lived there eighteen years. Came to Hennepin county, in 1864. Have eleven children: John, Frederick, Margaret, George, Julia, Adam, Henry, Susan, Charles, Conrad and Willie.

Page 325

Louis Pierre Garvais

was born at Wolf River, near Montreal Canada, in 1810. Lived there sixteen years, and moved to Lake Champlain, New York, where he resided for twenty-two years; then came to Saint Paul, remained there two years, and one year in Saint Anthony, after which he came to what is now Maple Grove. He made his claim on what is known as Bottineau Prairie, and was the first settler in this town. For nearly two years their only neighbors were the Winnebago Indians. After he had been here nearly two years, the whites began to settle around him. He married Mary Twombley, in New York, October 15th, 1830. They have had ten children, four boys and six girls, all living, with the exception of the first born, who died at the age of eleven, in York State. On the 15th of October, 1880, Garvais and wife, celebrated their golden wedding, at Osseo, impressive ceremonies being held at the church. Eight children and seventy-five grand children were present.

Page 326

John M. Eddy

is a native of New Haven, Vermont. When twenty-two years old, he went to California, and stayed about five years. In 1856 he came to Minnesota, and settled in Maple Grove. He was married in 1857, to Mary E. Evans, of Chittenden county, Vermont. They have five children. Mr. Eddy was the first town clerk, and held the office nine years. He enlisted in the Second Minnesota Cavalry, December 22d, 1863, was discharged December 2d, 1865, and has been farming since that time.

Page 326

W. E. Evans

was born in Chittenden county, Vermont, December 28th, 1824. He remained there, working as millwright, until he came to Minnesota; was one of the fast settlers of Maple Grove, and built the first house on this road, a log cabin, now used as a granary. Before his block-house was finished, he covered it with blankets to protect his family. In 1847 he was married to Miss Lucia C. Austin, of Vermont; she died in 1880. Mr. Evans has held various town offices since he came here.

Page 326

Leonard L. Hawkins

was a native of New Hampshire. In 1829 he married Olivia P. Wright, at Keene, New Hampshire. He lived in Vermont until he came to Minneapolis in 1856. For two years he had charge of the tollgate near the University. Mr. Hawkins died in 1863, and Mrs. H. resides in Minneapolis with her daughter, Mrs. G. W. Chowen.

Page 326

S. S. Hawkins

was born September 12th, 1842, at East Highgate, Vermont, and lived there twenty-two years. He went to Minneapolis in 1856, remained there until 1859, then located in Maple Grove. He was married August 29th, 1864, to Mary Woodworth. He is traveling for O. S. Rixford, of East Highgate, Vermont; has been in the business for twelve years, traveling winters, and spending summers at home. They have four children living.

Page 326

Minerva Hoff

was born in Ohio, April 17th, 1824, and lived with her parents until twenty-two years of age. She was married, in Ohio, to Luther E. Hoff, October 19th, 1850. They came to Maple Grove, June 2d, 1855, being among the first settlers of the town. They have five children living. Mr. Luther E. Hoff, her husband, died October 10th, 1864.

Page 326

Sarah Kiefer

a native of New York, was born April 30th, 1831. She lived there for ten years, and then moved, with her parents, to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She married, April 10th, 1849; came to Minnesota and settled in Maple Grove, in 1864, and has since made this place her home. Mr. Kiefer was born in Germany, September 6th, 1820, and died April 5th, 1874. Mrs. K. has nine children living. She now owns one hundred and sixty acres of land.

Page 326

Michael Knopf

was born near Buffalo, Now York, in 1835. Lived there ten years, then moved to Cook county, Illinois; remained there until twenty-five years of age. He was educated at the North-west College of the Evangelical Association at Napierville. In 1860 he came to Rice county, Minnesota, and engaged in farming. He enlisted July 24th, 1864, in Company E, Sixth Minnesota Infantry, and served until he was honorably discharged in 1865, at Fort Snelling. He was pastor of the Evangelical Church at Waseca for three years, at Frontenac three years, one year near Henderson, and is now pastor of the Evangelical Church in Maple Grove. Married in 1861, to Miss S. F. Fritch.

Page 326

George A. Laflin

a native of Chittenden county, Vermont, was born February 19th, 1837; he lived there nineteen years, and came to Maple Grove, Minnesota, in 1856. On June 10th, 1867, he was married to Miss Annie L. Eddy, of Maple Grove. In October, 1872, she died, and he married for his second wife, Elizabeth N. Kerr, January 7th, 1874. Mr. Laflin's first wife bore him three children, and he has two by his second wife.

Page 326

Q. A. Laflin

was born in Milton, Vermont, August 20th, 1850. He came with his parents to Minnesota in 1856, and lived in the town of Dayton until 1876. He was married December 7th, 1876, to Miss Nellie Knibbe, who was born in Holland December 18th, 1858, and came to America in 1873. They have two children.

Page 326

David Marchand

a native of Canada, was born October 14th, 1834. He lived there fifteen years, then removed to Massachusetts, and stated until 1851, when he came to Minnesota, and settled in Maple Grove; worked at carpentering till 1870, and has since that time followed farming. In 1863 he joined General Sibley's expedition as a scout, was drafted while on his way from Fort Snelling to Ft. Ridgely and was ordered to return to St. Paul. He paid three hundred dollars for a substitute. He was detailed for duty at Fort Wadsworth, transferred to Fort Abercrombie, and again transferred to Fort Wadsworth; he left there in November 1864, and returned to Maple Grove. He married Laura Gasner, September 20th, 1858. They have six children living.

Page 327

Albert A. Opitz

a native of Ohio, was born in Toledo, August 4th, 1855. He came to Minneapolis May 1st, 1868, and worked at the tinners trade until 1879, when he removed to Maple Grove. He married Mrs. Nancy Brownrigg, February 15th, 1880, who was born in Washington county, Ohio, in 1856. Her first husband died September 28th, 1879, and Mrs. Brownrigg married Mr. Opitz. They live on the farm purchased by Mr. Brownrigg.

Page 327

Otto Ohrmundt

was born in Germany, November 16th, 1848. He resided in his native country with his parents until he came to America. He came to this country in 1870, and was a residence of eighteen months in Wisconsin, came to Maple Grove, where he has since resided. He was married in Germany, in 1865. Has two children, a boy aged eight, and a girl four years.

Page 327

William H. Pavitt

came to Minnesota in the autumn of 1855. Remained about two years in Minneapolis, and then moved to Cokato, Wright county; staid there two years; then returned to Minneapolis, and remained until 1867, when he moved to Osseo, and has since lived on his farm, section 16, town of Maple Grove. He married Mary L. Hoff, in November, 1873. She is a native of Hennepin county.

Page 327

Catharine Peters

was born in Ireland, in 1832. She lived with her parents ten years; then went to England, and lived there three years; then emigrated to America. Came to Minnesota in 1855, and settled in Maple Grove. Married, April 4th, 1855, to John Peters, who died October 30th, 1866. She has two children living. James was born January 27th, 1856, and Edward, March 4th, 1858. The family is living upon the "Peters Estate," of 160 acres, on section 31. Both sons are able and active young men, conducting the farm with ability.

Page 327

Sherman Phelps

born in Smithville, New York, August 11th, 1820. He lived there twenty-three years; then moved to Cook county, Illinois, and remained until 1865, when he came to Minnesota, and located in Maple Grove, where he has since resided. Married Anna E. Limberger, May 18th, 1848, who died February 14th, 1869. Mr. Phelps has seven children living.

Page 327

A. Robert

was born in Belgium, May 12th, 1813. For forty-three years he lived in his native land, then came to Minnesota, and settled in Corcoran. He removed to Maple Grove, and has since resided here. In 1863, he enlisted in Hatches Battalion Minn. Cavalry, and was discharged in May, 1866. Mr. Robert has never married.

Page 327

Henry Robert

a native of Belgium, was born May 15th, 1819. When thirty-four years of age, he came to America, and located at Lake Superior; then removed to Minnesota in 1856; lived at Greenwood five years, and in Corcoran two years; then came to Maple Grove. He removed to Corcoran again, but returned to Maple Grove, and has since resided here. He married Miss Matilda Twombley, October 3d, 1859. They have four children living.

Page 327

William Trott

was born in England, in 1828. He came to America in 1846, and worked on a farm in Orleans county, New York, a few years; then went to Indiana, as foreman on a railroad. Poor health compelled him to resign. He came to Minnesota in 1853, and bought a claim in Eden Prairie; sold it for $500 ; then explored different parts of the then territory, making several claims and selling them. In 1854, he came to Maple Grove; bought a claim, built a shanty, which he covered with bark, and lived in it the first winter. July 1866, he married Lilly Sutherland, of Canada.

Page 327

Josiah Weaver

born in Miramichi, New Brunswick, November 26th, 1845. Went with his parents to Frederickton, lived there nine years and came to Minnesota in 1856, with his father, his mother having died when he was eighteen months old. Since coming to this state he has lived with Mrs. Hoff. He enlisted January, 1865, in company B, Second Minnesota Infantry Volunteers; served until July 10, 1865, when he was discharged.

Page 328

J. M. Williamson

a native of Washington, Ohio, was born February 24th, 1857. He came to Minnesota in 1865, and settled in Maple Grove, September 4th, 1880, he married Miss Sophia Zeorb. His father enlisted October 23d, 1861, in Company B, Seventy-fifth Ohio Infantry, but was discharged for physical disability, and was not able do a day's work after he came out of the army. Mr. Williamson, Sr., died in 1880.

Page 328

L. B. Wilmot

was born in LaPorte, Indiana, August 18th, 1839, and lived there fifteen years; then went to Minneapolis, and from there to the Black Hills, where he remained two years. Married Miss R. Foster, August 12th, 1875, and now lives in Maple Grove. They have one child, George.

Page 328

E. P. Woodworth

born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, July 13th, 1844. Lived there seventeen years, and in Pennsylvania three years. He enlisted in the naval service, August 13th, 1864; served ten months, and was discharged. He was married July 24th, 1866, to Selina C. Clarke, of Pennsylvania, and came to Maple Grove where he has since lived. They have three children living.

Page 333

Christopher Braesch

one of the first settlers on Bass Lake, was born in Prussia, in 1830. His parents died when he was nine years of age, and he was engaged in farming until he came to America, in 1854. After living in Chicago, Illinois, about eighteen months, he came to St. Anthony, Minnesota, where he built a small house. In 1856, he made a claim in Plymouth, where he now lives. Lived on his claim a short time, building a log house, then returned to Minneapolis, where he engaged in season work three years, was employed on the old Eastman and Gibson mill, and others. In 1859, came with his family to his claim in Plymouth, where he has since remained, and now has a pleasant home. He married Sophia Peters, at Chicago, in 1854. They have six children: Emma, Albert, Henry, Mary, Minnie and Charley.

Page 334

Thomas Clark

was born in Yorkshire, England, November 5th, 1828, and lived with his father until eleven years of age, his mother having died while he was young. At the age of thirteen, he began life for himself, and was engaged in farming until 1850, when he came to this country. Resided in Massachusetts, three years, New York, five years; in Canada three years, and in Huron county, Michigan, until 1869, when he came to Plymouth. He enlisted in the Twenty-ninth Michigan Volunteers, in 1864, and was mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1865. He was married to Jane A. Sanderson, of England in 1848. They have had eight children, seven of whom are living.

Page 334

Joseph W. Day

was born in Piscataquis county, Maine, July 22d, 1849, and lived with his parents, engaged in farming, until 1865, when he came with his father to Hennepin county. His father died in 1877, leaving Joseph to care for the mother and family. He has made his home in Plymouth since coming to this county, and in 1871 settled on his present farm. Married Ellen S. Hughes in l871. They are the parents of four children: John A., Albert W., Elmer L., and Elzada B.

Page 334

Benjamin Frost

a native of Maine, was born in Hancock county, March 15th, 1830. His parents died when he was twelve years of age, and in 1855 he I came to Minneapolis, and engage in lumbering with L. Day and Sons. He worked on the foundation of the dam at the falls, and on the boom piers above the falls; also helped to run the first logs for the mill at Minneapolis. Married Ellen Cruikshank, June 25th, 1862. In 1868 he bought the farm where he lives, eight miles west of Minneapolis. They have five children: Edwin, Ada, Orin, Benjamin, Jr., and Elva.

Page 334

David Gorham

one of the earliest settlers of Hennepin county, was born in Quebec, Canada. When he was four years of age his father died, and David went to Montreal. He was occupied in farming until 1836, when he came to the United States, and resided two-years in Virginia, and twelve years in Maine, engaged in lumbering on the Penobscot. In April 1849, he came to St. Anthony. He made a claim of 160 acres in what is now North Minneapolis, and also of the farm now owned by R. P. Russell, near Lake Calhoun. He ran the first shingle and lath mill in the place. In 1854, he made a claim in what is now Plymouth township, and after remaining on it one year, returned to Minneapolis, where he was engaged in the lumber mills for about twelve years. In 1864, he, in company with others, started for California, but on reaching the Bad Lands, were surrounded by Sioux Indians, and held seventeen days, then rescued by General Sully's Cavalry. They then returned to Minneapolis, satisfied with their adventure. In 1867 he bought his present farm, and has since lived in Plymouth. He hard held the office of Supervisor for ten years, and has done much for the cause of education. He was married, in 1850, to Miss Barber, of Maine. They have had nine children; seven of whom are living: Addelle., Thados, Edwina, David G. T., Emma, Lizzie, and Angelina M. Mary L. died the day of her birth, and Angelina died at the age of twelve years.

Page 334

Jonas H. Howe

a native of Massachusetts, was born in Worcester county, April 29th, 1821. He attended the Academy at Deerfield and New Salem, and at the age of twenty-one, went to Boston for two years, then returned to his father's farm for nine years. He came to Hennepin county in 1854, and made a claim where he now lives. The same year, went with a party to Crow Wing to get out timber for the first Suspension bridge. In the fall, built a cabin sixteen feet square, on his claim-. This was the second house built in the township. He brought the lumber for his house, from St. Anthony, floating it across Medicine Lake, as there was no road around. In 1855 his family joined him. In 1864 he was appointed enrolling clerk for the township, and afterwards enlisted in Company P, Eleventh Infantry, with the rank of sergeant, and served one year. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1865. In 1878 his dwelling was destroyed by fire, and he immediately rebuilt a more substantial house. Mr. Howe has been town clerk for a number of years, justice of the peace, and was census enumerator in 1880; has always taken an active part in the affairs of the town. His wife, whom he married in Massachusetts, was Margaret Swendell, of Boston. They have had ten children, seven, now living. Cora, the eldest, was a member of the first class at the Deaf and Dumb Institute at Faribault; was a pupil seven years, and taught three years, when poor health compelled her to retire from teaching.

Page 335

Thomas Hughes

one of the early settlers of Plymouth, was born in England, November 25th, 1803. He served five years in the British Army, and in 1849, brought his family to America, and located at Burlington, Iowa, until the fall of 1853, when he removed to Minnesota. He settled on the claim in what is now Plymouth, where he has since resided. At the time he came, there were no roads, excepting the Indian trails used by Shakopee and his band of Sioux. Mr. Hughes has given his attention to farming, since his first settlement, and has built up a fine home. He was married to Hannah Buckell, in England, February 6th, 1825. They have had nine children, six of whom are living in Hennepin county. Names of children: James, Mary Ann, John (deceased) Thomas, Henry, Charles, Ellen (deceased) Edward and Ellen second, (demmed.) His son, Thomas, who is now living with him, enlisted in the Sixth Minnesota Infantry in 1861, served one year and was transferred to Company K, Twenty-third Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps, and served until mustered out at St. Paul in 1865. He was engaged in the battle of Birch Coolie and Wood Lake. during the Indian outbreak.

Page 335

James Hughes

was born in England, January 2d, 1825. He remained with his parents until the age of twenty-one, in the meantime serving an apprenticeship of seven years at the blacksmith trade. He then went to Wales, and was engaged in Lee's iron works for nine months; returned to England, and established a smithing business. In 1852 he came to Burlington, Iowa, and engaged in business there until March, 1854, when he started for Minnesota, with six yokes of oxen, two cows and one wagon. The journey was pleasant until they arrived in Minnesota Territory, where they found large bodies of snow and no roads. He was obliged to leave his family alone in the wagon one night, while he went in search of food and assistance, during a terrific storm. When he arrived at Red Wing he had only five oxen and one cow, the others having perished on the route. Shipped from thereto St. Paul, sold his cattle, went to St. Anthony, and in May, 1854, made his claim in Plymouth, where he has since lived. He engaged in farming and smithing until the war of the. rebellion. July 1864, he enlisted in the Eighth Minnesota, and was detailed as post blacksmith at Fort Snelling, where he served until mustered out, May, 1865. He has been active in all public affairs of the township, and has held all its offices. He was married to Elizabeth Hatcher in England, April, 1848. They have had nine children, of whom six are living: Edward, Ellen, John, Julia, Thomas and Carrie.

Page 335

Henry Hughes

son of Thomas Hughes, was born in England, January 28th, 1835. He came to the United States with his parents, and was engaged in blacksmithing at Burlington, Iowa; came with his parents to Minnesota in 1853, with two yokes of oxen, two cows, three horses and two wagons, being twenty-seven days on the road. He worked at blacksmithing in Minneapolis, one year, then joined hi s father on the homestead in Plymouth. He was married December 4th, 1862, to Mary A. Case, of Ohio, who has borne him eight children, seven of whom are living. In July, 1864, he enlisted in the Eighth Minnesota Infantry, and was mustered out May, 1865. Mr. Hughes has a fine farm, and in connection with it, carries on the blacksmithing business.

Page 335

Charles W. Hughes

was born in England, May 2d, 1838. He came with his parents, Thomas and Hannah Hughes, to America in 1849, and to Minnesota in 1853. Charles W. remained in St. Anthony, working with Daniel Bassett, one of the first carriage-makers in the place, one and one-half years. He and his brother Henry made, claims in Benton county, remained one year, but were obliged to abandon their claims on account of scarcity of Provisions. In the fall of 1859, he built a carriage shop near the suspension bridge, in Minneapolis, and remained there until 1861, when he enlisted in Company D, First Minnesota Infantry, and served until mustered out in May, 1864. He participated in twenty-one engagements, some of them the hardest-fought battles of the war. In 1864 he joined Gen. Sully's expedition up the Yellowstone; returned in the fall and worked for the government at Fort Snelling, till the spring of 1865, when he came to Plymouth, bought forty acres of land, to which he has since added forty more, and has built up a good home. Married to Martha Hatcher, of Hennepin county, May 14th, 1865. They have eight children.

Page 336

Edward Hughes

was born in England, October 18th, 1849. At the age of three years, his father and family came to the United States, and resided at Burlington, Iowa, until 1854, when they came to Minnesota. Here Edward grew to manhood, and farmed with his father until November 28th, 1871, when he was married to Sarah Day, of this county. They settled on the present farm in March 1873. They are the parents of four children: George, Edward, Ada and Edna.

Page 336

Joseph Jamme

one of the early settlers of Hennepin county, was born east of Quebec, Canada, May 16th, 1814. He lived with his parents on the farm until he reached the age of twenty-four, and in 1838, removed to the United States, residing in Maine, engaged in lumber business near Bangor. In 1853 he came to Minnesota, and spent two years lumbering at St. Anthony and on the river. In 1855 he made a claim of 160 acres, in what is now Plymouth, where he now lives. After residing on his claim one year, he returned to Minneapolis and engaged in lumbering until 1866, since which time he has resided in this town where he has a pleasant home twelve miles west of the city. He was married in Oldtown, Maine, to Miss Celeste Barber, of that place. They have had nine children, of whom six are living. Those living are: Addie F., Clara, Phoebe, Joseph R., Henry C., and Bernard G.

Page 336

Alexander G. Jardine

a native of Scotland, was born in Ayreshire, on the 8th of October, 1847. At the age of fifteen he commenced to learn the blacksmith's trade, also worked for a time with Randolph, Elder & Co., ship builders of Govan, Scotland. In 1869, he went to Canada; stayed one year, and then removed to Massachusetts, but afterward returned to Canada, and in 1879, he came to Plymouth, Minnesota, and established a blacksmith shop, where he is doing a thriving business. October 19th, 1880, he . married, in Minneapolis, Miss Sarah, daughter of William and Ellen Allen, of Scotland.

Page 336

John H. Jordan

a native of Prussia, was born January 16th, 1845. When seven years of age, he came with his parents to America. They landed in New York in the fall of 1852, and went to Newark, New Jersey, for a short time, and in 1853, moved to Illinois. In the spring of 1855, they came to Minnesota, and made a claim on section 18 of what is now Plymouth township, where they experienced, of course, their share of the hardships of pioneer life. In July, 1864, John R. enlisted in the 8th Minn. Regt. Vol., served nine months, and was mustered out at Fort Snelling, May 16th, 1865. He returned to the homestead and lived, until his marriage with Anna M. Weidenbach, which occurred in November, 1868. In l871, he bought the farm where he now lives, Mr. Jordan has been active in all the public affairs of the town, also in promoting the causes of Christianity and education. He has been assessor for six years, also justice of the peace, and school officer for a number of years. At present he fills the office of town clerk. They have had six children, only three of whom are living: Anna, John and Alexander.

Page 336

Mathias Klausman

was born June 12th, 1828, in Baden, Germany. He lived with his parents until twenty years of age, when he went into the German army for a time. In 1852, he emigrated to America, stayed in New York a short time, then removed to Ohio, where he was engaged in farming, and also freighting for the iron works, until September, 1864, when he enlisted in, Company F One Hundred and Eighty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. In 1866, he came to Minnesota, and settled on a farm in Carver county, where he lived seven years, then sold out, and came to Plymouth; bought ninety-seven acres, on the east side of Medicine Lake in 1874, he bought fifty-one acres more in section 23. He has a fleet of pleasure boats, and his place is one of the pleasantest on the lake, situated six miles west of Minneapolis. Mr. Klausman married Miss Frances Kreyer, of Germany, January 12th, 1855. They have three living children: Peter, Charles, and Frances.

Page 336

Thomas Ottaway

a native of Devonshire, England, was born May 16th, 1828. When he had grown to manhood he took the superintendency of an extensive farm near his birthplace. The most of his time was spent in this business until 1869, when he brought his family to America. He was with William King, at Lyndale farm, one year, then superintended the Wilmar farm, for five years, and in 1876 he bought a farm at Parker's Lake, but sold in 1880, and bought where he now resides, one and one-half miles east of Wayzata. Mr. Ottaway was married to Miss Mary E. Rowell, of England, August, 1850. They are the parents of two children: Mary and Emily.

Page 337

Daniel C. Parker

was born in Cumberland county, Maine, June 9th, 1823. When four years of age he went with his father's family to Ohio, and remained nine years; then returned to Maine. At the age of twenty-one he began shipbuilding, and was engaged in this business eleven years, helping build some of the largest sailing vessels of that time. On the 28th of May, 1851, Mr. Parker married Miss Hester A., daughter of Ira and Betsey Green, of Maine. In the spring of 1855 he came to Minnesota and preempted the farm where he now lives. In those days lumber was hard to obtain, and he built a log cabin, 2Ox3O feet, using bass-wood bark for shingles; he now has a fine large barn, and about the year 1870, he built his present residence. He has taken an active part in all public affairs of the town; he was a member of the first school board, chairman of the first town board, and was also a delegate to the first convention hold in the state. They have had a family of seven children; only five are living.

Page 337

James M. Parker

one of the pioneers of Plymouth, was born in Cumberland county, Maine, September, 5th, 1820. He accompanied his parents to Kentucky, remained there one year and left on account of hostile Indians, removing to Cincinnati, Ohio, where his father engaged in shipbuilding. He remained there until 1836, when they returned to Maine. James lived with his parents until 1846 when he married Anna P. Ridley, and removed to Massachusetts, remaining one year. He returned to Maine, and in 1856, brought his family to Minnesota, and made the claim in this town, where he has since resided. His father preceded him one year. There were no roads at that time, and the Indians were continually passing to and fro. He has hold all the offices of the township, and has been justice of the peace twenty-one years; has been postmaster' at Parker's Lake for nine years. He has also been largely interested in the cause of education. Alfred A., George M., Ella J., Marietta M., Francis E., Dora A., Carrie E.; Walter I., Ida A., are their children. Eugene E. died.

Page 337

John H. Past

was born in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, March 23d, 1849. He came with his father to Minnesota in 1859, and remained until 1863, when they went to Delaware. In 1877, John H. returned to Minnesota, where he has since remained. Married Miss Margaret Rowan, of Pennsylvania, December 25th, 1864. They have had four children; only one of them is living.

Page 337

Henry Prohl

was born in Mecklenburg-Schweren, in 1827. At the age of sixteen he started in life for himself, and engaged in farming until 1858 when he came to this country, and to Minneapolis. After living there nine years, he bought the farm where he now lives, on the south shore of Bass Lake. When he came to this country he was a poor man; now has a fine, well-stocked farm. He was married in Minneapolis, in 1859, to Dora Went, of his native place. They have had eight children, only two of whom are living: Charles and Henry.

Page 337

F. Radintz

one of the early settlers of Plymouth, was born in Prussia, June 29th, 1828. He remained with his parents until fifteen years of age, when he began life for himself, and was engaged as shepherd until 1852, when he came to America. He went to Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and thence to the Lake Superior copper mines for nearly two years. In October 1854, he came to, what is now Plymouth, and made a claim of the farm where he now lives. He built a small log house and shaved out shingles for the roof. After remaining one year, he removed to Saint Anthony where he was engaged in well-digging for two years. In November 1857, he was married to Christina Snabel, of Prussia, and located on this farm, which he has since improved until it is a fine place. He has been treasurer of the school district and has done much for the cause of education. Of the fourteen children born to them, eleven reside with their parents on the farm.

Page 337

Nicholas Roehl

a native of Prussia, was born February 21st, 1827. When Nicholas was ten years old, his father died, and four years later, he began teaching, which he continued four years. His mother died, and he engaged in farming for nine years. He was married January 22d, 1849, to Anna Mary Schneider, and in June, 1854 brought his family to America, and settled near Saint Paul. In April, 1864, he bought the farm in Plymouth, where he now lives, situated eleven miles west of Minneapolis, where he has built up a pleasant home. He has been supervisor and justice of the peace, and has also been assessor three years. Of the twelve children born to them eight are now living.

Page 338

Jacob Roths

a native of Germany, was born August 6th, 1837. He remained with his parents until he reached maturity. He was married October 19th, 1865, to Katherine Nilles, of Germany, and in November started for America. He came directly to Minnesota and lived on Medicine Lake till January 1866, when he bought the farm where he now lives. He has been treasurer of the to township four years, also supervisor, and is chairman of the present board. He has a family of seven children: four boys and three girls.

Page 338

August F. Sandhoff

was born in Prussia, April 23d, 1834. He lived with his parents until twenty-one years of age, and worked at carpenters' trade until 1861, when he came to America. He located in Saint Anthony, and in 1868, bought the farm where he now lives, in the town of Plymouth, eight miles from Minneapolis. In 1869 he was married to Miss Willmina Sprung, of Prussia. They are the parents of five children, three of whom are living: - Otto, Emma and Mary. Mr. Sandhoff has been prominent in the growth of the town. He and his wife are members of the Evangelical Church.

Page 338

Herman A. Sandhoff

was born in Prussia, January 13th, 1830. He lived with his parents until the age of eighteen, when he began the trade of stone mason, and in 1851, moved to Berlin, where he worked until 1854. He then cam to America and worked at his trade in Galena, Illinois, a few weeks, then came to St. Anthony, where he worked seven months, on the old Island mill and the paper mill. In January 1855, he made a claim to the farm where he now lives. At that time the region around him was an unbroken wilderness, save one or two settlers. He was married to Miss Amelia Schmidt, of Hennepin county. They have had seven children, six now living. Mr. Sandhoff has been supervisor, and has been active in promoting the, affairs of the town. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church.

Page 338

Carl Schiebe Sr.

a native of Prussia, was born on the 8th of January, 1822. He lived with his parents until twenty-one years of age, when he commenced freighting, and was thus engaged until 1863, when he came to America; he lived in New York three years, and in 1866, removed to Minneapolis, where he remained seven years. In 1873 he bought two hundred acres of land in Plymouth, and built a house, 18x28 feet, which he proposed to use for a hotel; he soon found it was not large enough to accommodate the numerous travelers, so he built an addition 2Ox28 feet; the house is now well known throughout the county as the Farmer's Home. In 1879, he bought one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 35, where he erected 'a large dwelling house and barns on the Minneapolis and Wayzata road. In 1844, Mr. Schiebe married Johanna Genka, of Prussia.

Page 338

Frederick Henry Benjamin Schmidt

was born in Prussia, December 27th, 1829. He lived with his parents until twenty-one years of age, when he enlisted in the Prussian army, and served three years. In 1853 he came to America, and after a stay of one y ear near Chicago, came to St. Anthony, and in the spring of 1855, made a claim of 160 acres where he now lives. He resided in St. Anthony eleven years, engaged in carpenter work and teaming. In January 1854, he made a trip, with team to the Red River country, and was out twenty-nine days. During this trip he experienced many hardships, being several days with out food for himself or team. He was married December 17th, 1857, to Barbara Ortlieb, of Prussia, and in the following spring moved to his home in Plymouth, where he has since resided. He has been school officer for a number of years.

Page 338

Dennis Schmitz

was born in Coblentz Parish, west of the River Rhine, April 29th, 1827. He lived with his parents until eighteen years of age, when he entered the army, and served until 1850. In 1862 he came to America; spent three years in the lumber regions, of Michigan, and in 1855 came to Minnesota. The same year, his father and family emigrated to America, and making claims, settled in what is now Plymouth. Mr. Schmitz has been active in all public affairs of the town; was a member of the first school board, and has been chairman of the town board a number of times. He was married in St. Paul, February 6th, 1860, to Miss Susan Galner, of Prussia. They are the parents of seven children

Page 346

A. S. Adams

was born July 9th, 1848, at Townsend, Middlesex county, Massachusetts. He was raised as a farmer, and lived in his native town until 1867, when he came to Minnesota with his father, and located in Minneapolis township, where he has since resided, owning a farm of thirty-three acres. He was elected justice of the peace in March, 1880. Mr. Adams married Carrie Moffett, April, 1871.

Page 346

William Adams

a native of Scotland, was born in 1835. He came to America in 1869, and located in Minneapolis; he lived on Washington avenue South until his present residence was, built in 1875. Mr. Adams has been engaged in the carpenter's trade since a boy. His wife was Miss Ellen Walker; they were. married in 1864. Six children have been born to them.

Page 347

R. M. Aitken

was born in 1845, at Dunham, Canada East. He lived in his native town until eighteen years of age, when he went to Vermont and worked eight years in the car shops at Saint Albans, then removed to Mississippi and worked for a railroad company. In 1873 he went to Wisconsin, and in 1877, came to Minneapolis, in November of that year he married Lillian M. Shorey. Mr. Aitkin is proprietor of the Cedar Avenue Dairy, which he started in 1877 with only four cows, but has gradually increased the number to supply a growing trade, until now he has thirty-five.

Page 347

A. B. Allison

a native of Delaware county, New York, was born in 1840. He was engaged in farming until 1866, when he came to Hennepin county, and for four years worked in the woods; he then started in the dairy business; was in partnership with Mr. Collins but since 1875 Mr. Allison has conducted the business alone at his place on section 20, and has twenty-five cows. He was married May 6th, 1880, to Mrs. Broderick, of Maine.

Page 347

W. Bernstein

a native of Germany, was born in 1826. He emigrated to America in 1848, and for three years worked in Baltimore, as machinist in the railroad shops; then he removed to Washington and worked seven years in the navy yard; thence to Illinois, and was employed in the car shops at Aurora, until 1869, when he came to this state. In 1856 he married Catharine Faul who has borne him six children. Mr. Bernstein purchased his present farm in 1869, and is engaged in gardening and fruit raising.

Page 347

Robert Blaisdell

was born in 1803, at Peacham, Vermont. He was raised as a farmer, came to Saint Anthony in 1852, and took, by preemption, the farm where he now resides. Mr. Blaisdell attended the meeting at which Minneapolis was made a township, and helped to elect the first Town Board.. He has never missed a meeting since that time He also assisted in building the first school-house in the township. He married Miss Mary Chandler, in Maine. They are the parents of seven children.

Page 347

Robert Blaisdell, Jr.

a native of Aroostook county, Maine, was born May 4th, 1832. In 1846 he went to Wisconsin, and engaged in the lumber business at the head of Green Bay. In 1852 he removed to this state, and made a claim of 160 acres, which is a part of his present farm. He also owns, with his father, 360 acres in McLeod county. He too, attended the first election, and helped to build the first school-house In the township. His wife was Elmira Taunt, who has borne him six children.

Page 347

William Blaisdell

Was born at Belfast, Maine, in 1834. In 1851 he moved to Minnesota, and five years later preempted the farm he now owns. From 1863 until the fall of 1864, he was mining in California, Idaho, and Montana; then returned, and for one year was in charge of a lumber interest in Michigan. He now owns 20,000 acres of timberland in Wisconsin. Mr. Blaisdell acted as clerk at the first annual election held on this side of the river. There were only fourteen votes cast, four of them by the Blaisdell family. In 1861 he enlisted at the first call, and served until the regiment disbanded. He was married in 1865, to Miss Jennie Fletcher.

Page 347

M. D. Brown

was born in 1849, at Elmira, New York. In 1856 he came to Minneapolis, and has since resided here, with the exception of one year, passed at school in the East. Mr. Brown is engaged in farming on section 12, where he owns eighty acres of land, and boards horses summer, and winter.

Page 347

J. B. Bowman

was born April 27th, 1830, in New Brunswick. He learned the carpenter's trade, and worked three years in New York city., In 1857 he came here, and for twenty years followed his trade. He worked on the Nicollet House , H. G. Harrison's residence, and others. It was he who cut the brush so a team could pass on First avenue north, from Fourth to Sixth street. Mr. Bowman has only been absent from the town one day since coming here in 1857. He was married in 1869, to Amanda Christmas. They have three children.

Page 347

William Byrnes

was a native of Ireland. He emigrated to America in 1849, and lived in Homer, New York, until 1852, when he came here, and the following year made a claim of one hundred and fifty acres. In 1862 he enlisted in the Tenth Minnesota, and served until mustered out in 1865. He died December 1st, 1867. At the time of his death, he was sheriff of Hennepin county. Catherine, his wife, was born in Ireland, March 1827. She came to America in 1848, stayed the first year in New York city, and then removed to Homer. In 1850, she was married to William Byrnes, and two years later they came to Minneapolis. She has had nine children, seven of whom are living: Ellen, Anna, Mary, Teressa, William, Hugh and Lucelia.

Page 348

Lewis Carlson

a native of Denmark, was born in 1848. He came to America in 1869, and settled in Winona, Minnesota, where for three years he was engaged in the manufacture of barrels, then he removed to Chicago and worked at the trade there, three years. In 1875, he came to Minneapolis and was in the cooper business until 1879, when he started his dairy; he now has twenty-seven cows. In 1873, he married Abline Hanson. They have two children.

Page 348

F. X. Cripeau

was born in 1828, in Canada. At the age of nineteen, he went to Rhode Island, remained only one year and returned to Canada , in 1848, he moved to Illinois, and the following spring came to Saint Anthony, where he was engaged as clerk a few years for Mr. Bottineau, and then made a claim of one hundred and sixty acres, which is a part of his present place. In 1864, he enlisted in the First Minnesota Heavy Artillery and served until the close of the war, when he started in the gardening business; he raises vegetables exclusively, using about twenty acres of land for this purpose. Mr. Cripeau was married in 1854, to Rosalie Giard; ten children have been born to them.

Page 348

Peter Curly

a native of Ireland, was born in 1825. He came to America in 1846, and worked in the cotton factories of Lowell, Massachusetts, until 1849, when he came to Saint Anthony, and helped build the first Catholic church here. He preempted the farm where he still lives, one mile from the city limits, and built his present residence, in 1856. He was married in 1849, to Catherine Cain. They have had two sons, only one is living; John J.

Page 348

C. T. Earenfight

born in 1841, at Cincinnati, Ohio. He 7 lived in Illinois five years, then a short time in Indiana, and in 1863, removed to Minnesota; he has lived in Minneapolis, or near there most of the time since. He has eighteen acres of land on section 6, and is engaged in gardening; is also a wholesale dealer in cattle, on foot and dressed.

Page 348

Martin Ekes

a native of Germany, was born in 1834. He received his education in the schools of that country, and was by occupation a farmer. In 1853, he came to America and lived four years in New York city, being engaged as coachman; while in that city, he married Miss Catherine Gerard. They are the parents of two children. Mr. Ekes came to Minneapolis in 1858, and has since resided here; he has a vegetable garden of fifteen acres on Hennepin Avenue, where he also raises all varieties of strawberries; he was the first man to sell vegetables in this market.

Page 348

Owen Finley

was born in New York city, in 1845. In early life he went with his parents to Watertown, Wisconsin, and worked at the carpenter's trade; in 1873, he removed to Minneapolis and continued working at his trade until he was given charge of the Cemetery of the Immaculate Conception, which is now under his immediate care. Mr. Finley enlisted in 1862, in the Twenty-eighth Wisconsin, Company G, and served over three years. He married Maria Magerty in 1876. They have five living children.

Page 348

D. M. Foss

born in 1820, in Strafford county, New Hampshire. At the age of eighteen, he went to Lowell, Massachusetts, and learned carpentering. In 1865, he came here and worked at his trade until 1879; assisting in building some of the first dwellings in the city, the St. James Hotel, and some of the principal places of business. Mr. Foss is now engaged in gardening; he makes a specialty of vegetables and small fruits. In 1845 he was married, at Lowell, to Eliza Murch, who has borne him three children.

Page 348

W. H. Fruen

a native of England,-was born July 15th, 1846. At the age of seventeen, he commenced learning the machinist's trade. In June 1865, he came to America and worked at his business in Boston, until removing to Minneapolis in 1870; he worked in a shop on Second and Cataract streets till the present factory was built in 1874. Mr. Fruen has been twice married, his present wife, to whom he was married in 1871, was Miss Henrietta Birquest, of Illinois. They have three sons and one daughter.

Page 348

Thomas Gaffney

a native of Ireland, was born in 1826. When two years old he came with his parents to America, and lived on a farm in Aroostook county, Maine, until eighteen years of age, when he commenced lumbering on the Penobscot river. In 1854, he removed to Saint Anthony, and for eight winters worked in the pineries; in 1857, he secured the claim where he now lives and built his present residence in 1880. August 18th, 1862, he enlisted and went to Fort Ridgely; the following summer he went with the expedition against the Indians, across the plains, and in the fall of 1863 went to St. Louis, where he was engaged in guard duty during the winter and in the spring went into active service, participating in all the battles of his regiment. He was honorably discharged in August, 1865. In April, 1857, he married Ellen Buckley. They have six children.

Page 349

C. C. Garvey

was born in New Brunswick, March 29th, 1828. At the age of four years he went with his parents to Maine. When he was but eighteen his father died, and it became his duty to cue for and support the family. In 1850 he came to Minnesota, made one of the first claims on the west side of the river, and received the second patent from Washington. Mr. Garvey attended the first election on this side of the river and cast the first ballot. He was married, in 1859, to Miss L. A. Nason. Nine children have been born to them.

Page 349

W. M. Girling

a native of England, was born in 1830. He came to America, and following the business of his father and grandfather, went to manufacturing knitted goods. He started factories in Boston, and in New Hampshire, and Germantown, Pennsylvania. In 1874 he came here, and is now one of the proprietors of the Minneapolis Knitting Mills. Mr. Girling has a family of eight children, five sons and three daughters.

Page 349

E. A. Goodspeed

was born in 1854, at Vassalborough, Maine. He came to Minneapolis in April, 1871, and was engaged in the lumber trade until 1877, when he became a member of the firm of Goodspeed and Sons, wholesale dealers in sheep. This business is exclusively wholesale, and they sell either on foot or dressed. The individual members of the firm are A. H., J. B., and E. A. Goodspeed. April 13th, 1879, Mr. Goodspeed married Mary Townsend They have one child.

Page 349

John Green

born in New Brunswick, in 1820. He lived there until twenty years of age, engaged in farming: then went to Maine, and for eleven years was in the lumber business. In the fan of 1853 he came to Minneapolis, and in 1855, took by pre-emption the farm he still owns, and built his present residence in 1875. Mr. Green was married, in 1850, at Old Town, Maine, to Mary Hutchins, who was born in 1830, at Knox, Waldo county, Maine. They have three children : James, Rhoda, and Luella.

Page 349

M. J. Hallaron

a native of Ireland, was born September 9th, 1832. He emigrated to America in 1851, located in Cortland county, New York, and engaged in farming. In 1857 he came to St. Anthony, and that winter worked in the woods, and in 1855 made a claim one mile west of Cedar Lake. The summer of 1856 he worked on Lake Pepin, and that winter he was with Mr. Nash, in the hardware business. The following summer he was employed by Tufts, Reynolds and Co. Mr. Hallaron was married, December 20th, 1858, to Catharine Wallace. They removed to the farm, and remained until, November, 1862, when they came to Minneapolis, and he engaged in the dray and express business for fourteen years. In 1878 he moved to his farm, and erected all the buildings. They have six children: John, Mary, Nellie, James, Katie, and Agnes.

Page 349

Christopher Hanke

a native of Germany, was born in 1826. He emigrated to America in 1854; and lived in Ohio until 1857, when he came here, for two years he rented a farm, and in 1864 purchased 205 acres on section 5, 6 and 7, and has since resided there. He was married in Germany, November 9th, 1851, to Miss Stammen. They are the parents of five children. Mr. Hanke makes a specialty of raising full blood Jersey cattle, Chester White and Poland China swine. He has one of the finest farms in Hennepin county; his barn, built in 1876, is 88x36 feet, and four stories high; it is considered the second best in the county; he also has a granary 73x24 feet, three stories high; the whole place is a model of neatness. Mrs. Hanke annually manufactures 2,000 pounds of fine butter for private customers.

Page 349

J. W. Hayes

was born in 1853 at Watertown, Jefferson county, Wisconsin. In 1866 he moved to Steams county, Minnesota, and engaged in farming; he came to Minneapolis in May, 1875 and worked for G. McPeters until he bought him out in 1877, since which time he has conducted the Lyndale Dairy in partnership with Mr. Mathison; they own fifty-three cows, and are doing a successful business. Mr. Hayes was married in May, 1879, to Miss Glenen of Wisconsin.

Page 350

J. F. Held

a native of Prussia, was born in 1844. He moved to Indiana in 1861; enlisted August, 1862, in the Fifth Indiana Cavalry, and served until the close of the war. He came to Minneapolis in 1865 and worked three years in a saw mill; afterwards was engaged as a laborer until 1871, when he bought 145 acres of land on section 80, and the spring following started an extensive garden; he makes a specialty of fine celery, also raises a large variety of vegetables, and has a vineyard of one-half acre. His wife was Austine Crousey, whom he married in 1878. They have one child: Margretta.

Page 350

C. Jenson

was born in Denmark, in 1847. He emigrated to America, and in 1867 went to Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. In the fall of 1868 he removed to Minneapolis, and was engaged as laborer until 1872, when he embarked in the dairy business. The firm of Smith and Jenson started with forty cows, but at the expiration of four months they sold out, and in the fall of 1873, commenced with only twenty cows, which they sold again in the spring. The following autumn, the firm of Jenson Brothers located on the east side, engaged in the dairy business with twenty-four cows, and in 1875, bought their place of fifteen acres, on section 29. In the spring of 1878 this partnership was dissolved and C. Jenson is now sole proprietor of the "Western Avenue Dairy."

Page 350

Hans Johanson

a native of Denmark, was born in 1844. He came to Minneapolis in 1872, and in, 1876 commenced the dairy business. He now has fifteen cows. Mr. Johanson was married in 1875, to Miss Anna Madsen. They are the parents of one child.

Page 350

Martin Layman

was born in Greene county, New York, January 18th, 1811. For a time he resided in Tompkins county, and then removed to Illinois, where he worked at farming until 1853, when he came to Minneapolis, and bought the place where he has since lived. He bought the original claim of Hanscom, and paid him $1,000 for it. He built his present commodious residence in 1876. Mr. Layman married, in 1832, Miss Elizabeth Brown, who has borne him thirteen children. All are living but one son and one daughter.

Page 350

A. D. Libby

a native of Maine, was born in Waldo county, in 1833. After finishing his education he was engaged in a store for a time, and in 1857 moved to Minnesota. He first located a farm in Wright county, but soon moved here, and helped break the land where South Minneapolis now stands. For eight consecutive years he taught in the schools of Hennepin county, and was one of the volunteers at the time of the outbreak in 1862. Mr. Libby is now Clerk of Minneapolis township. He was married in 1866, to Miss Hannah Garvey. They have five children: Byron, Louis, Viola, Stella, and an infant.

Page 350

P. S. Miller

it native of Sweden, was born in 1854. In the autumn of 1879, he married Miss Rozetta Jordan, of Minneapolis. He came here in 1872, and worked for dairymen until 1877, when the firm of Miller Brothers started with twenty cows. They own two acres of land on section 17, and now have sixty fine cows. They run one wagon twice a day in summer, and are doing a prosperous business.

Page 350

U. Oswald

born in Switzerland, in 1829. He was a civil engineer, and worked ten years on the first railroad in his native country. He emigrated to America, and in 1875 was married to Frances Runser, of Wisconsin. He came to Minneapolis in 1867, and worked at farming the first year; after that as landscape gardener; in the spring of 1875 started his park, on the Cedar Lake road. It is furnished with a good green-house, and its fine drives, walks, etc., make it a favorite resort. Mr. Oswald also furnishes his guests with ice cream, lemonade, and all kinds of refreshments.

Page 350

R. L. Pratt

was born at Lincoln, Maine, September 16th, 1830. He lived on a farm until nineteen years of age, then worked at the lumber business; he came to Saint Anthony in June, 1850, and continued lumbering until 1859, when he removed to California, but returned in 1865 and bought the place he now owns on section 17. He married Lydia, daughter of Rev. A. Turner, of Levant, Maine. They have three children. Mr. Pratt bought the only dairy in Minneapolis in 1865; it consisted of fifteen cows, which at that time furnished the city with milk. He now owns forty milk cows.

Page 350

Stephen Pratt

a native of Penobscot county, Maine, was born in 1828. In October, 1849, he came to Saint Anthony; there were but three or four houses here at that time. He worked as laborer and in the lumber business until 1858, when he took a claim in Wright county, which he sold four years later. He enlisted in the First Minnesota Cavalry in 1862, and served until the regiment was mustered out in November, 1863. The following winter, Mr. Pratt worked in the woods and in the spring bought his present farm of 160 acres; he started the dairy and butcher business with a partner, but they separated in 1865, and Mr. Pratt retained the farm; he raised the first "early rose" potatoes in this county, paying thirty-three dollars per bushel for the seed. The second year he raised 1,500 bushels which he sold at four dollars per bushel. In June, 1872, he was married to Mrs. Jennie Curtis. They are the parents of one child.

Page 351

J. M. Patten

born in Penobscot county, Maine, in 1840. He went to Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1858, and worked at teaming. In 1860 he married Annette Danforth, and in 1862 enlisted in the Forty-fourth Massachusetts and served until mustered out. In the spring of 1864 he went to California for the benefit of his health, and returned to Nebraska by an overland route, walking about nine hundred miles of the way. He was one of the first workmen on the U. P. Railroad in 1866-7, then returned to Maine for a short time, thence to Milton, Massachusetts. He bought a farm in Randolph, but only lived there four years, when he removed to Minnesota for the health of an only son, who died February 22d, 1877. Mr. Patten is Proprietor of the "City Dairy," and owns fifty cows.

Page 351

Thomas W. Peirce

a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania was born August 23d, 1823. He was one of six sons all of whom learned the carpenter's trade; he commenced working when fifteen years of age, and continued the trade for about fifteen years; moved to Ohio in 1846; he went to Indiana for a short time, but returned to Ohio and formed a partnership with a Mr. Hillman, in contracting and building. In the fall of 1852 Mr. Peirce removed to Saint Anthony; he built a house for Mr. Richards, and in October, 1852, he purchased a claim of 40 acres from Mr. Lowell, paid thirty-three dollars for it, and made a settlement with the government. The following spring he cleared

small piece of land and planted one-half acre to potatoes; this was the beginning of his farm. In the summer of 1853 he built a residence for Mr. Hanson. Mr. Peirce was appointed a bidder for the first land sale in the county; the sale never occurred however. In 1855-6 he was a member of the Territorial legislature, and was president of the Protective Association, formed by settlers to defend claims from land jumpers. It was he who sharpened and drove the first stake, for the survey of Minneapolis, at the junction of Nicollet and Hennepin avenues; Charles Christmas was surveyor, Mr. Peirce is one of the oldest living settlers of Hennepin county, and relates many thrilling incidents of pioneer life. He was married in 1849 to Miss Margaretta Moss. They have two children: Frederick W. and Laura Jennie.

Page 351

Fred. Peterson

was born in 1850, in Denmark. He came here in 1872, and was employed by different dairymen for five years. April 9th, 1879, he married Laura Oleson. They have one child. The firm of Peterson Brothers established a dairy in 1877, with forty-five cows, afterward increased their stock to sixty-five; the partnership was discontinued in April 1880, and Mr. Fred. Peterson is now proprietor of the Accommodation dairy.

Page 351

Christian Peterson

came to Minneapolis in 1877, and worked for dairymen until the fall of 1879, when he established himself the business; he now has twenty cows.

Page 351

Michael Rey

was born in Alsace, in 1826. He came to America in 1849, and was employed in a wholesale store at Saint Louis, until 1859, when he removed to Bunker Hill, Illinois, and engaged in farming. In September 1869, he came here and bought the place he now owns. He married at Saint Louis, in 1852. Seven children have been born to them. Mr. Rey has a fine garden, with eighty square feet of hot beds; he raises strawberries, raspberries and all kinds of vegetables.

Page 351

C. B. Sanborn

a native of Carroll county, New Hampshire, was born in 1827. He learned the tailor's trade and was in the clothing business at Great Falls, New Hampshire, for two years, after that he went to Meredith and carried a general stock of merchandise until 1857, when, he came here, and for a time engaged in the grocery business. He was married to Miss Sarah Hubbard. They had one daughter who died May 8d, 1880, at the age of twenty-one. Mr. Sanborn has thirty-three acres on section 34, and raises all kinds of evergreens adapted to this climate.

Page 352

N. Shepherd

was born at Bedford, Vermont, in 1823. At the age of twenty-one, he went to Lowell, Massachusetts, and remained four years; he passed two years in Newbury, Vermont, then removed to Ripon, Wisconsin, and carried on a building business for four years, employing about twenty men. He married Lydia Newcomb, who bore him one son and three daughters. Mr. Shepherd came here in fall of 1877, and the following spring started the "North Star Fruit and Vegetable Garden;" he makes a specialty of the Wilson and Albany strawberries, the Philadelphia and Turner raspberries and the Brittania blackberries, he also raises a great variety of vegetables, and keeps the different kinds of evergreens that are adapted to this climate.

Page 352

L. Small

was born in 1844, at Pembrook, Maine. When but sixteen years of age, he went to sea, and at twenty-three became captain of the ship Vulcan; after six years, he left the water, and lived in Boston six years, then for two years he engaged in the fishing business. In 1862, he married Miss Robina Ostrom. Mr. Small embarked in the dairy business in March, 1879, and now owns forty cows. The firm of Small and Darling, stock dealers, was established in August 1880, located at Sixth avenue south and Thirty-fourth street. They have a desirable farm of forty acres, and do a general stock business.

Page 352

C. A. Smith

a native of Wilmington, Vermont, was born in 1829. He lived there until thirty-three years of age; then went to Waltham, Massachusetts, and for seven years was engaged in a bakery. He came to Minnesota, and worked at the carpenter's trade, three years in Northfield, and the same length of time in Minneapolis. He was married in 1850, to Elizabeth A. Jefts, who has borne him five children. In 1875, Mr. Smith started his garden of ten acres on section 2, and is doing a thriving business; he has extensive hot beds, and the green house is a building 75x24 feet.

Page 352

James Smith

was born in Scotland, in 1834. For a time he held the position of overseer of the Colzium estate in Sterlingshire, for the late Sir Archibald Edmondstone. In 1871, he came to America, and for five years had charge of a stock farm on Long Island, then of the Thorndall farm in Dutchess county, New York, two years, and in the spring of 1876, took possession of the Lyndale farm, where he now resides; this place has the finest barn in Minnesota. Mr. Smith raises the celebrated Jersey cattle, Berkshire swine, Norman horses and Cotswold and Lincoln sheep, all from imported stock; at the late fair, he received seven first-class premiums amounting to over $500. Mr. Smith's wife was Margaret McVicar, of Scotland, they were married in 1860 Five children have been born to them.

Page 352

Nils Smith

a native of Denmark, was born August 17th, 1847. He came to America in 1864; located at Minneapolis, and for three years worked on a farm; he then engaged in the dairy business for himself; in 1875, having thirty-five cows, he sold a half interest and in 1877, sold the remainder. In the spring of 1880, he started again with thirty-two cows and now has thirty-eight. He owns ten acres of land on section 1, and forty acres on section 29. In October, 1875, he married Hanne Hansen, who has borne him two children: Soren and Hanne.

Page 352

Captain John Tapper

a native of England, was born in Dorsetshire,, on the 25th of March, 1820. He emigrated to America in 1840, and spent the first summer in St. Louis. In the fall he went to Fort Atkinson, Iowa, remained one and one-half years, then went to Fort Crawford, Wisconsin, and lived until the autumn of 1844, when he removed to Fort Snelling. At the beginning of the Mexican war he went to Mexico, with Dr. George Turner, of the United States Army, and remained with him until the close of the war, when they returned together to Fort Snelling, and Mr. Tapper engaged with Franklin Steele. He was at the Fort something over a year; then came to St. Anthony, and managed Steele's boarding-house one season; then took charge of the ferry, and afterward of the first suspension bridge. In 1862 he removed to Iowa, and engaged in farming. He returned in the winter of 1880-81, and located on a farm belonging to the Steele estate, near Minnehaha Falls. On the 8th of August, 1853, he married Matilda Stinson, of Minneapolis. This was the first marriage which occurred on the west side. Five children have been born to them: Rosie E., Frank H., Willie D., Mary M., and Jesse B. The first four were born on Nicollet Island, the last one in Iowa.

Page 352

L. Tilleny

was born in Plymouth, England, in 1831. When a babe he came with his parents to America, and lived in Vermont until March, 1854, when he went to California, where he was engaged in mining and the dairy business until 1860. He then removed to Wisconsin, and in the fall of 1863 came to Minneapolis, and purchased the farm he still owns, on sections 6 and 7. He is a breeder of the celebrated Norman and Clyde horses, from imported stock. Mr. Tilleny was married, in 1858, to Lydia Stanton.

Page 353

Hiram Van Nest

was born in 1831, near Sandusky, Ohio. In early life he moved to Illinois with his parents, and when twenty years of age came to Minneapolis. He attended the first election held on the west side of the river, and, November 27th, 1854, he had placed on record the first warranty deed in Hennepin county. It was Mr. Van Nest who cleared the road from the point where it leaves Lake Calhoun to Minnehaha Creek near the Goodrich farm. In 1861 he married Rachel Blaisdell. They have two children living. His farm of 120 acres is on section 10. He raises shorthorn cattle, Lincoln and Southdown sheep, and Berkshire swine, from imported stock.

Page 355

Adam Burg

a native of Germany, was born in 1826, at the village of Moetach. He attended school until twelve years of age, and afterward worked on a farm. In 1852 he emigrated with his father to the United States. He resided in Chicago three yews. In 1855 he came to Minnesota, settled at St. Anthony, and has since been a permanent resident of Hennepin county. His wife was Therese Kohler. Their marriage occurred in 1866. Of the nine children born to them, six are living.

Page 355

Charles Estes

was born in the town of Cornish, York county, Maine, April, 1835. He engaged in railroad business in Massachusetts for a time, and in 1853 moved with his parents to Minnesota. He located at Anoka, and helped build the first mill-dam at that place. He eventually came to St. Anthony, which is still his home. His father is living with him a vigorous old gentleman eighty-seven years of ago. Charles Estes enlisted in the Ninth Minnesota Infantry, and served three years. He is one of the old settlers, and has a fine place. The first brick made in this country were manufactured on his farm. His wife was Mrs. Julia Estes, whom he married in 1872. They have three children living.

Page 356

Elijah W. Grindall

was born September 20th, 1804, at Penobscot, Hancock county, Maine. He received his education in the public schools, and then worked at farming. In January, 1826, he married Caroline Higgins, who bore him nine children. Mr. Grindall came to St. Anthony in 1854, after a few months residence in Iowa. He was an energetic farmer, and served as County Commissioner several terms. His death occurred in 1872. Mrs. Grindall and her youngest son, Olin, live at the farm.

Page 356

Ernest Hilgedick

a native of Germany, was born in 1823. He attended school until sixteen years of age, and was employed in farming from that time until 1844, when he emigrated with his parents to America. He resided in Warren county, Missouri, until 1850; then spent three years in California, where he met with considerable success in mining. He came to Minnesota, and purchased a farm in Ramsey county. Lived there until he settled in this county, in 1872. His marriage with Lisetta Dothage occurred in 1853. They have ten children. Two of the sons are proprietors of the Edgewood Dairy.

Page 356

Louis Kampff

was born in Hanover, North Germany, in 1828. He learned the trade of potter, and came to the United States in 1854, lived three years at Galena, Illinois, then came to St. Anthony, where he has since been engaged in the manufacture of pottery, with success. He was married in 1857, at Galena, Illinois, to Minnie Koehlberg, of that place seven children were born to them, six of whom are living.

Page 356

M. F. Kletzin

was born in North Prussia, in 1830. In 1852, he came to America and located at Lockport, New York, where he was engaged in gardening until 1856, when he came to St. Anthony, and resided in the city till 1865, then located on the place where he now lives. He has made gardening a successful business. Married in, 1861, Johanna Sandhoff, who has borne him two children, but one of whom is living.

Page 356

John Oberlies

a native of Germany, was born In 1834. At the age of fourteen, he began an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, and in 1853 came to America. He lived in Pennsylvania five years, then came to this county, and has since resided in the town of St. Anthony. He was among the first carpenters who worked in Minneapolis. His wife was Miss Katherine Kessler, whom he married in 1854. They have had eight children, of whom five are living.

Page 356

Nathan O. Phillips

one of the oldest settlers of St. Anthony township was born in Windham county, Vermont, in 1822. He attended the public schools, until the age of eighteen, and was also engaged in the occupations of farmer and carriage builder. In 1844, he went to Boston, Massachusetts, and found employment in a wholesale paper establishment, where he remained about six years, and in 1850, came to St. Anthony. He lived there one year then made the claim where he has since resided. He has been clerk of the town for the last eighteen years. He was married in 1849, to Mary A. Philbrook. Four children have been born to them, two now living: Eugnia: F. and Proctor H.

Page 356

C. J. Swanson

was born in Smoland, South Sweden. He emigrated to the United States in 1869, and settled in McLeod county, Minnesota; one year later he came to Minneapolis. He began the manufacture of brick in 1876. The business has since been prosperous. The yards are located on the east side of the river, three miles north of the city and furnish employment to forty-five men and ton teams. He was married in 1876, to Christine Johnson, who has borne him one child.

Page 356

Frank Thiry

a native of France, was born February 25th, 1835. He engaged in farming till 1853 when he came to America. After a residence of two years in New York, where he learned the tinners' trade, he removed to Utica, thence to Illinois, and worked at his trade at Napierville. In 1857 he came to Saint Anthony and worked as tinner for Spence and Pomeroy. In 1860 he established a hardware and tin store, and carried on the business five years, then took as partner, Charles Henry, and the firm of Frank Thiry and Company did a successful business for about ton years. Mr. Thiry was obliged to leave the city on account of ill-health, and has since lived on his farm. He still owns the business house, number 9, Main street, E. D. He was married in 1860, to Caroline Stolzman; they have had eight children, seven of whom are living.

Page 499

Judge Isaac Atwater

In few men are more rare combinations of talent required, than in pioneers of new countries; invincible courage, enterprise tempered by prudence; promptness and decision united with calm reflection; sagacity combined with enthusiasm, are indispensable requisites. Trades, professions, creeds, in short all that has a tendency to make a successful commonwealth must be represented as near the beginning as possible. Among those who planted the foundation for the future city of Minneapolis, and assisted in laying the corner stone of the state of Minnesota, none contributed more zealously than Judge Isaac Atwater, who arrived at St. Anthony Falls, in 1850. He is a native of Homer, Cortland county, New York, where he lived and worked on the farm until he was sixteen years of age, which life he then abandoned for the necessary preparation incident to a profession. He received a thorough classical education, and graduated at Yale college, in 1844, and two years subsequently in like manner graduated at Yale law school. Promptly upon being admitted to the bar he commenced a successful practice of law in New York city, which was continued until his removal to St. Anthony, where immediately upon his arrival, he entered into partnership with Hon. John W. North, and continued the practice of his profession in the district and supreme courts of the Territory. A few months subsequently to his arrival, he was appointed one of the regents of the state university of Minnesota, and, on the organization of the board, was made secretary, which responsible position he held for nine years, performing the duties in the most satisfactory manner, and this, too, without compensation. It is proper to remark that had it not been for the judicious course punned by Judge Atwater and his colleagues in these early days. none of whom ever received any compensation for their services, but on the other hand contributed large sums of money from their own pockets in the interest of the institution, there is no probability that the stately edifice which we all are so proud of would have been built at all, or at least not in this neighborhood. To the first board of regents are the citizens indebted for the inauguration of the University of Minnesota, at the Falls of St. Anthony. Several liberal citizens, then residents on both banks of the Mississippi, such as Calvin A. Tuttle, Esq., also subscribed and paid, large subscriptions to enable the regents to commence the erection of suitable preparatory buildings for the use of the university. In 1861, upon the advent of the St. Anthony Express, Judge Atwater, in addition to his numerous other duties, became editor-in-chief of that paper, and conducted the editorial columns with great ability until his elevation to the supreme bench upon the organization of the state government in 1857. His vigorous and able pen soon gave this paper, then published on the extreme frontier, a national reputation, and it was the source of the introduction of thousands and thousands of emigrants into the territory as permanent settlers.

In 1853 he received the suffrages of the citizens of Hennepin county for district attorney. This office, in a new country, where the inhabitants are concentrated from the four quarters of the globe, is attended with difficulties, which are unknown in old settled communities. In 1857 he was elected one of the associate justices of the Supreme Court. His elevation to a seat on the supreme bench necessarily caused him to vacate the editorial chair of the St. Anthony Express, but his habits of industry were continued in frequent contributions of articles of rare merit, which appeared in the leading periodicals of the day. In 1864 he resigned the office of supreme judge, in consequence of a determination to visit the Pacific States for the purpose of resuming the practice of law. He opened an office in Carson City, Nevada, extending his practice to Virginia City, in that state. He remained three years on the Pacific slope, when he returned to Minneapolis, and has since that time continued the practice of his profession, occupying at the same time, for years, a seat in the city council, a portion of which time he was president of the board of aldermen. For eight years he was a member of the board of education, an important trust for which his knowledge, habits, and interest in schools peculiarly fitted him. The three last years of his service with the board, he was president of that body. It will be seen that Judge Atwater has bestowed a good deal of his valuable time to municipal as well as educational purposes, and to his influence and services are the citizens largely indebted for the healthy and prosperous condition of the matters closely connected with the city affairs, as well as the excellent system of schools which abounds in Minneapolis. He is also a valuable member of the board of trade, which in a measure, shapes the future destinies of the city. Judge Atwater belongs to the Protestant Episcopal Church, in which he has occupied numerous positions and trusts in the interest of Christianity, and is always ready to bestow aid and assist in the elevation of mankind.

In 1849, Judge Atwater was married to Miss Permelia A. Sanborn, a lady who is universally respected by a large circle of acquaintances. Her beautiful home is surrounded with the choicest floral gifts, the fruits of her handiwork. She takes much interest in the propagation of plants, flowers and vines, which make our homes cheerful and happy. Her good works in these things were held in such high estimation by the State Horticultural Society, which she was unanimously elected an honorary member of that society. The Judge and Mrs. Atwater have had three children. Cora, the eldest, a bright little girl, died in 1852, aged fifteen months. L. Isabel, the second daughter, is the wife of Col. A. C. Reid, of San Francisco, California. The youngest, John B., is also a graduate of Yale College, has chosen the same profession as his father, and is the junior member of the firm of Atwater and Atwater, attorneys at law.

Page 500

Alfred Elisha Ames

a representative of the pioneer settlers of Minnesota none are more deserving of a bright record, than Alfred Elisha Ames, whose life was a great success. He was a native of Colellester, Vermont, where he was born December 13th, 1814. He attended the common schools a few months of each year, working on a farm the balance of the time, until he was seventeen years of age. Under the influence of his honest, industrious parents, his mind was fitted to look beyond his immediate surroundings, and win his way to an honored and useful career. In 1832 he went to Painesville, Ohio, where he attended school during the winter, working for his board with a doctor. He became interested in medicine, reading when opportunity was afforded. He engaged in farming and brick making for some time, and in 1836 he, with his newly wedded wife emigrated to Boone county, Illinois, where his father, with family had preceded him. In 1837 his father died, and all depended upon his exertions for the support of his wife, also his widowed mother and her family. In November 1838, taking a pack on his back, he started by way of an Indian trail to Vandalia, then the seat of government. Through the kind efforts of Hon. Stephen A. Douglass, he obtained employment as deputy of the secretary of state and private secretary to Gov. Carlin. In 1840 Mr. Ames attended medical lectures at Rush Medical College, Chicago, under Professor Daniel Brainerd; he afterward worked on his farm reading medicine nights; later with Dr. R. S. Maloney, of Belvidere, where he also began to practice. In 1842 he was elected to the state legislature from the counties of Boone, McHenry, Kane, De Kalb and Grundy. After the adjournment of the legislature, he went to Chicago and attended a course of medical lectures, studying with Professor Brainerd. He attended another course of lectures at Chicago, and graduated from Rush Medical college in February, 1845. In 1847 he made a professional visit to New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Cincinnati, and St. Louis, visiting all the hospitals and deriving much benefit from the tour. He was elected to the state senate of Illinois in 1849. At Springfield, Governor French commissioned him paymaster-general of his staff and the next year, owing to his faithful devotion, he was re-elected to the senate. In October 1851, he came to Saint Anthony in quest of a new home, and in November located a claim and built a shanty on the present site of Minneapolis. Forming a partnership with Dr. J. H. Murphy, he began the practice of medicine at Saint Anthony. He was elected to the territorial legislature from Hennepin county in 1852 and in October, 1854, he was chosen probate judge. In 1856 Dr. Ames drew the bill for incorporating the village of Minneapolis, and was appointed its postmaster. On June 1st, 1857, he was elected a member of the constitutional convention, in which body he was chairman of the committee on school lands and university, and in 1860 was a member of the state normal school board. In 1862 he visited the hospitals in the principal eastern cities, and returning home resumed his practice. In 1868 he went east to visit his native place and May 1st he embarked at New York city for California, being absent several months. After his return he continued to reside and practice in this city until his death. He served in many public capacities; was a member and usually a leader in all medical societies, also actively interested in all matters pertaining to educational advantages. During the summer of 1874 his health began to fail him and in September he passed peacefully to his rest. His funeral, which took place the Sunday following, was conducted by Dr. McMasters of St. Paul, attended by nearly all the masonic bodies in the state. Dr. Ames was an enthusiastic worker in the cause of masonry. Many lodges were organized and instructed by him; he was the first grand Master and organized the first grand lodge in the state. He was a member of the Episcopal church. His marriage with Martha A. Pratt, occurred at Geneva, Ohio, in 1836. By this union they had seven sons, five of whom with their mother, survive him.

Page 501

Eli B. Ames

was born in Colchester, Vermont, August 3d, 1820. In 1832, moved to Ohio, and in 1836 to Boone county, Illinois, where he lived until 1841, then went to Ottawa and was admitted to the bar in 1842, when he moved to Hennepin, Putnam county, Illinois, where he was postmaster from 1844 to 1848. Probate judge from 1848 to 1850. Member of the state legislature in 1851 and 1852. Governor Madison's private secretary for two years. In 1855, appointed consul to Hamburg, and acted as such until the spring of 1857. During that spring he went to Washington, to arrange a postal treaty between that country and the United States, for the general exchange of German mail through Hamburg. He succeeded in the undertaking and also in reducing the rate of postage from thirty to ten cents. He showed such ability in the office as consul, that the consulate was held open for his return a year, which he did not do, but came to Minneapolis in June, 1857, and located, opening a general insurance business, which he has followed to the present time. He was secretary of the state senate from 1861 to 1864, and elected mayor of Minneapolis in 1870 and 1871. Married Miss Delia A. Payne, in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31st, 1854. They have had three children, all living, Addie H., Alice D. and Agnes L.

Page 501

Ezra B. Ames

was born at Garden Prairie, Illinois, August 26th, 1837. Is a son of Dr. A. E. Ames, who made the first kiln of brick in Chicago, and was one of the early settlers of that region. Mr. Ames moved with his parents, in the spring of 1852, to Minneapolis, attended the first school in this city, taught by Mary A. Schofield; only six pupils attended, himself and two brothers, two brothers of the McLeod family and Emma Tuttle, in a log house near where the Washburn mill now stands; also attended the first courts held in the old government mill, and first religious services, at which the Rev. Mr. Pond officiated. In 1854, he engaged as clerk with Tuft, Reynolds and Whittemore in the mercantile business, remained until 1856, when he opened a general store at Dayton and continued until 1860. Then engaged in milling at Rockford, Wright county, until 1862, when he enlisted in First Minnesota Cavalry, served his term of one year, and was honorably discharged. On his return, opened in company with Mr. Hopper, a meat market, on the corner of Washington and Nicollet Avenues, which business he followed until 1871, after which he engaged in the commission business, and latterly has given his attention to his own real estate and tenement business. Was married at Minneapolis, January 1st, 1864, to Mary C. Hopper, one of the early comers to this city. They have had four children, two now living; Edgar C. and Frederick. A.

Page 502

Albert Alonzo Ames

was born at Garden Prairie, Boone county, Illinois, January 18th, 1842. At ten years of age he moved with his parents to Minneapolis, graduated from the high school at sixteen, and at once commenced the study of medicine with his father. Graduated at the Rush Medical College, of Chicago, February 5th, 1862. Married, April 21st, 1862, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Capt. Richard Strout, of Minneapolis. In August 1862, Dr. Ames, in company with others, raised Company B of 9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and engaged in the service on the frontier, participating in all the battles of his regiment against the Indians. In the fall of 1863, accompanied his regiment south, and was in active service until the close of the war. His experience in surgery, gained during his time of service, was of great value to him. In July 1864, he was commissioned surgeon, and served in that capacity until mustered out, August 18th, 1865. Returned to Minneapolis, and engaged in the practice of his profession with his father. In November, 1866, he was elected to the state legislature from Hennepin county. In 1868, went to California, and engaged in the newspaper business until 1874, when he returned to Minneapolis, where he has since remained. After the death of his father, in September, 1874, he took his practice, and has continued it since. Has held, several offices of prominence, and was elected mayor of Minneapolis in 1876. Is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Odd Follows, Druids, and Knights of Pythias. Has three children living: Charlie C., Effie F., and Frankie E.

Page 502

Herman Abel

was born in Germany in 1825. Learned the dyeing and scouring business in his native country, and followed it for thirty-one years in Germany and the United States. He has been engaged in Minneapolis since 1878, and is at present, located at No. 304 Hennepin Avenue. Married Rosina Flad, June, 1861. They have two children, Anna C. and George J.

Page 502

A. M. Alden

was born in Cortland county, New York, October 24th, 1838. At the age of twelve, moved with parents to McHenry county, Illinois. In 1855, came to Minnesota and settled in Fillmore county, and engaged in farming there and in Dodge county until 1863. Thence to Olmsted county, engaged in the dry goods business until 1866, then to Fillmore county again, engaging in a general merchandise business until 1872, when he moved to Minneapolis and engaged in the grocery and crockery trade until 1880, when he retired for the purpose of looking after his property. Married in 1860, to Maria Shedd, of New Hampshire. They have live children, Elizabeth E., Wm. A., Jennie M., Bertha F., Edwin M. His wife died in 1871. Married for second wife, Mrs. H. E. Pardee, of Elgin, Illinois. They have had four children, two now living; Lyman S. and Harriet M.

Page 502

Z. O. Allen

born in Washington county, Maine, June 7th, 1859. Came to Minneapolis, in July, 1878, engaging in several different branches of business until August, 1880, when he bought an interest in the meat market located at 717 Washington Avenue south; firm name, Barber and Company.

Page 502

J. C. Allworth

Proprietor of the Allworth House, located at 118 Second street south. It is a two-story building with thirteen rooms, with the office, bar, dining-room and kitchen on the first floor, and the parlor on the second floor.

Page 502

James. M. Allan

was born in Montreal, Canada, February 11th, 1843. In 1857, moved with his parents to Upper Canada. In 1860 moved, and lived at Fort Atkinson, Iowa, one year, then to Decorah and learned the blacksmith trade. Enlisted, in 1863, in the Forty-sixth Iowa Infantry, and went to Tennessee, and was discharged at Davenport, September 23d, 1863. In 1872 went to Montana and, engaged in mining' and prospecting. Moved the same year to Minneapolis and worked six years for R. B. Langdon & Company. Was appointed on the police force in March 1879, which position he has since held. Married November 14th, 1865, to Mary E. Meadow. They have had three children; one now living, Leon L.

Page 503

Andrew Anderson

was born in Norway, January 22d, 1845. Came to the United States in 1866, and settled in Iowa, where he worked on a farm for two years. Moved to Hastings, Minnesota, in 1868, and worked three years on a farm and in a saw mill. Came to Minneapolis in 1871, and opened a saloon, which he continued for one year, then worked at coopering three years, and is now located at No. 1225 Fifth street south, in saloon business. Married Miss Clara Anderson; they have one child, Louisa.

Page 503

C. H. Anderson

born in Sweden. Moved to the United States and settled in Minneapolis in 1872, where he worked for six months in a meat market, then engaged for the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railroad Company until 1877, when he made a trip to his old home in Sweden, remaining there for nine months, when he returned to Minneapolis and engaged in the clothing business until the spring of 1880, when he engaged in the wood trade on the corner of Washington Avenue and Sixth Avenue south.

Page 503

C. P. Anderson

born in Sweden, in 1836. Came to America in 1866, and worked in Chicago four months, thence to Red Wing, Minnesota, working six months; then to Wisconsin, working at his trade, carpentering, for two years, thence to Lake City, keeping boarding house and saloon five months; then to Burlington, Iowa, working at his trade for two years, thence to New Ulm, Minnesota, in 1872, for a short time, and to Minneapolis, working at his trade until 1878, when he established his present business at 1421 Washington Avenue South.

Page 503

W. P. Ankeny

was born at Somerset, Pennsylvania, October 4th, 1821, died at Minneapolis, December 20th, 1877. In early life he was the publisher of a newspaper in his native town, also in mercantile business, and holding the position of postmaster. He went to California during the excitement attending the opening of that state, and engaged successfully in the stock business. On his return east he engaged in running a steam tannery. In 1857 Mr. Ankeny came to Minneapolis, and from that time until he was confined to his room by illness, was closely identified with the material growth, and Political interests of this city. He built a saw mill at the Falls in company with a Mr. Clement and Mr. Robinson of this city. They continued to do a lucrative business until 1872, when he was joined in the lumbering business by his brother A. T. Ankeny. He built the Galaxy mill, in 1871, which was burned and rebuilt, and went down in the explosion of 1878. He served as councilman for the sixth ward, and in the fail of 1861, was elected senator for the 27th district. He was largely interested in the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railroad, and the building of the Minneapolis Harvester Works. Was mainly instrumental in starting the first Building and Loan Association in the city, and was at one time its president. The many enterprises he was engaged in furnished at all times employment for a large number of men. His son W. S. Ankeny now occupies a responsible position at the Galaxy mill.

Page 503

A. T. Ankeny

was born at Somerset, Pennsylvania, December 27th, 1837. Received his education at Hiram, Ohio, and at Jefferson College, Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania. Studied law with John D. Ruddy, at Somerset, and completed his studies in the office of Hon. J. S. Black, Attorney General of the United States, at Washington, D. C. He was admitted to the bar April 1st, 1861. In February, 1862, on the accession of Hon. E. .M. Stanton to the War Department, was appointed by him to a position in the Quartermaster General's office, and held the same until the close of the war. He then resumed the practice of law at Somerset, and for a time was connected with one of the banks at that place. Came to Minneapolis in the spring of 1872, and became associated with his brother, W. P. Ankeny, in the manufacture of lumber. In 1874, the firm built the Galaxy flouring mill. Continued in the lumber business until 1877, at that time resuming the practice of law, which he has since continued successfully. Mr. Ankeny was married at Wheeling, West Virginia, May 2d, 1861, to Miss Martha V. Moore, daughter of John Moore, long identified with the interests of Wheeling. They are the parents of five children: Florence, Robbie, Nellie, Mattie, and Sallie. Residence on Western Avenue, on the bluffs outside of the city limits, where he owns forty acres of land, portions of it being very desirable residence property.

Page 504

John F. Appleby

born at Whitesborough, Oneida county, New York. When five years of age came with his parents to Wisconsin, and was reared on a farm. Enlisted in 1862 in the Twenty-third Wisconsin regiment, and served until honorably discharged July 4th, 1865, at Mobile, Alabama. During his term of service he invented the repeating magazine fire-arm, while at the siege of Vicksburg, which he sold to Thomas W. Lane of Boston, Massachusetts. After his return home he engaged in farming until 1868, during which time he completed the "Appleby Twinebinder," patent issued in 1869,and has since then received patents on several different binders; also patents on self-rakes and reapers, the latter known as the "Appleby Reaper." Came to Minneapolis in March, 1880, and arranged with the Minneapolis Harvester Works to manufacture his twine-binders, engaging with the company as mechanical superintendent of their works. He completed his binder at Beloit, Wisconsin, where they are still manufactured. They are also manufactured at Plano, Illinois, Excelsior Works, Miamisburg, Ohio, and at Whitewater, Wisconsin. Mr. Appleby was married at Mazo Manie, Wisconsin, in 1847, to Miss A. D. Spink. They have three children, Ruby G., J. Percy and John Roy.

Page 504

A. R. Archibald

Principal and proprietor of Archibald's Business Academy. A native of New England. Graduated at Dartmouth college, New Hampshire, and came West to take charge of the Stevens Seminary, Glencoe, Minnesota, filling the position acceptably until the fall of 1876, when he became commandant of the Minneapolis Military Academy. In the fall of 1877, opened the present institution to meet the wants of young people coming into the city, whose education was limited. At first the outlook for success was poor, but at the close of the year twenty names were enrolled. Since then, the business has developed in spite of opposition and at present the enrollment numbers sixty names with a prospect of twenty more during the year. Young men and women from the country and city who have not the time for a full course, here find just what is needed to prepare them for the practical pursuits of life.

Page 504

Solon Armstrong

was born at Sutton, New Hampshire, May 15th, 1834. Attended the Wesleyan University at Middletown, Connecticut, four years, then read law with George and Foster, Concord, New Hampshire, until 1857, when he came to St. Anthony and continued his studies with Lawrence and Lochren, until the fall of 1857; admitted to the bar the same year, also elected justice of the peace. Held the office till 1864, when he entered the government service in the quartermaster's department one year, making a trip across the plains with Col. Thomas's expedition. He then went into the office of Todd, Gordon and Co., till 1870 when he was appointed by the city council, city justice and clerk, which offices he held until the unity of the two cities, when the office was abolished. He called a meeting of the first council for the union of the two cities. He then entered the Zenith flouring mill office as book-keeper, till 1877, then purchased the old City Mill, after which Mr. M. B. Rollins became associated and they continued till the spring of 1878. In company with Mr. C. Noble bought the grocery interest of O. T. Swett and is at present located in Masonic block, University Avenue East Division. Mr. Armstrong was a member of the city council from 1873 to 1878 and president the last two years. Was married in Minneapolis February, 1874, to Mrs. Sarah B. Redfield, who died April 14th, 1879. Has three children living, Bessie P., Solon and Joseph.

Page 504

J. H. Arnell

was born in Orange county, New York, February 20th, 1836. Came to Minneapolis May 10th, 1857, and worked at his trade, harness-making, for William Murphy. In 1858, went into business for himself as one of the pioneers in the harness business. At that time there were but two other shops in Minneapolis. His first partner was John Conover, who sold out in 1860, leaving him alone. In 1862, he enlisted in the Second Minnesota Battery, serving nearly three years. Was discharged from the hospital at Nashville, Tennessee. Returning to Minneapolis, he resumed his old business. August 1874, he joined in partnership with L. Christlieb, and has continued business with him since. Was married to Francis Peet, of Minneapolis, September 23d, 1874. They have two children: Paul B. and Mabel.

Page 504

B. Aronson

born in Sweden, December 1st, 1845. Was raised on a farm until twenty-one years of age, when he learned the trade of mason, which he has followed constantly since. Came to America in 1867, and located in Minnesota, and commenced work for the Sioux City Railroad, building bridge foundations. Worked in Scott county one season and came to Minneapolis in 1872. Worked for George McMullen in 1872, working for himself alone until the firm of Patterson and Aronson was established, in 1877. They now employ from twenty to thirty men.

Page 505

John Arnoldy

was born in New Ulm, Brown county, Minnesota, September 4th, 1860, where he was brought up to the harness-making trade, and worked until 1877, when he came to Minneapolis, and worked for leading firms in the city until he formed a partnership with Andrew Keim in 1880, and located at 120 Plymouth Avenue.

Page 505

Peter Arnoldy

born in Germany, March 1st, 1849, and raised on a farm. Came to America in March, 1872, stopping a short time in Chicago and New Ulm, and reached Minneapolis in November, 1872. Is a cabinet-maker by trade, and by his industry and skill has built up quite a large business at his present place, 1503 Washington Avenue south. Was married in 1875, to Lucy Breyen, of Germany. They have two children: Herman J. and John M.

Page 505

K. Aslesen

was born in Norway, December 6th, 1853. Came to America with his parents who settled in Houston county, Minnesota, in 1857, where he remained until 1867, when he moved to Brownsville. Soon after, moved to Lansing, Iowa, where he worked as clerk in a grocery for six years. Thence to New Albin, engaging in general mercantile business until March, 1879, when he moved to Minneapolis and became one of the firm of Aslesen Bros. in a general grocery trade at 511 Washington Avenue south. In April, 1880, he bought his brother's interest in the concern and has since continued alone.

Page 505

F. A. Atwater

was born in Burlington, Vermont, in 1830, where he conducted a hotel for several years. Moved to Illinois in 1857, and in 1873 to Delano, Minnesota, where he engaged in the clothing business. September 1st, 1880, he bought the Clark House, located corner Fourth street and Hennepin Avenue, 100x118 feet, four stories high, eighty rooms. Office, dining-room, billiard hall, bar and mercantile sample rooms on the ground floor. Reception room and parlors on second floor. A conveniently arranged and well conducted house. Mr. Atwater married Miss Naomi N. Bradley, June 16th, 1856. They have four children: Stella C., Fanny, Edward and Hubbard.

Page 505

Ezra H. Austin

born at Hogansburgh, New York, April 4th, 1844. At the age of twelve went to work in the Howland mills at Waddington, New York, where he remained until 1860, when he went to Williamsburgh, New York, and ran a mill. August 11th, 1861, enlisted in the One hundred and second New York Volunteers, and served with the regiment through the war; mustered out June, 1865, came to Winona, Minnesota, in 1867, and ran the "Glen mills" for two years; moved to Wasioja, in the "Star mills" two years; came to Minneapolis in 1870, was with the Washburn mill eighteen months, the Pillsbury twelve months, and in Wisconsin six months; went into the Palisade mill in 1873, and has been there since. Married Miss Mary Fleener, March 4th,1870. They have one child living, Etta H.

Page 505

E. C. Babb

was born in Westbrook, Maine, February, 1834, where he followed lumbering until 1857, then moved to Berlin Falls, New Hampshire, and continued the lumber business until 1862, when he enlisted in the Ninth New Hampshire Volunteers; served as non-commissioned officer three months, was promoted Second .Lieutenant. In 1868, was promoted First Lieutenant and Captain in 1864. Was honorably discharged June, 1865. Speculated in oil in Canada two years; came to Minneapolis in 1868, and engaged in lumbering until the fall of 1875; since then has been in the ice business; proprietor of the Minneapolis Ice Company, until the formation of the Cedar Lake Ice Company in 1878. Was married at Berlin Falls, New Hampshire, August 1862, to Miss L. Chandler, of that place.

Page 505

Ernest and Bernard Bachner

twin brothers, were born in Prussia, February 1st, 1844. They learned the gunsmith trade in their native country, and in 1865, came to America, landing at Baltimore. Ernest secured a position in a gun manufactory at Washington, D. C., and Bernard came West, securing a position at Eau Claire, Wisconsin. They remained in their respective places about a year, and then met by appointment at Minneapolis; since then they have been identified with the interests of this city. For description of business, see other portions of this work.

Page 506

S. Harlan Baker

civil engineer, office 101 Central Avenue, was born fifty miles west of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 30th, 1846. He followed farming at home till 1865, when he entered the State Normal school, at Millersville, Pennsylvania, and graduated in the fall of 1867, after which he lay sick for two years. In 1869 came west for his health and located in Minneapolis. In the spring of 1870, went railroad surveying under Colonel Clough, remained a short time and engaged on Government survey on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad, where he remained until the spring of 1872, when he opened his present office. In 1876 was elected county surveyor, and served two terms. Married in Minneapolis, November, 1875, to Miss Laura Mixer. They have one child, Jessie.

Page 506

George Bagley

a native of London, England was born March 17th, 1850. At the age of two, he moved with parents to Kingston, Canada, and settled on a farm. When seventeen, he began an apprenticeship at the confectioners' trade in London, Canada, and served three years. In 1872 he removed to Chicago where he worked at his trade until 1878, when he came to this city, established a candy manufactory, and has since remained in that business, now located at 316 Nicollet Avenue. He married Mary Burge of Chicago, December 25th, 1874. They have one child, Ettie Iola.

Page 506

Miner Ball

was born December 15th, 1838, at Berne, Albany county, New York. Remained on farm until the age of sixteen; came to Minnesota in 1857, and lived at Caledonia one year, thence to St. Paul, and in 1859 engaged in mercantile business at Rockford, Wright county, being the only trader there. In 1861 sold out and came to Minneapolis and bought a photograph gallery of Charles Robinson, and conducted it until the following spring, when he sold out and moved to Lake City and opened the ginseng trade. In 1863, moved to Menomonee, Dunn county, Wisconsin, and run a livery stable, store and farm for three years. Then returned to Rockford, and went into trade. Built a saw mill opposite Greenwood and run it two years; it burned and he moved to Delano and built the Delano Flour and Saw Mills; remained there until 1879, and was foremost in building up the town. Came to Minneapolis in November, 1879, and entered into real estate and commission business. In 1880, sold his Delano property and in the fall opened a real estate office in the Clark House. Was married February 18th, 1862, to Miss Kate P. Powers, of Greenwood. Their children are Willie P., Robert Leslie, Ruth A., Frank P., and Firman G. Mrs. Ball died December 17th, 1875, and Mr. Ball married for his second wife Mrs. Sallie W. Jackson, of Pennsylvania, July 16th, 1879. She had one daughter, Viola Jackson.

Page 506

Daniel R. Barber

was born at Benson, Vermont, in 1818, lived with his father on the farm until he was twenty-one years of age, when he embarked in mercantile life, which he followed for thirteen years, twelve of which he was post-master. In 1856 he closed his business in Benson, and came West, locating at the then small town of St. Anthony Falls. For several years his business was dealing in real estate and loaning money, large sums of which were entrusted to him by Eastern parties, and on which he never met with a loss. He assessed the town and city for eleven years, and was once census enumerator. In 1872 he bought the Cataract Mill (described elsewhere in this work), which he has operated successfully since. Mr. Barber was married in February 1845, at Orwell, Vermont, to Miss Ellen L. Bottum, with whom he has since lived. The fruits of this union are: Julia B., born in May, 1846, and Edwin R., born in November, 1862. In August, 1865, Miss Julia was married to J. Wells Gardner, of this city, who died in San Francisco, California, in 1876. Edwin R. married Miss Hattie E. Sidle, a daughter of H. G. Sidle, banker, in October, 1873. They are now living at 41 South Seventh street. Both Edwin and Mrs. Gardner are partners with their father in the mill. After the death of Mr. Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. Barber left the home they had built up and occupied for twenty-one years, corner Fourth street and Second Avenue south and now live with their daughter at Second Avenue south between Fourth and Fifth streets.

Page 506

Ed. C. Barber

was born in Franklin county, Illinois, June 1st, 1849, and was brought up in his native state, and worked four years in the post-office at Cairo; also engaged as mail agent on mail train for eight years. After some time spent in various other pursuits, he came to Minneapolis in July, 1880, and started a meat-market at 1224 Western Avenue. Married in 1871. Present family, wife and one boy.

Page 507

Charles S. Bardwell

was born in, Hampshire county, Massachusetts, November 19th, 1836. Lived with his parents on the farm until the age of eighteen, when he came to St. Paul, Minnesota, and at once went to work in a sash factory, remaining but a few months; then went to Excelsior, and engaged in carpentering until 1863. Enlisted the following fall in the Second Minnesota Cavalry, serving two years and one month. Was on the frontier among the Indians, near the Bad Lands, and engaged in numerous conflicts with the red-skins. Was discharged in the fall of 1865, and returned to Minneapolis and engaged as foreman with J. Copeland and Company, in the sash, door and blind business. Remained with them six years. In the fall of 1872, went into business with L. C. Bisbee. Sold out in 1875, and moved to his present location. Married Miss Eliza Green, in 1858, who died May 8th, 1864. Mr. Bardwell has one son, who is now in the senior year at the university. In 1867 he was married again, to Miss Nettie Jenks, who died in 1872. They had one child, Lamont J.

Page 507

D. H. Barker

was born in Cumberland county, Maine, March 1st, 1844. In 1862 he located in Pennsylvania, and engaged in the lumber business. Came to Minneapolis in 1865, and followed lumbering seven years. Started a meat market and route in 1872, on Central Avenue, E. D., where he continued until he was burned out, in January, 1879. Next opened at his present location, where he is doing a growing business in meats, salt and fresh, canned goods, fish and oysters, at No. 717 Washington Avenue south. Married in 1870, to Miss Katie Lammer. They have three children: Nettie, Gracie, and Edna.

Page 507

S. Barker

born in Ripley county, Indiana, August 16th, 1844. Came to this city in 1866, and worked four years in a sawmill, as millwright, and has assisted in building nearly all the mills in the city, and has also worked at repairing. For the past three and a half years, has been with Pillsbury exclusively, as a millwright. Married Rachel Jerman, November 17th, 1868. They have three children: Warren E., William E., and Mary.

Page 507

Jacob Barge

is a native of Germany, born in 1839. Established business in Minneapolis in 1863. First year's business was two thousand dollars. In 1880 it amounted to thirty thousand dollars. Mr. Barge is at present one of the alder- men of the city. Married Miss Louisa Gessart. They have two children: Louisa and Emma.

Page 507

Thomas G. Barnard

of the furniture manufacturing firm of Barnard and Cope, was born in 1826, at Charlotte Town, Prince Edward Island. Remained there until the age of nineteen, when he went to Boston and learned the cabinet makers trade. After this, worked four years in Boston. Thence to Norway, Oxford county, Maine, engaging in the manufacture of furniture for five years. Came to Minneapolis in 1857, and engaged in the furniture business. His ripe experience, covering a period of thirty years, has made his present establishment one of the institutions of the city. Mr. Barnard has a pleasant home where he resides with his family, on Tenth street, corner of Mary Place.

Page 507

E. G. Barnaby

was born in Montreal, Canada, in 1839. He remained there for sixteen years, then he moved to Chatham, Canada West, where he remained till 1857, thence to New York city, entering the mercantile establishment of Lord and Taylor, where he remained until 1863. He then went to Memphis, Tennessee, engaging in business about a year. During the same year, took charge of a dry goods house where he remained till May, 1867, and then started a gents furnishing store under the Overton Hotel, and in 1872, started another store in the same line, under the Peabody Hotel. He continued business till 1879, when he came to Minneapolis and opened a gents furnishing store, at No. 2, Nicollet House block. Was married in Brooklyn, New York, March, 1865, to Miss Mary Finley. They have three children: Carrie, Minnie A., and Mary B.

Page 507

John T. Barnum

of the firm of Barnum and Goodrich, trunk manufacturers, was born at Rochester, New York, March 5th, 1857. Received his education at the Rensselaer Polytechnic school, Troy, New York, in 1879 and remained in Rochester one year. Came to Minneapolis in April 1880, was with D. D. Whitney in his trunk factory. September 1st, 1880, took possession of the business in company with Mr. Goodrich.

Page 507

F. C. Barrows

was born in Orino, Maine, March 29th, 1832. He was reared in the lumber region of that state; after reaching manhood, engaged in that business until 1855, when he moved from the "Pine Tree State'' and came direct to St. Anthony. He at once entered the ranks as a lumberman, first for Dwight, Woodbury and Company, in building a mill and dam at St. Francis, above Anoka, on the Rum river. In 1868 he formed a partnership with Jonathan Chase, in the winter of 1869-1870, he and his brother became partners, the firm known as "Barrows Bros." For several years they did job work for J. Dean and Company, during which time they accumulated quite a stock of logs, which they were two years in converting into lumber. In March, 1878, he entered the firm of which he is now a member, Merriman, Barrows and Company. He was married to Miss Sarah J. Swain, at Minneapolis, October 25th, 1864. They have had five children; four of whom are now living; Nellie, Freddie, Harry, and Frankie. Mrs. Barrows died in March 1873. He remained a widower until March, 1877, when he was United to Mrs. Sadie E. Jones, of Stillwater.

Page 508

W. M. Barrows

born at Augusta, Maine, September 1st, 1830, moved with his parents to Orino, Milford and Lincoln, finally to Chester, where he remained till 1855, following lumbering. Moved to Old Town, and remained till the fall of 1856; came to St. Anthony and for seven years worked in the woods winters and on the river summers. Run a freight train from St. Anthony to St. Paul from 1863 to 1865. In the fall of 1865 started the lumber business with a Mr. Spafford, under the firm name of Barrows and Spafford for one year, then alone for one year. In the fall of 1867 took as partner Andrew Hall, for one year. Fall of 1868 the firm of Barrows Brothers was formed. Married Nancy Fernold, July 3d, 1855. They have six children, William H., Melvin P., Wyley R., Lydia F., Eddie P. and Jessie.

Page 508

C. H. Bates

was born at Cohasset, Massachusetts, November 26th, 1852. He was educated principally at Boston, Massachusetts, also studied dentistry in the same place and practiced his profession there. Has practiced dentistry eight years. Came to Minneapolis in May, 1880, and is now permanently located at 327 Nicollet Avenue. Family consists of himself and wife.

Page 508

John W. Bates

was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, January 5th, 1849, where he lived for four years, then moved with parents to Troy, New York, and remained about two years. In 1855, came to Minnesota with his mother and settled in St. Anthony. From 1868 to 1873 taught school in Henry county, Illinois, and from 1873 to 1877 engaged in coopering at St. Joseph, Missouri. Returned to Minnesota, and in August, 1879, he was appointed on the police force, which position he has since held. His mother died in 1873 in this city.

Page 508

A. L. Bausman

was born in Pennsylvania, March 25th, 1834. Educated at Pittsburg and studied dentistry at the same place for three years. Came to Minneapolis in 1856, and has been in continuous practice of his profession since. The doctor is the oldest dentist in practice in the city. Was married to Miss Fannie R. Abraham, of Minneapolis, November 1863; she died in 1876. Married again, January 1879, to Rebecca Fenby, of St. Louis. They have three children: Bertha, George and Fenby.

Page 508

John Bayer

proprietor of Bayer's hotel, located at 109 First street north. Mr. Bayer, was born in Germany, in 1831; came to America in 1854; came to Minnesota in May 1855, and located in Scott county, where he remained for three years, thence to Wisconsin and lived three years. In 1861, enlisted in the First Minnesota Regiment Volunteers; served three years, when he returned to Scott county, and remained until the spring of 1865, when he came to Minneapolis. Married Annie Berndgen, July 21st, 1865. They have five children; John R. H., Lucy, George G., Anthony M., and Frank X. M.

Page 508

James Baxter

firm of Downs and Baxter, was born in Westmoreland, England, August 10th, 1835. At the age of sixteen commenced the trade of stone cutter and mason; came to America in 1854, and finished his trade in Chicago, where he remained until 1857, when he came to St. Paul In 1859, went to Carrollton, Indiana, where he was employed as foreman for quarries and cut stone used in the Portland locks, for Barton, Robinson and Company, contractors for Louisville and Portland canal and locks. In 1865 came to Minneapolis, and until 1877, was employed as foreman for R. B. Langdon, Saulspaugh and Company, St. Anthony Falls Water - Power Company, and others, also took some contracts on his own account. Was married at St. Anthony, November 2d, 1859 to Miss Catherine Ryan, of St. Paul. They have five children living; William C., Mary, Bridget, Eleanor and Catherine.

Page 509

J. Flanders Beaumont

eye and ear surgeon, was born in Freeport, Illinois, March 29th, 1859; educated at Freeport and Montrose, Illinois, and at Princeton college. First studied medicine with his father Dr. J. H. Beaumont, and Dr. Constantine Hering, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia in 1876, with the degree of .M. D. He next entered the New York Ophthalmic Hospital and studied diseases of the eye and ear, was afterwards assistant surgeon in the same hospital. Was also an attending physician of the New York Homeopathic Dispensary. He came to Minneapolis in August, 1880, and confines his practice solely to the treatment of eye and ear diseases; is a member of the American Ophthalmological and Otological Societies; Illinois Homeopathic Association, and Hennepin county Homeopathic Society. Dr. Beaumont was marriage in 1878 to Miss Ella Jenifer, of Cincinnati, Ohio. They have one child, Alice J.

Page 509

Franklin Beebe

of the law firm of Beebe & Rossnaan, 112 Hennepin Avenue, was born at Lincklaen, Chenango county, New York, October 28th, 1825. Remained with parents until 1843, attending Oxford and DeRuyter Academies. He then entered the State Normal School at Albany, New York, and in 1848 began the study of law at Truxton, with Alanson Coats, and finished in the office of John Waite at Norwich, New York. Was admitted to practice in 1851, and formed a partnership with John Waite, and practiced law at Norwich, until the fall of 1855, when he came West and located at Minneapolis in l856. Opened an office near the old land office, and soon after removed to the building then owned by T. Chambers, near the suspension bridge. Has since been elected three times to the office of probate judge, in the meantime following his profession. The present firm was formed in the fall of 1879, and is a successful one. Was married first in Norwich, New York, April, 1858, to Miss Lavinia, daughter of Dr. James Thompson, of that city, who died January 13th, 1868, leaving two daughters now living: Mary Francis and Harriet Lavinia. Mr. Beebe was married again to Dora H., daughter of D. G. Thompson, of North Warmouth, Maine. They have one child now living, Daniel G.

Page 509

Alonzo H. Beal

was born in Saco, York county, Maine, July 10th, 1833. When fourteen years of age he began studying photography, but left that business and went to Buffalo in 1852, engaging in the furnishing business two years. In l854 he returned to Maine, as a photographer, and has continued as such ever since. In April, 1855, he was married to Ruth Clark, of Hollis, Maine. They have two children, Eugene and Charles. Mr. Beal moved to Boston, in 1857, thence to St. Anthony Falls in 1860. After having made several attempts to get a fine gallery, each of which was destroyed by fire, he finally established himself at No. 18 South Fourth street, where he has since remained and prospered.

Page 509

Jacob Becker

was born in Stark county, Ohio, November 18th, 1841, and was married to Elizabeth Moarls, in 1867. They have had five children, three of whom are living: Mary, Anna and Ida. Mr. Becker enlisted in 1861 in the One Hundred and Seventh Ohio volunteers. He served one year only, and removed from Wooster, Wayne county, where he at that time lived, to Milwaukee, Wisconsin; thence to Winona, St. Louis and Minneapolis. Here he erected, in 1873, the Island Saloon, and has since been proprietor.

Page 509

S. N. Bell

is a native of Ohio, and was born January 4th, 1831. He married, in 1854, Rosetta Bowers, of New York. They have six children: Minnie, Eva, Carrie, Milton, Grant and Colfax. He lived in Racine, Wisconsin, a number of years, engaging in farming while there; also after removing to Faribault county, Minnesota. In 1875, he engaged in the grocery business in Minneapolis, 416 Nicollet Avenue, where he is still found.

Page 509

Karl Bendeke

a native of Norway, was born April 21st, 1841. After graduating from the medical school of Christiana, Norway, in 1865 he came to the United States in 1867. At Chicago he again graduated from the medical college in 1869, and practiced in that city until he removed to Rushford, Minnesota, in 1870. He practiced here five years then came to Minneapolis. He was married to Josephine Fanske, from Bergen, Norway in 1869.

Page 510

F. Benjamin

was born in Connecticut in 1839, and at the age of twenty-two went to California and engaged in mining for two years, when he returned to Connecticut. In 1874 he came to Minneapolis and opened a saloon. He and Ella M. Spaulding were married in 1872. Their children are Frederick and Gracie.

Page 510

C. Henry Benton

of the firm of Benton, Benton and Roberts, attorneys at law, was born at Lunenburgh, Essex county, Vermont, in 1841. His parents and family moved to Guildhall, Vermont, and the same year his father came west to secure a home, but soon died at Rockford, Illinois. In 1860, C. H. entered the Vermont University at Burlington, and in 1861 enlisted in the Fifth Vermont volunteers, being promoted to first lieutenant and mustered out September 19th, 1864. Soon after, he entered the Albany law school, from which he graduated in 1866 and commenced practicing in Troy, Vermont. He married Miss Flora Hadley, who died in 1869. Two years later Mr. Benton came to Minneapolis, where he was married to Jeanette Graham of this city, who bore him two children, Christine and Harry.

Page 510

Webster Benner

was born in Lincoln county, Maine. He came to Minneapolis in 1870 and was in the drug business until 1880, when he originated the Minneapolis Soap Works. He has a partner in business, the firm name being Pomeroy and Benner. They make Shipments throughout the northeast. Mr. Benner was married in Maine, and has one son living at Waldboro, Lin coln county.

Page 510

Col. R. C. Benton

was born at Waterford, Caledonia county, Vermont, May 13th, 1830. At twenty-one he entered the University of Vermont, and graduated with the class of 1854. He taught school at Johnson, Vermont, two years and was there admitted to the bar in 1856. He practiced law until 1861, when he entered the array as captain of company "D," Fifth Vermont infantry. In 1862 he was promoted to the office of lieutenant colonel of the Eleventh Vermont and remained in service until 1864. He participated in some of the principal battles, being wounded June 9tb, at the battle of Savage Station. After the war he returned to Vermont and again practiced his profession. In 1867 he removed to St. Albans, Vermont, and in 1875 located in Minneapolis. He was assistant secretary of Vermont state senate in 1856-1857, county attorney of Lamoille county in 1860-1861, and a member of Vermont state board of education in 1874. He married Miss Sara Leland in 1856. Their children are: Lucy and Mary. Two children have died.

Page 510

S. J. Bennett

born at Mineral Point, Wisconsin. He lived at that place until sixteen years of age, when he went to Colorado. After spending three years there he returned to Wisconsin; thence to Minnesota, and in 1874 settled in Minneapolis, engaging in the coopering business. He married Nancy King, in 1872. Enlisted, in August, 1862, in the Twenty-first Wisconsin, served one year, and was discharged for disability.

Page 510

A. Bermann

is a Russian by birth, and was born May 29th, 1853. He came to Minneapolis in November 1879, and was engaged in peddling until 1880, when he became a partner of L. Bloustein. They are now known as the firm of Bermann and Bloustein, and deal in new and second hand goods. He was married October 10th, 1877.

Page 510

A. C. Berry

captain of police, was born February 21st 1830, at Pittsfield Maine. He settled in Minneapolis in 1866, and being a carpenter, at once commenced that business, and continued in it until appointed on the police force, in 1867. Since his promotion to the rank of captain, in 1877, he has discharged his duties with credit to himself and to the general satisfaction of the force at his command. He was married in Penobscot county, Maine, to Jennie M. Whitcomb, November 30th 1854. Their two children, Ida and Charles, have died.

Page 510

Herman Bidwell

was born in New York, March 2d, 1851. He commenced in the milling business at Galesville, Wisconsin, in 1870, and remained there five-years; then removed to La Crosse, remaining four years. He became a resident of Minneapolis in July 1879, and has since been engaged in milling. His marriage with Lue Curtis, occurred November 7th, 1875. They are the parents of one child, Julia.

Page 510

John Berry

one of the pioneers of Hennepin county, was born in Buxton Maine, in 1801. Was engaged in farming and carpenter work until he came to St. Anthony, in 1851, and has followed farming most of the time since. He was the first man to raise a crop on the west side, having made a claim on section 31, east of Cedar, Lake, in April, 1851, and resided there until 1857, since which time he has lived in the city. Mr. Berry fell, while engaged in carpenter work at Bangor, Maine, and shattered his right arm, and by a similar accident, twelve years since his right leg was injured. He married Hannah Bunker, February 12th, 1826. The children living are: Mrs. W. A. Rowell, of this city, Mrs. D. L. Paine of Indianapolis, Indiana, and Mark T., surveyor and superintendent for Dean and Harrison. Mrs. Berry died April 23d, 1879. Mr. Berry lived with his son, Mark T., until his death, which occurred in April, 1881.

Page 511

Frederick G. Berry

was born in Brooklyn, Hennepin county, Minnesota, in 1857. At the age of sixteen he commenced teaching. He entered the State University of Minnesota in 1874, and graduated after a six years course. In July 1880, same year, he was taken as book-keeper in the money order department of the Minneapolis post office. He commenced studying law, in the office of Morrison and Fitch, in September, 1880.

Page 511

Jonathan C. Berry

was born and lived in Buxton, York county, Maine, until twelve years of age when he removed to Grove, Allegany county New York, and learned blacksmithing. He spent six years in the Galena, Illinois, lead mines; then started for California, with team and wagon, in 1852, and succeeded in reaching there August 27th. He engaged in teaming and mining until 1854. During that year he bought and run the first threshing machine in the state. He came to St. Anthony in 1855, and purchased an interest in a, plow factory and made the first plow manufactured in the state. He was married at White Oak Springs, Wisconsin, in 1858, to Miss Amanda Beckwith, who was born at Noblesville, Indiana. They have two children: Frank and Flora.

Page 511

E. L. Bidwell

of the firm of Bidwell and Company, is a native of Massachusetts, and, was born March 15th, 1856. He became a resident of Northfield, Minnesota, in 1859, where he remained six years; then came to Minneapolis, where he received his education, and has since resided.

Page 511

G. W. Bigby

was born in Pennsylvania, in 1845, and in early life learned the carpenter's trade with his father. He came to Minnesota in l857, and settled in Freeborn county, where he remained until July, 1880, when he became a citizen of Minneapolis. He has worked at his trade many years, and is well established as a contractor, builder, and cabinet-maker.

Page 511

L. Biggs

was born in Maryland, February 15th, 1836. He learned his trade as millwright at home, then removed to Indiana, where he spent ten years. He was wedded to Mary J. Lynn in 1863, who bore him two children, Elma and Roland. His wife died in August, 1870. After remaining a widower seven years, he married Annie Byers. They have one child, Mabel. Mr. Biggs came to Minneapolis in 1871. He was one of those who assisted in building the old "A" mill, and helped to rebuild the old "B" mill. He has been in the employ of Washburn and Company during the nine years of his citizenship.

Page 511

J. W. Birdwell

was born September 10th, 1838, at Tuscumbia, Alabama. He moved to Minneapolis in 1871, and has remained here since. At the first call for volunteers he enlisted, and served in the war until mustered out at Trenton, Tennessee, in 1863. He was married, on his return to Julia Clift, of Illinois. She has borne him one child, Josephine. Mr. Birdwell is the Minneapolis manager of the business of the Victor Wheat Heater Company.

Page 511

David Blakeley

manager of the Tribune, was born in Franklin county, Vermont, in 1834. The family moved from there to Syracuse, New York, in 1838, where, at the age of thirteen, he entered the printing office of the Daily Star. In that office and that of the Journal, he thoroughly mastered the typographical art. After completing his apprenticeship, returned to Vermont and devoted five years to study. In 1857 he left the University of Vermont, and came to Minnesota, where he entered the profession of journalism, starting three newspapers. In 1860, was elected chief clerk in the house of representatives, and re-elected the following year. He was then appointed superintendent of public instruction by Governor Ramsey, and at expiration of term, was returned to the office by election. He contributed largely to the organization of the common school system of Minnesota. In 1865, he, with his brother, Major C. H. Blakeley, purchased the Chicago Evening Post and took editorial charge of that paper, remaining until April, 1874, when he disposed of his interest in the Evening Post and succeeded to the editorship of the St. Paul Pioneer. One year later, he conceived the idea of consolidating the Pioneer and the Press, which was soon accomplished, and during his service with the consolidated Pioneer Press, was jointly, with Mr. Wheelock, in editorial charge of the paper. The Minneapolis Tribune, having subsequently been added, Mr. Blakeley removed to Minneapolis, the better to represent the journal in this city. Finally becoming convinced that there wag a fine future for journalism in Minneapolis, he severed his connection with the St. Paul establishment entirely, and taking the Minneapolis Evening Tribune in charge, he has maintained his relations with that journal since. On May llth, 1880, in company with Gen. A. B. Nettleton, he established the Morning Tribune, thereby, giving to Minneapolis, a first-class metropolitan journal, of which her citizens have had every reason to be proud.

Page 512

L. V. N. Blakeman

who is a native of New York city, came to this place in 1869, and was engaged in the mercantile business until 1874, when he became a partner of G. Menzel, in the foundry business.

Page 512

William Blakeman

one of the earliest settlers of this locality, was born in Prussia, April 18th, 1828. He came to the United States in 1848, and settled in La Fayette, Indiana, where he engaged in upholstering and carriage trimming until 1856, when he removed to Saint Anthony. He was the first upholsterer here. He retired from labor in 1868, and has since lived on the fruits of his industry. He married Magdalene Kretz, of Germany. They have five children living: Mary, Lizzie, Frank, Charles, and Fred.

Page 512

Adolph Blitz, M. D.

was born in Prussia, February 10th, 1845. He moved to America in 1864, and studied medicine at the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery. From this institution he graduated in 1873. He removed to Nashville, Tennessee, in May, 1874, and while there he became a member of the Nashville Medical Society, Davidson County Medical Society, and Tennessee State Medical Society. He is a member of the American Medical Association, International Medical, Ophthalmological and otological Congress; in March, 1877, Doctor Blitz in company with others, founded the Nashville Medical College, which afterward became the medical department of the University of Tennessee. On account of failing health, he resigned his position and removed to Minneapolis in 1880. Doctor Blitz was married in 1877, to Anna D. Wicks, of New Bedford, Massachusetts. They have two daughters: Nellie and Bertha.

Page 512

J. W. Blood

was born March 16th, 1845, at Boston, Massachusetts. He moved with his parents to Janesville, Wisconsin, in 1855. He received an academic education at Milton, Wisconsin, and at Chicago, where he learned the trade of machinist. He came to Minneapolis in 1874, and has been engaged as foreman in the machine shops of the Harvester Works since. He was married to Miss E. W. Cragg, of Cincinnati, in 1874. They have one child; Meda.

Page 512

L. Bloustein

of the firm of Bermann and Bloustein, was born in Poland, 1839. His early life was spent in Scotland, and a few years later he began business in England. In 1879 he came to America, and the next year took as a partner, Mr. A. Bermann. They now deal in gents' furnishing goods, and have a large stock.

Page 512

C. N. Boardman

dentist, was born at Waterloo, Yates county, New York, January 6th, 1841. He was educated principally at Mount Vernon, and studied dentistry at Cincinnati four years. He commenced his practice in Columbus, Indiana. Coming to Minneapolis, In 1872, he at once established himself as a dentist, and has been in continuous practice here since. Miss Elizabeth LeDuc of this city became his wife in 1874.

Page 512

W. M. Boardman

was born at Rochester, New York, October 4th, 1857. During early life he lived on a farm, later he was engaged in the grocery business. In 1876, he came to this city and opened a restaurant. Mr. M. C. Tate joined him in this business in October, 1880, when they bought the restaurant, which they now ran at 214 Nicollet Avenue. He married Sarah McCue, July 20th, 1880.

Page 512

A. H. Bode

was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1838. He came to America and located at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1848 and attended the public schools of that city until 1853, when he entered a lawyer's office. In the summer of 1855 he removed to Madison and went to work for the LaCrosse and Milwaukee Railway as warehouseman at Richfield, and was afterwards agent at Horicon for four yean. Returned to Milwaukee, and in 1863, went into the Merchant's bank. In August, 1865, he came to Minnesota as general freight and ticket agent of the Minnesota Central Railway, and after its purchase by the Milwaukee and St. Paul, remained as general agent until 1871. He was then engaged with a construction company, until 1873, since which time he has been with the Minneapolis and Saint Louis Railway. He was married at Horicon, Wisconsin, December 26th, 1858. They have eight children: Carrie F., Addie C., Willie F., Mabel, Freddie C., Bessie I., Grace E., and J. Henry.

Page 513

John Bofferding

one of the early settlers, was born in Luxembourg, August 29th, 1826. He came to the United States in 1850, and settled first at Sauk City, Wisconsin. In 1853 he started on a prospecting trip which ended in his settling in Minneapolis in 1856. Here he worked at his trade, that of carpenter, until 1875, when he began the grocery business and has since continued it. He was married in 1862 to Katrina Frius, of Germany, who bore him three children. Those living are Maggie and William.

Page 513

Nicholas Bofferding

brother of the above, and who also came to Minneapolis in 1856, was born at Luxembourg, August 2lst, 1830. He worked at the carpenter trade here until 1875, and has since worked with his brother, Mr. John Bofferding.

Page 513

T. M. Bohan

a native of Ireland, was born June 29th, 1832. He came to the United States in 1848, and remained in New York one year, then removed to Milwaukee. There he learned the shoemaking trade, at which he worked until 1855; then he moved to St. Anthony and opened a shop and two years later engaged as foreman for Wensinger. In 1877 Mr. Bohan, in company with J. A. Kennedy started in the boot and shoe trade. One year later Mr. Kennedy sold his interest to Mr. McNeice, the present partner. Mr. Bohan was married to Anna Shortell, of Milwaukee, in 1857. They have seven children: Mary, John, Annie, Timothy, Thomas, James, and Katie.

Page 513

George F. Bollier

was born in Switzerland, June 18th, 1819. He learned the trade of shoemaker in his native country and worked at it until 1856, when he emigrated to the United States, coming direct to St. Anthony, where he has since resided. In 1858 he opened a boot and shoe store and has added to his stock from time to time. Mr. Bollier was married in 1856, to Sarah Allemann, of Switzerland, who died in 1864. He was married in 1866, to Paulina Diedrich. Their children are: William and Hattie.

Page 513

N. H. Bolton

was born ten miles South of Cleveland, Ohio, February 10th, 1839. He remained with his parents until twenty-seven years of age and there acquired a knowledge of milling and manufacturing. He came to Minneapolis in 1872 and at once commenced in his present business, that of manufacturing mill machinery. Mr. Bolton was married in 1865 at Farmington, Washington county, Wisconsin, to Mary L. Norton; have had three children: Celeste, Gracie and Ada.

Page 513

S. Bonfoy

was born in Montgomery county, New York, in 1817. At the age of fifteen he learned the woolcarding business. Fifteen years later he went to Georgia, remaining at Columbus eleven years, when he removed to Roswell, Georgia. Here he was engaged as superintendent of a wool factory. When General Sherman passed through on his march to the sea, the factory was burned. He removed to Indiana and remained nine years. In 1874 he came to this city and again engaged in the wool-carding business.

Page 513

L. Bostwick

was born in Toronto, Canada, June, 1815. He moved to St. Anthony, accompanied by his wife and daughters, in 1850. The year following, he was elected justice of the peace, which office he held until 1860. He was elected, under very peculiar circumstances, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of I. I. Lewis. At that time there was a "Maine liquor law," under which a person was indicted for opening a saloon in St. Anthony, and the case was brought before Mr. Lewis, who resigned rather than to try the case. In l871, Judge Bostwick decided to retire from active life and enjoy the fruits of his labor. He has been one of the most active citizens of this now flourishing metropolis, and from its earliest growth identified with its interests.

Page 513

Pierre Bottineau

was born January 1st, 1817, at a place on Turtle river, Dakota Territory, once called Rats Point, but afterwards named Bottineau's Point from its being the residence of his father, Joseph Bottineau; who was engaged with the Northwestern Fur Company. The mother of Pierre Bottineau, was a native of the Ojibwa tribe, whose father was a captive Dakota, and mother an Ojibwa. By this marriage there were several children, with only one of whom, Pierre, we have to do. In 1816, one year before the birth of Pierre, hostilities arose between the Hudson Bay Company, the old company established in 1670, under a grant by Charles II, of England, to Prince Rupert and others, and the Northwestern Company., These were both English companies. The Red River settlement was founded by Lord Selkirk, a Scottish peer under a grant from the Hudson Bay Company. The North-western Company, whose head-quarters were Canada traded by the way of the lakes, and had virtually preempted this territory before the Selkirk colony arrived and did not recognize their claim as a part of the Hudson Bay Company's territory, as this company had never before extended their lines so far south. The Hudson Bay Company transported goods by way of Hudson Bay. After the establishment of the Red River settlement in 1812, petty strife began, which in 1816, culminated in open hostilities. Lord Selkirk had demanded troops from the Governor General for the protection of his colony without avail, but instead, was enjoined against repetition of hostilities. In spite of this injunction some more blood was shed, but at last, as neither party received the support of the government, an amalgamation took place, and the united company controlled the country. In consequence of these hostilities, the little colony of Red River was greatly weak ened by emigration to the territory of the United States and Canada.

Pierrie Bottineauls father was commanded by the North-western Company to take part in the struggle but he absented himself on one of his hunting expeditions. On his return he was imprisoned, but owing to his influence with the tribe from which he had taken his wife, he was. soon released, as worse troubles were liable to arise.

Amid these bustling scenes, in a wild country, among Indians, and half-breeds more dangerous than the Indians themselves, Pierre Bottineau was born. He was early trained by his father for the hunt. He possessed a strong frame and rugged constitution, and became a skillful horseman, and a sure marksman with a rifle, learning, as well as inheriting these qualities from his father, who was unsurpassed in the chase. His father died when he was fourteen years of age, and LeCompte, a famous guide, but lame in consequence of an injury, pleased with the early accomplishments and promise of the boy, took him to live with him, promising to instruct him in the mysteries of his art. LeCompto was at this time the only man conversant with the country, and familiar with the duties of a guide. He held out brilliant prospects, of high wages, ending in a fortune, especially because he needed the sure foot, strong arm and quick eye of this young half-breed. During the years 1832-1833 Pierre made a few short trips in company with LeCompte, carrying messages between trading posts, but his first long trip was in 1834, at the age of seventeen. LeCompte was then employed by the Hudson Bay Company to carry messages and the mail from Fort Garry to Fort Snelling, and Pierre accompanied him. They started the first of November and reached their destination December 27th. Communication was difficult and expensive, and sometimes not undertaken oftener than once a year. They went down on the east bank of the Red River, and after eight days reached Red Lake River, which it was necessary for them to cross, though now very high and full of drifting ice. A feeble old man named Alard, went with them, and a pony with a Red River cart carried the man, baggage and provisions. A raft was quickly built and the cart and its contents were safely transferred to the other side by Pierre and Alard. They next returned for Le Compte and the pony, the current carrying them down some distance at each crossing. On attempting to cross again, with all hands and the pony, their clumsy raft foundered on a stump, and was soon piled with ice so that the upper end was submerged, and the lower end stuck up at a sharp angle. The situation was critical and promised at the best, a cold bath to all.

Here Pierre proved himself equal to the emergency, for cutting loose a few pieces of timber he secured them together by a cord made of buffalo hide, and making his two companions straddle the logs, since neither could swim. He took the chance of keeping on the little raft and poling it to shore. It floated, however, much farther, and struck a bend in the river that was frozen over, in consequence of there being less current. Here he was obliged to jump on the ice, after securing a long cord to the raft, one end of which he held in his hand. The ice would not bold the weight of a man, and Pierre went in, all over, in very deep water, but holding fast to the rope. When .he came up, he swam, breaking the ice before him, to the shore, and hauled his companions after him. They were fortunate in having dry suits at, the cart, and soon were all right in dry clothing. The pony was rescued, and they started again. After traveling four days they reached the Wild Rice river, and crossed the ice and encamped near its bank. By some means, here, the pony who had escaped narrowly one danger of drowning, got into this stream in the night and was drowned. In this dilemma it was decided, as Alard could not travel, to leave him in charge of the cart and stuff while Le Compte and. Pierre went on to Lac Traverse, a trading post of the American Fur Company, in charge of Mr. Moore. The journey, it was thought, would take four days. Pierre was loaded with bedding and provisions supposed to be sufficient for Le Compte and himself for the four days journey, and they set out. The lameness of Le Compte and the burden of Pierre rendered traveling slow, but it proved that the estimated distance of fifty or sixty miles, increased every day they traveled. Le Compte seemed not to be familiar with the country and arriving at Goose river. He called it the Cheyenne and the Elm he supposed the Wild Rice. They traveled thus for several days until their provisions were gone, hoping to reach the Bois des Sioux, where Le Compte declared he should recognize the country. On the eighth day they reached this river, having been already four days without food, and found a fresh Indian trail which they followed to the camp. It proved to be the camp of a party of Sioux numbering ten men with five tepees. The strangers were kindly received and their hunger appeased by a repast of otter and skunk meat. The next day they reached the trading post and obtaining a horse and man returned for Alard and their stuff. The old man's joy cannot be described, as the twentieth day after their departure he saw them returning. He had improvised a sled and loaded it with blankets and provisions, determined to start the next day, dragging his sled, trusting to a good fortune to take him to some habitation. After staying a few days at the post, Le Compte bought a horse of Mr. Moore and they proceeded to the trading post of Mr. Renville at Lac qui Parle and from this point they set out for Traverse des Sioux, another trading post distant four days journey. The post was in charge of Mr. Louis Le Blanc. Alard was left at Lac Traverse on account of the depth of snow and the difficulty of traveling. Trouble arose again in attempting to find Traverse des Sioux and the two companions were near starving, as their supplies had given out; when, fortunately, a coon was, killed and their hunger appeased. After traveling in a circuitous route for several days in search of the trading post, Pierre insisted upon taking a direct course for Fort Snelling or as near direct as the Minnesota river would conduct them, disregarding Traverse des Sioux altogether. It is a difficult matter to divert a guide from an old route but at last the point was conceded and they set out. On the following day they came on an Indian camp and were received in a friendly manner and directed on their way. It appeared that the guide was mistaken in reference to their location and they soon reached Traverse des Sioux, and without further accident arrived at Fort Snelling, December 28th, 1834.

Among those whom Pierre met at the Fort at this time he mentions Mr. N. W. Kittson. After spending a short time visiting friends and relations who bad formerly lived at Red River, he returned and for two years spent his time trapping in the winter and hunting buffaloes during the summer. Two hunts were usually made each year, one in the early summer and one later, about fall.

The outfit for these hunts was as follows: each hunter was supplied with a good hunting horse, gun and ammunition, and with two or three ponies, drawing each a Red River cart. The latter were used to carry their families and baggage, as well as to transport the results of the chase. Frequently these hunting parties would number several hundred hunters, besides their families.

After reaching the hunting grounds, each found occupation in killing the buffaloes, dressing, drying, cooking and making pemmican. Pemmican was an important article of food and merchandise with the Hudson Bay Company in furnishing supplies to their employees, and still continues to be used. It was made in the following manner. The lean buffalo meat was cut into thin strips, and a skillful woman would cut these strips round and round, making them quite long. These were spread in the sun during the day, and gathered at night in order to protect them from rain or dew until they became as dry as a bone. They were then placed over the fire to cook. After this the meat was beaten in a buffalo hide until completely pulverized, when it was mixed with melted fat and packed in skins for market. The lean and fat of two animals is condensed in one sack of pemmican. No salt or seasoning was used in its preparation, but properly prepared it would never spoil. Besides the process had driven out the water and so reduced the bulk that a very little would satisfy hunger and furnish food in the most condensed form for long journeys. When the carts were loaded with pemmican and hides the party returned from the hunt. Encounters with hostile Indians, and accidents frequently occurred which caused much danger and risk.

During the summer of 1835 Pierre made a trip to Hudson Bay in the employ of the Hudson Bay Company, and again the next summer a second trip. It will give some idea of the hardships to which voyageurs were subject if we state here the tests to which they were subjected before they were employed. A day and place was set for those who desired employment, to exhibit their powers of endurance. The load of a voyageur, two packages weighing about one hundred pounds each, was ready and the man who could carry the load to a certain goal and return without resting, in the quickest time, was counted the best man, and from those, most successful the employees were chosen. The Hudson Bay Company were haughty and overbearing to the natives and half-breeds, and treated them as "comme les betes," while the policy of the American Fur Company was much more liberal. This led many to transfer their trade to the American company.

December 1st, 1836, Pierre Bottineau married Genevieve Larance, daughter of John Baptiste Larance, a farmer of the Red River settlement.

A few months after, he undertook the memorable journey across the plains, as guide for Martin McLeod, and two companions, Parys and Hayes, from LaFourch, Red River colony, Territory of Hudson Bay, to Fort Snelling. The time estimated for the journey, was twenty-five days; of this, the journey to Lac Traverse was estimated at fifteen days, and the remainder of the journey ten days. The time consumed was, however, fifty days, and two of the party, Messrs. Parys and Hayes, perished by the way. The indomitable hardihood of Pierre Bottineau, alone, brought Mr. McLeod and himself through. They started with a dog trainee, moccasins and snow-shoes. The deep snow and the inexperience of the party retarded their progress.

They so frequently required their snow-shoes or moccasins loosened or tightened that the patience of Bottinean was taxed to its utmost, and short days journeys were accomplished. This was, however, only a small matter compared with the trouble that followed. Blizzards, cold, and want of food finally added to their miseries, until Hayes was lost in a storm and never seen again, and Parys, though found, was in such a frozen condition as to compel him to remain in a hut, carefully built and provided for his comfort, until horses could be sent for him from Lac Traverse. When the relief party arrived they found proof that death had ended his sufferings soon after their departure. Mr. Parys was a Polish gentleman who had served under Remarino, and left his country after the fall of Warsaw to avoid the fury of the Czar Nicholas I. Mr. Bottineau and the surviving traveler, Hon. Martin McLeod, arrived in safety at Fort Snelling, April 16th, 1837. May 4th, Bottineau started on his return on horse-back, took a traveler at Lac Traverse, and reached the Red River June 5th. Spent the summer and winter following, in the usual way, hunting and trapping. May, 1838, he undertook his next trip across the plains as guide for a large party, consisting of forty families, Swiss, French, and Scotch. This trip was accomplished without any remarkable incident, except that the Indians along their route became somewhat troublesome, and it was necessary to court their good will by distributing tobacco and flour among them in passing their villages. This was especially true because of the hostility of the Sioux toward the Chippewas, and the half-breeds of the north were associated with the Chippewa's. Four of these Sioux villages were passed at Lac Traverse, numbering eighty or ninety braves; two at Big Stone lake, numbering three hundred; two at Lac qui Parle, two hundred; one at Blue Earth, seventy one; at Redwood, one hundred; one at Traverse des Sioux, one hundred and fifty; one at Belle Plaine, fifty ; one at Little Rapids, one hundred; two at Shakopee, three hundred. These fifteen hundred warriors were often on the war path. At Minnehaha, Lake Calhoun and Pig's Eye there were five or six hundred more. Some of them, whose villages were not in their path, might, notwithstanding, be met on the plains. Owing to some accidents to their carts and one person, it was determined to send a messenger ahead to obtain from General H. H. Sibley his barge to transport the party from Traverse des Sioux. On arrival at this point the boat was found in readiness, and the party were successfully landed at Fort Snelling, though the time occupied from Traverse des Sioux was fourteen days, owing to low water.

At this point in his history Mr. Bottineau stops to pay a tribute to the kindness of Gen. Sibley, to whom he was frequently indebted for courteous and generous acts. He always extended this kindness to poor or rich, white man, Indian, or half breed. The Sioux held him in the highest regard and called him the "Great Medicine Man." He smoked a red pipe with a long stem and often hunted with the Indians. On one occasion after hunting all day unsuccessfully, while smoking around the camp fire, he cried out "Well, we will idle a bear tomorrow" Sure enough the next day's hunt brought in the bear and forever established the Indians' faith in Gen. Sibley. Bottineau brought down twenty head of cattle from the Red River settlement as well as some other merchandise. He sold on his arrival, cows at $50 to $75, oxen at $150 to $200 per pair, butter at fifty cents per pound.

October, 1838, he engaged to guide a small party of men to Red River and remained there until 1840. June 1st, 1840, he crossed the plains once more with a large party consisting of twenty families, and brought his own family along to settle in this country. On this journey he fell in with the old guide Le Compte and a party conveying a Mr. Simpson to Fort Snelling. Mr. Simpson

was a son of Sir George Simpson of England, who had been making an expedition in aid of science and was now on his return, bound for England. Simpson showed signs of insanity at this meeting but the parties diverged, intending to take different routes. On the next day Bottineau was overtaken by two men riding at full speed after him, who requested him to come to the aid of the other party as Mr. Simpson, in a fit of insanity had killed two of the party, one of whom was Le Compte himself. The relief party found that he had added his own death to that of his comrades by blowing out his brains. After disposing as well as could be done of the bodies of the slain, Mr. Bottineau joined the remainder of the party with his own and proceeded, arriving at the Fort in July. Here he found great changes, for the officers of the Fort had driven away Perry and Gervais and others; only a few remained and they were on the point of going, having received notification to that effect from the Fort. Here, for the first time Bottineau met Franklin Steele.

Bottineau went on to Saint Paul with his family and made a claim there in 1840, between Gervais and Clewette, camping on the bluff opposite the site of the old National hotel. The claim ran as follows: Commencing at a point, now the foot of Jackson street, running down the river eighty rods, thence at right angles to the river one mile, embracing a strip eighty rods wide running back to Clewette's claim. Not having money to invest in permanent improvements, he pitched a skin tent (lodge) on the bluff and lived there all summer. During the summer he was employed by Mr. Aiken, an old agent of the American Fur Company, with others to transport freight. In the fan he was able to build a house and make some improvements on his claim. In the spring of 1845 he put twenty acres in crops. From this time he was employed at various things but largely for the American Fur Company, until the spring of 1845. During this time he made one more trip to the Red River. In the summer of 1845 he moved to, the falls of St. Anthony and became identified with the interests of the place until 1854, when he removed to Bottineau Prairie in Maple Grove. During the years 1845 and 1846 he made two more journeys to the Red River settlement.

In 1851, Mr. Bottineau acted as guide to Gov. Ramsey, and the commissioners appointed by the government to negotiate a treaty with the Pembina Indians. The journey was made with a military escort. After holding a council with the Indians at Pembina, and concluding the treaty,

commissioners and Gov. Ramsey expressed a wish to visit Fort Garry, and it was determined to extend the trip accordingly into the British dominion. In 1853 he piloted Gov. Stevens, of Washington Territory on the Northern Pacific railroad exploration, going west to the Rocky Mountains and returning by the Missouri river to St. Louis.

In the fall of 1853, Mr. Bottineau, made a hunting excursion, acting as guide for a party of English lords and bankers. During the winter of 1854-1855, he went with Captain Carney to Mille Lac with a military escort to arrest two Indian murderers. In 1856 he made an expedition with Colonel Smith, to explore the northern country for a suitable point to locate a military post. In 1858, after the report of Colonel Smith's expedition, further exploration was determined on by the general government with reference to the establishment of the post in question. Mr. Bottineau accompanied Colonel White and a captain in the regular army who were charged with the enterprise. This expedition determined the site and located the present Fort Abercrombie at a point then known as Graham's Point. In the winter of 1856 and 1857 he, with others, located the townsite of Breckenridge, and during the following summer he located a town site on his own account at the mouth of Cheyenne river. In 1859, he went with Skinner, the geologist, to locate salt springs for the state. In June, 1860, he accompanied a military expedition to Pembina, and on his return, went with Gov. Ramsey and Judge Bailey to negotiate a treaty with the Pembina and Red Lake bands of Chippewas, but were not su successful in concluding treaty. In 1862, he made a trip with Captain Fisk to Montana, and after reaching Benton, left them to another guide and returned, passing through great dangers from Indians. Since then he has resided on a farm at Red Lake Falls, Polk county.

Page 518

William W. Bosworth

was born in Washington county, Maine, December 16th, 1857. In 1857 he came to St. Anthony and engaged in the lumbering trade until 1875, when he was appointed on the police form as patrol, and in May, 1876, was appointed sergeant, and served in that capacity until 1877, and since as patrol. He was married to Miss Maria Craig, at St. Anthony, August, 1867. Their children are: George, Fred, and Eva May.

Page 518

M. C. Boutell

was born at Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1837. At the age of seventeen he was employed by Messrs. Nelson and Rice, of that city, and remained sixteen years. He moved to St. Paul in 1863, and engaged in the hardware business. In 1876, removed to Minneapolis. Mr. Boutell was married to Miss Maria Wellington, of Massachusetts, who bore him three sons and one daughter.

Page 518

Millard P. Bowen

attorney and counselor at law, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, April 19th, 1856. He was educated at Buffalo, New York, and studied law with Bowen & Rogers, of that city.. He was admitted to the bar at Minneapolis, January, 1879, and has been in practice here since. His office is located at 324 Nicollet Avenue.

Page 518

Winn M. Brackett

originator of the Minneapolis fire department, was born in Maine in 1843. He moved, in 1846, to Nova Scotia, with his parents, where his father was American consul. Six years later he returned to the United States, and at the age of sixteen was identified with the Hose "Annex" of Washington Engine Company, No. 1, of Calais. In 1861, Mr. Brackett enlisted as musician in the Sixth regiment, Maine volunteers, and served until the fall of 1862, when he returned to Calais. Here he was appointed paymaster's clerk, with headquarters at Washington. He came to Minneapolis in 1865, and was engaged as book-keeper for Eastman, Gibson and Company. About this time he organized the Miller's Fire Association, from which has grown the present fire department of Minneapolis. In 1871 he was elected second assistant of the department, and at expiration of the term was chosen chief engineer, and, has held the position since. Mr. Brackett was married at Minneapolis, in 1867, to Miss Emily Hoyt, formerly of Portland Maine. They have four sons: Charles and Winslow Jr., are living; Chapin and Frankie are dead.

Page 518

T. A. Brann

is a native of Maine, born at Gardiner, Kennebec county, March 26th, 1840. He enlisted as a private, April 18th, 1861; he was promoted through the intervening grades to the Rank of First Lieutenant. In 1866, he located at Saint Charles, Minnesota; two years after, he removed to Whitewater, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1877, when he came to Minneapolis. Mr. Brann is the local freight agent of the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Railway Company, which position he has held since coming here. He was married in 1866, to Miss M. J. Atkins, of Gardiner, Maine. They are the parents of four children.

Page 519

E. C. Briggs

was born at Coventry, Rhode Island, February 20tb, 1838. He came west in 1854, and located at Richfield, Minnesota, where he engaged in farming and carpentering until 1877, when he removed to this city, and was employed as packer in the Minneapolis Mill; he has continued to serve as such ever since. Mr. Briggs was married to Miss V. M. Ray, in September, 1860. Their children are: Ida and George.

Page 519

William Brigham

was born in Worcester county, Massachusetts, September 19th, 1835. Early in life he located at Marietta, Ohio, and was in the boot and shoe business there until 1855; thence to LaFayette, Indiana, until 1865; thence to Chicago until 1869, when he came to Minnesota and settled at Saint Peter, still connected with the boot and shoe business. In August 1873, he came to this city, where he was engaged as foreman by the North Star Boot and Shoe Company. Mr. Brigham's family consists of his wife and one daughter.

Page 519

F. H. Brimmer

dentist, was born at Ellsworth, Maine, December 30th, 1844. He received his education in his native place, and there studied dentistry with Doctor Osgood. He graduated from the Philadelphia Dental College Class of 1876-7, with degree of D. D. S. He came to Minneapolis September 30th, 1879. Doctor Brimmer is unmarried.

Page 519

E. Broad

is a native of Maine, and was born May 29th, 1814. His father, being a blacksmith, he commenced in early life to learn the trade. In 1842 he moved to Bangor and remained there in pursuit of his trade, until 1865, when he came west and located at Saint Anthony, where he has since been engaged in the manufacture of edged tools. Mr. Broad was married to Miss S. C. Marsh, at Portland, Maine, in 1844.

Page 519

David Brooks

was born in England, Novernber,1802. He learned the tailoring business, and was converted at twenty-one years of age, and joined the Wesleyan Methodists. Educated in England, and licensed to preach in 1832, and preached in his native country ten years. Came to America in 1842. Settled in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Joined the Rock River conference in 1844. Appointed to Dixon, Illinois, for one year. Fell into the Wisconsin conference in 1845, at its organization, and was stationed one year at Light House Point, and one year at Platteville; also stationed at Dodgeville and Watertown. Came from the Baraboo conference to Minnesota in 1853, by order of Bishop Scott, to take charge of the Minnesota district as presiding elder, embracing all the territory of Minnesota and seventeen thousand squire miles of Wisconsin. Was its presiding elder four years, making appointments and filling them, that reached from the southern line of the state to Lake Superior. Was the presiding elder of Lake Superior district two years, by appointment from the Winona conference; then from the Minneapolis conference to the Minneapolis district, by Bishop Baker, for four years. Appointed to the Monticello circuit for two years and one year agent for the Hamline University; then five years agent for the American Bible Society. Was then sent by Bishop Clark to the Sank Centre district as presiding el- der, for two years. At the end of that time the work in the upper district was reorganized by Bishop Haven, necessitating a change in the, presiding elder in district. From Sauk Centre he went to Brooklyn Centre one year; from there to Champlin and Maple Grove for three years. At the end of that time he again took the agency of the American Bible Society for two years, The first winter he came to Minnesota, he obtained a charter for the Hamline University, and named it. The following season obtained from Bishop Hamline, from whom it takes its name, the munificent sum of twenty-five thousand dollars. Was the first president of the board Of trustees of the institution.

In June, 1855, he left St. Paul, camping out in the open air on his way to Fort Ripley, from there with a guide to assist, put his boat into the Mississippi river, paddling on to Sandy Lake, East Savannah river, St. Louis river. Thence to Superior Bay, carrying his canoe across Portages varying in distance from one mile to ten; when in St. Louis river. Had an encounter with a black bear who wanted to take passage on the boat or give him the bear's hug. This he objected to, and having no weapon but his oar which he used industriously about the bears head and fore paws, spattering water in his face until he was glad to beat a retreat, shaking the water from his shaggy eye brows, so that he could see which way to make his escape. Landed in Superior at the head of the lake, and preached the first Protestant sermon ever heard there, also obtained a site and lot for a church. Married Miss Ann Moseley, who died of cholera in 1850; married again in 1852 to Margaret W. Prior. They have had five children, Jabez, Josia, Emma , Adin, and Amy A.

Page 520

Jabez Brooks, D. D.

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature at the University of Minnesota, was born in England. When a youth his parents emigrated to America and settled in Wisconsin in 1842, at Southport, now Kenosha. At this point he pursued his studies at Southport Academy. After finishing his preparatory studies in the West he entered the sophomore class in Wesleyan University at Middletown, Connecticut, in 1847, and graduated in 1850. He maintained himself while pursuing his studies by teaching and performing whatever labor he could get. After graduating he came to Wisconsin and conducted until 1851 a seminary at Watertown, Wisconsin. He next occupied the chair of Greek and Mathematics in Lawrence University at Appleton, Wisconsin. In 1854, he was elected principal of the preparatory department of Hamline University at Red Wing, and entered upon his duties on 16th of November, and during 1854-5 he was pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at that place. In 1857-8, ill-health compelled him to retire from teaching. In 1861 he was elected president of Hamline University, which position he retained until 1869, when he resigned, and the same year was elected professor of Greek at the University. Since 1869 he has continuously held that position, and for several years after, the decease of Professor Walker in 1876, had charge of the department of Latin also. During his presidency of Hamline University, Professor Brooks was a member of the State Normal school board, the Agricultural College board, the general conference of the Methodist Episcopal church, and commissioner of Indian payments. Mr. Brooks was married in 1854 to Miss Ruby B. Pearce, of Watertown, Wisconsin, and has had five children: The eldest, Adin P., died February 2d, 1881, D. Denslow, Olive E., now Mrs. E. T. Sykes, Anna E. and Lucia May.

Page 520

Ole Brobaugh

a native of Norway, was born August 20th, 1852. He came to the United, States in 1869 and located in Red Wing, Minnesota, where he was engaged in farming until 1874. He then started a meat market, in which he continued one year, when he came to Minneapolis and opened a meat market with a partner. In January, 1880, Mr. Broliaugh bought his partner's interest and has since continued alone. Mr. Brohaugh was married in 1878, to Albertine Hanson, who bore him one daughter, Clara.

Page 520

Baldwin Brown

was born in Rochester, New York, February 7th, 1838. He came to St. Anthony in 1849, in company with his parents. His first enterprise was freighting from St. Paul and St. Anthony to the different government posts. He dealt in horses, cattle and real estate for several years, and in 1862, built the old "St. Cloud Hotel.'' He was engaged in different pursuits until 1870, when he opened a livery and sale stable. Mr. Brown was member of city council from 1872 to 1877, member of legislature 1878 and was elected member of board of county commissioners Hennepin county, fall of 1880. He married Emma Day in 1865. Their children are: Charles, William, Baldwin and Frederick.

Page 520

Benjamin J. Brown

was born in Maine, April 4th, 1821. A few years in early life were devoted to lumbering, and at twenty-six yean of age engaged in traveling business, in which he remained about six years, and in 1852 came to St. Anthony. Here he commenced the lumbering business, in which he was successful until the great financial crash of 1857. He is now employed as overseer in lumbering camps. . Mr. Brown was the first marshal of St. Anthony. He was also interested with Anson Northrup in the civilization of murderous Indians, by the hemp method, in 1857. He was married to Nellie Carleton, April 8th, 1855. They have ten children living, two of whom, Ben Bruce and Nellie, were born at Crow Wing, being the first white children born in that region, and Mrs. Brown the second white woman who lived in that locality.

Page 521

C. D. Brown

was born in Maine, in 1835. At eighteen years of age he learned the trade of wagon-maker, and has continued in that business since, except three years spent at sea. He came to St. Anthony in 1857, and in the fall of 1859 established opposite the Pillsbury "A" mill. Mr. Brown enlisted, in 1862, in the First Minnesota battery, and was discharged at the end of one year on account of failing health. After returning, he opened a shop near the present location, which was burned in 1869; soon after he located at his present shop, 417 Main street, S. E. Mr. Brown was married, in 1859, to Henrietta Murphy who has borne him four children.

Page 521

F. D. Brown

was born at Vienna, Maine, May, 1847. He came to Minneapolis with his parents in 1854. He learned the trade of blacksmith of his brother, when he was so small he was obliged to stand on a block to strike the anvil. "Brown Brothers" were the first fires started in the C. M. & St. P. R. R. shops. Mr. Brown was married, in 1870, to Miss E. S. Lindstrom. They have two children, May and Nellie. Levi Brown, his father, started the first blacksmith shop on the west side, and died in 1857.

Page 521

J. H. Brown

is a native of Canada, and was born September 16th, 1856. He married Elizabeth Gipson, June 2d, 1879. They have one daughter. His early life was spent in the hotel business. During the summer of 1880, he moved to Minneapolis, and now has a sample room, 527 Washington Avenue south.

Page 521

J. M. Brown

was born at Winthrop, Maine, August 19th, 1839. He came to this city in 1869, where he engaged in lumbering three years, then bought a shingle mill at Belknap, on the Saint Paul and Duluth Railroad. He had this mill in operation four years, then returned to Minneapolis. Since 1878, he has been engineer in the North Star Planing Mill. Mr. Brown married Ada Dean, December 25th, 1867.

Page 521

W. W. Brown

was born in Vermont, in 1843. He moved to Iowa in 1863, and followed the hotel business fifteen years. He removed to Lake Calhoun, Minnesota, in 1878, and after having in charge, one year, the Lake Side House, he came to Minneapolis, where he has since resided. He is now the proprietor of the Theatre Comique, and also of the Sherman House, 129 Second street north.

Page 521

Zelora E. Brown

was born in Brookfield, Madison county, Now York, February 9th, 1834. When four years of age, his parents moved to Genesee, New York, where his father received a severe injury, by a falling tree, which resulted in his back being broken. What is quite remarkable, he is still in good health, having lived the last forty years with his lower limbs paralyzed. At the age of twenty-one, Mr. Brown came west, but soon returned to New York, where he married Miss Mary R. Armstrong, December 30th 1856. They came to Dakota, Wisconsin, in 1859, where he engaged in farming until 1861, when he was drafted, but accepted the alternative of paying three hundred dollars, and remained with his family. In the fall of the same year he engaged with N. F. Griswold, of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, as traveling agent for agricultural implements, with whom he remained four years, three years of the time being spent at Rochester, Minnesota, where he was superintendent of Mr. Griswold's business in that section. Here, a son, Walter R., was born to him. He then moved to Irvington, Iowa, and become a partner with J. R. Armstrong, in a general merchandise store, remaining five years. Another child was born there, Clarence Z. In 1871, Mr. Brown came to Minneapolis, where he again engaged as solicitor and collector for Mr. Griswold, traveling seventy-five thousand miles by team. He formed a partnership with H. O. Hamlin, in 1877, which still exists, dealing in real estate.

Page 521

J. B. Brouillette

was born in Canada, in 1824. He was a dry goods merchant in his native place three years, then moved to New Orleans, where he was engaged in the Saint Charles hotel five years; thence to California, where he was in the hotel business five years; thence to Australia, remaining there two years. He also spent several years in Washington Territory, Oregon and the British Possessions, engaged in farming and mining. He came to Minneapolis in 1879, where he has since remained. Mr. Brouillette was married to Miss Jane Renwick. Their living children are Mary, Joseph, James, Louise, and Victor.

Page 521

James Bryant

was born at Bedford, Indiana, January 22d, 1843. He came with his parents to Minneapolis in 1856; his father, R. R. Bryant engaged in mercantile business on Washington Avenue. In 1861, James Bryant enlisted in the, First Minnesota Volunteer infantry; he was wounded in the battle of Gettysburg in 1863, and in July, 1865, was honorably discharged. He was, elected register of deeds for Hennepin county, in 1866, which office he held until 1871. He then entered upon the abstract business, in which he continued until 1876, when he entered the clerks office as deputy clerk of court and served until January, 1881, when he again went into the abstract business. Mr. Bryant was married in this city to Miss Abbie Robinson, in November, 1865. They have had six children, five of whom are living.

Page 522

Henry Buckendorf

is a German, and was born November 2d, 1844. He attended the public schools of Germany until the age of fifteen, when he learned the business of florist. He served one and a half years in the Prussian army. Soon after, he emigrated to the United States, coming directly to Minneapolis, where he at once engaged in the business of florist, in which he still continues, and has one of the finest establishments in the city. Mr. Buckendorf is unmarried.

Page 522

William Buckendorf

was born in Germany, in 1833. He attended the public schools of his native country until 1848. He then was instructed in floral gardening. In 1857 he came to America with Judge Ames, and was in the employ of Dr. Ames until 1863, when he purchased his present gardens. Mr. Buckendorf was the first florist in this city. He was married to Barbara Weber, September, 1860, who died sixteen years later, leaving four children. Mr. Buckendorf was married in October, 1878, to Maria Gerdis.

Page 522

Martin Buerfening was born in Prussia, October 13th, 1847. He lived in his native country twenty-one, years, during which time he learned harness-making. In 1868 he came to America, proceeding directly to Minneapolis, where he settled, and worked at his trade until 1875. He was then appointed on the police force, where he has since officiated. He was married to Eustena Weinard, of Wilmington, Delaware, in 1873, who bore him three children : Ida, Mary, and Anna.

Page 522

G. C. Bugbee

was born at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, April 15th, 1837. He was reared to manhood in his native place, and in 1857 came to Minneapolis. Mr. Bugbee loaded the first lumber for shipment from this city, on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad, and has been engaged in that business since. He is at present with the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway, also St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway. Mr. Bugbee was married at St. Paul, May 22d, 1863, to Miss Dora M. Gabert.

Page 522

Edward Burke

was born at Montello, Wisconsin, August 19th, 1857. While yet a boy he moved with his parents to Winona, Minnesota. At the age of twelve he commenced as a Miller at Minnesota City, and remained for five years in the employ of the Winona Mill Company of that place. In May 1879, he removed to Minneapolis, where he was employed in the Washburn Mills eight months; he then engaged with the Standard Mill as packer, and has since remained at that place.

Page 522

L. W. Burrell

was born July 13th, 1852, at Dover, Maine. Here he attended school until eighteen years of age, when he changed his home to Clearfield, Pennsylvania; he then learned blacksmithing. In 1872 he removed to Minneapolis; for six years he was in the employ of other parties, and in 1878 opened a shop and resumed his trade, until the establishment of the Hame Factory. Mr. Burrell was married November, 1877, to Miss Flora Rich, who bore him two children, Rose and Thomas.

Page 522

William E. Burwell

was born at Buffalo, New York, November 24th, 1844. He moved to Now York city in 1854, thence to Minneapolis, November 4th, 1874. Here he entered the First National Bank as general book-keeper, which position he held until May, 1880, he then being elected assistant cashier of the Northwestern National Bank.

Page 522

C. R. Bushnell

was born in Jefferson county, New York, November, 1832. He engage in farming until 1848, when he went to Racine, Wisconsin, and learned the machinists trade; here he remained until 1855, then removed to Waconda county, Illinois. In 1857 he located at Lake City, Minnesota, employed in manufacture of sash, doors, blinds, etc. Meeting with reverses, caused by the panic of 1857, he was made destitute and through the winter of 1857-1858 he subsisted principally on corn meal and molasses. In 1862 he went to St. Paul and was employed in the Pioneer foundry, by Mr. Gillman; the spring following he came to St. Anthony and engaged with Charles Soott in his foundry. Mr. Bushnell started a machine shop in 1864, on the west side of the river and made the shafting for the first woolen mill ever built in this city. He sold out in 1865, and that year formed a co-partnership known as C. R. Bushnell and Co., but afterwards better known as the St. Anthony Iron Works. Since January, 1880, he has been a member of the firm of Bushnell and Spear, Northwestern Stove Works. Mr. Bushnell was married September, 1855, to Miss Delia Kitz. Their children are, Charles, Arthur and Elbert.

Page 523

Louis Buschjost

was born in Germany, February 14th, 1850. He acquired a knowledge of shoe-making in his native country, and worked at it until 1874,when he came to the United States. He first settled in Cincinnati, Ohio; thence to Saint Joseph, Missouri, where he remained until 1877, when he came to Minneapolis, and has since continued in his business. Mr. Buschjost was married to Emma Altwein, of Wisconsin, who bore him a son; Otto.

Page 523

B. F. Butler

was born in Maine, in 1829. He moved to Detroit, Michigan, in 1854, and was with the Michigan Central railroad. In 1856, he located at Minneapolis, engaged in the sash and blind business; a few months after, he took a claim at Forest City, remaining on it one year; thence to Fair Haven, Stearns county, and purchased a farm, which he tilled until 1873. He then returned to this city, where he has been employed in the North Star Iron Works and millwright in the different mills throughout the state. Married Miss Eliza Tucker, in 1860. They have one child living; Allana.

Page 523

G. S. Butler

was born at Clinton, New York, March 4th, 1834. He engaged in book-keeping for twenty years, previous to his entering mercantile business. He located in Minneapolis in l876. Mr. Butler was married August 6th, 1862, at Clinton, New York, to Miss Sophia A. Comstock, Harriet E., and Alice B., are their children.

Page 523

H. C. Butler

was born in Maine, in 1838, where he remained until coming to Minneapolis, in 1857. He is the proprietor of the Minneapolis Mill Pick Depot and Iron Works, which business he has carried on since his coming to the city. Mr. Butler was married to Miss Eunice L. Baine of this city, in 1857. They have seven children.

Page 523

W. E. Butler

is a native of Maine, born May, 1848. At twelve years of age he learned the trade of saw filer, and continued in it until 1871, when he commenced learning photography of W. H. Jacoby. In 1874 he commenced business in his present location on Central Avenue, Nicollet Island. Mr. Butler does a general photographic business, including portraits in india ink, water colors, and oil. He was married to Miss Fannie Whittier, of this city, in 1872. They have one son: Henry Edwin.

Page 523

F. G. Buttolph

was born at Troy, Oakland county, Michigan, December 6th, 1847. At the age of sixteen, he accompanied his parents to Canada, where he learned his trade, that of dyeing, and engaged in it until 1878, when he came to Minneapolis. In addition to his dyeing works here, he has a hat establishment, in which he renovates silk, felt, and straw hats.

Page 523

T. J. Buxton

was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, November 18th, 1833. He moved with his parents, to Union county, Ohio, 1835, where he resided on a farm until twenty-one years of age. He began banking business at Marysville, as cashier, where he continued six years. Mr. Buxton raised Company "E," Sixty-sixth Regiment, Ohio Infantry, and entered the field, in West Virginia, in 1862. He participated in several of the most prominent engagements, being taken prisoner, at Port Republic, and held as such in Salisbury and Libby prisons, for four months. In 1869 he located at Minneapolis and opened the City Bank, in which he has served as cashier since. He has also held the office of city treasurer for four terms. Mr. Buxton was married to Miss Delia A. Griffin, of Delaware county, Ohio. Their children are: Bessie and Marie.

Page 523

James Byrnes

is a native of Ireland. He accompanied his parents to America in 1852, locating on a farm, in Hennepin county Minnesota; he remained with his parents three years, then spent two years in Saint Anthony. At the age of seventeen he learned the blacksmith's trade. Mr. Byrnes was in the south three years, during the war. He came to this city, in 1866, and opened a blacksmith shop. He married Julia F. Sullivan, in 1865, who has been a resident of this state twenty-six years. They have five children, living, and have lost three sons. Mr. Byrne's shop is located at 104 First street south, where he employs three men.

Page 524

W. F. Cahill

came to Minneapolis in 1853. He bought the Island mill in 1860, and operated it until 1870, when it was destroyed by fire. The same year he built the Holly mills, and also the Florence mill at Stillwater. Cahill and Company purchased the Dakota mill in 1873, and in 1877 the Galaxy, from the Ankeny estate. The latter mill was destroyed by the explosion of May, 1878, and rebuilt by Cahill, Fletcher and Company, in 1878-9. It was opened in December of the latter year. Mr. Cahill also had an interest in the Minnetonka mill, from 1875 to 1877. He was married in 1853, to Sarah M. Bailey. Their children are: Florente, now the wife of P. Greenleaf; Mariam B., now Mrs. F. Hinkle, Helen E. now the wife of W. T. Maxfield; Paul W., died at the age of four years.

Page 524

James Cain

came to Minnesota in 1863, and for five years was engaged in farming in Dakota county; then came to Minneapolis in 1868, and followed lumbering seven years. In 1875 he engaged in saloon business on Second street north where he remained two years, then moved to his present location, 24 Hennepin Avenue. September 27th, 1876, he married Frances Murphy.

Page 524

T. H. Cain

was born in March, 1856. In early life he went to Canandaigua, New York, thence to Clinton, Iowa, and learned the trade of horseshoer. He located at. Minneapolis in October, 1878. Here he worked for different parties until March, 1880, when the existing firm of Keep & Cain was formed.

Page 524

George Calladine

harness and horse furnishings, 16 First street north. He was born in Hertfordshire, England, in 1827. At the age of twenty-two he entered the army and served as saddler, three years, in the Eleventh Hussars. In 1852, he went to Australia, and remained three years; returned to England, and in 1856 came to Minnesota; settled at Rockford, Wright county, where he still owns 240 acres of land. At the breaking out of the war, Mr. Calladine recruited a company on money raised by the sale of his live stock; of this company he was first lieutenant, and served three years and six months; was mustered out as captain at Chicago in 1865. He participated in many of the principal engagements of the war, and was provost marshal for General Burnside during his Tennessee campaign. In 1866, he came to Minneapolis and engaged in the harness business with Mr. Pavitt; since 1870 Mr. Calladine has carried on the trade alone. He was married in 1866 to Margaret McDonald, of Chicago. They have two children, Caroline M. and Margaret E.

Page 524

Arthur A. Camp

was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, August 15th, 1850. He was educated in Burlington, Vermont, graduated from the University of that place. In 1869, he learned the drug business at Saratoga Springs, and continued in it until 1875, when he removed to New York and was engaged as assistant house physician in a hospital. He studied medicine and graduated from New York Homeopathic Medical College in 1878; he came directly to Minneapolis, and has since been in continuous practice here. He was elected president of the Homeopathic Medical Society of Hennepin county, in September, 1879 and was re-elected in 1880. Dr. Camp married Miss Mary Walton, at Saratoga Springs, in 1878. They have one child; Arthur W.

Page 524

John McK.Campbell

Contractor and builder, is a native of Scotland, where he was born January 1st, 1842. He emigrated with his parents to Prince Edward Island in 1843. In 1856, he entered the coast merchant sailing, and continued until 1863, when he returned home and served an apprenticeship at ship building; then went to sea for one year; he landed in New York, traveled about through several states and finally settled in Owatonna, Minnesota, where he remained three years doing carpenter work. He removed to Minneapolis in 1870, and has since been engaged here in contracting. In 1873, he married Mary Morrison. Three children have been born to them; Anna Belle, Alvin B. and Mary.

Page 524

E. C. Cauvet

of the firm of Cauvet and Reid, was born in New York city, November 4th, 1836. He enlisted May 24th, 1861, in Company C, 42d New York Infantry. At the battle of Ball's Bluff he was promoted to second lieutenant, and first lieutenant at Antietam. December 13th, 1862, at the battle of Fredericksburg, he was promoted to captain; and January 1st, 1864, was appointed assistant provost marshal, under General Hancock. He held this office until June, 1864. Was mustered out at New York city, July 13th, 1864. After leaving the service he went into the plumbing business at New York, which he continued ten years. In February, 1874, he came to Minneapolis, and has been in business here since that time. His wife was Emma Knight, whom he married January 8th, 1866. Three children have been born to them; only one is living, Viola L.

Page 525

Casper Cantieny

a native of Switzerland, was born in 1807. He emigrated to America in 1850, and located in Ohio for five years, during which time he followed house carpentering. He then spent two years in Illinois and three in Wisconsin, in the hotel business; also kept the Garden City Hotel of St. Paul two years. In 1861 he enlisted in the First Minnesota Cavalry, and served seventeen months. From that time he worked at the carpenter's trade in St. Paul and Red Wing until 1865, when he came to Minneapolis, and followed his trade here four years. In 1879 he erected the building he now uses for a liquor, cigar and confectionery store, No. 1 Nicollet Avenue. He was married in 1848, to Maria Coray. They have four children.

Page 525

T. J. Canney

a native of New Hampshire, was born in Tuftenborough, October 27th, 1831. He tame to Wright county, Minnesota, in 1857, moved to Clear Water in 1859, thence to Minneapolis in 1864 and started a dairy, which business he continued until 1876, when he purchased the state right for patent concrete sidewalks. He was married in 1855, to Julia Smith of New Hampshire. Their children are: Fred, Frank, John, Flora, Bessie and George; the latter died in 1876 aged twelve years. Mr. Canney is contractor in concrete walks and drive ways, also house and barn roof painting, with fire and water proof paint; No. 1929 Western Avenue.

Page 525

E. J. Carlin

was born at Troy, New York, in 1848. When a child he went with his parents to Binghamton, New York and remained until 1870, when he removed to Iowa. In 1871 he came to Minneapolis, and has since been engaged in the cooper business, with the exception of three years passed in Philadelphia. His wife was Ella McCarthy, whom he married in 1875. Their residence is No. 714 Seventeenth Avenue south. Mr. Carlin was one of the founders and is a charter member of the Hennepin County Barrel Company.

Page 525

G. C. Carr

born in Lauderdale, Mississippi, June 1st, 1859. His parents were slaves and his father died in the great struggle for freedom; his mother came to this city with her children, and at the age of six years G. C. was obliged to go on the street blacking boots and selling papers, until 1870, when he commenced attending the public schools; his love for penmanship induced him to turn nearly his whole attention in that direction. In 1875 he went to Red Wing and worked as shop-boy in a barber's shop mornings and evenings, attending school during the day. He remained until 1878, having learned the barber's trade. His business enabled him to attend Commercial college, and he is now bonding his energies to perfect himself in penmanship, with a view to teaching. His place of business is at 409 Hennepin Avenue.

Page 525

L. S. Carr

head miller at the Union Mill, was born at Watertown, Wisconsin, February 23d, 1851. He learned milling at home, where he worked about seven years; he came here in September, 1874, and was in the Washburn "A" mill until May 2d, 1878. On that day Mr. Carr left the mill three minutes before six o'clock, and at ten minutes after six the explosion occurred which left the mill a mass of ruins. After this he worked in the Pillsbury, the Washburn "B" and the Washburn "C" mills until March 1st, 1880, when he went to the Union mill. He was married May 29th, 1878, to Ida R. Ripley.

Page 525

E. D. Case

was born in Minneapolis, October 2d, 1857. He was married December 24th, 1878, to Eva M. Cobb. E. D. is the son of Emanuel Case, one of the early settlers of Hennepin county, who died a few years since. Mr. Case is engaged in the livery business at 211 Plymouth Avenue.

Page 525

George W. Cates

a native of Maine, was born in Cutler, Washington county, in 1854. He came to Minnesota when a child, and lived on a farm at Bloomington until 1870; since that time he has been engaged in the agricultural implement business. He is now with H. Kirkwood as book-keeper and traveling salesman. September 18th, 1877, he married Mary C. Phillips, of St. Paul, who has borne him one child, Edith E.

Page 525

William M. Carlton

was born at Manchester, New Hampshire, November 27th, 1844. When a child he went with his parents to Beaver Dam, Wisconsin; from there he removed to Watertown and learned the milling business. He spent some time in Madison, Beaver Dam and Monroe, and in 1872 came to Minneapolis; he worked at railroad building on the frontier one season, but returned to this city and has been with the Holly mill since June, 1874. He is now head miller. April 26th, 1870, he married Maggie Graham, of Wisconsin. Their children are Clara, Jeanette and Elizabeth Grace.

Page 526

H. M. Carpenter

a native of Rhode Island, was born in Providence in 1828. He came to St. Anthony in 1854 and worked two years as clerk for Tufts, Reynolds & Whittemore. In 1857 he engaged in general merchandise business with Mr. Andrews as partner, but they were burned out, in about sixteen months, and in 1860 Mr. Carpenter started in the same business alone. He continued it four years, and in the meantime bought an interest in a paper mill. In the spring of 1865 he started the paper store at St. Paul, and the following year took a partner, J. T. Averill, the latter taking charge of the St. Paul store. Since the withdrawal of Cutler and Secombe from the firm, Mr. Carpenter has had entire control of the paper mill. He married Kate Ladd, of Providence, Rhode Island, April 20th, 1852. Three children have been born to them: Frank, Henry and Edwin.

Page 526

J. F. Chaffee

pastor of Hennepin Avenue Tabernacle, was born in Attica, New York, November 5th, 1827, converted and joined the Free Will Baptist at twelve years of age. At eighteen, moved to Illinois and soon joined the Methodist; before twenty-one years of age, was admitted on trial in the Rock River Conference, and sent to the Carthage circuit for one year, at Oquawka two years, Monmouth one year, Knoxville one year, Lewiston two years, Jefferson street, Chicago, two years, transferred to Minnesota in 1857; to St. Anthony until the spring of 1859, then to Jackson street, St. Paul, from the spring of 1859, to the fall of 1860, then two years in Minneapolis. Five years presiding elder of the Minneapolis and St. Paul district. Three years pastor of Centenary church, during which time the church was built and dedicated. One year city missionary, during which time the Seventh street church was built and dedicated; for the next three years, was agent of the Hamline University, during that time which he relocated on fifty acres of valuable land. The next year supplied Duluth, one year in Faribault, two years presiding elder of Winona district, one year in Jackson street, St. Paul, then invited to come to the present pastorate on Hennepin Avenue; was a member of two general conferences in 1868 and 1880; was married in 1849 to Calista Hopkins, of New York; have two children living: Carrie C. and Hugh G.

Page 526

W. H. Chamberlain

a native of Maine, was born in 1830. In 1846 he went to Boston, Massachusetts, and remained four years, working in a furniture store, and part of the time clerking in a hotel. In 1850 he went to New York and kept books one year in the Commercial Exchange bank; from there he removed to Brooklyn, where he learned the jeweler's trade, then spent one year in Ohio, and in 1857 came to Minnesota; he located in Saint Anthony, but in 1862 moved on this side of the river, and since that time has been engaged in the jewelry business here; he is at No. 6 Washington Avenue south. Mr. Chamberlain was with General Sibley in his raid against the Indians in 1862. He was married in 1856, at Troy, New York, to Charlotte Knickerbacker. Their living children are: William, Ida, Mary and Charlotte.

Page 526

W. B. Champion

was born on Prince Edward Island, in 1848. He moved to Maine and resided about eight years, then came to Minneapolis in 1878, and engaged in forming the Hennepin County Barrel Company, of which he is the president. His wife was Miss Minnie McArthur to whom he was married in 1870. They reside at 309 Washington Avenue north.

Page 526

Z. L. Chandonnet

pastor of the church of Our Lady of Lourdes, was born July 10th, 1848, at St. Pierre Les-Recquets, Nicollet county, Quebec. He attended the Petit and Grand Seminaries, in Quebec, completing his theological education at Three Rivers, where, on the 22d of November 1874, he was ordained and at once appointed Vicar of St. Francis of Xavier's church at Baliscan. Here he remained until September 29th, 1875, when he was appointed to a like position at St. Annals Church, at Yamachiche. This position he retained until October, 1877, when he came to Minnesota, and was placed in charge of the churches at Belle Prairie and Little Falls, Morrison county, remaining, there until March 1st, 1879, when he was placed in charge of the churches at Lenz and Corcoran, Hennepin county, and in December following was transferred to his present charge in Minneapolis.

Page 527

James Chant

was born in Somerset county, England, January 16th, 1840. He came to the United States in 1873, and located the same year at Hawley, Clay county, Minnesota, on a farm. Here he remained until 1878, when he became a partner of Mr. Maskell in the city meat market. Mr. Chant's family consists of his wife and nine children.

Page 527

Josiah H. Chase

a native of Kingston, New Hampshire, was born September 15th, 1840. He learned the trade of carriage making of his father, and remained with him until 1852, when he went to Boston and worked in a clothing store, at a weekly salary of two dollars and seventy-five cents. In 1856 he came to Olmsted county, Minnesota; afterward made a claim of 160 acres in Mower county. In the fall of 1856 he came to St. Anthony, and the following spring purchased, in company with S. A. Lewis, a stock of boots and shoes, to which in a few months they added general merchandise; in two years Mr. Chase bought out his partner and continued the business alone; in 1861 he closed the dry goods department, and carried only boots and shoes and clothing. In 1866 he was burned out and at once located on Main street; in 1875 he erected the building he now occupies, located on Central Avenue, corner Second street. Mr. Chase is the oldest clothing dealer in the city. He was married in 1863, to Ellen May Rankin. They have had four children only two of whom are now living: Henry and Josiah.

Page 527

C. E. Chilstrom

a native of Sweden, was born July 22d, 1851. He came to America with his parents in 1856 and located in Wisconsin, but removed to Minnesota, and his parents now reside in Litchfield. In January, 1871, he came to Minneapolis and worked for Dr. Linn, afterward for Pabody and Whittaker, and has continued in the drug business since. The firm of Patterson and Chilstrom was formed in October, 1880 ; they carry a full line of goods appertaining to the drug trade. Mr. Chilstrom's wife was Matilda Nelson of Sweden, to whom he was married in May, 1880.

Page 527

E. H. Chittenden

was born in Monroe county, New York, in 1832. In 1856 he went to Medina, New York, and practiced as veterinary surgeon four years, then removed to Ohio and remained two years. In 1862 he began steamboating on the Ohio river and followed that business four years; he then came to Minnesota and engaged in farming in Faribault county until 1874, when he removed to Minneapolis. He built two small steamers and ran one of them one season between this city and St. Cloud, then sold her and resumed his practice as veterinary surgeon, which he has continued since. Was married in 1858, to Hannah Gerry; six children have been born to them but only two are living.

Page 527

J. A. Christian

was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, September 12th, 1832. He moved to Walworth county, Wisconsin, in 1847, and from there to Chicago in 1851; thence to Caledonia, Illinois, where he dealt in cattle, hogs, wheat, etc., until 1860, when he went to Colorado, and for nine years engaged in mining. Six years of this time he was treasurer of Summit county. In 1869 he came to Minnesota, and for two years was in the lumbering business at Dayton; then came to Minneapolis and ran the Zenith mill for two years. He entered the firm of George H. Christian and Company, in 1873. The latter retired at the expiration of one year, and the firm took the name of J. A. Christian and company. The mill explosion of May, 1878, caused suspension of business, and in July of the same year a new firm was formed, under the name of Christian, Brother and Company, and own the Crown Roller mill. In June, 1874, Mr. Christian married Mary E., Hall, who has borne him three daughters: Carrie, Annie, and Susie.

Page 527

Llewellyn Christian

a native of Wetumpka county, Alabama, was born June 10th, 1841. In 1844 he went with his parents to Wilmington, North Carolina, and in 1849 removed to Geneva, Wisconsin. In 1854 he went to Chicago, and attended high school four years. At the expiration of that time he went to New York, and remained until 1872, when he came to Minneapolis and engaged in the Zenith mill, the firm name being Christian, Day and Company. From that time until the present he has been associated with J. A. Christian. His wife was Miss Eliza French, whom he married in 1874.

Page 528

Levi Christlieb

born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, July 8th, 1844. He went to St. Joseph, Missouri, in 1869, and the same year removed to this city. Until the spring of 1870 he worked with Greeley, Loye and Company, harness-making; then with Davis and McCallum, and the Trades Manufacturing Company, until August, 1874, when he went into partnership with John H. Arnell, and has continued to do a prosperous business since. They are located at 108 Central Avenue. Mr. Christlieb is unmarried.

Page 528

Richard Chute

was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, September 23d, 1820, and moved to Columbus at the age of seven years, and four years later to Fort Wayne, Indiana. In 1841, he formed a partnership with William G. Ewing in the fur trade; from that time until 1854, he visited in the autumn of each year, Minnesota, Iowa and other western points. He was at St. Anthony in 1844 and built a house, which was used for several years as a trading post. After the death of his partner in 1854, Mr. Chute located in Saint Anthony, and until 1868, had charge of the property, since owned by the Saint Anthony Water Power Company; he sold lots lying east of Main street, but was restricted from selling between that and the river; since that time he has been engaged in the real estate business. While traveling in the fur business, Mr. Chute was present at the forming of several treaties with Indians. He was at Agency City, Iowa, when the treaty was concluded with the Sac and Fox tribe by which they ceded to the government all their lands in Iowa territory, he was also at Washington when the treaty was made with the Winnebagos in 1856. In early days he took a lively interest in railroad matters and was among the incorporators of some of the companies. Mr. Chute was commissioned by Gen. Sibley as Colonel of the Seventeenth Regiment Militia, and in 1862, he was quartermaster of an expedition from Fort Snelling to the Chippewa country, under Gen. Dale. In 1863, he was appointed regent of the State University. He is an elder in the Andrew Presbyterian church, and has been superintendent of the Sabbath School for many years. He married Mary Young, of Indiana, February 28th, 1850. They have three living children; Charles, Willie and Grace.

Page 528

C. W. Clark

a native of Delaware county, New York, was born March 3d, 1827. Until seventeen years of age, he lived on a farm, then learned the black-smith's trade. In 1847, he went to South Wilbraham, Massachusetts; thence to Illinois, and in 1860, came to this city. In 1867, Mr. Clark built a shop near where Goodfellow and Eastman now are, and in 1875, bought his present shop which is 2Ox66 feet, and two stories high, situated on the corner of Third street and Third Avenue south. He was married December 19th, 1852, to Eliza Bliss, of Massachusetts, who has borne him nine children, seven of whom are living.

Page 528

H. B. Clark

was born in Brockton, Massachusetts, March 7th, 1841. He received his early education in his native town and worked for his father until 1859, when he went to California. He returned in 1861, and worked at the wholesale grocery business in Boston, Massachusetts, until 1869, when he came to Minneapolis. The following year he opened a meat-market, and has been in that business since, with the exception of two and one-half years which he spent in charge of the National Hotel of this city. He removed to his present location in July, 1880.

Page 528

Isaac B. Clark

was born in Effingham, Illinois, October 2d, 1856 When two years of age he moved with his parents to Missouri and lived on a farm until eighteen years old. In 1874, he removed to Galesburg, and two years later went south; he visited Memphis, New Orleans and Saint Louis. In 1878, he came to Minnesota and settled in this city. In the spring of 1880, he traveled through Dakota and Montana, but returned here in the fall of the same year and opened his photograph gallery on Washington Avenue south.

Page 528

John Sinclair Clark

was born at Saint Marys, Nova Scotia, in 1849. After teaching for a few years he came to Minneapolis, in June 1870, and entered the classical course at the University. Acting as assistant librarian of the institution for four years he thus furnished himself with the means necessary to carry through the full University course, and graduated in June, 1876. He was immediately tendered, and accepted, the position of instructor in Latin and mathematics. This place he filled until the spring of 1880, when he was appointed assistant professor of Latin, and still remains as such.

Page 529

John Clark

a native of Norfolk, England, was born November 13th, 1827. He came with his parents to America in 1834, and located at Genesee, New York; remained there three years, and then removed to Kishwaukee, Illinois., where he resided until 1867, when he came to this city, and has since lived here, with the exception of eighteen months passed in Florida. While at Kishwaukee he learned the trade of carriage-making and blacksmithing, and has been in that business nearly all his life. He was married in Illinois to Miss Esther Palmer. They are the parents of five children: Ella, now the wife of J. W. Crockett, Walter, Frederick, Luther and Charles.

Page 529

John W. Clark

was born at Minneapolis, January 5th, 1861. He is engaged as book-keeper for his father, F. P. Clark, at his saw-mill on the corner of Main street and Fourth Avenue N. E.

Page 529

Gilbert Clough

is a native of Lyme, New Hampshire; he was born August 26th, 1839, and came to Minneapolis with his parents in 1857. He worked at logging from the time of his arrival, and in 1866 went into the business with his brother, D. M. Clough; their cut the first year was one and, one-half million feet; it now amounts to about eighteen millions annually. Mr.Clough's wife was Fannie Shereton, whom he married May 28th, 1873. They reside on Fifth street near Fourth Avenue S. E.

Page 529

Daniel Cobb, A. M.

was born November 7th, 1818, in Onondaga county, New York, where his father was a preacher for forty years. The subject of this sketch was converted May 5th, 1839; educated in the Onondaga institute, teaching school at different times; entered the ministry in 1843, at the Oneida annual conference. First appointment for one year to Elbridge and Sennet, next to Freetown. Then for two years each at the towns of Owasco, Moravia, Asbury, Cortlandsville, Norwich, New York Mills, and Utica. Was transferred to the Minnesota conference in 1857 and appointed presiding elder of the Winona district for two years; from there to the Red Wing district as presiding elder for four years; after that stationed in Minneapolis in what is now the Centenary church; then appointed chaplain for the Sixth Minnesota Regiment, remaining in the chaplaincy until the close of the war; was present at the last battle at Fort Blakely, Mobile. On returning home in August, 1865, was mustered out of service, and the September following, was appointed to the Jackson street Methodist Episcopal church, St. Paul for three years; thence to Rochester two years; then to the Minneapolis first church for one year; at the end of that time, took a supernumary relation and went east on a visit for one year, preaching at the Ashgreen Methodist Episcopal church, Albany, New York, for seven months, and the Wall street church, Auburn, two months. Returning to Minnesota at the end of the year, was appointed presiding elder for the Minneapolis district for two years, and presiding elder for St. Paul district for two years; thence to the Centenary church for two years; then appointed presiding elder of the Owatonna district for four years; when he came to Minnesota in 1867, as presiding elder of the Winona district. There was twenty-two thousand square miles of territory to look after. Providing himself with a pair of Indian ponies and a buckboard, drove for four years organizing quarterly conferences; establishing churches, preaching, and in one year, preached two hundred and eighty-six sermons, taking wheat for pay, throwing the sacks into his wagon and carrying it to Red Wing to sell. He has taken charge of forty-nine camp meetings, extending from the Iowa line to Breckenridge; was elected chaplain in the Minnesota legislature for two years. First candidate for governor on the prohibition ticket in 1860. For thirty-seven years this veteran of Methodism has preached every Sunday excepting the time he was in the army, and one Sabbath out of the desk, on account of sickness. The honorary degree of A. M. was conferred upon him by State University at Athens, Ohio. Married April 22d, 1858, in Red Wing, to Louisa M. Sherman, who was educated at Fort Edwards, New York, and for three years was preceptress in the Hamline University. They leave three children; Alonzo W., Temperence Irene, and Ida May.

Page 529

H. J. Cobb

a native of Harmony, Somerset county, Maine, was born in l837. He came to St. Anthony November, 1853, and engaged in lumbering. In the summer of 1855 he brought the first cattle on a steamer from Rock Island, Illinois, and has since that time been engaged in the cattle trade, with the exception of three or four summers. Mr. Cobb is the pioneer cattle dealer of this county. He is now a member of the firm of Smith, Cobb and Brackett, stock dealers. He is also in the grocery business on Fifth Avenue south. In 1857 Mr. Cobb married Miss Mary Monel of Harmony, Maine. Their children are, Edward, George and Gracie.

Page 530

W. C. Colbrath

was born in Adrian, Michigan, in August, 1848. He came here in 1864 and worked for leading druggists of the city until 1872, when he went into busines with a partner; after two and one-half years he bought his partner's interest and has carried on the business alone since that time. He keeps a fine line of artists and carriage painter's materials and occupies the floor and basement of his store, No. 43 Washington Avenue south. Mr. Colbrath was married in 1874 to Lucy C. Russell, daughter of R. P. Russell, one of the pioneers of this county.

Page 530

Emerson Cole

a native of New Hampshire, was born in Milan in 1839. He came to Minneapolis in 1864 and engaged in the milling business, which he has followed to the present time. His wife was Agnes O'Neill of St. Paul. He is a member of the firm of Cole and Hammond, manufacturers of lumber.

Page 530

Thomas Coleman

is a native of Ireland; he was born in 1838. In early childhood he came with parents to Kingston, Canada, he removed to Chicago, Illinois, and thence to Galena, where he learned the shoemaker's trade and worked until 1848; he then removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, and from there to California, but finally settled in Minneapolis in 1863. He worked for different boot and shoe houses here until 1878, when he started in business for himself, and has since been doing a good trade. In 1865 he married Margaret T. Williams, who has borne him two children.

Page 530

D. F. Collins, M. D.

was born in Cork, Ireland, September 19th, 1850, and was educated at St. Vincent's Seminary of that city. He came to the United States in 1866, and lived in New York city one year, when he went to London, England, and studied for two years; he returned to New York and went to the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, where he graduated in 1873; during the same year he was elected a member of the New York Medico-legal Society, and in 1875 he was appointed one of the physicians connected with the board of public charities and corrections of New York city. Dr. Collins removed to Minneapolis in February, 1879; since coming here he has been appointed consulting physician of the orphan asylum., and medical examiner of the Catholic Mutual Insurance Association. He was married in Paris, France, May 16th, 1874, to Miss Frances Brown. They have two children: Mark and Jerome.

Page 530

Jesse Collom

was born at Meadville, Pennsylvania, and when a child came to Saint Paul with his parents. In 1865 he came here and attended school for a time, and in 1870 went in Mr. Marshall's store and learned the jeweler's trade, remaining two years. He then went to Iowa and to California, but returned to this city in 1876, and has since kept a jewelry store at 29 Fourth street south. In 1874 Mr. Collom married Ada Needham. Their children are Willie and Verney.

Page 530

N. E. Colstrom

a native of Sweden, was born May 9th, 1834. He emigrated to America in 1869 and located in this city. In 1870 he married Martha Britha. They have four children; Annie, Charles, John and Frank. Mr. Colstrom is the inventor and manufacturer of the Minneapolis slab-press brick machine, also brick moulders and trucks. This machine was perfected in 1876, by Mr. Colstrom, who is the sole proprietor. Twenty-two thousand bricks can be turned out in ten hours, by this machine. His place is 142 Twelfth street north.

Page 530

J. H. Conkey

was born at Plattsburg, New York, December 25th, 1820. He came west in 1850, and located in Wisconsin. It was he who laid the first iron on the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Railroad between Milwaukee and Waukesha. In 1859, in company with R. B. Langdon and others, he did the first grading on the Saint Paul and Pacific Railroad, and afterward engaged in business in Wisconsin until 1865, at which time he removed to Faribault, where he remained six years. He came to this city in 1872, engaged in business in company with R. B. Langdon at the Union planing mill, and has since continued in the same. Mr. Conkey was married in 1848 to Martha A. Langdon. She has borne him six children, only three of whom are living: Frank, Robert and Jennie.

Page 530

Elias H. Connor

was born at New Sharon, Maine, August 23d, 1824. He lived in his native town until twenty-one years of age, then spent three years on the Penobscot River. In 1848 he came to Lakeland, Minnesota, opposite Hudson, Wisconsin, where he worked one winter, then located at St. Anthony, and has since resided here. He is a carpenter and millwright, and he built the first two story frame house in the city, for Captain Rollins, in 1849. He purchased lots in 1850 and built his present residence on Second street, south-east. He has carried on a large business in contracting, building and drafting; he was in charge of the wood work on both the old and new suspension bridges, and drove the first horse across the old bridge; when the new one was building, Mrs. Connor and her daughter Georgia, then only six years old, walked to the middle of the bridge on a single plank, and returned in safety. . Mr. Connor built the first bridge across the Saint Croix, at Taylors Falls; he has built a number of large mills in different cities, and has had extensive contracts in carpenter work in all parts of the country adjacent to Minneapolis. He married, in 1855, Miss Hannah Rollins, who has borne him three children: Lillian, Georgia and Rosa.

Page 531

A. S. Converse

a native of Windsor, Massachusetts, was born January 4th, 1820. When eighteen years of age he removed to Chenango county, New York, and remained there in the carriage making business until 1854, when he came to Minnesota, and located in Dakota county; but in January 1855, he engaged in wagon and carriage making in Minneapolis, and has since been a resident of this city. His wife was Caroline Kenyon, whom he married in Chenango county, New York. Their children are. Vanelia, who was the wife of A. D. Prescott, (deceased), Rufus and Alvin. They reside at No.

725, Washington Avenue north.

Page 531

H. T. Cook

is a native of Canada. At the age of six years he moved with his parents to New York, and remained there until 1851, when he went to Wisconsin, and learned the wagon makers trade at Oshkosh, after which he removed to Iowa; came to this city in 1877, and has been in business here since. His wife was Zayda Holsen, of Iowa, whom he married in l853. She has borne him three children.

Page 531

C. H. Cook

was born in the state of New York in 1846. In 1851 he went with his brother to Wisconsin, then passed some time in Iowa, and came to Minneapolis in the spring of 1880. He was married in 1875 to Frances Becker. They have two children.

Page 531

Grove B. Cooley

was born at Attica, New York, December 10th, 1827. In 1848 he began the study of law at Canandaigua, and two years later, moved to Wisconsin, where he was a professor in the Ripon College from 1853 to 1858, teaching the dead languages and the higher branches of mathematics. In the autumn of 1858 he removed to Minnesota and located at Mantorville, Dodge county, where he was engaged in the practice of law, serving four years as county attorney and eight years judge of probate. He was also a leading member of the board of education of Mantorville. He was a member of the state legislature in 1872 and chairman of the judiciary committee, leaving a good record. He was associated for two years with Hon. A. J. Edgerton, now United States Senator, in the practice of law at Mantorville, under the firm name of Edgerton and Cooley. For four years he was a partner of Hon. Samuel Lord, now deceased, under the firm name of Cooley and Lord. In 1872, Judge Cooley came to Minneapolis and entered into partnership with Thomas Lowry, which continued until the spring of 1874, when he was unanimously elected judge of the municipal court of Minneapolis, which position he has filled to the general satisfaction of the public and continues to hold. In 1856 he was made a Master Mason in the Ripon Lodge, Ripon, Wisconsin, and has since been an active member and a diligent Masonic student. In 1872, he was Grand Master of Masons in Minnesota.

Page 531

George W. Cooley

civil engineer, office 411 Nicollet Avenue. Mr. Cooley is a native of New York city; he was born in the year 1845, and lived with his parents until nineteen years of age, when he came West and engaged with the St. Paul and Pacific Railway Company as assistant engineer, and served in their surveys until l867. It was he who drove the first stake for the St. Paul and Pacific Railway west of the Mississippi. During 1867-'68-'69 he was engaged in the United States surveys in Minnesota and Dakota. He located the junction of the Northern Pacific Railway with the Lake Superior and Mississippi and commenced the construction of the Northern Pacific Railway February 15th, 1870, under General Ira Spaulding. In l870 Mr. Cooley resumed business in Minneapolis as civil engineer and surveyor, and has continued in the same line to the present time. He has surveyed about one-third of this city, and has been engaged on many of the railroads and public improvements throughout the country. He served one term as county surveyor, was assistant engineer of the falls improvement, also of the work on the Minnesota river, and has lately completed the improvement of Hull's Narrows, Lake Minnetonka, having been appointed by the legislature. Mr. Cooley is now chief engineer of the Minneapolis, Lyndale and Lake Calhoun Railway.

Page 532

Joseph Coombs

was born in the year 1831, in England. He came to America in 1852 and lived four and one-half years in Maine, then came to St. Anthony and took a homestead. For two years he worked in the mines near Lake Superior, and in 1864 returned to Maine, where he is married to Miss Agnes L. Conary. He remained there nearly two years, then returned to Minneapolis, and has since been engaged in the coopering business here. Mr. Coombs resides at 605 Twelfth Avenue south.

Page 532

B. Cooper

a native of Pennsylvania, was born Lancaster county, in 1841. He came to this city in 1857, and for about seven years was engaged in carpenter work and farming, with the exception of some time spent south during the war. Mr. Cooper is now engaged in contracting and building. The following are a few of the any buildings erected by him: The residences Mrs. Byers, W. B. Jackson, J. M. Williams and D. R. Barber. He employs about twenty-five men; office, corner of Hawthorne Avenue and Twelfth Street. In l869 Mr. Cooper married Addie Bassett. They have two children: Edna and William.

Page 532

Charles Coot

was born in New York city, August 30th, 1847. He moved here in October, 1875, and worked one year in the car shops of the street railway. In 1876 he went to work for J. T. Elwell, in the spring-bed business, and has charge of the manufacturing department. At the age of seventeen Mr. Coot enlisted in the United States navy; he was on the Ladonia, an iron-side steamer, eight months, then was transferred to another steamer and remained until the close of the war. He was honorably discharged April, 1865.

Page 532

F. R. E. Cornell

was born November 17th, 1821, at Coventry, Chenango county, New York. At the age of fourteen he began teaching winters, and when possible to do so he attended school at Oxford Academy. In 1840 he entered Union College at Schenectady, and after graduating in 1842 taught several years, in the meantime reading law. He was admitted to the bar in 1846, and commenced practice with A. G. Chatfield, the late Judge Chatfield of this state; continued until 1854, when he came to Minneapolis. He was elected to the state senate in New York, has been a member of the city council, of the state legislature several times, and was attorney general six years. In January, 1875, he took his seat as associate judge of the supreme court, and still holds that position. His marriage with Eliza Burgess occurred in 1847. They have had three children; the living are Frank and Carrie.

Page 532

Charles Coplin

was born in La Porte county, Indiana, October 13th, 1849. In 1864 he moved Richmond, remaining one and one-half years; thence to Chicago for two years and on to Iowa. He located in Minneapolis in 1874, dealing in groceries two years, then went into the meat market with Fortier and Company. Their place of business is known as the "Excelsior Market." Mr. Coplin was married December 13th, 1876.

Page 532

T. W. Correns

a native of St. Lawrence county, New York, was born in 1835. His early life as spent in farming; in 1872, he went to Iowa and remained six years. He came to Minneapolis in 1878, since which time he has kept a saloon at 526 Washington Avenue south.

Page 532

Wyman Costigan

was born in Penobscot county, Maine, December, 1844. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1869, and was a lumberman until he entered into partnership with Fortier and Coplin in 1875. He was married in 1866.

Page 532

Andrew Craik

was born in Scotland in 1817. When an infant he came with his parents to Canada, and at the age of sixteen commenced to learn milling. In 1846 he removed to Three Rivers, Canada, and engaged in the manufacture of oat-meal for the Quebec market. In 1861 he removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin, and eight years later came to this city; he purchased the Edina mills at Richfield, and has since conducted them, in company with his brother John. He also has a flour and feed store at 219 First Avenue south. Mr. Craik was the first man to manufacture pearl barley and oat meal in the state of Minnesota. His wife was Miss Elizabeth Broadfoot of Scotland. She has borne him six children: William, James, John, Andrew, Isabel and Alexander.

Page 533

E. A. Cramsie

a native of Pennsylvania, was born at Philadelphia, in 1836. He learned the blacksmith's trade, and in 1856, moved to St. Paul, where he worked at his trade with his father and brother. He enlisted in the Tenth Minnesota Infantry and served until the regiment was discharged. On his return from the army, he came to this city and worked for different persons until 1875, when he established business for himself at 111 Main street southeast; he now has a partner and they transact a general blacksmithing business, making a specialty of fine horse-shoeing. Mr. Cramsie married Miss Mary Ahern, of St. Paul, in 1858. They have had seven children.

Page 533

M. H. Crittenden

born in Washtenaw county, Michigan, in 1834. In 1855, he moved to Winona, Minnesota, engaged in farming until 1863, when he went to Rochester and embarked in mercantile business. In 1867, he removed to St. Paul and commenced the manufacture of galvanized iron cornice, roofs, etc. Mr. Scribner, his present partner became interested with him in 1872; their office and factory in St. Paul is on the corner of Sibley and east Sixth streets, and in this city at 203 and 205 First Avenue north. Mr. Crittenden was married to Miss Murray, in 1855. They are the parents of two children.

Page 533

A. J. Creigh

has been identified with the city of Minneapolis since 1876; he came here that year as the agent of Emerson, Fisher and Company, carriage manufacturers of Cincinnati, and has since, by square dealing, and strict attention to business, established a good trade which is yearly increasing. The sales for the year 1880, amounted to six hundred buggies; he also deals largely in horses and harness.

Page 533

Richard Crosby

a native of Canada, was born January 23d, 1851. He came with his parents to Le Sueur county, Minnesota, when he was five years of age, and remained on a farm until he was nineteen. Came to Minneapolis in 1874, and has worked as mill wright since that time. He has been employed in the Anchor mill since June, 1879, occupying the position of head millwright. Mr. Crosby was married in 1874; his wife was Eveline A. Campbell, who died in August, 1876, leaving one child, Alice M.

Page 533

Captain Judson Newell Cross

was born January 16th, 1838, in the town of Philadelphia, Jefferson county, New York. He is the son of Rev. Gorham Cross, who was pastor of the Congregational Church at Richville, St. Lawrence county, New York, for forty years. He went to Oberlin College, Ohio, at the age of seventeen and remained until the war broke out, supporting himself by teaching during the college vacations, which at that time were in the winter. He was the second one to sign the roll at the great church at Oberlin, April 20th, 1861, when after a stirring speech by Professor Monroe, a hundred college students enlisted in a half hour and became the somewhat famous company C, Seventh Ohio lnfantry regiment. He was commissioned its first lieutenant April 29th, 1861; he was with his regiment through the several campaigns in West Virginia, under Generals McClellan, Rosencranz and Cox, was severely wounded in the arm and shoulder, and taken prisoner at the battle of Cross Lanes in West Virginia, August 26th, 1861. Being too badly wounded to be sent on to Richmond, he was kept in the rebel camp during the battle of Carnifax Ferry, September 10th, where General Rosencranz first won his fame, and at the ferry the next day when the two armies, Generals Floyd and Henry A. Wise on the rebel side, fought several hours over them at Clifton, and was finally recaptured by General Rosencranz on the 11th of September. He was taken by slow stages to Cincinnati, where he was skillfully treated by Dr. Muzzy and his arm saved. November 25th, 1861, he was promoted to captain of company K, the same regiment, and as soon as able he was detailed as recruiting officer at Cleveland, where he remained until he rejoined his regiment early in 1863, at Dumfries, Virginia, having been married to Clara Steele Norton at Oberlin, Ohio September 11th, 1862. His wound gave him so much trouble that he resigned February 9th, 1863, and studied law at the Albany law school until June 13th 1863, when he was commissioned first lieutenant in the Fifth regiment V. R. C., and promoted to captain, October 28th, 1863, by President Lincoln, and was stationed at Cleveland, St. Louis, and Indianapolis. In December, 1863, he was placed in command of the military post at Madison, Indiana, remaining until April, 1864, when he was made acting assistant adjutant general of the district of Indiana, and chief of staff of the commanding general of that district. In July following he was ordered to Washington, D. C., and received the appointment of assistant provost marshal of the district of Washington, and placed on the staff of the military governor. In November he was appointed provost marshal of Georgetown, D. C., and soon after special mustering officer, to muster for pay at Annapolis, Maryland, the eighteen thousand returned prisoners of war from Andersonville. He resigned his commission and was honorably discharged March 16th, 1865. He finished his law studies at Columbia College, New York city and the Albany law school, graduating in the spring of 1866. He soon commenced practicing law at Lyons, Iowa, of which city he was elected mayor in 1871. He remained in Lyons nearly ten years as partner of Hon. A. R. Cotton, who was in congress part of the time. Captain Cross came to Minneapolis October 15th, 1875, and formed a law partnership with his old friend and classmate, Col. H. G. Hicks, with whom he is still in active practice. He is a member of the Plymouth Congregational Church of this city, and in politics is a republican. He has four children living: Kate Bird, aged sixteen; Morton Murdock, aged fourteen; Nellie Malura, aged eleven, and Clara Amelia, aged three. One, Clevie S., died in Mancy.

Page 534

Wm. Cross

was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, June 9th, 1858. He grew to manhood there and learned the trade of tinsmith; in 1879 he removed to Minneapolis, and worked at his trade until April, 1880, when he started in the business with Hans Lindas, the firm now being Cross and Lindas. They deal in stoves and tinware, and manufacture copper and sheet-iron utensils. They are located at 829 Washington Avenue south.

Page 534

G. W. Culver

a native of Saint Paul, Minnesota, was born July 11th, 1857. He received his education in the schools of that city and completed a course at the Faribault military school. At the age of sixteen years he began business by assisting his father, Geo. Culver, in the management of the Metropolitan hotel at Saint Paul. In the fall of 1878 he started in the book business, soliciting for different publications. He continued this until December, 1879, when he established a book store at Stillwater, located on lower Main street; and in the winter of 1880 he purchased one-half interest in the book store at 255 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis, firm name of Culver and Merrill. Mr. Culver married Miss Saidee Ten Eyck, in Saint Paul, July 11th, 1879.

Page 534

A. A. Cummings

was born in Illinois, near Chicago, November 7th, 1855, and made that city his home until he grew to manhood. He learned the painter's trade with William Glasgow at Chicago, and worked with other fine workmen until he is now master of the art. In 1877 he came here and engaged in sign and ornamental painting for Mr. Wagner. In 1879 he formed a partnership with Mr. J. M. Bausman, which continued until October, 1880, when Mr. Cununings went into business alone. His present location is at 252 Hennepin Avenue.

Page 534

R. W. Cummings

a native of Lycoming, Pennsylvania, was born in June, 1825. He attended York Academy seven years, and in 1843 came west. He traveled through several states, and finally located at Cottage Grove, Minnesota, in 1845. There he opened a farm and made some improvements, but lost it, because of being a minor. In 1847, he came to Saint Paul and worked as clerk for Mr. Jackson in mercantile business. The fall following he came to St. Anthony and made a claim at what is now the junction of the main line and branch of the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba railroad, improved it and followed general farming until 1853, when he went into the real estate business, and has been thus occupied until the present time; his office is at 100 Central Avenue. Mr. Cumming's wife was Martha Estes, of St. Anthony. Their children are Minnie and Louise, both living with their parents at 325 Sixth Avenue south-east.

Page 534

R. R. Cummins

a native of Delaware county, Pennsylvania, was born May 17th, 1844. He learned the trade of machinist at Philadelphia. August 8th, 1862, he enlisted in the army of Potomac, and took part in all the battles in which the regiment engaged. He was mustered out July 23d, 1864, and came to Eden Prairie, Hennepin county. He built the steamer " Mary," for Captain Halsted, in 1876, and ran one season as her captain. During the winter following he assisted in building the "Hattie" and in the summer of 1877 he ran the "Fresco," on Lake Minnetonka. In 1879 he came here, and worked for C. C. Washburn three months, and since that time has been in the Galaxy mill. May 2d, 1865 he married Georgiana Leigh, who has borne him two children : Oscar and Lena.

Page 535

T. C. Cunningham

was born at Bangor, Maine, in 1857. He came to Minnesota in 1859, and located in Rice county, where he followed milling until coming to this city in 1876. He was in the restaurant business until January, 1880, when he took the Bushnell House, of which he is now proprietor. Mr. Cunningham was married January 13th, 1880, to Miss Ellen Peters.

Page 535

C. C. Curtiss

was born August 23d, 1837, in Clinton, Oneida county, New York. In 1858 he graduated from the normal school at Albany, and has since followed the profession of teaching, with the exception of two years that he kept books, in New York city and Rochester. He came to Minnesota in 1869, having previously received the degree of M.A. from Hamilton College, New York, and settled in Rochester, where he was elected city superintendent of schools, which position he held one year; then went to Winona, and remained four years, teaching penmanship in the normal school. In 1874 he came to Minneapolis, and started "Curtiss Business College," and started another in St. Paul in 1879. Mr. Curtiss married Maggie Hamilton, who has borne him five children. Those living are: Willie, Harry, and Fred.

Page 535

Theodore L. Curtis

a native of Freeport Maine, was born in 1818. He came to Minneapolis in 1855, and followed the business of contractor and builder for a time, and afterward engaged in furniture manufacturing and undertaking. He married Miss Esther Moore, August 27th, 1846. Six children were born to them: Emma, Susie, Fannie, Theodore, Etta, and Norman. Mr. Curtis died September 11, 1874.

Page 535

Theodore F. Curtis

son of Theodore L. Curtis, Was born at Portland, Maine, February 7th, 1855, and came here with his parents, when a babe. In 1878 he opened a restaurant at No. 39, Washington Avenue south, afterward kept the "Bon Ton," and in April, 1880, opened the "Fulton Market" restaurant, at 221, First Avenue south, where he is still in business.

Page 535

James Cuthbertson

a native of Canada, was born in 1843. He came to Minneapolis in 1866, and worked at pattern making for the Minneapolis Iron Works, and remained with them three years., In 1870 he engaged in business for himself, and in 1874 the firm of Fender and Cuthbertson was formed; they manufacture the Standard middlings purifiers, and other mill furnishings, at 425 Fourth street south. Their goods are largely used in all the mills of this city, also in many other places throughout the country. In 1874 Mr. Cuthbertson married Hannah Bates; two children have been born to them: Harry and Jennie. Mrs. Cuthbertson died February 23d, 1880.

Page 535

C. H. Daggett

member of the firm of Bidwell and Company, was born at Canton, Massachusetts, September 19th, 1847. He came to Minneapolis in 1867, and worked for M. D. Bidwell until 1873, since which time he has been a member of the firm. He was married in 1873, to Sarah N. Bidwell, of this city. They have one son: Hubert L., aged three years.

Page 535

Alpheus Dale

was born in the state of Pennsylvania, in 1844. At the age of nine years, he removed with his parents to Illinois and remained there until 1863, when he removed to Iowa, and two years later, came to Minneapolis. He worked at carpentery until 1871, then started a back stable, and continued until 1879, when he added a livery business. His stable is located at 220 Second Avenue north, where he has accommodations for thirty-four horses. Mr. Dale was married February 28th, 1872, to Louisa Arnold.

Page 535

Rudolph Dalluge

a native of Germany, was born November 8th, 1844. In the fall of 1867, he came to America and passed the winter in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, coming to this place the following spring. He learned the trade of blacksmith in his native country, and has been engaged in that business in this city. He was married September 13th, 1873, and is the parent of one son and two daughters. He has been a member of the firm of Dalluge and Rapke, general blacksmithing, since 1876. Their shop, which is located at 106 north First street, is 26x36 feet. They run two fires and employ three men.

Page 536

Patrick Daly

a native of Ireland, was born in Tryone county, April 23d, 1836. In 1857, he went to Australia, where he engaged in gold mining; in 1865, he removed to New Zealand, and continued mining. In October 1870, he left that country for America, landed in San Francisco, California, and after a short time, came to Minneapolis. Until 1875, he was in the hotel business; since then, has served on the police force. Married in 1860, to Catharine Fox, a native of Ireland. They have had six children, four of whom are living.

Page 536

T. K. Danforth

was born in Nashua, New Hampshire, in 1824. He came to Saint Paul, in the fall of 1853, and engaged in the express business for eleven years; then accepted a position as conductor on the Saint Paul and Pacific railroad, which he held until 1875, when he went to Champlin, Hennepin county, and engaged in farming until 1878. He then came to this city and opened a livery, sale and boarding stable, which he has since conducted. His location is in the rear of the Brigham house, on Hennepin Avenue, between Fifth and Sixth streets. He was married August 2d, 1857, to Olive Fogg. They have one child, Hattie, born November 26th, 1860.

Page 536

S. G. Daniels

proprietor of the Bellevue house, corner Washington and Third Avenue north, was born in Saint Albans, Vermont, in 1841. He engaged in hotel business in his native town, then in Boston, Massachusetts, four years; in the City hotel, Brattleboro, Vermont, two years; and two years in the Park house. He built the Bellevue house, this city, in 1870. It is, in size, 30 x 40 feet, three stories high, and contains thirty-one rooms. Mr. Daniels is the oldest landlord in the city.

Page 536

Frank Dark

is the proprietor of the Market hotel, located corner of First street and First Avenue north. The house has a stable in connection, which has room for fifty horses. The proximity of this house to the city market makes it a favorite with the farmers. C. D. Dark, son of the proprietor, has charge of the office.

Page 536

T. H. Darum

was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1848. He came to the United States in 1873, and for two years resided in Illinois and Wisconsin. He came to Minneapolis, and for five years was traveling for A. Kelly and Company, selling goods. In September 1880, he opened a saloon on Tenth Avenue south, corner of Second street.

Page 536

John Davin

was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, in November, 1852. His parents removed to Beloit, Wisconsin, when he was a babe, and in 1864 they removed to this city. At the age of thirteen, John commenced life for himself. He first worked on the canal, and then went into the Arctic mill, where he remained for seven years. He then went into the old Washburn mill one year, and came to the Cataract, where he worked as packer one year, and has since remained in that mill. He has learned milling thoroughly.

Page 536

Charles Davidson

was born near Hudson, Ohio, July 29th, 1852. When he was three years of age his parents removed to Iowa. He attended a select school at Danville, and afterward taught in his father's house, on the farm near Grinnell, Iowa. In 1869 he entered the preparatory department of the Iowa College, and after six years graduated in the classical course. In 1876 he entered the graduate department of Yale College, and in the fall of 1877 returned to Grinnell, where he was appointed tutor in the Iowa College, which position he occupied four months. He then taught six months in the graded school of Grinnell. In the summer of 1878 he received the Master's degree, and in the fall was chosen professor of languages in Mitchell Seminary. In 1879, moved to Minneapolis, and founded the "Minneapolis Academy." His wife, whom he married in 1878, was Miss H. A. Noyes of Independence, Iowa. She was born October 29th, 1852, and graduated from the Iowa College in 1878. She supported herself during the entire course by teaching vacations.

Page 536

C. Wright Davison

was born in Leeds county, Province of Ontario, February 27th, 1849. At the age of sixteen he graduated from a country winter school and began teaching, receiving for his services the princely sum of six dollars and fifty cents per month, and board. At twenty-one he went to Nebraska and engaged in carpenter work, then as clerk, and afterward as district agent for the American Insurance Company at Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri. He then engaged with Richard Edwards on the city directory, and in the winter of 1872 was sent by him to publish the St. Paul directory. In 1873, returned with W. M. Campbell, and issued St. Paul, Minneapolis and La Crosse directories. In 1874-5 was in the printing business. In 1876, was manufacturing fine furniture, employing twenty men. Since that time has given his attention to the directory and Abbott's map of Minneapolis, enjoying a prosperous business, the result of grit and perseverance.

Page 537

R. A. Davison

was born in Ohio. He moved to Iowa, and engaged as cashier with Matthews and son, at Rockford. He remained there two years, and when the First National Bank of Cedar Falls was organized, he accepted a position in it and remained for six years. He then came to Minneapolis and opened the banking business of R. A. Davison and Company, on the east side. Mr. Davison was married to Miss Mary L., daughter of Hon. H. Leavitt, of Waterloo, Iowa.

Page 537

E. J. Davenport

was born at Middlebury, Vermont, May 15th, 1852. He graduated at Middlebury College in 1871, and came to Minneapolis in the fall of that year. He occupied the position of deputy clerk of the district court until 1874, and for the three years following was clerk of the municipal court. From that time until January 1881, he was engaged in the practice of law; then entered upon his duties as clerk of the district court, to which office he was elected in the fall of 1880. He was married June 16th, 1875, to Miss Jennie H. Taylor, a grand-daughter of ex-President Harrison. They have one child, Levi B., born November 11th, 1876.

Page 537

J. H. Davis

was born at Warren, Vermont, April 12th, 1838. He grew to manhood on a farm, and came with his parents to this city in 1858. He engaged as check clerk with the C. M. and St. P. Railway, and remained in that position until the spring of 1880, since which time he has given his entire attention to his interest in the Meyrs and Davis drayline. He became a member of that firm in 1871. Mr. Davis is an unmarried man, and resides with his mother at 111 Sixth street South.

Page 537

W. H. H. Day

of the firm of Smith & Day, was born in Washington county, Maine, November 20th, 1840. He came with his father to Minneapolis in June, 1854, and has resided here since. In March 1876, he entered into partnership with J. R. Smith in the hardware business at 529 Washington Avenue south. He was married in August, 1863, to Nettie K. Hanscomb, of Maine. They have four children: Addie M., Franklin E., Fannie E. and Frederic H.

Page 537

William H. Davis

was born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 1st, 1840. He learned the trade of machinist, serving four years with Alfred Jenks and Son. In 1866, removed to Canton, Ohio, and for five years was foreman of E. Balland Company's 's iron works. He was engaged at his trade in Wheeling, Virginia; returned to Canton, and went to Cleveland, Ohio, until 1876, when he came to Minneapolis and engaged as superintendent of the Harvester Works, which position he held until October. 1879. He then entered into partnership with Hashow and Maish in the Variety Iron Works. Mr. Davis was married November 24th, 1864. Children: Calvin Hartley, born in Philadelphia, and Mabel Ellen, born in Canton, Ohio.

Page 537

Ernest Dean

a native of Sweden, was born in 1851. He emigrated to America in 1866, located in Hastings, Minnesota, one winter, then came to Minneapolis. First worked at painting, and in 1870 engaged with Greenleaf and Buchanan, dealers in boots and shoes. He then passed two years at Brainerd, and on his return to this city engaged as salesman with Clementson for six years. Then with C. A. Heffelfinger until the organization of the firm of Liljengren and Dean, furniture manufacturers, in May, 1880. He was married in 1875 to Ida Peterson.

Page 537

Joseph Delorier

was born in Dakota Territory, near the Canada line, in 1849. He moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1864, and to this city four years later. From 1867, he was engaged in surveying for seven years; since then has kept a boarding house at No. 13 Second street north. He married Adelaide Boucher in 1876, who has borne him one child, Wilfred L.

Page 537

Z. Demeules

was born in lower Canada July 23d, 1839. He received his education at Montreal College and came to Minnesota in 1855, settling at Osseo, where he engaged as clerk in a general store. In 1862 he established business for himself, and in 1879, removed to Minneapolis and opened his grocery store at 27 First street south. He has been a notary public in Hennepin county for sixteen years. Married Margaret Labresche, of Michigan, in 1859. Of the nine children born to them, eight are living.

Page 538

W. H. Dennis

architect, was born in Delaware county, New York, in 1845. At the age of fifteen, he went to New York city, began learning the profession of architect, and made that place his home for fifteen years. During this time, he spent two years in Europe, perfecting himself in his chosen profession. He had charge of the city hall building at Cleveland, Ohio, which cost half a million dollars, and was employed on the state capitol of Michigan. He was married in 1877, and came to Minneapolis the following year. He drew the plans for the residence of R. B. Langdon and the wholesale stores of T. A. Harrison, Wyman and Mullin, Ball and Naylor, the Hennepin Avenue Methodist church, and many other prominent buildings and residences.

Page 538

D. Dennison

was born in Farmington, Maine, in 1843. In 1866 he removed to New York city and remained there until 1874, when he came to this city. He was engaged with the firm of Barnard and Cope, furniture manufacturers, until the fall of 1879, when he became one of the partners in the firm of J. H. Hiscock & Co. Mr. Dennison was married in 1872 to Helen Green.

Page 538

James E. Dennison

was born in Farmington, Maine, in 1842. In 1865 went to New York city and eight years later removed to Little Falls, New York, where he was employed as foreman in a furniture factory. He then returned to Maine and came to Minneapolis in February 1880, and engaged in the furniture manufacturing business as a member of the firm of J. H. Hiscock & Co. In September, 1862, he enlisted in the Eighth Maine and served thirteen months as member of the band. He then went to California and remained until he went to New York in 1865.

Page 538

H. T. Dick

a native of New York, was born in 1844. He was engaged in the restaurant business in Iowa for several years, and came to this city in 1878, where he opened a restaurant on First Avenue south, but not making it pay, he removed to Washington Avenue south, and in December, 1880, opened at his present location 405 Nicollet Avenue, where he has accommodations for forty people. He married Lizzie Ceperley in 1872, and has three children: Maud, Charles and Hattie.

Page 538

Seymour Dickinson

was born in St. Lawrence county, New York, April 5th, 1843. Moved to Wisconsin in 1856, and in 1862, enlisted in the Twenty-first Infantry; reenlisted in the Third Wisconsin Cavalry in 1863, and served until his discharge in the fall of 1865. In 1873, went into the sewing machine business, and two years later, removed to Owatonna, Minnesota. In 1879, came to Minneapolis and has had charge of the office of the American Sewing Machine since. He was married in 1860 to Matilda Rickel, by whom he had two children; Elsie and Viola. His first wife died in 1873, and he married in 1875, Fanny L. Peet. Their children are: Agnes, Ida, and Warren.

Page 538

Fred W. Dillingham

was born in Oxford county, Maine, August 11th, 1851. In early youth he came with his parents to Minneapolis where he was educated at the common schools and State University. He worked for his father, one of the pioneers of this county, until 1876, when he engaged as salesman with the North Star Boot and Shoe Company, in which position he still continues.

Page 538

Charles B. Dixon

was born at Janesville, Wisconsin, July 27th, 1856. While young, his parents moved to New York, and he grew to manhood in that state, learning the milling business at Lockport. Came to Minneapolis in July, 1879, and worked at the Standard mill. He was married January 28th, 1878, at Lockport, New York, to Miss Helen Eager.

Page 538

J. S. Dodge

a native of New York, was born in Oswego county, March 18th, 1853. He learned milling in his native town, Pulaski. Came to this city in 1870, and engaged as head stone-dresser at the Washburn B mill. Two years later he removed to Elkader, Iowa, and had charge of the Elkader mills. He returned to Minneapolis in 1874 and has since been with the Washburn mills. Since January, 1880, he has had charge of the Hungarian department in the C mill. Married Ida Sherman of Iowa, September 18th, 1876.

Page 538

A. M. Dole

was born in Waterbury, Vermont, March 1st, 1814. At the age of fifteen he went to Ottawa, Canada, and was with Hamilton Brothers in the lumber business. Then engaged in merchandise and lumber business at Pembrook, Ontario, under firm name of Cameron and Co. In 1855 he came west on a prospecting tour and after seeing Minneapolis, determined to make that place his home at some future time. He started a lumber mill at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, and continued there until 1862, when he sold his interest to his partner and managed his business in Canada until 1872, when he came to this place. In 1878, he became interested in the Star Oil Company, of which he is the manager. Married in 1857, Miss S. M. Stiles of Fort Covington, New York. They have had two children, Fannie J. and George. Fannie died in 1868 and George is with his father in the Star Oil Company.

Page 539

James Albert Dodge

professor of chemistry in the University of Minnesota, was born at Salem, Massachusetts, March 27th, 1848. He graduated at the Salem high school in 1863, entered the classical course at Harvard University in 1865, and graduated in 1869. He next taught school one year in Newport, Rhode Island, thence returned to Salem and taught in the high school three years, paying close attention to the science of chemistry. In 1873, he went to Europe, pursuing the study of chemistry at the Universities of Heidelberg and Berlin, in Germany. He went from Germany to Manchester, England, and studied with Professor H. E. Roscoe, the famous chemist. In 1875, he returned home and taught in the Omaha, Nebraska high school, making a specialty of teaching chemistry. In the fall of 1876, he returned to Europe to complete his studies at Leipsic and Heidelberg, receiving from the latter the degree of Ph. D. in the spring of 1878. Returning home he took a position as professor of natural science in Baldwin college at Berea, Ohio. In the fall of 1880, he accepted the offer of professor of chemistry in the University of Minnesota.

Page 539

John W. Doell

was born in Saxony, German Empire, August 28th, 1851. After attending college at Eisenach four years, he came to America in 1867, and was engaged for several years as a type-setter in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. In 1872, he came to Addison, Illinois, where he completed his studies in English at the Seminary whence he graduated in 1874. Coming to Minneapolis he was engaged in teaching Trinity Parochial school, continuing until November 1st, 1880, when he resigned.

Page 539

W. A. Dolliver

was born at Kenduskeag, Maine, October 2d, 1844. He received his education in his native town and remained there until the age of twenty-one, when he went to Bangor, Maine, and began in business as an insurance agent. He remained at Bangor until coming to Minneapolis in 1874, and has since resided here. He still continues in insurance and now conducts what is known as Dollivers' Insurance Exchange, representing six of the leading companies. He was united in marriage November 15th, 1870, to Miss Ella Simonton, of Maine. They are parents of one son, aged one year.

Page 539

Edward Donlin

was born in November, 1824, and is a native of Ireland. He came to America in 1839, and was one of the first settlers in Minnesota, locating in Washington Lake township, Sibley county; he had the honor of naming the township. In 1865 he came to Minneapolis, and was employed by others seven years, then commenced business for himself, and is now proprietor of the Northwestern Marble Works. He was married in 1849 to Miss Jane S. Bunnell, of New York city. They are parents of six children.

Page 539

M. Donnelly

was born in Lewis county, New York, January 31st, 1837. He learned the shoemaker's trade at Booneville, Oneida county. He first started in the pursuit of his trade in his native county. He came to Minneapolis in 1872, and started in the boot and shoe business in February of the next year, at his present location, 312 Washington Avenue north. He employs nine men who are constantly at work in the manufacture of all kinds of boots and shoes to order. He married Helen E. Hinton, of Lewis county, New York, in 1859.

Page 539

J. W. Doran

was born in 1850 in Indiana. He moved, in early life, with his parents to Ohio. He lived there five years, then went to Jamestown, Blue Earth county, Minnesota, in May, 1857. He resided there until coming to Minneapolis in 1872. He learned the trade of cooper in this city, and joined the association in 1876. He was married in 1879 to Miss M. C. Graham. Residence, 918 Chicago Avenue.

Page 539

J. H. Dorner

was born at Adrian, Michigan, in 1852. He went to Chicago in 1870, and learned the art of making confectionery with Mr. Eckardt, the famous Chicago caterer. He remained there until 1880 when he came to Minneapolis. He has now one of the finest establishments of the kind in this city. His wife was Pauline Kelly, of Chicago.

Page 540

C. D. Dorr

was born at East Great Works, now known as Bradley, Maine, in 1824. He followed lumbering through early life and in 1847 came to St. Anthony. In 1849 he built a frame house, then in company with a few men went to Swan river and met "Hole-in-the-Day," an Indian chief at Little Rock, and arranged with him for getting out timber, for which they were to pay five dollars per tree. They cut about one hundred sticks which was the first timber gotten out. Mr. Dorr continued in lumbering until he became connected with the Mississippi and Rum River Boom Company. For ten years he was employed in looking up and locating government, state, and school lands. He served as alderman of St. Anthony one term. In 1866 he took the position of boom master and yet serves in that capacity. He married Celestia A. Ricker of Maine, March 4th, 1849.

Page 540

Daniel Douglass

is a native of England. He came to Minneapolis in 1871, and was in the employ of Walker Brothers five years, being foreman three years. After leaving their employ he engaged in business for himself and is now a member of the prosperous firm of Douglass and Hall, machinists and mill furnishers. He was married at Bury, England, August, 1866, to Elizabeth Holt. Mary B., Sarah A., and Annie are their living children. Residence on Cedar Lake road.

Page 540

James Dougherty

was born at Baltimore, Maryland, August, 1855. He came to Minneapolis in 1862 with his parents. He commenced working in the Pillsbury mill in 1871 at the foot of the ladder and has advanced step by step until he has reached the position he holds at present, that of stone dresser. He has been stone dresser and grinder for six years past. By his strict attention and industry gives entire satisfaction to his employers.

Page 540

Hezekiah B. Dow

is a native of New Hampshire, born December 30th, 1826. He lived with his parents on a farm until twelve years of age, when they moved to Gilmanton, New Hampshire, and four years later to Vershire, Vermont. At the age of seventeen he went to Lowell, Massachusetts, and served an apprenticeship as mason and plasterer. He heard of the falls of St. Anthony and resolved to see them, so in 1850 he started west. At the time he arrived at St. Anthony there were but few families here, but his trade yielded him four and five dollars per day, which soon enabled him to purchase a home on the banks of the Mississippi and send for his wife, whom he had left in Maine. They lived on the east side thirteen years. In 1864 he removed to Minneapolis and bought property of Mr. Bickford, where he now resides, at 401 Fourth street north. He was married to Miss Eliza Goodrich of Bartlett, New Hampshire, in 1855. Their only surviving child is Horton L., who is station agent at Osakis, Minnesota, for the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railroad.

Page 540

John F. Downey

was born at Hiramsburg, Ohio, January 10th, 1846. When he was eleven years old his parents removed to Michigan. He attended school at Three Rivers, and Colon Seminary, staying at the latter place two years. Thence he went to Hillsdale College, Michigan, entered the freshman class in the spring of 1867 and graduated in 1870, after which he took the place of Professor Collier, professor of natural sciences, for a year, and then was principal of the school at Cassopolis, Michigan. At the expiration of that time he took a post-graduate course in the higher mathematics, astronomy and civil engineering at the University of Michigan. For several years after completing his post-graduate course he was professor of mathematics and astronomy at Ann Arbor. In the fall of 1880 he received an offer and accepted the same position at the University of Minnesota. He was married, December, 1875, to Miss Stella Osborne, of Cassopolis, Michigan, by whom he has one child, Harold D.

Page 540

J. O. Drange

a native of Norway, was born in 1830. He came to the United States in l861, and resided in Racine, Wisconsin, eight years, engaged in blacksmithing. He then went to Otter Tail county, Minnesota, on a farm, remaining three years; thence to Minneapolis, where he worked at blacksmithing until 1879, when he opened a clothing store, located at 309 Washington Avenue south. His wife was Jennie Heen, whom he married in 1876.

Page 540

William Dressler

was born in Germany, July 24th, 1831. He came to the United States in 1852, and passed the time in prospecting in various parts of the country until 1856, when he came to Minneapolis. He removed to St. Paul and lived four years; thence to Osseo, Minnesota, in 1862, and remained until 1864. He then went to Watertown, Minnesota, and engaged in the grist and saw-mill business until 1870, when he returned to Minneapolis, and has since been in a sale and boarding stable. He was married in 1859, to Doretha Ruter, of Germany. They have seven children: Matilda, Amelia, Martin, Anna, Fred, Albert, and Otto.

Page 541

D. Driscoll

born in 1840, is a native of Ireland. At sixteen years of age he learned carriage-making, serving an apprenticeship of five years, also paying a premium of fifty dollars. He has been in the business continually ever since. He came to America in 1862, locating at Waupun, Wisconsin. In 1871 he removed to Minneapolis, and worked at his trade until 1875, when he established business for himself. In 1879 the firm of Driscoll and Forsyth was formed. He married Miss Margaret Ryan, in 1866. They have five daughters and two sons.

Page 541

C. H. Dubois

was born March 24th, 1847, at High Falls, New York. The son of a farmer in poor circumstances, he worked his way through the Albany Normal school. After serving for three years as principal of a large public school, he spent a year at Cornell University. Next he attended the law department of Michigan University, from which he graduated. After residing a year in Galveston, and another in Washington, he purchased the Herald at Grand Haven, Michigan, and two years later, the Saturday Evening Post at Grand Rapids. Noting the rapid growth of Minneapolis in wealth and population, Mr. Dubois concluded that here was a much larger field than in Michigan. On the 26th day of July, 1879, he started the Saturday Evening Spectator, which is now a well established weekly newspaper.

Page 541

William Duhnke

is a native of Prussia. He came to America in 1854; resided at Chicago one year; thence to Milwaukee remaining two years. He next made Indiana his home where he remained seven years, dealing in general merchandise, also kept the Tell City post-office. In 1866, he came to Minneapolis, and after being a dealer in crockery one year, opened the Mozart hall of which he is proprietor. He married Augusta Guhr in 1857. She died in 1871, leaving two children; William and Amelia. Mr. Duhnke married again, Annie Guhr, who bore him two children; Reinhold and Laura.

Page 541

C. H. Dunham

was born at Plainville, Connecticut, June 26th, 1852. He moved with his parents to Faribault, Minnesota, when a child; while there learned milling and worked in mills until he came to Minneapolis, which was in August, 1880. On his arrival in this city, he entered the Union mill as miller.

Page 541

L. A. Dunn

was born at Lancaster, Ohio, August 19th, 1850. He came to Minneapolis in 1869 and received his education at the University of Minnesota, and after graduating read law with Beebe and Shaw, and with Lochren, McNair and Gilfillan, and was admitted to practice. He was appointed clerk of the municipal court by Judge Cooley in 1877 for one year. He was succeeded by Mr. Wilson, who died in 1879, and Mr. Dunn served the remainder of his term. The spring of 1880, he was appointed for one year. His marriage occurred in 1876. He is the parent of one son, William.

Page 541

Thomas Dunn

is a native of Ireland, born in 1847. He came to the United States in 1857, his father having preceded him. He learned milling with the Pillsburys, was with them six years, and is now in the Anchor mill. Ten years previous to his coming here he was engaged in cotton mills. He married Miss Mary McCarthy, September 19th, 1870. Their children are: William J., Thomas M., Juliet, Ellen and Grace.

Page 541

R. P. Dunnington

was born in Morgan county, Ohio, in 1835. He located at St. Anthony in 1856, and assisted in building Bassett's saw-mill on Bassett's Creek; also assisted in putting in the machinery at the North Star Woolen Mills and the Cataract mill. He continued as a millwright until 1873, when he took the Pettit & Robinson saw-mill to operate. In 1878 he opened a liquor store and billiard hall. He married Ella Rowe in 1867. She died in 1870, leaving one child, Parris M.

Page 541

J. A. Dunsmoor

was born in Lunenburgh, Worcester county, Massachusetts, December 18th, 1808.. He located first at Farmington Maine, and was elected from that district to the legislature. He also held many responsible offices in that locality, some of which were: postmaster, county treasurer, superintendent of school boards, etc. He removed to St. Anthony in 1851, and the next year bought land in the present town of Richfield, Hennepin county. A portion of this land he donated to the Richfield Mills Company, being where the mills now stand. Another portion he donated for the school building. He was a man of unusual enterprise, and ranked among the most prominent men in his town and county. Among the offices of trust which he held were: assessor, postmaster, and justice of the peace. In 1873 he removed with his family to Los Angeles, California, at which place his busy and well spent life ended, December 23d, 1873. The remainder of the family still resides there, except one son, Frederick A., who is a resident physician of Minneapolis. Mr. Dunsmoor was married June 4th, 1837, to Almira Mosher, of Temple, Maine. Their children are: James F.., Irving A., Albert V., Charles H., Frederick A., and John M.

Page 542

F. A. Dunsmoor

has been a life long resident of Hennepin county, having been born at Richfield, May 28th, 1853. He received his education at the public schools and State University of Minneapolis. He first studied medicine with Drs. Goodrich and Kimball, of this city, and graduated from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, of New York, in 1875. He afterwards received private instructions in surgery, diseases of the chest, pathology and chemistry, from Professors Hamilton, Flint, Janeway, and Doremus. He was associated for a time with H. H. Kimball in practice, and as a surgeon for the Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad. He is a member of the State Medical Association, and is professor of surgery in the medical department of Hamline University. He was married in 1876, to Bessie Turner, daughter of the late Dr. Turner, of the United States army.

Page 542

W. Droll

was born in 1846, at Bavaria. He came to America in 1868 and to Minneapolis in 1873, and has since been engaged in the manufacture of barrels, tubs, hogsheads, kegs, etc. He was married in 1878. Residence 828 Main street north-east.

Page 542

E. W. Dyer

was born at Addison, Washington county, Maine, in 1836. He engaged in farming and boat building, and in 1864 came to Corcoran, Hennepin county, Minnesota, then went to Pike's Peak for two years and returned to Corcoran in 1859. In 1862 he removed to Rockford, Wright county, and for two years was a carriage maker, then worked a farm until coming to Minneapolis in 1875, and has since been proprietor of the Wilber House. November, 1879, he took the Clark House and ran it one year, then returned to the Wilber House. He married Annie Astrope, of Canada, in 1863. Their children are: Abbie F. and Harris H.

Page 542

E. W. Eddy

a native of Brunswick, New York, was born June 28th, 1826. He went to Albany and remained two years, then removed to St. Paul and remained in the livery business there until 1861, when he came here and in 1864 sold out; then he passed three years lumbering, and in 1867 returned to the livery business. He built the stable he now occupies in 1878; it is located on Third street between Nicollet and First Avenue south. Mr. Eddy married Julia Groff in 1849; she died in 1869, leaving two children, Melford and Carrie: he was married the second time in 187 2, to Anna Walch.

Page 542

A. H. Edsten

a native of Sweden, was born in 1837. He emigrated to America in 1864, and located at Chicago, where he was first engaged as cabinet-maker, and afterward was employed on the wood-work in car-shops; he remained there about two and one-half years, and came to Minneapolis May 5th, 1867. He worked in car-shops until he established himself in the furniture business in 1871.

Page 542

P. F. Eichelzer

was born near Heidelberg, Germany, October 7th, 1850. When two Years of age he came with his parents to America and, settled in New Orleans: removed to La Fayette, Indiana, in 1855, and in 1872 he came to this city, and entered his present business as hatter and furrier, with J. S. Sneddy for partner. Mr. Eichelzer had nine years experience in this business while at La Fayette. He married Louise B. Gregory, September 1st, 1874. They have one child, Hattie G.

Page 543

Wyman Eliott

was born in Penobscot county, Maine, May 19th, 1834. He came to Minneapolis in 1854, and has been closely identified with the growth and prosperity of the city; he has had the advantage of witnessing its advancement in every direction, and has thus become well acquainted with its history and early settlers. He passed his first year in Minnesota on a claim near Monticello; he is one of the pioneer farmers and market-gardeners of this county. He has a pleasant home at the corner of Tenth street and Ninth Avenue south. Mr. Eliott was married November 25th, 1868, to Mary Ella Chase, of this city. They have two children, Sarah and Jenella.

Page 543

Charles J. Elliot

a native of Canada, was born December 25th, 1848. He came to this city in the summer of 1871 and worked at his trade of miller until 1872, when he commenced in business and continues very successfully, as dealer in fruits, confectionery, oysters, ice cream, etc., at 727 Washington Avenue south. Mr. Elliot married in 1875, Dora Tool of Minneapolis.

Page 543

D. Elliot

was born December, 1828, in Penobscot county, Maine. In 1852, he went to California and was interested in mining until the winter of 1854, when he returned to Maine, and the following spring came here and preempted a farm of 180 acres where his present residence is, 1415 Sixth Avenue south; for five or six years he was engaged in gardening. In May, 1862 he went to Montana but returned in 1864 and for a time carried on a grocery business. Mr. Elliot's wife was Marietta Smyth, of Maine. They have one child, Etta.

Page 543

B. R. Ellis

born October 19th, 1835, at Nantucket, Massachusetts. In early life he went to northern New York, and at the age of seventeen commenced to learn carpentering. In 1862 he removed to Iowa and remained six years, then returned to New York. After a residence of four years there and one year in Canada he went to Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In the spring of 1874 he came to Minneapolis and has since been engaged in business here; the firm at present is Ellis and Huff, carpenters, builders and jobbers, 305 Second Avenue south. Mr. Ellis was married October 19th, 1854, to Miss Spears, who died in 1862, leaving two children; his second wife was Mary Mead, who has borne him two daughters.

Page 543

James T. Elwell

was born July 2d, 1855, at St. Anthony, Minnesota. He moved with his parents to Granite City and thence to St. Cloud, where he remained until 1864, then removed to Cottage Grove. In 1874 he came here and established the business of manufacturing spring beds. Mr. Elwell is a young man of energy and perseverance, and is meeting with deserved success; a description of his business will be found in this work among the manufactures of the city.

Page 543

Seth Emerson

was born at Deer Isle, Maine, in 1834. Twenty-three years of his life were passed on the sea; he commenced before the mast and worked his way up to Captain. In 1870, he came to Minnesota and located at Wolls, remained only two years, then came to Minneapolis and engaged in carpenter work. He is now a member of the farm of Galpin and Emerson, carpenters, builders and jobbers; they employ eighteen men, and their principal business has been building residences. Mr. Emerson was married in 1864 to Miss Whitney. Their residence is 923 Twenty-first Avenue south. They have had five children, only two of whom are living.

Page 543

George W. Emery, M. D.

was born at Toronto, Canada, May 21st, 1841. He received his education in the schools of that city; Knox college and Model school. He studied medicine at the University of Tronto, at Bellevue hospital medical college, and in 1865, graduated from the Berkshire medical college of Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He practiced in Illinois eight years, and four years in Wisconsin. In May, 1877, he came to Minneapolis and has since followed his profession here. He is physician to the Bethany Home, and is medical examiner for the New England Mutual, New York Life and Hartford Continental Insurance companies. Dr. Emery was married in 1861 to Miss Hall, of Philadelphia, who died in 1862; in 1864, he married Matilda Fairfield, of Toronto, Canada. They have one child, Bertha. Dr. Emery is a member of the Peoria county, Illinois medical society, and of the Minnesota state medical society.

Page 543

N. H. Emmans

a native of Sussex county, New Jersey, was born January 19th, 1854. He grew to manhood with his parents on a farm and attended the public schools at home, also Starkey Seminary, at Eddytown, New York. He came to this city in 1875, and two years later entered the Boston one price clothing store, where by energy and strict attention to business, he has gained the entire confidence of his employers, and now has charge of the merchant tailoring department.

Page 544

August Ende

was born in Germany, in 1829, and emigrated to America in 1847. He lived at Baltimore, Maryland, the first year then removed to St. Louis, Missouri; thence to Freeport, Illinois, where for two years he was in the hotel business. In 1855, he came to St. Anthony and continued the same business until 1863; he then moved to this side of the river, bought and enlarged the Farmer's hotel, and has since kept the house. He married Miss Amelia Rey, at St. Louis in 1853. They have nine children, Louisa, Edward, Bertha, Charles, Adolph, Amelia, Emma Anna and Julius.

Page 544

C. O. Englested

was born in Norway, in 1851. In 1868 he came to the United States, and passed two years in farming, at Rushford, Minnesota; he came here in 1872, and for four years worked about the lumber mills; in 1876 he started in the saloon business at 117 Washington Avenue south, and in April, 1880, moved to No. 1201. He was married in 1878, to Laura Egstrom, who has borne him one child, Harry J.

Page 544

Henry Enger

a native of Norway, was born February 19th, 1847. He emigrated to America in 1869, and located in Wisconsin, where for three years he was in the saloon business; in 1873 he came to Minneapolis, passed eighteen months in a hotel, and three years in the North Star Laundry. Since that time he has been in the restaurant business. He married Miss Lena Olsen in 1876. They have one child: Mary.

Page 544

Samuel Erb

was born in Canada, January 26th, 1852. He came to Minneapolis in 1870, and the year following went to work at the Goodnow and Hawly lumber mill, where he had charge of the scaling department two years; since 1873 he has had the management of the mill. Mr. Erb's wife was Catherine Hoben; they were married June 30th, 1874, and reside at 112 Fourth Avenue north. Their children are Mary, who died at the age of one and one-half years, William and Samuel.

Page 544

T. J. Essene

was born in Sweden, February 26th, 1853. He came to America in 1863, and lived in Chicago until 1866, when he removed to this city; he was employed by Thompson and Wiggin until 1870, when he went into the meat business, and since 1877 has kept a market in partnership with Mr. Hopper. Mr. Essene's wife was Annie Mersen, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; she has borne him two children, only one is living, a girl born in 1880.

Page 544

J. M. Eustis

was born in Oxford county, Maine, December 15th, 1827. In 1857 he removed to Minneapolis, and with his own hands cleared away the hazel brush and threw up the first dirt for the Nicollet House, which was completed, furnished and opened May 1858; during the hard times of 1857, he was advised by some of the leading men here, to abandon the enterprise, but with his pluck and perseverance he carried it through to successful completion, and then disposed of his interest to Gilson Brothers. At the commencement of the rebellion he made a contract with the Government to feed all the Minnesota soldiers for thirty-seven cents each per day; he also supplied the army under General Sibley, during the war upon the frontier, after the Indian massacre. At the same time he was engaged in the lumber business with W. E. Jones and Company, for about five years, then built a block on Hennepin Avenue. He, in company with others, selected the site for a fair ground, laid out a track, erected buildings and put everything in good order for the purpose. Mr. Eustis has been a contractor on the Northern Pacific railroad; and was in the employ of the St. Louis railroad company for several years, until in the fall of 1880, he was elected sheriff of Hennepin county for two years.

Page 544

O. J. Evans, M. D.

was born in Oneida county, New York, February 5th, 1840. He was educated at the academy of Rome, in his native state, and studied medicine with Dr. Armsby, professor of anatomy at the Albany Medical College, also with Dr. Virgil of Rome, New York. After completing the regular courses of lectures at the Albany College, he graduated from that institution in 1862, receiving the degree of M. D. Dr. Evans was commissioned as assistant surgeon of the Fortieth New York Infantry, in 1862, and in 1864 was promoted to first surgeon. He was also medical director of the department of Farmville, Virginia, and was placed on the operating board of surgeons, holding both positions until the close of the war. He was mustered out of service in July, 1865, came to this city, and has since practiced medicine here, his office being at 22 Hennepin Avenue. He is president of the Hennepin County Medical Association, a member of the State Medical Society, and president of the Minneapolis Board of Health, this being his second term. He also served one term in the City Council. Dr. Evans was married in 1869, to Elizabeth Dodge, who died in January, 1879. She was a daughter of Colonel John Dodge, of Princeton, Illinois.

Page 545

John R. Everard

a native of Liverpool, England, was born in June, 1828. While there he learned the tailor's trade. In July, 1878, he came to Minneapolis, and locating at 213 Hennepin Avenue, established a merchant tailoring business, in which he invested a capital of seven thousand dollars. He employs fourteen men in his manufacturing department, which is still located at 213 Hennepin Avenue, but in November, 1878, he removed his place of business to 10 Washington Avenue south.

Page 545

Albert E. Farrington

was born at Conway, New Hampshire, in 1816. He came to Minnesota, 1855, and located at Maple Grove, where he engaged in farming nine years. He exchanged his farm for one in Hassan, Minnesota, and removed there at once, where he lived until 1874, when he came to Minneapolis. Since, he has been dealing in real estate, also buying and selling horses. Mr. Farrington is now proprietor of the Fourth Avenue hotel. His sons are engaged in a livery and sale stable.

Page 545

G. F. Farrington

came from Boston in 1879, where he had been engaged in the merchant tailoring business for some time previous. He located at 219 Hennepin Avenue, in April of the same year. Here he remained until March, 1880, when he leased his present location, a store room with manufacturing establishment on third floor, at 239 Nicollet Avenue. Mr. Farrington though comparatively young, is a very enterprising and successful business man.

Page 545

W. D. Federspil (one of the earliest settlers)

was born in France, 1824. He came to the United States in 1853, and settled first at Port Washington, Wisconsin. In 1854 he came to St. Anthony and followed the blacksmith's trade there until 1856, when he removed to the west side of the river, and is now one of the oldest blacksmiths in the business in Minneapolis. Mr. Federspil was married in 1847, to Margaret Weber, of Luxembourg. They have seven children living: Catherine, Jean P., John, Mary, Josephine, Annie and Nicholas.

Page 545

Robert Feek

is a native of England, born January 8th, 1834. He went to Ogdensburg, New York, in 1856, where he remained seven years; thence to Ontario, where he was engaged in the hotel business several years. He established a restaurant in Minneapolis in 1879, where he has since resided. Mr. Feek married Miss Sophia Dove in 1865, who bore him one son, Robert G.

Page 545

J. C. Felch

was born in Grafton county, New Hampshire, May 10th, 1842. At the age of eighteen he learned telegraphy, and continued in that business eight years. In the spring of 1869, he was elected to the house of representatives of New Hampshire, for one year. He came to Minneapolis in the fall of the same year; the spring following removed to Fort Abercrombie, Dakota; where he was postmaster three years. He then returned to this city, and in 1875 he engaged with the Pettit mill, and has remained with them since. Mr. Felch married Miss Annie Frott, October, 1876. They have one child, Gertie M.

Page 545

Frank B. Felt

of the firm of H. G. Harrison Co., started in the grocery business, in Minneapolis, in 1868, in the employ of B. S. Bull and Company. He remained with them three years, and was afterwards with Newell and Harrison, eight years. He entered the firm now known as H. G. Harrison & Co., June 10th, 1880. This firm occupies the front rank of grocery houses in the north-west.

Page 545

W. J. Fender

Of the firm of Fender and Cuthbertson, was born at Kingston, Ontario, September 14th, 1839. He came to Minneapolis in 1867, where he worked seven years at pattern making, In 1874 he entered into partnership with J. Cuthbertson and built the La Croix or French purifiers. Mr. Fender is the inventor of the "Standard Purifiers," about three hundred of which are in use in this city. This purifier is in use in all parts of the world where flour is made. It was invented in 1874, and since then several improvements have been made. Mr. Fender is also a member of the firm of Gunn, Cross and Co., whose establishment contains all kinds of general mill supplies.

Page 546

John Ferguson

is a native of Scotland and was born in 1849. He came to the United States at the age of ten, and learned the trade of millwright, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1861 he enlisted in company "I" First regiment United States Artillery; he was in service until August, 1865, and participated in all engagements of the company. On his return he removed to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where he remained two years, coming to Minneapolis in 1867. He engaged in carpentering six years and has since been in the millwright business, throughout the northwest; he has been in the Crown Roller mill since November, 1879. Mr. Ferguson was married June 21st, 1871, to Miss Isabella Savage; they are parents of two children, Isabella and John.

Page 546

Emil M. Ferrant

son of one of the earliest settlers, Martin Ferrant, was born in St. Anthony, September 7th, 1854. Here he received his early education, until 1872, when he went to Europe to complete his studies. He returned in 1878, locating in Minneapolis, where he still resides and is engaged with the well known firm of Smith and Scribner.

Page 546

Charles Ferrier

a native of Scotland, was born December 8th, 1852. His childhood was passed on a farm, but at the age of fourteen he learned the trade of blacksmithing, in which business he continued until 1872, when he emigrated to America. He located at Winona, Minnesota, where he was in the employ of the Winona and St. Peter railroad two years; he then removed to Wells, Minnesota, where he was engaged with the Southern Minnesota railroad six months; thence to Nebraska and to Mason City, Iowa, where he opened a shop and worked at his trade until coming to this city in the spring of 1876. Mr. Ferrier was married to Miss Lydia Rust, in 1876, who bore him one daughter, Flossie F.

Page 546

A. H. Fessler

was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, in 1849. At the age of twelve he commenced to learn milling, and has been since the completion of his trade engaged in different mills

from the Atlantic to the Pacific coasts. He came to Minneapolis in 1872, where he remained two years, and after visiting various towns in the state, spent two years in California, returned in 1878, and at once engaged with Washburn and Company. He is now head miller of the Washburn "B." Mr. Fessler married Miss Kate Lessman, July, 1878. They are parents of one child, Gertrude.

Page 546

J. W. Field

was born May 2d, 1853, in Dexter, Jefferson county, New York. He engaged in the boot and shoe business at Utica, New York, a number of years, when he decided to come West. He removed from that city to Minneapolis in 1876, where he at once opened an establishment in the same line of business. He makes a specialty of Burt's men's shoes. Mr. Field was married in 1876, to Ella J. Wager, of Oneida, Madison county, New York.

Page 546

W. A. Fisher

was born in Illinois in 1847. In 1860 he came to Minneapolis and was engaged in farming three years, after which he enlisted in the Eleventh Minnesota regiment. He remained in service one year, when he returned to this city and attended school. In company with C. H. Cole and E. H. Chittenden, (1876) he built the steamer "Monticello'' and ran the same between this city an St. Cloud for three years. Mr. Fisher engaged in the restaurant business, in the "Market Restaurant," in 1879, furnishing that year fifty-five thousand seven hundred meals. In 1867 he married Miss Mary Smith. Their children are: Alberty, Ernest, Lizzie and Minnie.

Page 546

Thomas Fitch

attorney at law, was born in New York, 1838. He moved to San Francisco, California, where he read law with Judge Shafter, and was admitted to the bar in 1864. The same year, in Nevada, he opened his first office, and practiced his profession until the expiration of his term in congress, in 1871, when he was employed by parties in New York to attend to some mining litigation in Salt Lake, after which he was engaged by Brigham Young as attorney and counsel. During his stay he was elected as senator from a proposed state, with a constitution providing for the surrender of polygamy. The subject, however, did not receive the attention of congress. Mr. Fitch spent two years in traveling through Europe, the South, and California, after which he remained four years in Arizona, engaged in practicing his profession. In 1880 he removed to Minneapolis, and formed a partnership with Mr. Morrison, known as the firm of Morrison and Fitch. He was married in San Francisco in 1863, to Mrs. Annie M. Shultz.

Page 546

Herman Fleer

pastor of St. John's Church, was born at Westfalen, Germany, May 20th, 1852. Came to America the same year, and settled in Gasconada county, Missouri. Spent his boyhood, on his father's farm, until January, 1871, when he went to Elmhurst, Illinois, and entered the Evangelical Protestant Seminary. Remained there four years, received a certificate entitling him to admission into the theological seminary at Marthasville, Missouri, entered and graduated June 21st, 1878. Was ordained in St. Louis on the same day, and appointed to this charge. Also has charge at Osseo, Champlin, and Medicine Lake, which places he visits once in three weeks.

Page 547

Samuel Foreman

was born in Baltimore, in 1840. In early life he moved to Louisville, Kentucky, thence to Indiana; he lived in several cities in that state, and in 1874, removed to Minneapolis. Mr. Foreman learned his trade, that of a blacksmith at the age of fifteen and has been engaged in the same since. He was married in April, 1877 to Miss Irena McKey, who bore him one daughter, Lillie, who died in 1880.

Page 547

John Forler

is a native of Canada, and was born February 22d, 1840. He lived on a farm until nineteen years of age when he learned the tanner's trade. In 1863, he came to Minneapolis, and in company with Mr. Harvey, engaged in photography; he sold to his partner after an experience of fourteen months. He removed to his present location in 1876, where he has a large stock of new and second hand furniture. Mr. Forler was married to Miss Mary Stokes in 1874. They have three children.

Page 547

W. Forsyth

was born at Kingston, Canada, in 1842. At the age of fourteen he learned wagon-making; serving an apprenticeship of six years, and has since been continually in the business. In 1864, he went to Toronto, Canada, and the next year removed to Titusville, Pennsylvania. In April, 1872, he removed to St. Paul; thence to Minneapolis in September of the same year. He worked for various parties in wagon-making until 1879, when the firm of Driscoll and Forsyth was formed, and has since continued. He was married in 1864 to Miss Elizabeth H. Scott. They have one son and three daughters.

Page 547

C. J. Fortier

was born in Lower Canada, July 26th, 1843. He moved to Maine in 1851, where he remained eleven years at that time going to California, remaining five years. In 1869, he came to Minneapolis and engaged in lumbering two years, in the grocery business two and one-half years, then opened the meat market in which he still continues his business. His partners are Charles Coplin and Wyman Costigan. Mr. Fortier's family consists of his wife and five children.

Page 547

A. D. Foster

one of the oldest pioneers, was born near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, August 22d, 1801. He lived on a farm until eighteen years of age, when he acquired a knowledge of the tanner and currier trade. After engaging in the mercantile business in Pittsburg, also in Washington county, of that state, he sold his interests and removed to St. Louis, Missouri. In 1848, he, being in frail health, came to St. Anthony, with the hope of being benefited. He came from Chicago with a team, and for a time, engaged in teaming, drawing logs fourteen miles, from Coon Creek to be converted into lumber with which to build the steamer "Gov. Ramsey." He lived one winter in a shanty sixteen feet square, for which he paid nine dollars per month. In 1850, he erected a store building, and was successful in business until 1856, when he was burned out. Since then he has lived almost a retired life, devoting a portion of his time to fruit culture. Although seventy-nine years of age, Mr. Foster is an active man and still reads without the use of glasses. He was married in Washington county, Pennsylvania, September 9th, 1824, to Miss Martha Ramsey. They have three children: Josiah, who resides in Indianapolis; Martha, who resides in Racine, Wisconsin;, and Lysander, who is a physician, in this city.

Page 547

Andrew J. Foster

one of the early pioneers of this region, was born in Cooper, Washington county, Maine, June 8th, 1827. He moved to St. Anthony, in 1849, and in the spring of 1850 engaged in lumbering, in which he continued two years. He then preempted eighty acres of land on what is now known as Franklin Avenue. In 1857, Mr. Foster retired from the lumbering business and commenced gardening on his claim, which he continued to do for seventeen years. He next engaged in a general real estate business, building and selling houses, etc. In the spring of 1880 he opened a grocery store in connection with his other enterprises. Mr. Foster first married Miss Abigail Getchell, of Washington county, Maine, who died in 1852. He remained a widower one year, when he married Mrs. Mary Averill of Stillwater, the ceremony being performed by Justice Hedderly, first justice of St. Anthony. Their children are: Ada, William, Owen and Elmer.

Page 548

Stephen Fox

was born at Buffalo, New York, 1843. He engaged in farming ten years, when he entered the army as mechanic in the quarter-master's department. At the close of the war he returned to Erie county, New York, and engaged in milling; he was also employed in several states as a mechanic. In 1878, he removed to Minneapolis, where he has since resided. Mr. Fox was married December 1st, 1878, to Miss Mary Ruddock.

Page 548

Samuel Franklin

was born in Butler county, Ohio, November 29th 1818. At the age of sixteen he learned tailoring and engaged in his profession, in different parts of his native state and of Indiana, until 1852, when he came to St. Paul, Minnesota; where he remained until the spring following, when he removed to Minneapolis. He engaged in teaming seven years, and in 1873, again established himself in tailoring. Mr. Franklin was married to Miss Mary Halsey, in 1840. Their children living are: William B.,, Martha J., Mary L., Samuel, Jr., and Fannie W.

Page 548

S. J. Franklin

son of Samuel Franklin, was born at Minneapolis, August 21, 1856. He acquired a knowledge of the carpenter's trade and in 1876 was employed by the Manitoba railway company, in whose employ he remained three years, and has since been with the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul railroad company.

Page 548

William B. Franklin

son of Samuel Franklin, was born at Middleton, Ohio, in 1842. He came with his parents, to Minneapolis, in 1853. He enlisted in the Sixth Minnesota volunteers and served until his discharge in 1865. Three years later he was employed by the Minnesota Stage Company, where he continued as driver till 1873. He made a claim of 160 acres (1878), at Clontarf, Swift county, on which he has since lived. Mr. Franklin married Susana Sheran in 1875. Their children are, James and William.

Page 548

P. J. Fraser

was born in Upper Canada, October 7th, 1847. He came to Red Wing, Minnesota, in 1863, and engaged in the manufacture of doors, sash, blinds, etc. He came to Minneapolis in 1869. The firm of Fraser and Shepherd, in 1879 built a spacious building, and now carry on the wholesale manufacture of sash, doors, blinds, mouldings, glazed sash, brackets, stair raflings, scroll sawing etc.

Page 548

Cornelius Frederichs

first assistant of fire department, also of the firm of G. T. Vail and Co., was born in Germany, October, 1840. He came to America with his parents, when four years of age, locating at Detroit, Michigan. The spring of 1858 he removed to Minneapolis and engaged in cabinet making with his brother. In 1861, he enlisted in the Third Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and in the winter of 1863 reenlisted and was honorably discharged, August, 1865. Mr. Frederichs returned to this city and again engaged in the cabinet business with Mr. Vail, in 1858. He entered the fire department in 1871, was elected foreman of the Hook and Ladder Company, and in 1874 he was elected second assistant chief engineer ; in 1876 he was elected first assistant chief engineer, during which time he was engaged in cabinet and undertaking business. Mr. Frederichs was married to Miss Mary Lacher in 1862, who died June 16,1864.

Page 548

George Frenet

a native of Canada, was born November 25th, 1842. He resided in his native place until nineteen years of age. In 1862 he visited Lake Superior, where he was engaged as engineer in a copper mine. Three years later he removed to Minneapolis where he was employed by Dean and Company, lumber merchants, ten years. In the spring of 1878 he was appointed on the police force, which position he has since held. His marriage with Mary Lebrich, of Michigan, was solemnized December 7th, 1865.

Page 548

Louis E. Fritsche

was born in Germany, July 15th, 1848. He came to America in 1854. In 1867 he located in Minneapolis, where he completed his trade, that of coppersmith, which he had begun at New Ulm, Minnesota. This city has since been his home. Mr. Fritsche and Miss Pauline Bader were united in marriage December 27th, 1879.

Page 548

G. W. Floyd

was born in Watertown, New York, April 28th, 1842. He acquired a knowledge of photography in Cincinnati, Ohio. He engaged in his business several years before coming to Minneapolis in 1871. Soon after his arrival, he took charge of the operating department of Mr. Jacoby's gallery. In August 1875, Mr. Floyd opened an establishment for himself, and does a large business. He was married to Mrs. Frank Sweet, of Minneapolis, in 1875.

Page 549

Harlow A. Gale

was born in Worcester county, Massachusetts. When three years of age his father died, and he lived with an uncle in Vermont, Rev. Samuel Goddard, until 1846, when returned to his mother. In 1852 he went to Massachusetts, and engaged in teaching and studying until 1856, when he graduated from Union College, Now York. The same year he came to this city, and engaged in the real estate business. In 1858 he was appointed deputy clerk of the district court for Hennepin county, and in 1859 was appointed county auditor. Was subsequently elected for two terms, and in 1865 declined a third nomination. He bought out the insurance agency of W. B. Cornell, and with S. C. Gale organized the real estate and insurance agency of Gale and Company. In 1872 he bought and platted Gale's first addition to Minneapolis, and in 1873 the second. It was he who conceived and executed the idea of the present city market, a description of which may be found elsewhere. Mr. Gale was married in 1859, to Libbie Griggs, who has home him four children: Harlow, Robert, Willie and Isabel.

Page 549

S. C. Gale

was born September 15th, 1827, at Royalston, Massachusetts. Was apprenticed to learn the tanner's trade until 17 years of age, when he commenced preparation for college. He studied at the academies of New Salem, Shelburne Falls, and West Brattleboro, Vermont, and finally Yale College, where he graduated in 1854, after which he attended Harvard law school one year and taught school two years, continuing to read law in the meantime. In 1857 he came to Minneapolis, and the autumn of the same year he was admitted to the bar. After a year or two he discontinued the practice of law and engaged in real estate business, which he still continues with success. Mr. Gale has a pleasant home on the corner of First Avenue south and Fourth street. He was married October 15th, 1861, to Miss Susan Damon, of Massachusetts. They are the parents of five children.

Page 549

G. R. Galpin

a native of Tioga county, New York, was born March 27th, 1843. He resided there until 1869, when he came to Minneapolis; he engaged in different pursuits, and for a time worked at his trade of millwright, but finally in 1875, started in the grocery business, which he still conducts at No. 319 Washington Avenue north.

Page 549

Morenus Galpin

was born in Auburn, New York, April 23d, 1843. In early life he moved with his parents to Battle Creek, Michigan, where he learned the carpenter's trade. In 1862, he enlisted in Merrill's horse, an independent regiment, designed for bodyguard to General Fremont, served until 1865 and was wounded five times. He came to Minneapolis in 1871; for two years was foreman for Frank Fleming, and was with George Libby five years. The firm of Galpin and Emerson was established April 1st, 1880.

Page 549

Thomas Gardiner

Was born at Fredericton, New Brunswick, September 12th, 1833. He moved to St. Anthony in 1857, and remained until 1860, when he came to Minneapolis and engaged in the doing business with Dr. W. H. Leonard at the present stand of Janney, Brooks and Eastman. In 1868 the firm dissolved by mutual consent, and Mr. Gardiner went in business alone, establishing a homeopathic pharmacy, which despite the fact of its being a new departure, has from the first grown steadily. Mr. Gardiner married in 1862, Mary Knight, of Buffalo, New York. Their children are Louise and Mary.

Page 549

L. Garrity

a native of County Mayo, Ireland, was born in 1841. He emigrated to America in 1858, and after a short residence in New York, located in Hudson, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1872; then removed to Minneapolis and embarked in the hotel business on Second Avenue south. In 1877 he went to his present location, No. 206 Washington Avenue south. He married Catharine Hopkins in November, 1869. Their children are Mary, Kate, James, Edward, Timothy and Annie.

Page 549

C. A. Gau

a native of Germany,, was born in 1844. He came to the United States in 1866. For three years he lived in Carver, Minnesota, and kept the Railroad House; the rest of the time he has been a resident of Minneapolis, and since November, 1877, has been proprietor of the Union House, No. 613 Washington Avenue south. In 1872 he married Louise Thorn, who has borne him three children: Henry, Amelia and Louise.

Page 550

G. A. Gibbs

was born in Montreal, Canada, December 28th, 1841. In September 1861, he moved to Port Hope, Michigan, and the same fall enlisted in the Tenth Michigan Infantry, and served until August, 1865; he returned to Canada and worked at carpentering there until 1870, when he came to this city and continued in his trade several years. In 1877 he passed six months at Fort Custer, Montana, but returned in June 1878, and engaged as millwright at the Zenith mill; he now occupies the position of head millwright at the North-western mill. His wife was Anna Sweet, of Nova Scotia; they were married in September 1871. They have three children: Marion, Edgar and Howard.

Page 550

N. H. Giertsen

a native of Norway, was born January 25th, 1852. He came to the United States in 1867, and settled in Minneapolis where he worked in various lines of business until 1871, when he opened a grocery and general merchandise store at 213 First street north where he still continues in business. Mr. Giertsen was married in 1874 to Mary Clark of this county. They have two children: Arthur and Mabel.

Page 550

Henry Giles

was born in Oxfordshire, England. He came to New York, July 6th, 1848, and remained until September 1849, having charge of the naturalist Audubon, during the time his mind was impaired he then went to Eldorado, Wisconsin, thence to Fon du Lac where he fitted up the Forest street steam mills; he then had charge of a mill in Menasha for about two years, and of the Lawrence mills at Appleton, three years. In March, 1878, he came here and was employed as head stonedresser at the "A" mill four years previous to the explosion and since July 1878, has been at the "C'' mill. He married Sarah Gilbert, July 16th, 1849; she has borne him seven children: Henry, Lucy, Willie, Louisa and Luella, twins, and Hattie. Gilbert died at the age of four years.

Page 550

J. Gillesby

was born in Hamilton, Connecticut, August 20th, 1855. He lived on a farm, and from boyhood engaged in buying and selling stock. He came to Minneapolis in 1873, and has been interested in the meat market business most of the time since. He is proprietor of the Clifton House, on Third street north-east; it is a fine little brick house of thirty rooms and nearly new. Mr. Gillesby married Katie Rice, of Red Wing, in November 1880.

Page 550

D. M. Gilmore

born at Newville, Pennsylvania, in 1840. He came to this city in 1857, but on account of the financial crash, and the hard times resulting, he returned to Pennsylvania in the fall of the same year. In 1861 he enlisted in the Third Pennsylvania Cavalry, the first volunteer regiment of cavalry in the service. He commenced as corporal, but when mustered out in 1864, held the commission of captain; he was in many of the principal battles, and was wounded in January, 1864. After leaving the army he was in business in Pennsylvania for about one and one-half years, and in 1866, returned to Minnesota; he was in the auction business for six years, and since that time has been engaged in furniture manufacturing. His marriage with Miss Sarah Kyle, of Maryland, occurred in 1867. They reside at 909 Washington Avenue north.

Page 550

J. H. Gilmore

born at Steubenville, Ohio, July 17th, 1848. When quite young he moved with his parents to Mount Pleasant, where he attended the public schools and worked at farming several years, and then was in the cattle trade until 1867. He read law in Illinois two years, spent the same length of time traveling in the west and returned home, and purchased an interest in a newspaper, which he sold in 1872 and removed to Chicago, thence to Minneapolis; here he followed printing for a time, then became associated with Mr. Baker in civil engineering; he now owns several farms in this state and is interested in real estate and lumbering. His nuptials with Abbie Chase were celebrated February 19th, 1879. They have one child, Raymond.

Page 550

J. A. Gilman

a native of Wisconsin, was born in Washington county in 1834. He lived there until 1873. He enlisted in the Twenty-first regiment of United States Volunteer Infantry, and at the battle of Chickamauga, in Georgia, he was captured and taken to Libby prison in company with sixty others. They were transferred several times and after fifteen months imprisonment Mr. Gilman and eleven others were exchanged, the remaining forty-nine having died during confinement. He was honorably discharged at Washington, August 6th, 1865. He then returned to his home in Wisconsin, and in 1873 he removed to Minnesota. He remained at St. Paul a few months, then became a resident of Minneapolis, where he has since resided. He has been in the employ of the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railroad Company as en inspector, since his first locating here. July 3d, 1869, he married Amelia Marco, of Wisconsin. Four children have been born to them: John H., Nellie E., Fred R., and Albert A.

Page 551

J. Q. Gilman

born December 1st, 1851, at Hallowell, Maine. When nineteen years of age he learned the blacksmith's trade, and in 1872 opened a shop at Richmond, Maine. Staid there only one year, and removed to Gardiner, where he worked in partnership with another man until 1877, when he came here, and worked at his trade on Sixth Avenue south. From there he moved to the corner of Fourth Avenue and Third street south, and in November, 1880, opened the shop where he now is, at 280 Fifth Avenue south. In June, 1878, he married Miss Ida Blaisdell.

Page 551

Charles Gille

a native of Prussia, was born September 25th, 1842. He came to America in 1852, and lived at Watertown, Wisconsin, until 1861, when he enlisted in the Twentieth Wisconsin Infantry, and served three years. He was mustered out, and reenlisted in the Forty-third Wisconsin Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He then went into the furniture business in Iowa, and from there to Mankato, Minnesota, where he was employed as carpenter until 1877, when he came here, and has since been a contractor for carpenter work; office on Third street and Fifteenth Avenue north-east. In 1869 he married Mary Malli, who has borne him seven children. Those living are: Lena, Emma, Bertha, William, and Herman.

Page 551

G. F. Girrbach

was born March 29th, 1842, at Calmbach, Kingdom of Wurtemberg. In April, 1864, he came to America. Lived a few months in Connecticut, then to New York city, and in 1865 came here. He worked for the firm of J. Dean and Company until 1871, when he established himself in the grocery business, and the year following added a stock of general merchandise. He is doing a successful business at 1624 Fifth street south. His wife was Louisa Jager, whom he married in 1864. They are the parents of six children: Louisa, William, Lydia, Fred, Minnie, and Esther.

Page 551

James Givans

a native of Ohio, was born in 1830. He went to West Liberty, Iowa, in 1853, and engaged in the livery business. In 1872 he removed to Minneapolis, and occupied stables with Mr. Ensign until 1880, when he moved to the alley back of the city market. He has a sale stable exclusively. Mr. Givans married Mary Innman, of Pennsylvania, in 1855. She died in 1867, leaving three children: George, Sophia, and Callie. His second wife was Sarah Bozarth, whom he married in 1871. She has borne him three children: Daisy, Ethel, and Mary.

Page 551

Mitchell W. Glenn

was born December 24th, 1830, at Newark, New Jersey. In early childhood he moved to Mount Vernon, Ohio, and at the age of eleven entered a machine shop; he afterwards learned ironing carriages, and then returned to the machine shop. He entered the army as color-bearer of the Eighth Indiana, though he had the use of but one arm, the other being lame from an injury; at the battle of Rich Mountain, he carried the only colors on the field. He received several wounds at that battle, one shows plainly now over the left eye. After his return home he was commissioned adjutant of the Thirty-fifth Indiana, which position he held two years, and in 1863, he was made colonel of the One hundred and Seventeenth Ohio Militia. He came to this place in 1868, and went into the North Star Iron Works. In 1878, he purchased the Minneapolis Boiler Works. He has been a member of the city council since 1872, with the exception of one year, and vice-president of the council two terms; he was also chairman of the board of county commissioners for two years. His marriage with Mary Kelly, of Ohio, was celebrated October 8th, 1862. Their children are: J. Willard and Eugene.

Page 551

William Glessner

was born January 22d, 1816, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania. When fifteen years of age he went to Ohio, and remained until the spring of 1854, when he came to St. Anthony. He entered a homestead and lived on it only one year, then returned to St. Anthony and engaged , with Mr. Johnson in the manufacture of furniture; after two years partnership Mr. Glessner carried on the business alone; in 1870, he abandoned manufacturing and entered the retail furniture and the undertaking business, which he still continues. His wife was Miss Abbie DeVaul, of Ohio, who has borne him five children. Mr. Glessner's residence is at the corner of Eighth street and Eighth Avenue, south-east.

Page 552

Gottleib Gluek

was born April 22d, 1828, in Germany. In 1855, he came to America and the year following moved to Minneapolis. In 1857, he built a brewery, which was destroyed by fire and rebuilt in 1880; it has a capacity of forty-five barrels per pay. He married Caroline Foell in 1857; eleven children have been born to them, Louis, Charles, Emma (deceased), Emma, Jennie, Carrie, John, Louisa, Christina, Annie and Lydia. Mr. Gluek died October 16th, 1880.

Page 552

J. G. Gluck

was born March 24th, 1833, in Bavaria. In 1849, he came to America and lived in New York city nearly four years, then was employed as journeyman at the tailor's trade which he learned in Bavaria. In 1857, he came here, and the year following, established himself in business as a merchant tailor at St. Anthony; since 1868, he has been on the west side of the river. He married Annie Gutzwieller in 1858, and in March 1876, she died, leaving four children, Franklin, John, Mary and George. His second wife was Franziska Boldt, who has borne him two children, Hugo and Albert.

Page 552

Ard Godfrey

a native of Penobscot county, Maine, was born at Orono, January 18th, 1813. His father and elder brother being mill-wrights, he learned that trade, and at the age of eighteen, had charge of building a lumber mill. In 1847 he came to St.. Anthony, to take charge of the improvements of the water power then inaugurated by Franklin Steele, Rantoul and others. He arrived in October, and in 1848 returned to Maine. While there he made arrangements with Steele to return to St. Anthony. He had quite an experience in building dams in Maine. After his return to this place he operated in lumber for Steele and others, also for himself, for several years. In 1852 he had a claim made for him by Captain Monroe, of Fort Snelling, near Minnehaha Falls, where he has since lived, with the exception of seven years spent in this city, to give his children better educational advantages. In 1853 he built a saw-mill on Minnehaha Creek, and in 1866 a grist-mill; both were destroyed by fire. He was married in January, 1838, to Harriet N. Burr, of Maine; children, Helen, now Mrs. M. Berry, of Minneapolis; Abner, a farmer near Hancock; Harriet B., a teacher; Martha A., Sarah C., now Mrs. Osborne, of this city; Mary and Minnie. Three children died in infancy. Mr. Godfrey resides on his farm near Minnehaha Falls where he has a pleasant home.

Page 552

Chris Goehringer

came to Minnesota in 1865, and located at North Branch; he was one of four men who located and named the town. He resided there about three and one-half years, then came to this city and worked in a saw-mill two years. For a short time he was in the grocery business, then started a saloon on First Avenue north, and is now in the same business at 101 Nicollet avenue. In 1870 he helped to organize hose company number three, and in 1872 was elected its first assistant, which position he held until 1875, when he was elected foreman, and acted in that capacity until the company disbanded in 1879. He married Mary Nieson in 1870. Their children are Lena, Chris and Kate.

Page 552

O. A. Gonyea

a native of Maine, was born January 26th, 1833. He came to Minneapolis in 1865, and for sixteen years worked in the woods and on the river. He is proprietor of the New Idea billiard hall, No. 21 Main street south-east, which he built in 1872. His wife was Catherine Hogan, whom he married in 1861. They have four children: William, Lillie, Nellie and Charles.

Page 552

A. H. Goode

is a gentleman whose long experience well qualifies him to fill the position he holds as manager of the Minneapolis branch house of J. H. Kerrick and Company. This firm manufacture and deal in iron and wood-working machinery and supplies.

Page 552

P. Goodrich

was born at Rochester, New York, in 1857. At the age of three years he went with his mother to Boston and lived eight years; then after passing three years in Chicago, he returned to Rochester to prepare for college; he graduated from the university of that city in 1880, and came to Minneapolis in August of the same year. In September, 1880, he purchased in company with J. T. Barnum, the trunk manufactory of D. D. Whitney, which business they are now conducting at 26 Washington Avenue north.

Page 552

E. Gordon

a native of New Hampshire, was born in July, 1853. When fourteen years of age he commenced learning the mason's trade, and has followed that occupation since. In 1855 he came with his parents to St. Anthony, and in 1867 removed to Colorado, he went to Michigan in 1876, and returned to this city in 1878, since which time he has done business here as contractor for masonry work: he makes a specialty of plastering, cistern-building and kalsomining. His residence is No. 810 Washington Avenue north.

Page 553

L. B. Gorman

a native of Quebec, was born in September, 1853. He came to the United States in 1867, and followed the lumber business at Grand Rapids, Wisconsin, for one year. In 1868 he came to Minneapolis and continued the same work until June, 1878, when he took the billiard hall at the corner of Hennepin Avenue and Second street. His marriage with Jennette Hibbard occurred December 25th, 1878.

Page 553

William W. Gould

was born in Canada, December 15th, 1840. He learned the milling business in Uxbridge, Ontario county, and in September, 1865, moved to South Bend, Indiana, where he taught school one year, then went to Boone county, Iowa, and was employed in cabinet and carpenter work one year, thence to Council Bluffs, where he worked as carpenter for the Chicago and Northwestern Railway. He returned to South Bend and worked at milling and cabinet making until June, 1878, when he came to this city and helped build the Pettit and Washburn mills; since June, 1880, he has been employed as Mill-wright at the North-western, mill. He married Alice Burdic in 1873., They have one child, Harry.

Page 553

Charles E. Gray

born at Westerly, Washington county, Maine, October 7th, 1849. When six years of age he came here and at the age of eighteen commenced lumbering, which employment he continued for seven years. In 1874 he engaged in the milling business at the North Star mill; remained two and one-half years with this firm, being part of the time in charge of a mill at Long Lake, since then he has been at the North-western mill. Mr. Gray married Eva Lowell, April 4th, 1876. They had one child, Sadie, who died in infancy.

Page 553

C. A. Graves

was born at Cameron, Somerset county, Maine, April 26th, 1837. In early manhood he commenced to work at building, and was engaged on saw mills on the Penobscot river, and at different places in the United States and Canada. In 1857 he came to St. Anthony; worked at his trade on the St. Croix river two years, thence to Stillwater, where he remained until 1864, when he went south and worked one year for the government construction department. In 1867 he came to Minneapolis and since that time has been employed constructing mills.

Page 553

Thomas K. Gray

was born in Lincoln county, Maine, in June, 1833. His home has been in Minneapolis since October, 1855. In 1866 he married Julia Allen; they are the parents of five children: Horace, Edward, Herbert, Gracie and Daisy. Mr. Gray is a partner in the firm of Gray and Hofflin of this city, and is also in the drug business at No. 108 Bridge square; this business was established in 1856 by John D. Gray and Dr. M. R. Greely. In 1858, T. K. Gray bought the doctor's interest and the firm of Gray Brothers continued until 1870, when John D. was obliged to travel for his health, and Mr. T. K. Gray has since been alone in the business. In 1865 the present building was erected; three stories and the basement are occupied for the transaction of this large and increasing business.

Page 553

J. L. Grandy

was born in Dundas county, Canada, in 1825. He moved with his parents to St. Lawrence county, New York, and lived there until 1847, when he went to Wisconsin. He did carpenter and jobbing work at Grand Rapids until the war broke out, when he enlisted in the Eighteenth Wisconsin Volunteers, served one year and was discharged for disability. In the spring of 1863 he removed to Beaver Dam and remained four yews in the employ of J. H. Rowell & Co., manufacturers of seeders. Since the fall of 1867 he has resided in Minneapolis, engaged in the manufacture of the New Comet washing machines. He married Pauline Eaton, in Wisconsin. They have four children, Phoebe Ann, Augustus, Louis Lincoln and Ida May.

Page 553

W. Q. Greely

was born May 20th, 1827, in Waldo county, Maine. He attended school until seventeen years of age, when he commenced to learn blacksmithing. He went to Bangor, where for five years he worked at forging for Pope and Lang; also fitted up a factory at North Vassel-borough, Maine. Since October, 1855 he has lived at St. Anthony. He occupied various locations for a number of years, and finally built a shop on Main street south-east. This was destroyed by fire, and in 1877 he purchased the shop he now occupies, No. 121 Main street south-east. His wife was Amanda Gowan, of Bradford, Maine. They have two children living: Otto and Alice.

Page 554

Anton Grethen

a native of Germany, was born in November, 1834, and in 1854 emigrated. to America. He read law with Brisbin and Bigelow, of St. Paul, and was admitted to the bar in December, 1858. He followed his profession until elected auditor of Hennepin county in 1864. This office he filled until 1871, when he resumed his law practice in the firm of D. G. Shillock, and afterward with General Baxter. In 1880 he was elected alderman for the First ward. Mr. Grethen resides on Nicollet Island. He was married in 1857 to Babette Jenkins. Their children are: Emilie, Adolf and Otto.

Page 554

J. M. Griffith

was born in 1835, in Germany. When a child he came with his parents to America, and lived in Saint Clair county, Illinois, until twenty-one years of age, and then in Montgomery county five years. He removed to Montana, where, for nine years, he was engaged in contracting and building, also operated a saw-mill, and for a time conducted a general merchandise business. His marriage with Carrie Sharp occurred in April, 1867. They are the parents of five children: Ernest, Benjamin, Mary, Franklin, and an infant. He is now engaged in the manufacture of brooms., and dealing in broom corn.

Page 554

John Grime

a native of England, was born in 1846. He came to America in 1869, and locating at Scranton, Pennsylvania, commenced work in the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western railway shops, where he was employed until 1870; that year he came to Minneapolis and worked for the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway Company until 1872, when he went to the Harvester Works, and in April, 1880, began preparations for his present business, that of manufacturing machinists' and engineers' tools. Mr. Grime was married in this city, September 22d, 1875, to Emma Morrill. They have one son, Edward.

Page 554

William Grimshaw

a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was born December 6th, 1853. He came to Minneapolis with his parents in 1855; he studied here and graduated from the only high school in the city at that time. When only fourteen years of age he commenced the carpenter's trade, working with his father summers and attending school winters; his business is now that of architect and builder. He was married in October, 1876, to Miss Minnie, daughter of George Roberts, of Wisconsin.

Page 554

E. S. Grindall

was born at Penobscot, Maine, March, 1832. He moved with his parents to Bangor, and followed butchering for five years; then he went to Boston and engaged in draying until 1855, when he removed to Iowa, and a few months later, to this city. He was with Hause and Bailey for a time, and then in the employ of Stimson and Hayes, and in 1855-56 assisted in drawing stone for the old Winslow House. In 1865 he started a dray line, which he has since continued with profit. He was married in 1858 to Sarah Smith. They are the parents of four children: Sabine, George, Eaber and Bertie. Mr. Grindall's father, was county commissioner for several years; his mother is still living.

Page 554

John Grosbusch

a native of Germany, was born in 1846. He came to America in 1868, and lived on a farm one year near Albert Lea; from there he went to Steele county where he worked on a farm and in a brewery until 1871, when he removed to this city, and was in a brewery here four years, then started a saloon on Washington Avenue, and in the spring of 1880 moved to his present location He married Theresa Hausler in 1876. Their children are Mary and John.

Page 554

Freeman Grover

a native of New Brunswick, was born September 13th, 1831. In 1857 he moved to Wisconsin and was in the lumber business until 1875, then he went south and for three years, was engaged in growing oranges in Florida, but returned to Wisconsin and in 1880 came to this city. He is proprietor of the Butler Hotel, No.709 Third street south. In June,1862, he married Margaret Heasely. Five children have been born to them: John, Mary, Otis, George and Ward.

Page 554

Frank Grygla

born in 1848, at Cracow, Poland, and emigrated to America in 1870; he lived in Milwaukee two years, then removed to Chicago. In 1877 he came to Minneapolis and in company with Mr. Selden engaged the manufacture of galvanized iron cornice, fire and water-proof sky lights, elevator buckets, doors and shutters, etc., No.114 Third street north. Mr. Grygla was married in 1877. He is the father of two children.

Page 555

Absalom R. Guilder

born at Milton, Vermont, in August, 1826. He lived with his parents until 1842, when he moved to Watertown, Wisconsin, and engaged in building the "Old Yellow mill" of that place. In 1866 he came to Minneapolis to assist in the construction of the Washburn B mill; after its completion he turned his attention to a long felt want of those interested in milling; after a long and laborious task he was rewarded with a series of patents, which placed him in the front rank of our ablest inventors. In June, 1872, he secured his first patent for a middlings purifier, the second in December of the same year, the third in October, 1873, the fourth in September, 1874, the fifth in May, 1875, and the sixth was for drying and draining hose. In April 1876, he made an improvement on granulating machines, and in September, 1876, another patent on middlings purifiers, July, 1877, an improvement on the turbine wheel. and in 1877, 1878, and 1880, he received re-issues on several of them; they are all patented in the United States and Canada and his machinery has been sold in all parts of the world where flour is manufactured. Mr. Guilder married Eva Collins in I 850. They have one child, Ella. Mrs. Guilder died February 10th 1871.

Page 555

Simon Guimon

was born in Quebec, Canada, May 12th, 1840. He moved to Dayton, Minnesota in 1862, and for four years was in the wood business; in 1866, he moved to Anoka, and worked eleven years as rawyer in the mills; he removed to this city in 1877, spent two years more in the wood business, and in May, 1880, bought the Union house, 121 First street north. His wife was Ellen Goodin; they were married in July, 1866; seven children have been born to then, those living are Mary, Josephine, Simon, Nellie, and Ida.

Page 555

S. R. Gunnersen

was born in Norway, in 1844. He attended school in his native town until his eighteenth year, when he entered the University at Christiana. Passed all the degrees common to a divinity student, and in 1867, took the degree of D. D. Afterwards studied theology in Germany. After traveling through several European countries, came to Augsburg Seminary, Minneapolis, in 1874, and was elected a member of its faculty.

Page 555

Charles F. Haglin

of the firm of Haglin and Corser, architects, was born at Syracuse, Now York, in 1848. He studied the profession of architect at Syracuse, and in 1869, moved to Detroit, Michigan, remaining until the fall of the same year, when he went to Chicago, and in 1873, came to Minneapolis. He established an office in connection with Mr. Long, and in 1876, formed a partnership with Mr. Corser. Mr. Haglin drew the plans for the Minneapolis and St. Paul depot, also for the high school building, completed 1879.

Page 555

W. N. Haight

was born at Burlington, Vermont, in 1850. His early life was passed at St. Albans, of that state, and after the age of twelve years, he was there engaged in architecture and building. He located in Minneapolis in 1876, and has been successful in business. Mr. Haight built the Woman's Home, Col. Benton's residence and others.

Page 555

Christopher Webber Hall

was born in Wardsboro, Windham county, Vermont, February 28th, 1845. He remained with his parents on the farm, attending the village school, and for one or two terms the Leland and Gray Seminary, at Townsend, Vermont, until he began preparation for college at Chester Academy, Chester, Vermont. The expense of his preparatory course was paid by teaching penmanship. Entered Middlebury College in 1867, and graduated in 1871. Taught one year at Glen's Falls, New York; then came to Mankato, Minnesota, as principal of high school. In l873 he was elected superintendent of the Owatonna city schools, where he remained until his departure for Europe to pursue his scientific studies in the universities of Germany. July 27th, 1875, he married Nellie A., eldest daughter of Hon. M. H. Dunnell, of Owatonna, who shortly afterward accompanied him to Germany. She died at Leipzic, February 21st, 1876. After taking the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Prof. Hall returned to America in December, 1877, and passed six weeks assisting Prof. Seeley, at the Middlebury, Vermont, College. In April, 1878, upon invitation of Prof. Winchell, he came to Minneapolis, and entered into work at the University of Minnesota, relieving that gentleman of his class-room duties that he might give his attention to the duties of the natural history survey of the state. In June following he was employed for one year with the duties indicated by the title of assistant state geologist, and later, the same year, was appointed professor of geology, mineralogy and biology, which position he has since held.

Page 556

J. G. Haller

pastor of the Evangelical Mission, was born in New York, in 1858, moved to Michigan in 1864, and was converted at twelve. He attended district school until fourteen years of age, then took a clerkship in a mercantile house for a few months; it not being congenial to his tastes, left it and fitted for college in the high school. At sixteen entered the Northwestern college, at Napierville, Illinois, and graduated in three years. Came to Minnesota in 1877, taught school seven months, in Stearns county, and in 1878 joined the Minnesota conference and was stationed on the Dakota circuit, twenty-fiver miles south of St. Paul, laboring jointly with the Rev. Mr. Manthey. In the spring of 1879 stationed at the Minneapolis Mission, when failing health almost compelled him to abandon the ministry, but feeling a stronger obligation to his Master than to himself, he persevered until health returned.

Page 556

Lorentz Halling

a native of Sweden, was born in 1839. He came to the United States in 1867, residing in New York one year where he was employed as tailor. After visiting cities in Wisconsin and Michigan, he located at Winona,. Minnesota, where he remained two and one-half years. In 1871, he removed to Minneapolis, where he opened a saloon and has since resided. Mr. Halling married Julia Danielson, in 1870. Their children are Hjalmar, Nellie, Jessie, and Florence.

Page 556

William S. Hall

a native of England, was born in January, 1844. He came to America, in September, 1869, first locating at Philadelphia, and remaining there until 1871, when he returned to England. In 1873 he returned to America and removed to Hudson, Wisconsin, where he was in the employ of the West Wisconsin railroad until 1878; he then came to Minneapolis, and entered his present business, that of machinist. His marriage with Miss Alice Singleton was solemnized at Bury, England, in 1868. Their children are: Sarah A., John Wm., and Susan.

Page 556

Hobart O. Hamlin

son of Oliver Hamlin, was born at Salem, Wayne county, Pennsylvania, June 29tb, 1832. Mr. Hamlin moved to St. Anthony, Minnesota Territory, in 1854, and has since resided at the Falls. In the fall of 1856, he engaged in the mercantile business with Alpheus Rowell, and in common with many others during the trying period of 1857, he met with severe financial reverses. In that year he was elected the first auditor of Hennepin county, but soon resigned his position and, in 1861, was elected clerk of the district court, which office he filled four years. In 1877, he formed a partnership with Zelora E. Brown, and they have since been successfully engaged in the real estate, loan and insurance business. Mr. Hamlin's and Miss Anna Rocke's nuptials were celebrated, September 28th, 1862., Their children are: Grant G., Oliver C., George B., Ernest T. Kate and Hobart O.

Page 556

Henry Hamm

a native of Germany, was born in 1846. He came to the United States, in 1873, locating in Philadelphia, and very soon enlisted in the Ninety-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in which he served eight months. He returned to Philadelphia, where he engaged in blacksmithing until 1867. He established his saloon business in Minneapolis in 1879. He was married to Lizzie Freideger in 1872, and have three children, Annie, Maggie and Lillie.

Page 556

William Hammond

was born in Oakfield, Wisconsin, May 22d, 1947. He came to Minneapolis in 1870 and worked at lumbering ten years. In July, 1880, he established a saloon business at 21 Nicollet Avenue.

Page 556

C. J. Hamnstrom

was born May 16th, 1843, in Sweden. He learned the trade of shoemaker at an early age, and continued in that avocation until 1865, when he came to the United States, proceeding directly to Minnesota. Four years he was engaged in the pursuit of his trade in different parts of the state, thence came to Minneapolis. In 1874, he opened an establishment and has since been very successful in the manufacture of boots and shoes. Mr. Hamnstrom was married in 1866 to Miss Barbara Larsom, of Sweden. They have four children, Preston, David, Lydia and Elizabeth.

Page 557

Richard Hankinson

was born at Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1842. He lived on a farm until 1861, when he enlisted in Company D, Eighth Michigan Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded at Wilmington Island in 1862, and was discharged in 1863, on account of his wounds. He re-enlisted in the Thirteenth Michigan Light Artillery and served till the close of the war. He came to Minneapolis in 1865 and entered the service of the North-western Telegraph company, and has since been in their employ. He was line builder and repairer four years; for three years was superintendent of construction, and since has been assistant general superintendent. He organized the North-western Telephone Exchange company in 1878, and was elected general manager, serving as such until March 1880.

Page 557

Samuel F. Hance

physician and surgeon, was born at Macedon, Wayne county, New York, July 1st, 1825. He was educated at Canandaigua, New York, also at Wesleyan University of Lima. He studied and graduated as M. D. at the Albany Medical College, and has been in continuous practice since. In 1862, he entered the army as surgeon of the Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry, and was successively promoted brigade surgeon, and division medical director, in General McCook's corps. On account of ill-health, he served only two years. He located, at Minneapolis in 1872, and has practiced here since. Dr. Hance is a member of the State Medical, Society of Minnesota. He and Miss Sarah Wright were united in matrimony, in 1855. They have one child, Elizabeth.

Page 557

George A. Hanson

was born at Southbridge, Worcester county, Massachusetts, in 1842. He received an academic education and a course in Thompson, Connecticut, College. In 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Fifty-first Massachusetts nine-months' volunteers, and was discharged at the expiration of the time. After his discharge he engaged in the mercantile business until coming to Minneapolis, in 1875. The next year he was employed as general agent of the Norristown agricultural works until 1878, when he entered the Minneapolis Harvester works, as general superintendent, where he has since remained. Mr. Hanson's marriage with Miss Carrie Lewis occurred at Southbridge, August, 1861. Their children now living are George, Frank and Edgar.

Page 557

J. D. Hanson

was born October 30th, 1826, at St. Stevens, Charlotte county, New Brunswick. At nine years of age he apprenticed as a black-smith, and has since engaged in the business. He came to Minneapolis in 1877, and two years later built the shop he now occupies. Having formed a partnership with his son, the firm is now known as J. D. Hanson and Son. He was married June 13th, 1848, to Miss Susan Tourtillott who bore him four sons and three daughters.

Page 557

J. W. Hargraves

was born in New York, and at an early age moved with his parents to Wisconsin. At the age of twelve he removed to Decorah, Iowa, and while there acquired a knowledge of milling. In 1877, he removed to Lanesboro, where he remained three years; he then came to Minneapolis. Mr. Hargraves was married in 1878, to Miss Augusta Jordan, who bore him one child, James C.

Page 557

Ariel C. Harris

attorney at law, was born at Toledo, Ohio, November 30th, 1855. He was educated in the Toledo high school and University of California. He read law in the law department of Michigan University in the class of 1876. After practicing in Detroit, Michigan, for a time he removed to Texas, in 1877, thence to this city in the summer of 1879. Mr. Harris was manager of the Saturday Evening Spectator one year, when he opened his law office and has since practiced his profession.

Page 557

S. A. Harris

cashier of the North-western National Bank, first came to this city in 1868. From 1870 until April, 1880, he field positions in the different banking institutions in the city. At the latter date he was elected to his present position.

Page 557

H. G. Harrison

was born at Belleville, St. Clair county, Illinois, April, 1822. He remained at his native place until 1859, when he came to Minneapolis and engaged in lumbering, and organized the firm of J. Dean and Company. When the Security Bank was established, Mr. Harrison became its vice-president, which office he has since held. He was the second person who engaged in the wholesale grocery business in this city: he opened with a partner, B. S. Bull, in 1863. After a period of eight years a new partnership was formed with George R. Newell, which was dissolved in 1879. Mr. Harrison was married in 1847, to Miss Irene A. Robinson, who died in 1876. Their children are Edwin, George, Lewis, Hugh and Perry. Mr. Harrison remarried to Miss Lizzie Hunt, who bore him one child, James G.

Page 558

Thomas A. Harrison

was born in St. Clair county, Illinois, December 18th, 1811. He lived on a farm until sixteen years of age, when he moved with his father to Belleville, Illinois, and worked in a flour mill which his father had purchased. In 1860, Mr. Harrison removed to Minneapolis to join his two brothers who had preceded him. Two years later he entered into partnership with his brothers, and J. Dean, forming the well-known firm of J. Dean and Company, and carried on an extensive lumber trade. When the Security Bank came into existence Mr. Harrison was elected its president, which high trust he still retains. His marriage with Miss Rebecca Green was solemnized in November 1840. Four children were born to them.

Page 558

Philip Hartmann

a native of Germany, was born in 1846. He came to the United States in 1854, locating in Scott, county, Minnesota. Ten years later he removed to Minneapolis, where he was employed in Morrison Brothers saw-mills, until 1874, when he opened a saloon, billiard-hall and summer gardens, at his present location. Mr. Hartmann married Katie Pauly, in 1872, who bore him five children. Those living are: Adolph, Philip and Annie.

Page 558

Charles C. Hashow

a native of France, was born in 1843. He became familiar with the machinist's trade, in his native country. In 1862, he came to America and superintended several copper mines on Lake Superior. He invested largely in mining stock, but in the financial panic after the war, he lost heavily and. was left destitute. He walked from La Belle to Houghton, sixty-eight miles, then went by boat to Green Bay, thence to Chicago, where he found employment, which was furnished him by the North-western Manufacturing Company. In 1865, he came to Minneapolis, and was engaged as foreman in the Minneapolis Iron-Works ten years, then began business for himself once more. Mr. Hashow married Miss Mary Crickler, in 1866. Their children are: Charles and Louise.

Page 558

W. H. Hastings

was born in Elmira, Chemung county, New York. He came west with his parents who located at Red Wing, Minnesota. Here he remained and was engaged six years in the flouring mills. After pursuing his trade, in the states of Michigan and Wisconsin, he returned to Minnesota and was employed in the Galaxy mills of this city, as stone dresser. He was married May 30th, 1871 to Miss Bessie Kendall. They are parents of one child, Bernice.

Page 558 

Henry Hauschild

a native of Germany, was born in 1848. He came to America in 1867, and lived two years in southern Minnesota, when he removed to this city. In the spring of 1880, he became proprietor of the present sample room and billiard hall. Mr. Hauschild and Miss Jennie Stremel were married in 1872. They have two children, Oscar and John.

Page 558

Jacob Hauser

was born in Germany in 1829. He came to the United States in 1853, locating first in Wisconsin; during the same year he went to California, where he remained three years, when he came to Minneapolis and at once opened a grocery store. He is one of the oldest grocers in the city. Mr. Hauser was married in 1857, to Catherine Holloran, a native of Ireland. Their children are Catherine, Johanna and John.

Page 558

J. F. Hause

was born at Tyrone, Schuyler county, New York, July 12th, 1850. He came to Minneapolis in 1870, and after working three years for Mr. Heffelfinger became his partner in the boot and shoe trade. Two years later he opened a shoe store and in 1875, sold a share to Mr. Davis; this firm continued until April, 1880, when Mr. Davis sold and was succeeded by Mr. Chesnut. The firm is now known as. Hause and Chesnut.

Page 558

E. P. Hawthone

was born at Huntington, New York, in 1842. He came to St. Paul in 1861, and immediately opened a farm of 160 acres in Richfield, Hennepin county. He, however, still resided in St. Paul, remaining there until 1866, when he removed and located on his farm. There he remained ten years at the expiration of which, he removed with his family to Minneapolis and rented the firm, which he still owns. Mr. Hawthorne and Miss Rebecca Giles were married in 1866. Their children are Meredith, Harry and William.

Page 558

W. P. Hawthorne

was born in Westchester county, New York, in 1837. He located in Henry county, Illinois, in 1859, where he engaged in farming two years. In 1862, he enlisted in the Nineteenth Illinois volunteers and served three years. He participated in some of the most noted engagements. After his discharge in 1865, he came to Minnesota, locating on a farm in Richfield, where he remained thirteen years. He then removed to Minneapolis and entered the flouring mill business and built the Trades mill in company with his brother, D. M. Hawthorne, in 1879. Mr. Hawthorne's marriage to Miss Ellen Shark took place in 1865. Their children are Norman and Ellen.

Page 559

John Hayes

born in June, 1819, is a descendant of William Hayes and Julia Ryan, of Ireland. He came to America in 1847, remaining a short time in New York, then came to St. Anthony, in 1856. Mr. Hayes was one of the early settlers, and was obliged to endure the hardships of pioneer life. He pursued his avocation, that of a carpenter until May, 1861, when he engaged in the grocery business in which he has since continued. Mr. Hayes was married in Chicago, July 8th, 1855, to Miss Margaret Hardy. They have eight children, all of whom are living at home except two daughters, who are at the convent in St. Paul.

Page 559

M. P. Hayes

was born at Limerick, Maine, in 1829. He went to Brighton, Massachusetts, where he was employed as salesman in a meat market, remaining about seven years. In the fall of 1854, he came to St. Anthony and opened a meat market which he kept until 1865, when in company with H. M. Martin, he established the old St. Anthony Iron Works. In 1876 they took another partner, C. R. Bushnell, and continued business until 1879, when their works were destroyed by fire. In 1876, Mr. Hayes. in company with T. F. Andrews built the block occupied by N. B. Harwood and company. Three years later they built four elevators. Mr. Hayes was married at Limerick, Maine, in 1855, to Miss Elizabeth Stimson. Their children are Ellen E., Carrie A., Emma and Frank M.

Page 559

George Hayford

was born at Farmersville, Cataraugus,county, New York, in 1843. He came to this city in 1865, and was employed by Judd and Brackett in the Washburn B mill, since which time he has been engaged in the different mills of the city, occupying the position of head miller, grinder, and stone-dresser. Mr. Hayford was married to Miss Ardilla Stillman from his old home in New York, in 1864. They have one child.

Page 559

O. F. Haynes

was born November 7th, 1845, at Wilmington, Vermont. He learned the trade of blacksmith, and since his locating in Minneapolis, has been engaged in the pursuit of his avocation. He was married November 12th, 1865, to Angie E. Bowen, born at Jamaica, Vermont, in 1848. They have two children, Lillian A., and Freddie E.

Page 559

Lambert Hays

a native of Germany, was born December 25th, 1841. He came to Albany, New York with his parents, where they lived three years. After living five years in Wisconsin, he removed to St. Anthony, where he engaged in the bakery business in which he continued until 1871. He then opened his First and Last Chance sample room at his Present location. He has also been a member of the city fire department several years. Mr. Hays was married in 1864. Their children are, Katie, Theodore, Lambert, Lizzie, Joseph, Mary, and Albert.

Page 559

James H. Hazer

was born at Albany, New York, in l838. At the age of sixteen he acquired a knowledge of engineering at Troy, New York, where he remained until 1857, when he went to Hartford, Connecticut. In 1862 he enlisted in the First Connecticut Cavalry, and was with the army of the Potomac until 1865, when he was discharged. In 1874 he removed to Minneapolis, and took charge of the Monitor Plow Works engine four years; then of the Nicollet House engine until November, 1879, since which time he has had control of the Corliss engine at elevator "A.". Mr. Hazer was married to Miss Annie Travis, of Madelia, Minnesota, in 1865. Their children are Frank and Clarence.

Page 559

Fred Heckrich

born in 1843, is a native of Germany. He came to this city in 1867, and for six years was engaged as a painter. Since that time he has been the proprietor of his present restaurant and sample room. For several years he has been a member of the fire department. Mr. Heckrich was married in 1869, to Caroline Figge, who bore him three children: Freddie, Charles, and Mattie.

Page 559

Edwin Hedderly

one of the earliest pioneers, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1814. He was engaged in mercantile pursuits in his native place until 1846, when he located in Indianapolis, Indiana, and was connected with the business interests of that place. In 1849 he came to St. Anthony, which at that time, like St. Paul, was only an Indian trading post. In 1851 he took a claim of one hundred and sixty acres in what is now known as West Minneapolis. He was connected with the various committees appointed for the purpose of naming and laying out the streets and boundaries of this city. His first business experience here was in the firm of Hedderly and Chambers, grocers; next as Hedderly and Roach, hardware dealers; then as Hedderly and Vroman, and last as E. Hedderly, druggist, in which business he continued until his death in June, 1880. He was prominently connected with the interests of this locality for thirty-one years. He was married to Mary J. Kennard, of Philadelphia. Their living children are: Angeline E., Emma, Theresa J., George W., Edwin P., Charlotte C., Thomas L., Alfred H., Daniel G., and Josie J.

Page 560

D. G. Hedderly

son of one of the earliest pioneers of this region, was born in Minneapolis, March 16th, 1856, where he has always lived. After receiving his education, Mr. Hedderly was employed by the Trades Manufacturing Company as harness maker, until he became familiar with the trade; afterward, by George Calladine. In 1875 he opened a grocery store, and has since been having a fine trade. Mr. Hedderly's marriage with Lillian A. Foster was solemnized in 1877. They have one daughter, Zetta V..

Page 560

T. L. Hedderly

was born in this city, April 2d, 1852, and was a son of the old pioneer, Edwin Hedderly, and is one of the first white boys born in this locality. Mr. Hedderly received his education in Minneapolis, and studied dentistry with Doctor Bowman, which profession he has practiced six years. He was married in 1875, to Miss Jessie McGregor, of Black River Falls, Wisconsin. Their children are: Duncan, Roy and Edwin.

Page 560

N. M. Hedstrom

born in 1843, is a native of Sweden. He emigrated to America in 1869. Being a miller, he has been in the employ of the firm of Crocker, Fisk and Company, occupying the position of shipper in the Minneapolis mill for ten years. Mr. Hedstrom was married in 1878, to Miss Ellen Nelson, who bore him two children: Emily and Charles.

Page 560

C. B. Heffelfinger

was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, January 13th, 1834. He came to Minneapolis, in 1857, where he engaged in various pursuits until 1861, when he responded to the first call for volunteers, by enlisting in the First Minnesota Infantry, Company D. He was promoted, for gallant conduct, to the office of second lieutenant, first lieutenant and captain successively. In 1864 he was mustered out, but in 1865 he was tendered the commission of major of the First Minnesota Artillery, by Governor Miller, which he accepted and served as such until mustered out in October, 1865; at Fort Snelling. Mr. Heffelfinger engaged in the boot and shoe business, in 1866, with Mr. Walker, under the name of Walker and Heffelfinger. Four years later he bought Mr. Walker's interest, and in 1873, in company with others, he organized the North Star Boot and Shoe Company, and has been its manager since its organization. Mr. Heffelfinger was married, in 1863, to Mary E. Totton. Their children are: Alfred, William, Frank, Mary, Fannie Charles and Annie.

Page 560

C. A. Heffelfinger

was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, March 8th, 1850. He first located permanently in Minneapolis in 1866, engaging with the firm of Walker and Heffelfinger, boot and shoe dealers, one of the firm, Major Heffelfinger, being his brother. He succeeded the firm, in 1874, as sole proprietor and has since continued in the same line of business. He is also a partner in the firm of Heffelfinger and Kingman, of Red Wing, Minnesota. He was married in August, 1879, to Carrie B. King, daughter of W. S. King, of this city.

Page 560

Frank Hefti

was born in Switzerland, June 16th, 1844. He was educated in his native country, in the universities of Zurich and Muenchen; he studied medicine five years at these universities, and graduated at "Kanton Glarus," Switzerland, with degree of "M.D.," in 1868. Doctor Hefti came to the United States in 1874, locating in Wisconsin,, where he remained two years. He then located in Minneapolis, where he has been in continuous practice. Doctor Hefti was married in 1871, to Anna Blumer, of Switzerland. Their children are Barbara and Katie.

Page 560

J. Hefty

a native of Switzerland, was born April 28th, 1833. He came to the United States in 1853 and located in Illinois. After a few years he removed to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1868; then removed to Minneapolis, and in 1869 opened a grocery store in which he has since continued. He was married in Switzerland, in 1860, to Barbara Colby. They have eight children: Emma, Ella, Andrew, Fred, Julia, Nick, Frank and George.

Page 561

W. H. Helfrich

was born in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, March 21st, 1848. He remained with his parents until 1864, when he removed to Logansport, Indiana, and engaged in milling, continuing there five years. He then came to Minneapolis and secured a situation with Tomlinson and Tiffany, at the Arctic mill as second miller. He was engaged in the mills of the city a number of years, when he took the position of head miller in the Empire mill, January 14th, 1877, which position he still holds. Mr. Helfrich was married, May 25th, 1877. to Miss Nellie Legg who bore him one child, Mabel.

Page 561

John Heinrich

of the firm of Mueller and Heinrich was born in 1829. He came to America in 1853, locating at Galena, Illinois, and engaged in the meat business one and one-half years. He removed to Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, remaining seven years in market business and boarding house. He removed to Minneapolis in 1865, and had control of a meat market eight years, going into partnership with Mr. Mueller in the brewery in 1874. He married Minnie Borchert in 1858. They are parents of five children.

Page 561

Frank E. Hesler

son of Alexander and Helen Hesler, was born at Galena, Illinois, April 3rd, 1851. In 1854, moved with his parents to Chicago, Illinois, where he resided until 1869, when he removed to Evanston, Illinois. He entered the Northwestern University, and in 1872 he accepted a position as division engineer on the Prophetstown extension of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railway. In the following year he began his journalistic career upon the reportorial staff of the Chicago Post. December let, 1873, Mr. Hesler removed to Minneapolis, as city editor of the Evening,@ Times. With the exception of about two yews spent in travel, Mr. Hesler has been engaged in journalism for the past seven years. When the Daily Evening Journal was re-organized, he was appointed city editor, and now occupies that position. He was married to Ada V. Reid, only daughter of Hon. A. M. Reid, December 15th, 1874. In June, 1851, Mr. Resler's parents with their babe, visited St. Anthony, and held Frank under the spray of the then primitive falls. A bystander at the time, remarked, "Who knows but that some day this may be the site of a great city, and that this babe may not come here to live." The prophecy has been verified.

Page 561

J. H. Henderson

was born in Livingston county, New York, February 4th, 1829. He came to St. Anthony in 1852 ; in a few weeks he removed to Anoka and assisted in building the first dam across Rum river. He remained at Anoka sixteen years. In 1861 he enlisted and served one year in the war. In 1869 he came to Minneapolis and engaged in the grocery business; also dealt in lime, feed and cement, in which business he continued four years, then opened a sale and livery stable at his present location. Mr. Henderson married Ann J. Kurn, of Livingston county, New York, in 1855. They have one child.

Page 561

J. W. Henion

was born at Plymouth, Wayne county, Michigan, April 8th, 1832. When yet a child he accompanied his parents to New York, where he remained until 1854, when he came to Minnesota and located at Anoka. When the St. Paul and Pacific railroad was built through Anoka, Mr. Henion accepted the position of station agent. In 1866 he was appointed agent at St. Anthony, here he served until a station was established on the west side when he took charge of it in 1867 and held the position of general station agent until January 1st, 1880. Mr. Henion is one of the oldest station agents west of Chicago, having held that office continually for seventeen years. In 1878 he was treasurer and one of the directors of the Street Railway company. Mr. Henion was married at Anoka, January 1st, 1857, to Miss Emily Robbins. They have one child, Grace.

Page 561

C. Henry

foreman of Hose Company No. 3, was born in Washington county, Wisconsin, in 1845. He attended the public schools until 1860 when he commenced his apprenticeship as shoemaker. In 1864 he enlisted in company I, Thirty-seventh Wisconsin volunteers, and served with the Army of the Potomac until he was mustered out in 1865. He soon settled in Wisconsin, where he followed his trade until 1868, when he came farther west, locating in Minneapolis. In 1871 he was appointed on the police force, serving until 1875. He was appointed as foreman of Hose Company No. 3, at the time of its organization in 1873. In 1866 he was married to Miss Kate Shuple. Their children are, John, Annie, Andrew and William.

Page 562

Kennedy Henry

a native of Scotland, was born at Ayr, February, 11th, 1844. He apprenticed as miller in his native town and served six years. He was married to Miss Annie Boyd, a native of Scotland, in 1866. and embarked for America on their wedding day. He located at Chicago, where he remained as a miller, three years, then removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, remaining eight years. In April, 1878, he came to Minneapolis and obtained a situation as second miller in the Excelsior mill and has since held the same position. He has had three children born to him, John, Kennedy and Annie.

Page 562

C. E. Henshaw M.D.

Was born at Kirtland, Ohio, March 20th, 1844. He received his education in Ohio and Kentucky. He studied medicine and graduated from the medical department of the University of New York. He practiced his profession in Cleveland, Ohio, eight years, when he removed to Minneapolis, in 1880, and located his office at 101 Washington Avenue south. Dr. Henshaw is the father of one child, Emily.

Page 562

J. W. Hernlund

of the firm of Malmsten, Nelson and Company, was born in May, 1855. and is a native of Sweden. He accompanied his parents to America in 1869, locating at Red Wing, Minnesota, where they remained until 1871, when they removed to Minneapolis. Mr. Hernlund learned the machinist's trade, after which he attended Macalester College, preparatory to a two years course at the University of Minnesota. The death of his father compelled him to return to the pursuit of his trade, and in 1879 he bought an interest in the firm of Malmsten and Nelson, and has since been a member of that firm. Mr. Hernlund was married in this city, to Miss Clara Berguest, November 12th, 1879.

Page 562

Henry G. Hicks

is a native of New York, was born at Varysburgh, Genesee, now Wyoming county, January 16th, 1838. At eleven years of age he commenced to learn the harness trade with his father. At the age of fifteen, he began teaching school, which occupation he was engaged in until 1861. At the ages of fourteen, fifteen and sixteen he worked on a farm. His education was secured in the common schools of his native state and at Girard, Pennsylvania; also attended three summers at Oberlin, Ohio, where he entered college in 1860. In 1855, he removed to Freeport, Illinois, and in July, 1861, he enlisted in the Second Illinois Cavalry, as a private, in Company D; was made corporal and sergeant of his company, sergeant major and adjutant of his regiment he afterwards served as adjutant of the Seventy-first and Ninety-third Illinois Infantry Regiments until February 1864. Was with a squadron of the Second Illinois Cavalry at the battle of Fort Donaldson, and in the Ninety-third Infantry at Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills, the siege of Vicksburg and Missionary Ridge, being severely wounded in the face at the latter place. In April, 1865, he removed to Minneapolis, and has since made this his home. He was married May 3d, 1864, to Mary Adelaide, daughter of I. G. Beede, of Freeport. Illinois, by whom he had four children, two of whom are living, a daughter of fifteen, Minnie Adelaide, and a son of twelve, Howard Henry. His first wife dying in July, 1870, he married again November, 1873, Susannah R. Fox, of Clarion county, Pennsylvania. Mr. Hicks was sheriff of Hennepin county from December 1867, to January 1871; was city justice of Minneapolis three years, 1871-1874. Has been from 1870, to the present time, a member of the board of trustees for soldier's orphans, and president of the board for the last seven years. Was a member of the house of representatives in 1878-1879 and 1881. At the close of his term as city justice, in 1874, he commenced the study and practice of law, and was admitted to the bar in February 1875. He is a member of the law firm of Cross and Hicks.

Page 562

Charles Hierholzer

was born in Germany, November 2d, 1828. He acquired a knowledge of shoemaking, in his native country, and continued in the pursuit of his trade until 1849, when he emigrated to the United States, locating first at St. Louis. The next year he removed to Mississippi, where he remained one year, thence to Louisiana. Here he made his home, until 1855, when he removed to St. Anthony and the next year opened a boot and shoe store, and is probably one of the oldest men in the business in the city. Mr. Hierholzer was married in 1854, to Marguerita Berger, of Germany. Their children are: Ellen, August, Mary, Charles, Frank and Adolph.

Page 563

O. A. Hilgermann

is the proprietor of the Boston furniture house. This house was established in September, 1880, as a branch of O. A. Hilgermann's establishment at Chicago. The walnut furniture is manufactured by this house and sold on Chicago price list. Mr. E. Bundschuh has the management of the Minneapolis house, which is located at 405 Washington Avenue south.

Page 563

F. C. Hill

was born in Vermont, 1850. In 1870 he came to Minneapolis and remained one year, when he returned to Vermont, and engaged in the hotel business a few years, then removed to Cambridgeport, Massachusetts. In 1876, he returned to this city and was employed by the Street Railway Company two years, when with his brother, F. K. Hill, he opened the Chicago House.

Page 563

F. K. Hill

in company with his brother, is proprietor of the Chicago House, of this city. He was born in Vermont, 1855. He went to Boston, 1873, where for several years he was in the restaurant business. In 1876, he came to this city and was in the employ of the Street Railway Company, and since, in the above named house, with his brother. Married Mary Cavanaugh in 1878; they have one child.

Page 563

Francis Hill

was born at Rochester, New York, September 11th, 1836. He learned milling with his brother, Ichabod, and has been with him, through the greater part of his experience. Mr. Hill has been in the employ of Mr. Brackett one year and Pillsbury five years. His marriage to Miss Julia Brackett was solemnized March 26th, 1859. Their children are: Julia, Cora, Mary, Clara and Lucy.

Page 563

Ichabod P. Hill

head miller of Palisade mill, was born at.Westonville New York, December 18th, 1831. He became a miller at Rochester, New York, and spent ten years in Rochester and Oswego. He came west in 1864, located in St. Anthony, and worked in the old Minnesota mill, being engaged in milling five years; he then conducted the Nicollet House one year, when he sold out and removed to Belle Plaine and purchased the Belle Plaine mills, which were burned four years later. In 1873 he returned to this city and was engaged as stone-dresser, and since 1875 has been head miller. He is probably the oldest miller in the city. Mr. Hill married Miss Agnes Bibbins, June 3d, 1858. Their children are: Lola, Ichabod, Dursean, Blanche and Harvey.

Page 563

James W. Hill

a native of New Hampshire, was born in 1848. He enlisted as drummer-boy in the war, and served three years. He attended the Newbury Seminary, Vermont, three years, then removed to Manchester, New Hampshire, for the purpose of preparing for an apothecary. After traveling about, several years, he came to this city, and engaged in the livery and sale stable business in 1874.. Mr. Hill married Elizabeth Richardson, who bore him two children, Elizabeth and Charles.

Page 563

L. D. Hill

was born in Cumberland county, Maine, May 19th, 1845. He resided on a farm until eighteen years of age, when he enlisted in the Third Maine Battery, under Captain E. R. Mayo. He was with the company until June, 1865. In August of the same year, he came to .Minneapolis which has principally been his home since. He is now engaged in dealing in second hand g oods, 27 Nicollet Avenue. He was married in 1878 to Julia E. Stouart. Their children are Charles and Willie.

Page 563

George Hineline

a native of Germany, was born April 3d, 1830. He came with his parents to America, locating in Ohio. He removed in 1859 to Minnesota, and was engaged in different parts of the state, as a miller. In 1866 he located in this city, and secured a position as head miller with Perkins and Crocker; he remained with them four years. In 1872, he bought one-third interest in the Holly mill, which he sold five years later, and purchased one-third interest in the Model mill, which interest he now controls. Mr. Hineline married Miss Rosetta Stewart of Ohio. Their children are Margaretta, Mary, Thomas, Emma and Agnes. Two children have died.

Page 563

Francis S. Hinkle

was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, August 22d, 1847. He came to Minneapolis January 1st, 1878. Mr. Hinkle with his brother bought the Holly mill May 31st, 1878.

Page 563

John Hinton

was born at Birmingham, England, February 29th, 1832. He removed to the United States with his parents in 1845, who located at West Cambridge, Massachusetts, He served apprenticeship in England as saw manufacturer. He removed to St. Louis in 1857, and was engaged in the manufacture of saws until 1867, when he removed to Minneapolis, and pursued the same business. He volunteered in the fire department in 1868, and was appointed foreman of the steamer and hose company No. 1, in 1877, which position he resigned. but remained a member until the organization of the paid department, in 1879, when he was appointed as first pipeman, and continued as such until 1880, when he was again appointed as foreman of the steamer and hose company No. 1. He was married to Miss Sarah E. Locke, of Massachusetts, February 28th, 1844. They have two children.

Page 564

J. H. Hiscock

was born in Franklin county, Maine, in 1851. He learned his trade of cabinet-maker in New York city, where he remained nearly five years. He removed to Waverly, Iowa, in May, 1876, but soon after came to Minneapolis and resumed his, trade, in the employ of others, until 1879. The firm of J. H. Hiscock and Company was then formed, which has been in the furniture manufacturing business since. Mr. Hiscock was married in 1876, to Miss Kate Dagget. Residence 422 University Avenue south-east.

Page 564

J. T. Hobbs

was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1842. At eleven years of age he went to Wisconsin, and lived with an uncle three years, when he went into the lead mines of La Fayette county, in that s tate, and was employed there twelve years. He then removed to Eau Claire, and passed eight years in lumbering. He came to Minneapolis in September, 1878, and since that time has been engaged in milling, and is now shipping clerk in the Trades mill. He was married in August, 1873, to Miss Sarah J. Hanes.

Page 564

Henry Hobine

was born April 12th, 1844, at St. Louis, Missouri. He has been engaged as a millwright for twelve years in Utah and Wyoming territories and states of Kansas and Missouri. In 1872, he located in Minneapolis, and has assisted in putting in machinery in nearly all the mills of this city, erected since then. He has been in the North-western mill since September, 1879. In 1861, he enlisted in the Seventeenth Missouri Riflemen, known as the St. Louis Turners, served three and one-half years and participated in a number of the principal conflicts; he was discharged in December, 1865. He married Miss Luretta Saffell in 1875. They have one child, John H.

Page 564

E. J. Hodges

was born in Ohio, in 1848. He enlisted in the Thirty-second Wisconsin Volunteers in 1862, and was discharged in June, 1865. He went to Fond du Lac and worked in the lumber mills until he came to Minneapolis in 1875, since which time he has been employed in the planing mills of this city. He has been with the Union mills as superintendent since January, 1880. He married Miss Emma Martin in 1869. They have one child, Hattie A.

Page 564

George Holehouse

is a native of Lower Canada. At ten years of age he accompanied his parents to the United States, locating at Buffalo, New York. Upon reaching manhood, he served an apprenticeship as machinist and millwright. He came to Minneapolis in 1862, engaged in the pursuit of his trade several months, and enlisted in August of the same year, and served until the close of the war, in the Seventh Minnesota Regiment. After his discharge, he removed to Red Wing and remained six years, when he went to Iowa. In 1878, he located in this city, and has been employed in the platform mills much of the time since. He married Miss Louisa Blakie, of Red Wing, in 1867.

Page 564

Charles Holmberg

a native of Sweden, was born in 1849. He came to America in 1871, locating at Fort Wayne, Indiana, where he was employed in a flouring mill. He removed to this city in 1873, and secured a situation in the Minneapolis mill of Crocker, Fisk and Company, since which time he has remained with the same firm and now occupies the position of stone dresser and miller.

Page 564

H. W. Holmes

was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, January 4th, 1845. He came to Minneapolis in 1858. He engaged in steam-boating on the Minnesota, Mississippi and Red Rivers until 1877, with the exception of five years, during which he was engaged with the North-western Union Packet Company on the Chippewa river one year, and in the milling business at Wabasha, three years. In 1877, he engaged in milling in this city, in which he has since continued. He married Miss Frances E. Rollins, February 8th, 1869; Two children have been born to them, Payton R. and Agnes.

Page 564

Charles Evans Holt

was born at Clinton, Massachusetts. When eight years of age he moved with his parents to Cleveland, where his father still resides. Here he received his education, and at sixteen years of age, he enlisted in the Sixth Ohio Cavalry, in which he served three years, engaging in the battles of Cross Keys, Culpepper Court House, and numerous others. He was honorably discharged, at the hospital, at City Point, Virginia, at that time and for many months after, being under the physician's care. He returned home in 1865, then removed to Boston, where he was assistant superintendent and foreman of the iron works of George T. McLauthlin and Company. In 1875 he came to this city and was employed as head book-keeper for O. A Pray, and in 1878 became one of the present firm of O. A. Pray and Company. While in Cleveland he was in the firm of Holt, Ruple and Company, machinists, also firm of D. Holt and Son. He was active in organizing the Young People's Christian Association, of Cleveland, and was first secretary, then president of the same. He is a director of the Widows and Orphans' Protective (Life) Association of Minnesota, and honorary vice-president, for Minnesota, of the United States Mutual Accident Association of New York and Chicago. His union with Miss Rebecca E. Sherman, occurred at Lowell, Massachusetts, May 6th, 1867, They have four daughters: Alice, Agnes, Sophie, and Lucy. Their two sons are deceased.

Page 565

E. E. Holt

was born at Lebanon, Connecticut, November, 1823. He went to New York city in 1837, and for twelve years occupied the position of book-keeper for J. W. and J. Morgan, coal dealers; he was also engaged by J. Odell, serving in the same capacity two years. He removed to Oswego county, New York, where he opened a general produce store; thence to Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in the drug business twelve years. In 1867 he removed to this city and under the firm name of Treat, Holt and Company, began dealing in furniture, and at the end of one year closed out, and was employed by the Elevator Company, where he has since remained. He was married to Miss Anna Tilley of z New, Jersey, in 1843. Children. Carrie W., now wife of George H. Eastman, Minnie V., wife of F. B. Felt; and Hudson K. who died at the age of eight years.

Page 565

Henry Honkomp

proprietor of the Minneapolis Cotton Mill, came to this city in January, 1877, from Chicago, and has been engaged in the manufacture of seamless bags, carpet warp, etc. since his locating at the foot of Sixth Avenue South.

Page 565

Frank Hopper

was born at Oswego, New York, May 29th, 1853. He came to McLeod county, Minnesota, in 1857, where he remained two years, removing thence to Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. Two years later he went to Waverly and rented a mill which he had in control eight months, when he again changed his location to Le Sueur and worked in different mills until 1876. He located in Minneapolis in the spring of 1878, and has since been employed at the Anchor mill. He was married June 3d, 1878, to Miss Estella Chance, who bore him one child, Albert.

Page 565

Frank J. Horan

a native of Ireland, was born in Galway, March, 1847. He came to this country in 1866, and remained in New York city three years, then came to Minneapolis, and has since been engaged in business as merchant tailor. He began business with very small capital, but by perseverance and hard work he has risen and now has an extensive business, employing thirty persons. Mr. Horan was married in 1878, to Maggie Mahoney.

Page 565

Mrs. J. W. Horan

is proprietress of the Milwaukee House, situated at 112 Second street South. This house was built by Mr. J. W. Horan, in 1867, who was its proprietor until November 6th, 1874, when he died. His widow has since taken charge of the house, which has seventeen. rooms, with office, parlor, dining-room and kitchen on first floor.

Page 565

W. H. Horner

was born in Washington county, Indiana, February 28th, 1848. He accompanied his parents to Scott county, Minnesota, in 1854, and remained with them on the farm, until he reached manhood. In 1868 he removed to North-field and learned milling, remaining one and one-half years, when he went to Marshall, Lyon county, and took a claim, on which he lived two years. He then came to Minneapolis in September, 1873, and engaged with C. A. Pillsbury, where he remained three years, then went to Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, returning the next year and again was employed by Pillsbury as packer. He was married to Miss Dora La Roy in August, 1876. Their children are William B. and Bessie.

Page 566

J. W. Horton

a native of England, was born March 23d, 1842. He came to the United States in 1850, locating at Minnetonka, Minnesota. He farmed until 1861, when he enlisted in the United States Sharp Shooters, serving two and one-half years. After his discharge he located at Columbus, Ohio, remaining three years. In 1867, he came to this city, and practiced as a veterinary surgeon. From July, 1875, until August, 1880, he was driver of hose carriage No. 2. He was married April 17th, 1871, to Miss Julia A. Hoy. Their only child living is Frankie.

Page 566

O. Hovelson

was born February 23d, 1837, and is a native of Norway. He there passed his youth and learned his trade, that of shoe-maker. He came to the United States in 1868, working at his trade in Menomonee, Wisconsin, and other places until 1873, when he came to Minneapolis and after being employed by boot and shoe firms five years, he opened a store of his own and has continued in the same place since. He was married in 1868, to Carrie Hanson of Norway. They have four children, Oluf, Hannah, Hilda, and Bernhard.

Page 566

E. P. Howell

was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 8th, 1839, where he resided until 1867. He then removed to Minneapolis and first engaged with Walker and Heffelfinger, boot and shoe dealers, in whose employ he remained until 1873, when he became one of the firm of Heffelfinger, Howell and Company, at Red Wing, and resided there five years, when he sold his interest to Mr. Kingman and opened an establishment at his present location, 119 Nicollet Avenue. He is doing a fine business, employing six men in the custom department.

Page 566

Michael Hoy

special city detective, was born near Phillipstown, Ireland. He came with his parents to America, in March, 1853. He was first employed as a stone cutter in New York, then came west, locating at St. Anthony in 1857, and labored on the stone work of the State University. He continued at his trade until the fall of 1859, when he went to Louisiana as foreman on the levees of the Mississippi river. The next year he returned to St. Anthony and took the contract for building the East Side Irish Catholic Church. He enlisted in the Tenth Minnesota Volunteers and was commissioned second lieutenant by Governor Ramsey. He went with Sibley's expedition across the plains in 1863, and during the trip encountered the Sioux Indians at different places. At the battle of Nashville, December 15th and 16th, 1864, where he was in command of company "K," he was wounded and was honorably discharged April, 1865, on account of his wounds. He returned to his home and in 1867 was elected city marshal of St. Anthony, serving seven years, until the consolidation of the two cities, since which he has been a member of the police force, serving as captain and chief. At present he is the city detective, which office was created for him by the council. He was married in October, 1860, to Miss Catherine Qualy, at St. Anthony. They have had twelve children, seven of whom are living.

Page 566

William Hoy

a native of Ireland, was born June 26th, 1835. He lived in his native place until fifteen years of age. In 1850 he came to America, locating at Brooklyn, where he resided two years, engaged in marble-cutting. He then removed to Otsego, Now York, where he remained three years. In 1855 he came to Minnesota, locating at St. Anthony, and teamed from that city to Little Falls with supplies. Three years later he was employed as assistant wagon-master by the government, on the Spirit Lake expedition against the Indians. In 1862 he joined the Tenth Minnesota, serving under General Sibley against the Indians, at Mankato. Two years after, he began the house-moving business, in which he has continued. He was married August 26th, 1859, to Mrs. Mary Kelly, a native of Ireland, by whom he has nine children: John, Rosanna, Willie, Agnes, Joseph, Thomas, Edward, George, and Christopher.

Page 566

H. J. Hughes

is a native of Wales, and was born in 1846. He came to America, locating in Columbia county, Wisconsin, where he remained seven years, then removed to Blue Earth county, Minnesota. He came to this city in the fall of 1873, and worked in Symes' barrel factory for two years and has since then been in the coopering business. Since June, 1878, he has been with the Co-operative Barrel Company. He was married in 1878, to Miss Anna McCormick. They reside at 1225 Ninth street south.

Page 566

Thomas S. Hughes

was born in Tipperary, Ireland, in 1829. His father died when he was eight years of age, when he, with his mother and three sisters, went to Liverpool, England, there serving an apprenticeship of five years as stone-mason and brick-layer. In 1852 he was married, and with wife and mother came to America, locating at Cincinnati, Ohio. He worked at his trade five years, four of which were in the employ of the Little Miami Railroad Company. In 1857, he removed to Faribault, Minnesota, thence to Hastings, and after making the latter place his home seven years, removed to LeSueur county, on a farm. He came to Minneapolis in 1866, and has since resided here, engaging in the pursuit of his trade, under the direction of George McMullin. Mr. Hughes was married in 1852 to Miss Sarah Jones, who has born him five children: Susan S., Edmond S., Katie E. S., Elizabeth S., and Thomas S., Jr.

Page 567

James Hull

was born December 15th, 1836, and is a native of Nova Scotia. He came to the United States in April, 1854. He worked at ship-building for thirteen years at Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Wilmington, Delaware. He next was employed in building sleeping coaches for the Jackson and Sharp Car Company, remaining with them three years, when he went to Duluth, and was in the employ of the railroad company, building a depot and elevator. He remained one year, then came to Minneapolis, engaged as a millwright, in the different mills of the city. After the explosion, Messrs. Hull and Parker rebuilt the Pillsbury, Anchor and Empire mills, also the new elevator, in 1879, in company with L. C. Bisbee. He married Miss Jennie M. Brown, in 1868. They have two children living: Harry A. and Meta.

Page 567

H. H. Humphrey

was born in Lorain county, Ohio, September 16th, 1844. He came to Minnesota in 1854, and engaged in farming in Rice county, thence to this city in 1870, and has since made this his home. He was in the employ of Mr. Bidwell until he entered into partnership with Daggett and Bidwell. He was married in August, 1864, to Miss Rosie Bidwell.

Page 567

B. Hunt

was born at Baden, Germany, June 7th, 1834. He came to the United States, in 1854, locating at Lansing, Iowa, and. engaged in milling until 1866, when he came to this city. Here he engaged in milling one year, when he was appointed on the police force, where he served until 1878, except two years on account of sickness. On retiring from the force, he removed to Oregon, and once more engaged as a miller, and as such, remained until August, 1880, when he returned to this city and became the proprietor of the Hennepin House, 214 First street north. He was married to Margaret Hirt in 1860. They have three children living, Peter B., Kate, and Bernard X. Mr. Hunt also owns the building on Plymouth Avenue, occupied as the Bethany Home, which he erected in 1868.

Page 567

Samuel Hunter

was born in Glasgow, Scotland. He came to the United States in 1852, located at Providence, Rhode Island, where he learned the trade of plumber and gasfitter. Five years later he removed to Chicago, thence to St. Louis, in 1859, where he resided until the first call for volunteers, when he enlisted in the Third Missouri Infantry. At the expiration of five months he entered the United States Navy, and was attached to the navy yards at Cairo and Mound City, Illinois, until the close of hostilities. He came from St. Louis to this city in 1867; he returned three years later to St. Louis, where he remained three years, then came to this city and located. He was the first plumber here, and at that time were neither gas nor water-works. He was married in 1861, to Miss Rose Burns, of St. Louis. They are parents of four children living, Andrew W., Jessie, John B., and Samuel.

Page 567

George H. Huntington

was born in Green Lake county, Wisconsin, in 1848. He attended the district schools until 1864, when he came west with his parents, locating in Dodge county, Minnesota. For five years he attended the North-western College, and taught school, when he came to Minneapolis, engaged in the ice business with Roberts and Lum. In the fall of the same year, he was employed on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad as brakeman he served in different positions in railroading, and was also in the coopering business until 1878, when he opened and conducted the Bushnell House on Fourth street, Minneapolis. In May, 1880, he was appointed on the police force and is yet serving. He was married in 1878, to Miss Sarah Erickson, of North Branch, Minnesota.

Page 567

James Huntington

was born in Canada East, May 29th, 1818. He came to Dodge county, Minnesota, in 1864. While there built a flouring mill, of which he was proprietor three years. In 1869 he bought the Bushnell House in this city, of which he was proprietor until 1876; he then removed to Hinckley, Minnesota, but returned to this city two years later. He then rented the Sixth Avenue House, where he has since been. He was married in 1846, at Lowell, Massachusetts, to Miss Rachel C. Burbank, a native of Vermont. Their children are: George H., James H., Abbie H., and Alice H. C.

Page 568

James F. Huston

a native of New Brunswick, was born May 11th, 1830. He came to Minneapolis in 1865 and for four years had charge of the Monitor Plow Works. In 1870 he formed partnership with Mr. McCrimmon, with the firm name of Huston and McCrimmon, which was dissolved in one year. He pursued his calling until 1874 in this city, when he removed to Eagle Harbor, Michigan, where for three years he was in the employ of the government making improvements in the harbor. In June, 1879, he returned to this city and has since been in the pursuit of his trade. He married Miss Anna Hannes, in 1869. They have five children living: Nicholas, Mary J., Anna, Sarah and James.

Page 568

E. A. Hutchins, M. D.

was born in Vermont, November 14th, 1838. His education was secured at different schools and Fort Edward Institute, New York; he studied at Plattsburg, Burlington, Vermont, and at Berkshire Medical College, at Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He practiced in St. Lawrence county, New York, until the spring of 1878, when he came to this city and is now permanently located here. He was a member of the St. Lawrence County Medical Association and is now a member of the State Medical Society. He was married in 1863; his wife died leaving one daughter, Jennie C. In 1867 he remarried and has one daughter by his second wife, Gabrielle E.

Page 568

George E. Huy

was born in Steuben county, New York, in 1819. He remained at the old homestead until 1851, when he came west, locating at Long Prairie, Minnesota, in 1852, and the next year removed to Minneapolis and engaged in lumbering; it was he who sawed the first lumber on the west side. In 1854 he was elected register of deeds and also served as superintendent of the Minneapolis Mill Company until 1857. He was elected justice of the peace in 1858, and about that time built and had charge of a planing mill in company with R. P. Russell, on the site of the present Model mill. In 1861 he built the Dakota flouring mill and took as partner O. B. King; in 1866 Mr. Huy became sole owner and eight years after, sold to S. S. Brown and, company. On account of failing health he went to the Black Hills, where he engaged in mining. He married Miss Mary Ticknor, who died a few years after, leaving one daughter, Mary E. He was again married, to Miss Caroline Taylor, who bore him five sons, all residents of this city: George L., Frank, Albert, Arthur and Douglass.

Page 568

L. Mell Hyde

was born at Almond, New York, in 1824. He came to Minneapolis in 1857, and published the Minnesota Beacon, a temperance paper, and afterwards the Rural Minnesotian, which was devoted to agriculture, also to the temperance work. In the years of 1858, 1859, and 1860, he held the position of Grand Secretary of the Good Templars, and was again elected as such in 1880. His profession was that of house painting and wood engraving in which he continued eight years, then engaged in wood engraving only, at 222, Hennepin Avenue. He married Miss Annie H. Goodrich in 1860. They are parents of two children: William L. and Grace F.

Page 568

Valentine G. Hush

was born in Licking county, Ohio, in 1842. In 1867, he took the advice offered to young men by Horace Greely, and came west, locating in Minneapolis. For two years he was engaged as clerk, and during that time was married to Florence M., daughter of Judge W. W. Woods, of Marysville, Ohio. In 1869, he, in company with three other gentlemen, started the City Bank, and three years later, he established V. G. Hush's Bank, in which he has since continued. Mr. Hush has been connected with banking since boyhood, having never been engaged in any other business. The names of his children are: Estelle Woods, Harriet Louise, Jane Mary, Florence Belle, and William Woods.

Page 568

John Corrin Hutchinson

was born on the Isle of Man, England, May 11th, 1849. He emigrated to America with his mother in 1867. He first worked on a farm near Red Wing for two years, then taught in a district school for one year. Mr. Hutchinson then entered the University in 1870, and by his energy and perseverance, working at whatever he could get to do, pushed his way through the institution, taking a complete classical course, and graduating in 1876. During the junior year he taught in the St. Paul high school. After graduating he was employed as instructor of Greek and Latin in the University. In 1880 Mr. Hutchinson was appointed assistant professor of Greek, which position he now occupies. He was married in 1876, to Miss L. D. Hinckley, daughter of J. B. Hinckley, one of the earliest settlers in Minneapolis. They. have three children, Effie H., Drusilla and Ruth.

Page 569

Henry Iliowizi

was born in Russia, January, 1851, where he attended school until sixteen years of age, pursuing rabbinical studies. He then left for Germany, spending two years under the auspices of Dr. Baerwald; thence to the Jewish seminary in Berlin, under the care of the celebrated Honviz, remaining with him for three years; from there to the theological seminary at Breslau, for over one year. Was then called to London by the Anglo-Jewish Association, to acquire a knowledge of the English language and popular science, for the purpose of visiting the East as a teacher and director of a school. From London he was sent to Paris, for the purpose of learning the French language, at the same time studying Spanish. After remaining in Paris fifteen months, he proceeded to Africa, for the purpose of managing a school for children at Tetuan, remaining there for seventeen months, battling. with the cholera, famine, and the barbarisms of the uncivilized natives, whose great or chief mark of honor, was to kill an infidel, for such they called all who came to civilize them. From that point he crossed to Gibralter, remaining there for one year, instructing the youth, preaching in the synagogue, and giving lectures. From there he proceeded to America, landing in New York, July, 20th, 1880, remaining in the city for a few days, then going to Harrissonburgh, Virginia, to officiate during the holidays. So satisfactory were his labors that they invited him to become their resident pastor; but a difference arising upon the day of worship, which was not in keeping with the Jewish Sabbath, he, in a scholarly letter, clothed in kind and courteous language, declined the offer, and left for Chicago, Illinois, where he preached one sermon, to the entire satisfaction of the congregation; but the Portuguese pronunciation which he gave them did not agree with their German pronunciation. Bidding them good-bye, he left for Cincinnati, spending two or three weeks with Rev. Dr. J. M. Wise, who advised him of the necessity of the Hebrew Reformed congregation of Minneapolis, to which place he immediately came, and received a unanimous call, which he accepted, and is now in full charge, very much to the satisfaction of all.

Page 569

B. F. Inks

a native of Brandonville, Preston county, West Virginia, was born July 7th, 1855, and in November, 1857, accompanied his father to Minneapolis. With the exception of two years in the grocery store of Bradley and Branch, Mr. Inks has always worked at carpentering, being employed by other parties until November, 1880, when the firm of Stranahan and Inks, contractors and builders, was formed.

Page 569

C. H. Ireland

was born June 19th, 1836, at Dexter, Maine, and came to this city in 1876. Mr. Ireland is an old hotel man, having had several years experience in the business while in Maine. In 1880 he rented the Fewer House at 215 Second street south; it is of brick, and three stories high. Mr. Ireland keeps a strictly temperance house. His marriage with Sarah Langdon, of Hyde Park, Massachusetts, took place June 1st, 1870. In June, 1874, she died, leaving one child, Clarence G.

Page 569

C. Jacobson

a native of Norway, was born August 9th, 1835. He emigrated to the United States in November, 1868, and first settled at Red Wing, Minnesota. In 1869 he removed to this city, and worked at various lines of business until July, 1878, when he embarked in the grocery trade; he owns the property where he is now located, at 1314 Fourth street south, and is doing a prosperous business. In January, 1862, he married Sigrid Engebretsen. They have five living children: John, Laura, Wolborg, Charlotte and Jacob.

Page 569

George G. Jacoby

was born in 1838, in Germany. He moved to New York in 1859, remained two years, and in 1861 enlisted in the Fourteenth New York volunteer militia, the first regiment that enlisted to serve through the war served one year, and was discharged for disability. He located in West Virginia, and transacted a general merchandise business until 1865, when he returned to New York; after a three years residence there, he went to Philadelphia, where for nine years he was in the wholesale liquor trade. In 1877 he came to Minneapolis, and after about two years experience in the clothing and merchant tailoring business, returned to the wholesale liquor trade. He was married April 18th, 1868, to Fannie Mikols.

Page 570

W. H. Jacoby

photograph artist, was born at Massillon, Ohio, May 24th, 1841. Since the early age of fourteen he has studied the art, and now stands in the front rank of photographers. In 1861 he opened a gallery at Dayton, Ohio, from there he went to Springfield, thence to Xenia and in 1866 removed to this city. He commenced, business here at the corner of Bridge square and Second street, and about five years after, built his present studio at 252 Nicollet Avenue. In September, 1860, he married Louisa Stafford. They have one child, Charles L.

Page 570

Matthew Jarvie

a native of Scotland, was born December 18th, 1827. He came to the United States in 1855, and settled in Berkshire county, Massachusetts, where he worked at the woolen manufacturing business; he moved from that county in 1857, and continued the same pursuit at various places. In 1871 he came here and was at once engaged as superintendent of the weaving department of the North Star Woolen Mills. This position he resigned in 1873, and entered the grocery trade in which he is meeting with success; he owns the property where he is now located, No. 1329, Fourth street south. His wife was Miss M. Jarvie, whom he married in 1855.

Page 570

Thomas Jeffery

a native England, was born September 16th, 1845, in Derbyshire. In October, 1865, he came to the United States and lived in New York city until 1875, when he removed to Minneapolis and started in the carpet business; first alone, then as Kenyon and Jeffery, and now the firm name is T. Jeffery and Company. Their place of business is No. 225 Nicollet Avenue. He was married in 1869, to Miss M. B. Hague of England; the fruits of this union were four children, only one of whom survives: John Arthur, aged seven years.

Page 570

G. A. Jenks

born at Watertown, Jefferson county, New York, in 1826. He removed to Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1846, and was employed in the manufacture of machinery, with L. and A. G. Coes; after about two years he was given the general management of the financial department; he was with this firm ten years. In 1856 he went to St. Louis, Missouri, and accepted a similar position in the wholesale dry goods establishment of Pittman Brothers. In 1860 he came to Minnesota, and in 1862 was appointed republican commissioner to go into the army and take the vote of soldiers; and in 1865 was at Prairie du Chien, in the quartermasters department. He engaged in the manufacture of barrels, for A time, at Excelsior, and in 1872, came to Minneapolis; he worked for different firms until September 1st, 1878, since which time he has been employed by Fraser and Shepherd as general book-keeper. In 1846 he married Pamelia Lockwood. They have one child: Arthur, who is now assistant train dispatcher for the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway.

Page 570

A. W. Jewett

a native of Maine was born in June, 1840, at Aurora. His father was a black-smith and so he commenced learning that trade as soon as he was large enough to hold a hammer, and has continued in the business since. In April, 1869, he came to this city and is now a member of the firm of Myers and Jewett. December 11th, 1872, Mr. Jewett married Anna McCausland. They have two sons: Ira and Leon.

Page 570

A. M. Johnson

a native of Ohio, was born May 29th, 1849, in Logan county. He accompanied his parents to Minneapolis in 1866, and attended school here three years. Until 1872 he worked with his father at building, and then started in the milling business at the ''Old City Mill," where he remained three years; he then went to the Pettit mill where he is still employed. Mr. Johnson's marriage with Miss Clarinda Scott occurred October 11th, 1874. Two children have been born to them Nellie and Gertrude.

Page 570

Asa E. Johnson, M. D.

was born at Bridgewater, Oneida county, New York, March 16th, 1825. He first studied medicine in 1849 with Dr. Kellog, a homeopathic physician; then studied three years, in Otsego county, with Dr. Erastus King, afterward, he became dissatisfied with his homeopathic experience and, attended two courses of lectures at the State University of New York, where he graduated March 16th, 1851. The following May he went to Beloit, Wisconsin, and practiced there until May 1853, then removed to St. Anthony. Dr. Johnson is the oldest practitioner in the city. He was married March 16th, 1853 to Hannah Russel, of Wisconsin. They are the parents of one child, Roesina.

The Dr. was county physician for one year, and on the board of health two years. It was he who suggested the organization of the Minnesota Academy of natural sciences, now located in this city; he was the first president of that institution and held the office four years. He has served on committees of various natural sciences, entomology, comparative anatomy, geology and cryptogamic botany; he classified and identified eight hundred species in mycological botany. Among the classifications, the Dr. is the discoverer of seventeen new species peculiar to this state; some of them have been confirmed by such high authority as Professor Peck, state botanist of New York; he also discovered at Palmer Lake mound, Brooklyn, Minnesota, the skeleton of a mound builder; this curiosity is now in the Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences.

Page 571

Charles W. Johnson

was born in Belleville, St. Clair county, Illinois, March 17th, 1843. He received an high school education at his native place, and learned the printer's trade at intervals between the terms of school. He came to Minnesota in 1860 and worked on a farm and taught school two years; enlisted in the Sixth Minnesota and served over three years. At the close of the war he returned to Minneapolis, taught school and finally resumed his business of setting type, drifting naturally into newspaper work in the capacity of correspondent, reporter and editor on various city papers. He was elected and served one year as city clerk. In 1873 he was elected assistant secretary of the state senate and the following year was elected secretary of that body and for six years afterwards performed the duties of that office. In 1880 he was appointed supervisor of the census in the second census district of Minnesota. During the winter of 1881 he was engaged as the Washington correspondent of the Pioneer Press, and received the republican nomination for chief clerk of the United States senate. He has been engaged actively in politics of Minnesota as a republican for many years, and has been secretary of the state central committee and of the republican central committee for the Third congressional district. His family consists of his wife, the daughter of J. D. Rich, Esq., and two promising children.

Page 571

David B. Johnson

a native of Winchester, Gurnsey county, Ohio, was born August 7th, 1852. When seventeen years of age, he went to Muskingum College in New Concord, Ohio, and remained there about two years; he then attended the Geneva institute for the same length of time. At the age of twenty-one, he began the study of law with Milton Barnes at Cambridge, Ohio, and later with Amos Coggswell, of Owatonna, Minnesota. He was admitted to the bar in February, 1876, and practiced law at Owatonna three years, then came to this city and has since resided here. He married Miss Carrie M. Johnson at Owatonna, June 27th, 1877. They have one child, Antoinette.

Page 571

C. Johnson

was born in Sweden, September 12th, 1847. He emigrated to America in 1868, and after a short stay in Kansas, he removed to Goodhue county, Minnesota, where he remained until 1872. He then came to Minneapolis and engaged in the grocery business in which he continued until becoming a member of the firm of Ryberg and Company in the Stockholm meat market. He was married in 1880 to Anna Peterson, of Sweden.

Page 571

F. A. Johnson

was born in Sweden in 1849. He emigrated to the United States in 1871, and located in Minneapolis. For five years he was with the American Express Company, and since that time has been in the hotel business. He has been proprietor of the Swea House since September 1879. It is located at 723 Washington Avenue south. His marriage with Lena Cornell occurred in June, 1880.

Page 571

George H. Johnson

was born in Norway. He came with his parents to America in 1850, and settled in Cook county, Illinois. In 1862 he enlisted in the First Illinois Artillery. He served most of the time with the army of the Cumberland, and was in the battles of Chickamauga, Stone River, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, and others. He also accompanied Sherman as far as Atlanta on his march to the sea. . He was mustered out in July, 1865, and came to this city in the autumn following. He worked in the lumber mills for a time, and then went on the police force. Mr. Johnson was elected sheriff in 1870-1872-1874, and went to the legislature in 1876. In May, 1877, he was appointed deputy sheriff, and has since continued to fill that office. His wife was Annie Sheridan, of Anoka. She has borne him five children. Those living are: George and Nellie.

Page 572

J. W. Johnson

was born May 2d, 1825, in Franklin county, New York. He learned the contracting and building business, and worked in that line until 1857, when he engaged in mercantile business. In August, 1864, he moved to Red Wing, Minnesota, and in 1868 came to Minneapolis. He was in the dry goods trade here until September, 1869, when he took charge of the North Star Iron Works, then located in St. Anthony, but removed to the west side, and greatly enlarged in 1870. In 1872 he bought one-fourth interest in the works, and in 1874 bought the other three-fourths, and conducted the business until 1880, when he retired from active business. January, 1881, he was elected president of the City Bank. Mr. Johnson has been married twice; his first wife was Martha Walker. The second wife, Mrs. Malinda Roman, has borne him three children, Annie, Frederick, and Walter.

Page 572

K. Johnson

a native of Norway, was born in 1844. He emigrated to the United States in 1868, and ten years later came to Minneapolis. He is engaged as millwright at the lumber mill of P. G. Lamoreaux, and resides at 203 Third street north.

Page 572

Peter Johnson

a native of Sweden, was born July 12th, 1845. He attended school until 1861, then followed farming until 1866, when he came to America; he first located in Wright county, Minnesota, and in May, 1867, came to this city; he worked as an apprentice at the mason's trade until 1870, then worked five years as journey-man, and since 1875 has been contracting. Mr. Johnson still retains his old homestead in Wright county. He was married August 3d. 1873, to Miss Christina Swedeburg; they reside at 507 Fourth street north. Two children have been born to them: Carrolton and John Edward.

Page 572

W. H. Johnson

was born October 5th, 1825, at Ogdensburg, Now York. At the age of nineteen years commenced lumbering; in 1849 he went to Wisconsin, bought 160 acres of land, and after the heavy work of clearing was done, he run, in connection with his farm, a sawmill and lumbering business. Mr. Johnson hauled a portion of the rolling stock for the Chicago and North-western railway from Sheboygan to Fond du Lac, a distance of forty-one miles, on a plank-road, using eight teams; he drew an engine entire. In June, 1864, he came to Minneapolis, and had charge of Morrison's saw-mill until 1879, when he was elected superintendent of the water-works. He was councilman four consecutive years, and went to the legislature in 1877-1878. He married Miss Sarah Lyman, of Jefferron county, New York, March 11th, 1847. Their children are Jasper and Sumner. Mr. Johnson and family resident 1229 Eighth street south.

Page 572

Joseph Jonas

a native of Prussia, was born June 16th, 1848. He came to the United States in 1872, and lived in St. Louis, Missouri, until the following year, when he came to Minneapolis, and has since been engaged in the sale stable business. In 1880 he started a grocery and general merchandise store at his present location, No. 420 Plymouth Avenue. Mr. Jonas married, in 1879, Caroline Sternberg, of Prussia.

Page 572

J. G. Jones

was born in Washington county, Maine. He came to Minneapolis in 1857, and went into the clothing business in company with his father. In 1861 he enlisted in the Third Minnesota Volunteers, and served four years. He participated in the battle of Murfreesboro, the seige of Vicksburg and the capture of Little Rock; he then came to Minnesota and took part in the war against the Sioux Indians; he was at the battle of Wood Lake where three hundred Indians were captured, thirty-eight of whom met the death penalty on the scaffold at Mankato in 1862. On being mustered out of service he returned to Minneapolis, and was elected county treasurer while absent on his wedding tour. This office he held four years. Since 1870 he has been engaged in the logging business. He now has lumber yards at the corner of Washington Avenue and Tenth street north. In 1866 he married Anna Harrison. They have two children, Carrie and Harrison.

Page 572

Edwin Smith Jones

president of the Hennepin County Savings Bank, was, born June 3d, 1828, at Chaplin, Windham county, Connecticut. He received such education as the schools of his native town afforded, and attended two terms at the Monson Academy, Massachusetts. After completing his academical studies he began the study of law in the office of Hon. J. H. Carpenter, at Willimantic, Connecticut. Having finished his professional course he wished to explore the rich and fertile lands of the west, which were only waiting to reward the toil of those industrious ones who were willing to work. He accordingly carried out his plans in 1854, coming to seek a home and fortune in Minnesota. Finding Minneapolis a desirable place in which to locate, he entered the law office of Hon. Isaac Atwater to complete his reading. He was admitted to the bar in l855 and continued with Mr. Atwater until 1857, and afterwards alone. The next year, 1858, he was elected to the office of probate judge, in which he continued until 1861. In 1863 he entered the Union army and was commissioned captain and commissary of subsistence in the department of the gulf, an office which he retained to 1866, when he returned to Minneapolis and resumed the practice of his profession. During the years of 1866-1867 he was chairman of the county board of supervisors. Continuing to practice until 1870. Judge Jones accepted the position he now occupies, president of the bank. In 1873-1874 he was a member of the city council. Since 1860 he has been connected with the Masonic fraternity. He and his wife are members of Plymouth Church in this city. He was married in September, 1853, to Miss Harriet M., daughter of Whitman and Harriet James of his native town., and lost his wife twelve years later. He was married again in September, 1866, at Minneapolis, to Miss Abigal J. James, sister of his first wife. She died in April, 1872. In May, 1877, at Goffetown, New Hampshire, Mr. Jones was wedded, to Miss Susan C., daughter of Charles and Susan C. Stinson. His children living are: Edwin S., Jr., Ellen, David P. and William O.

Page 573

R. F. Jones

born in St. Lawrence county, New York, September 25th, 1852. He came to Minneapolis in 1875, and since then has been a wholesale and retail dealer in oysters, fish, game, etc., at his place of business, No. 806' Hennepin Avenue. The wholesale trade is very extensive; shipments being made throughout Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and the northwestern territories. He is the originator of the brand of oysters known as the Gold Seal; they are packed and shipped to him by his branch house in Baltimore, Maryland. Mr. Jones family consists of a wife and one child.

Page 573

W. H. Jones, born in Wales, May 1st, 1845. In the spring of 1857, he accompanied his parents to America, and lived with then on a farm in Columbia county, Wisconsin, until 1866, when he went to Green Lake county, and for two seasons was in the agricultural implement business; then he was employed one year as general agent for a Milwaukee firm, and afterward with E. H. Gammon. In January, 1878, he established himself in the agricultural implement business in this city. He is now president of the Plano Manufacturing Company of Plano, Illinois. He married Elizabeth Owens, September 18th, 1876. They have three children, Hugh, William and Arthur.

Page 573

Amos C. Jordan

managing editor of the Tribune, was born in Eaton, Canada East, April 22d, 1842. He removed to Minnesota with his parents in May, 1854, locating at Purgatory, four miles from Excelsior in Hennepin county. In 1867, he entered as an apprentice in the office of the St. Anthony Express, then owned by Isaac Atwater. In 1861, with four other compositors of the Atlas, owned by W. S. King, he enlisted in the First Minnesota Infantry, and in the absence of Mr. King at Washington, they closed the office. Remaining in the service continuously until August, 1865, he returned to Minneapolis and soon afterward secured the position of telegraph editor of the Daily Tribune. In 1872, he resigned, and with Col. Lounsberry, founded the Bismarck Tribune, of which he had entire editorial charge during the first year. In 1874, he joined as night editor of the St. Paul Pioneer, owned by David Blakeley. After the consolidation of the Pioneer and the Press, he continued as night editor of the consolidated concern until the purchase of the Minneapolis Tribune by Mr. Blakeley, when he once more returned to Minneapolis to assume the duties of managing editor, which position he has since held. Mr. Jordon has done more of editorial service in Minneapolis than perhaps any other person. His continuous service in responsible positions on leading journals in the state, amply testify to his capacity and ability.

Page 573

R. W. Jordan

a native of Ohio, was born in 1843. In 1852 he went to Illinois, and in 1859 removed to Colorado, where he commenced business as an architect. In 1871 he went to Salt Lake city, and remained one year, from there to Chicago, and thence to Sedalia, Missouri. His eyesight failed and for a time he was obliged to abandon his profession, but resumed it eventually, and in 1879, established his office in Minneapolis. He was married in 1870 to Matilda Lewis, who was the first graduate under Miss Jones, who came from England to establish the Pestalozzian system of education. Mrs. Jordan was the founder of Trenton Institute, of Trenton, New Jersey.

Page 574

John P. Joseph

born in Germany, February 22d, 1837. He came to America in 1859, and lived two years in New York city; he then resided in Ohio seven years, and at the expiration of that time came to this city. In 1863 he enlisted in the Seventy-second Ohio; was shortly after transferred to the mechanical department of Franklin shops, at Nashville, Tennessee, and remained there until the close of the war. In 1878 he commenced the business of bottling beer, and since 1880 has also manufactured all kinds of soda water, champagne, cider, seltzer-water, etc.; his place of business is at the corner of Marshall north-east and Thirteenth Avenue. Mr. Joseph was married in 1860, to Miss Katrina Reinhart. They have four children.

Page 574

John D. Kaestner

was born October 21st, 1852, in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. He moved to St. Paul in 1871; five years later he came to this city and started in the shoe findings, hide and leather business, at No. 228 Washington Avenue north. He is doing a prosperous trade here, and also acts as agent for a Sheboygan firm, buying hides and shipping to them. Mr. Kaestner was married in 1876 to Amelia Selsemeyer, of Wisconsin. They are the parents of one child: Lillian.

Page 574

J. Kantrowitz

was born January 1st, 1844, in Germany. He came to America in 1859, and located in New York, where he was employed in a mercantile house until 1861, when he went to Troy and spent six years in the clothing business with A. Ksensky Brothers. In the fall of 1880 he came here and established the Bay State one price clothing house, at 220 Hennepin Avenue, where he is doing a thriving business. He was married February 12th, 1865, to Pauline Cohen. Their children are: James, Isaac, Alexander, Minnie, Rosa, Frank and Josephine.

Page 574

Frederick Herman Karlson

was born in Sweden in 1884; attended the University of Stockholm a number of years, and was engaged as missionary for a short time. He came to America in 1868, settled in Mitchell county, Iowa, and the following year removed to Fayette county. In 1870 he was ordained in La Salle county, Illinois, and at once commenced his ministerial labor in Fayette county, Iowa. Came to Minneapolis in 1880 and took charge of St. Paul's church; also, has a Norwegian congregation in St. Paul, which he visits once in three months. Has three children, Alma Victoria, Agnes F. Louisa and Karl Herman, born respectively in 1863,1867 and 1873.

Page 574

C. H. Keator

came to Minnesota in 1856, located at Greenwood, Hennepin county, and for five years followed hunting and trapping. In 1861 he enlisted in the Mounted Rangers, and in 1862 in the Eighth Minnesota Volunteers From 1865 until 1867 he was in the auction and commission business, then he formed a partnership, with Mr. Snyder in the bill posting business; also as carriers for the Minneapolis Daily Tribune. In 1879 they sold the carrier business, but still continue the bill posting. Their office is in the Tribune counting room, City hall. Mr. Keator married Martha McLeod November 15th, 1864. Their only child, Jessie, died at the age of two years.

Page 574

C. T. Keen

was born September 21st, 1842, at Calais, Maine. In 1865 he went to Oskosb, Wisconsin and was lumbering eight years, and two years in the hotel business. In 1875 he removed to this city, and followed carpentering until March, 1880, when he became proprietor of the Glyndon House, 219 Third street south. He was married October 18th, 1875, to Miss Susanna King, who has borne him one child, Daisy.

Page 574

Matthias Kees

born in Prussia, September 27th, 1839. He came to America in 1856, and first settled in Illinois, but soon moved to Marathon county, Wisconsin, and until 1859 was interested in the lumber trade there. Then he returned to Illinois, and remained until 1862, when he went to Racine, Wisconsin, and enlisted in the Eighth Wisconsin Battery, light artillery. He was mustered out in August, 1865. In September of the same year he came to this city, and worked as clerk until 1869, when he started a grocery store. He is now located at 328 First street north. In 1877 Mr. Kees was elected to the city council to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of Alderman Thompson, and in the spring of 1880 he was again elected. In 1866 he married Susan Knaeble. Seven children have been born to them. Those living are: Clara, Susan, and Edwin.

Page 575

Andrew Keim

was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, April 18th, 1869. In early youth he went to Sandusky, and in 1868 removed to St. Cloud, Minnesota, where he learned harness-making. He came to this city in 1877, and worked for George Thele until November, 1880, when he started in business With Mr. Arnoldy, at 120 Plymouth Avenue.

Page 575

George Hackett Keith

was born in Orange county, Vermont, May 4th, 1825. He attended the district schools at home until sixteen years of age, when he worked on a farm one season, for seven dollars per month. He then went to Meriden, New Hampshire, and passed four years in studying and teaching. He removed to Indianapolis, and engaged in teaching private school one year, after which he was appointed superintendent of the preparatory department of the Franklin College, at Franklin, Indiana. He continued his studies and attended lectures until 1852 ,when he graduated from the medical college at Woodstock, Vermont. He moved to the city of New York and began practice, paying considerable attention to dentistry. In 1856 he came to Minneapolis, and has since resided here, with the exception of 1859-1860, when he made a southern trip. Dr. Keith commenced the practice of his profession in this city, but turned his attention almost wholly to dentistry. He was a member of the first state legislature, which met in 1858-1859. During the Indian war of 1862, he was surgeon of the expedition sent to the relief of Fort Abercrombie. In 1863 he received the appointment of provost marshal for the second district of Minnesota, and held the position until the close of the war. In May 1871, he was appointed post-master, and reappointed in 1875. He was married July 2d, 1851, to Anna Judson, daughter of Dr. Jonathan Going. She died in 1862. The present Mrs. Keith was Henrietta, daughter of S. A. and Dora Jewett. Their children are Walter, Mabel, and Mary.

Page 575

H. C. Keith

a native of Randolph, Vermont, was born in 1823. In 1841 he moved to Dover, New Hampshire, and remained there three years in the dry-goods and drug trade; he then traveled three years with Dr. Cutler, and in 1853 settled in Minneapolis. He preempted what has since been known as Falls City, now a part of Minneapolis. Until 1877 he was contracting and building; then he was in the real estate business till 1877, when he went to Lake Minnetonka; he spends his summers there, and will build a boarding house on Howard's Point. In 1844 he married Ruth Canney, of Dover, New Hampshire. Three children have been born to them. All are now living in this city.

Page 575

Albert A. Keith

was born at Dover, New Hampshire, January 30th, 1851. At the age of three years he came with his parents to Minnesota. They located on the bank of the river, about three miles below Minneapolis. Albert received his education in the graded schools of this city, and attended the college at Hillsdale, Michigan, one year, after which he returned home and took a position as clerk in the post-office and remained five years. When the carrier system was adopted, he was promoted to the position of superintendent of carriers, which he has filled five years. He was married in March, 1874, to Miss Maggie McKaban, of Minneapolis. They have one boy, Louis Henry, aged two years. Mr. Keith has been a member of the Old Settlers' Association since its organization.

Page 575

J. M. Keller

was born in Prussia, April 17th, 1830. He came to the United States in 1849, and settled in St. Louis in 1850. He came to this city in 1854, and worked four years for M. S. Hoblitt, He bought , with Frank Rorbach, the Morgan mill at Shingle Creek, but sold in 1865, and the following year was in the cattle trade. In 1866 he went in business with a nephew, but ,owing to ill health he sold in 1869. He opened the market at his present location, 428 First Avenue north, in September 1879. Mr. Keller's wife was Minnie Runge. They have six children living.

Page 575

H. H. Kelley

was born in Washington county, Maine, February 4th, 1854. In the fall of 1869 he came to this city, and was employed as clerk in different business houses until he started a meat market in company with his brother; they continued this until August, 1880, when they sold, and established their stock-yards and slaughter-house.

Page 576

W. A. Kelley

brother of the above, is a native of Maine; he was born in Washington county, December 27tb, 1851. He has been in partnership with his brother ever since his arrival in Minneapolis in 1874.

Page 576

E. S. Kelly

was born June 24th, 1848, in Ottawa, Canada, where he received a liberal education. He came to Minnesota in 1867 and located in this city. He entered the State University in the second year of its existence and studied there five years. He first studied medicine with Dr. H. H. Kimball, and graduated from Rush Medical College, February 1878, being first in his class. Immediately after graduating he returned to Minneapolis and has since continued in practice here. June 1st, 1880, Dr. Kelly was elected county physician.

Page 576

F. W. Kelly

was born April 5th, 1851, at Brooklyn, Long Island. He learned the plumbing trade at Cleveland, Ohio; worked at it there and in New York city until 1869, when he removed to St. Paul, he lived there several years and then worked two years in Chicago. He came here in 1873, and engaged with Wilson and Rogers, J. L. Spink, and others in his line of business until 1877, since which time he has been alone. Mr. Kelly was married in 1875, to Miss Catherine Collins of St. Paul.

Page 576

H. Krueger

was born at Watertown, Wisconsin, October 16th, 1859. He learned the trade of gunsmith at Eau Claire, Wisconsin. In 1877 he came to Minneapolis and established business at his present location. A description of his business may be found elsewhere.

Page 576

W. F. Kelly

a native of Ireland, was born in 1838. He lived in England from 1849 until 1862 when he emigrated to America; for a short time he lived In New York city, then went to Pennsylvania and in 1864 returned to New York. The year following he removed to this city and worked in the Milwaukee and St. Paul railroad shops until 1872, when he started in the grocery trade, in which he is having a rapidly growing business. In November, 1857 he married Annie Ryan.

Page 576

Edward Kennedy

was born in Ireland. In 1861 he came to the United States and lived in New York until 1865, employed as blacksmith for a railroad company. He then removed to Minneapolis and worked as engineer in the machine shops for the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul company. He worked some time with Mr. Butler to familiarize himself with the manufacture of mill picks, and then embarked in that business. His shop and contents were entirely destroyed by fire in November, 1880, but he rebuilt on First street south where he is now located. His wife was Margaret Murphy. Their children are Edward and Margaret

Page 576

A. H. Kenyon

was born in Washington county, New York, September 14th, 1842. He came here in February, 1873, and engaged in the dry goods trade for about three years; then he was in partnership with Thomas Jeffery a while, and in August, 1880, went in the carpet business with Mr. McVeigh. The firm carries a full line of everything appertaining to the wholesale and retail carpet trade.

Page 576

Walter Kerridge

was born in Norfolk county, England, January 21st, 1854. He attended the public schools until eighteen years of age, then learned the florist business which he still follows. In 1872 he came to America, and to this city in 1876. In June of the following year, he, in company with his father and brother, established their present business at 617 Fourth street north. Mr. Kerridge has never married.

Page 576

John Keys

was born in 1842. In 1862 he moved to Canada, learned the blacksmiths trade when young, and has worked at it twenty-one years. He removed to Hastings, Minnesota, in June, 1862, thence to Granville, Dakota county, where he lived five years. September, 1879, he came here and opened a shop on First street south, and in March, 1880, formed a partnership with T. H. Cain and bought the shop, No. 117 First Avenue south. He was married in 1863, and is the father of five children.

Page 576

B. W. Kimball, M. D.

was born in Bethel, Oxford county, Maine, March 12th, 1829. He received his early education at Gould's academy, and at the Brighton academy of Cumberland county. He first studied medicine with Dr. Twitchell, of his native place, and next with Dr. Peasley, of Hanover, New Hampshire. He graduated with the degree of M. D., from the medical department of Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1857. He practiced eight years as government physician in Idaho and Oregon, and in July, 1869, came to this city. He has been in practice as an occulist and aurist since 1871, having studied at the Manhattan eye and ear infirmary, the New York eye and ear hospital, and also with Dr. Mark Stephenson of New York. In 1875 he married Susie Lyon. They have two children living.

Page 577

T. S. King

removed to Minneapolis in the autumn of 1862, and has since been a resident of the city. Immediately upon coming to the city, accepted a position on the State Atlas, a weekly paper published by W. S. King, and remained with the paper in a business and editorial capacity until the birth of the Minneapolis Daily Tribune in the summer of 1867, into which the Atlas was merged. He was city editor of the Tribune for the first eighteen months of its existence. In July, 1871, accepted a tempting offer from the publishers of the St. Paul Pioneer, and devoted himself to establishing the Minneapolis branch and editorial department of that paper. Mr. King has since been, and now is, connected with the pioneer and its successor, the Pioneer Press, Minneapolis city editor.

Page 577

Charles D. Kingsley

born in Medina county, Ohio, September 15th, 1826. When quite young, he moved with his parents to Missouri, and in April, 1846, located at Marine Mills, Minnesota; he followed lumbering three years and in June, 1849, removed to St. Anthony. He worked at his trade of stonemason and plasterer a number of years, and in 1862, enlisted in the Ninth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry; he was captured in June, 1864, and confined at Andersonville, Savannah and Millen prisons. He came home on a furlough and was honorably discharged August 1st, 1865. He has served on the police force of this city since May, 1879. His wife was Julia Shepherd, who has borne him four children, Ira, Effie, William and John.

Page 577

Edward Kingsley

a life long resident of Minneapolis, was born May 2d, 1856. He received his education in the public schools of this city. He has been employed in the manufacture of eave troughs, and is at present running a planer in an establishment of that kind. In 1871, he volunteered in, the fire department, and was appointed stoker; on organization of the paid department, he was given the position of first pipe-man and in May, 1880, was appointed foreman. He was married in Minneapolis, April 17th, 1878, to Miss Augusta Gould. Their union has been blessed with one child, Burton.

Page 577

E. D. Kirst

a native of Germany, was born in 1831. When but fourteen years of age he commenced to learn cabinet-making. In 1856 he came to America, and for two years lived in Sullivan county, New York, then removed to Dedham, Massachusetts, and remained until July, 1861, when he came to this city. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the Ninth Minnesota, Company B. The first summer was spent in the Indian campaign; then he went south and participated in all the battles of the regiment. He was mustered out August, 1865. Mr. Kirst does cabinet work, repairing, general jobbing, and manufactures corn husk mattresses at 928 First street north. Mr. Kirst was married in 1861. His wife died in 1876; she was the mother of two boys.

Page 577

A. H. Kirk

was born in Broome county, New York, July, 1947. He enlisted in the Sixteenth New York Battery, February, 1864, and was honorably discharged in July, 1865. He came to this city in 1871, and was employed by O. A. Pray and Company for two years. After that he took charge of the mill furnishing shops for J. W. Johnson, and also did the draughting for the establishment, until May 1st, 1878, when he started for himself in the business of manufacturing mill furnishings. He married Nettie Strong, May 15tb, 1873. Their two children are Zoe and Freeman.

Page 577

M. J. Klopp

was born November 28th, 1847, in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania. In 1855 he went to Logansport, Indiana, and at the age of fifteen years commenced learning carriage-making, which trade he has since followed. Mr. Klopp's poor health obliged him to travel, and he spent some time in California, Colorado and Arkansas. In June, 1878, he came to Minneapolis, and worked at his trade, being employed by different firms until October, 1880, when he opened a shop at 99 Main street S. E. At the age of sixteen years he enlisted and served eight months, then re-enlisted and served until 1865. His wife was Christiana Schaefer. They have one son, Henry.

Page 578

J. W. Kline

a native of Frederick county, Maryland, was born in 1839. He came to Minneapolis in 1874 and worked at his trade, that of cooper, until 1877, when he, assisted by others, formed the North Star Barrel Company. At present Mr. Kline is president of this company. He resides with his family in this city.

Page 578

David Buell Knickerbacker D. D.

was born in Rensselaer county, New York, Feb. 24th, 1833. He is the son of Hon. Herman Knickerbacker, who was a member of congress from that district, also judge of probate in Rensselaer county. David B. was prepared for college at the Academy of Greenwich, New York; he then entered Trinity College, Hartford, and graduated in 1853; and in June, 1856, he graduated from the Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church of New York city. On the first Sunday in July of the same year, he was ordained deacon in Trinity Church, New York, by Bishop Potter, and was at once appointed missionary bishop of the north-west. His whole ministerial life has been spent in Minneapolis. He was ordained priest in Gethsemane Church, July, 1875, by Bishop Kemper. In 1874 he received the degree of doctor of divinity from Hartford, Connecticut. In 1877 he was elected missionary bishop for New Mexico and Arizona, but declined the honor. He has held the office of dean of the northern convocation of Minnesota, by appointment of the bishop, since 1870, and has represented the diocese in general conventions, five times, since its admission into union with the general convention in 1859. He is a member of the standing committee of the diocese, and also of its missionary committee since its organization.

Page 578

A. H. Knowles

a native of England, was born in 1830. He came to the United States in 1854, and lived the first few months in Philadelphia, then spent two months in New York in the steam and gas fitting business. He traveled for ten years through the middle states building gas works, and in 1866 came to this city; since which time he has been in the wholesale and retail liquor business.

Page 578

Alois Knoblauch

born in Wurtemberg, Germany, September 24th, 1833. He was educated and learned the shoemaking trade in his native country. In 1854 he came to America; worked a short time in New York, then removed to Chicago, Illinois, and thence to Fulton county. In 1857 he came here and started a small boot and shoe store; he is now enjoying a thriving business at 26 First street north. and 125 Washington Avenue south. He was married in 1858 to Amelia Stulcman. Their children are: Anthony, Frank, Amelia, Alois, William, Henrietta, George, Charles, Henry, Alexander and a babe.

Page 578

M. B. Koon

born January 22d, 1841, in Steuben county, New York. He moved with his parents to Michigan, and received his education at the Hillsdale College. In 1864 he went to California and remained two years, then returned to Michigan, studied law, and in 1867, commenced practice at Hillsdale; in 1870, he was elected prosecuting attorney of that county, and held the office five years. In 1878 he came to this city and established the practice of law in company with E. A. Merrill; the firm of Koon and Merrill continued until November, 1879, when Arthur Keith became associated with them, and the firm name is now, Koon, Merrill and Keith. Mr. Koon married Josie Van De Mark in 1873. Their children are Kate and Louise. Residence No. 30 Sixth street south.

Page 578

John Kraemer

a native of Germany, was born in December, 1827. He emigrated to the United States in 1857, and worked at blacksmithing in Chicago a few months, then came to this city and continued the trade here eighteen years, with the exception of three years in the war. He enlisted August 2d, 1862, in the Eighth Minnesota Volunteers. His wife was Barbara Roch; their marriage occurred August 2d, 1852. Mr. Kraemer owns the building which he has occupied for the past five years, No. 227 Central Avenue.

Page 578

A. C. La Brash

a native of Michigan, was born July 7th, 1841. His father, being a black-smith, taught him the trade while yet a boy. In the fall of 1854, he located at Waukegan, Illinois, thence to Chicago where he remained fourteen months, then returned to Waukegan, and in 1858, he came to St., Paul, where, with his father, he opened a shop, and for nearly two years remained there, then came to St. Anthony. While here, he was employed by others until 1861; he, then went to Osseo and opened an establishment of his own, and remained there until the Indian outbreak of 1862, when he returned to this city, and has since remained, doing a general black-smithing business on First street north. He married Miss Julia Potvin, of Canada, in 1860. They have three sons and one daughter.

Page 579

H. R. Lamoreaux

was born at Arcadia, New York, July 28d, 1842. In 1862, he engaged in the canal business, owning, and having in charge a boat between Buffalo and New York, until 1875, when he came to this city engaging in lumbering about three years. In October, 1880, he rented and furnished his present billiard hall at 223 First Avenue south. He married Mary Smith, of New York, March 3d, 1863. They have two children, Louis and Mary.

Page 579

Christian Lamp

a native of Denmark, was born August 24th, 1845. He passed his youth in his native place, where he learned shoemaking. He came to the United States in 1873, and first located at Marquette, Michigan, remaining five years, when he removed to St. Paul. In September, 1879, he located at Minneapolis, and with his brother opened a boot and shoe store. He is a member of the Light Infantry band. He married Miss Sophia Nelson, of Denmark, in 1868, who has borne him five children, four of whom are living: Walter, Bodil Mary, Christian and Joachim.

Page 579

Joachim Lamp

born January 7th, 1855, is a native of Denmark. He learned shoemaking there, came to the United States, in 1876, and has been with his brother since. He is also a member of the Light Infantry band, playing baritone, trombone, and strings.

Page 579

Freeman P. Lane

of the law firm of Giddings and Lane, is a native of Washington county, Maine,. born April 20th, 1853. He came west with his parents in 1862, locating in Minneapolis. He began his labors by engaging as a newsboy selling the Press and Pioneer. He attended school until 1867, after which he worked in L. L. Stanchfield's mill, at the mouth of Bassett's Creek. In 1868 he was clerk for his father in the grocery business. He entered the employ of the Northwestern Telegraph Company as line builder and repairer in Minnesota and Dakota, and remained with them until 1872. During this time, however he attended school two winters at the Minneapolis Business College. He then began reading law with Albee Smith, and in 1873, entered the Albany Law School, of New York. He was admitted to the bar at Albany, May 4th, 1874, returned to this city, and, in 1875, formed a partnership with G. W. Harl, and the next year the present firm of Giddings and Lane was organized, and is conducting a successful business. Mr. Lane was married, in 1875, to Miss Mollie Lauderdale, who has borne him two children: Bessie and Ina.

Page 579

James S. Lane

is a native of New Brunswick, born in 1833. After reaching the age of manhood, he gave his attention principally to lumbering. In 1852, he came to St. Anthony and engaged with the old water power company, and later with H. T. Welles. He was surveyor general of logs and lumber for three terms. He became a member of the firm of L. Butler and Company of No. One Platform mills, now Merriman, Barrows and Company. He was married, in 1860, to Miss Aubine Dorman, by whom he has seven children: Verna, Minnie, Lizzie, Mittie, Frank, Emma and Mark. His mother, Mrs. Velma Lane, is a member of his household, and though seventy-five years of age, is in good health and has been a resident of this city since 1855.

Page 579

Leonidas M. Lane

was born in 1835, at St. Stephens, New Brunswick. At sixteen years of age he entered a saw mill, remaining there until, August, 1855, when he came St. Anthony, and entered the mills as sawyer, and remained until 1861. He then enlisted in Company A, First Minnesota Volunteers, for three months. In the fall of 1862 he re-enlisted in Company A, Ninth Minnesota Volunteers. At the battle of Bryson's crossroads, he was taken prisoner, and taken to Macon, Georgia; from there to Charleston, thence to Columbia. After an imprisonment of nine months he reached the Union lines. He returned to St. Anthony in March, 1865. He has since been in the lumbering business in connection with his brother, J. S. Lane, and is now a member of the firm of Merriman, Barrows and Company. He married Anna McLeod in 1869. Their children are, Harry, Eva, Robbie, Roscoe and Leon.

Page 579

R. B. Langdon

was born at New Haven, Vermont, in 1826. He received an academic education, and began active life as foreman of a construction party on the Rutland and Burlington railroad, in 1848. Since then the principal business of his life has been the construction of railroads, having under his superintendence, roads in Vermont, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota. Tennessee and Mississippi. He built the water-power canal for the Minneapolis Mill Co., in 1866, also erected a number of the important buildings of the city. He had charge of the party who broke the ground for the first railroad in the state, the St. Paul and Pacific railroad, in 1858. Since 1866 he has been a resident of Minneapolis. In 1872, R. B. Langdon and Company erected a planing-mill on Third street which they still own. He was state senator for six consecutive years ending in 1878, and is now vice-president of the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railroad. He married Sarah Smith in 1859. Their children are: Cavour, Martha, and Caroline.

Page 580

J. Lange

was born June 25th, 1836, in Germany. He acquired a knowledge of the mason's trade in his native country, and in 1866 came to the United States and located in New York. Ten years later he removed to Minneapolis and erected the building on Riverside Avenue, where he is located, doing a good business in groceries. He was married in 1869, to Helen Gerdes, of Germany. They are the parents of six children, four of whom are living: Emily, Henry, William, and Herman.

Page 580

Louis Laramee

is a native of Montreal, Canada, born April 11th, 1837. He removed to Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in 1855, and engaged in the pursuit of his regular trade, that of harness-making. He came to St. Paul in 1857; thence to St. Anthony, and to this city in 1865, and has since remained here in business. His present location is 304 Nicollet Avenue, where he has an extensive establishment, employing twenty-eight men. Until 1876, he was working as an employee, and by his energy and strict attention to business has elevated himself to his present position. He was married in 1870, to Miss Alphonsie Davis, of Montreal, who bore him two children, Eugenie and Alfred.

Page 580

Carl Larson

is a native of Norway, and was born January 26th, 1844. He came to America in 1868, coming to Minnesota and locating in Fillmore county, where he resided four years, engaged as a wheat buyer. In 1872 he came to Minneapolis, where he was in the employ of Eastman and Bovey for three years. He kept a boarding-house in this city for three years, and in 1878, became proprietor of the Victoria Hotel, where he is still. He was married in Norway, to Martha Baltzerson, in 1866. They have one adopted child, whom they call George Larson.

Page 580

Eben E. Lawrence

machinist at Anchor mill, was born at Cherryfield, Washington county, Maine, November 7th, 1847. He came to Minneapolis in April, 1870, and gave his attention to lumbering until the spring of 1877. He then engaged in the Pillsbury mill, remaining three years; then to the Anchor mill as machinist. While in the lumber business he passed several winters in the pineries, occupying positions as chopper and superintendent.

Page 580

W. H. Lauderdale

was born in Livingston county, New York, August 15th, 1830. He obtained his education at his native place, in the public school. At sixteen years of age he commenced the tailor's trade, completing it at Sandusky, Ohio. He went to Wooster in 1849, where he remained four years. In the fall of 1857 he came to Minneapolis. He took a claim near Lake Calhoun, on which he lived until 1866, when he invested in another in Brooklyn township, and after remaining one year returned to this city and engaged in the dairy business until 1879. The next year he formed a partnership with Miner Ball, dealing in real estate. They dissolved partnership in 1881, and he began business under the firm name of Lauderdale and Company, at 11 Washington Avenue north. He was married in 1852 to Mary E. Sloane, who bore him three children: Margaret, Jeanette, Mollie, and Frank. Mrs. Lauderdale died in 1872.. His second wife was Mrs. Susan Robertson, of Nova Scotia. They have one child, George Hayes.

Page 580

James W. Lawrence

of the firm of Wilson and Lawrence, was born in New York, August 9th, 1846. He moved with his parents to Syracuse, where, while young, he attended the graded school. In 1857 he accompanied his parents to St. Anthony, remaining until 1860, when he returned to Syracuse and entered Hamilton College in 1864, from which he graduated after a four years course. He read law in New York city, with Sheldon and Brown, one year, and, in 1869, was admitted to the bar. He returned to this city in 1870, and the next year formed the partnership which now exists. During these intervening years he has served two terms as county attorney of Hennepin county. Mr. Lawrence was married, in 1873, to Miss Mary, daughter of J. K. Sidle. They have two children, Jacob S. and James, Jr. .

Page 581

Brady Lawson

is a native of Norway, born in 1845. He came to the United States in 1867, locating first in Eau Claire, Wisconsin; thence to Minneapolis in 1880. He is proprietor of the Eau Claire House, 211 Second Avenue south. He married Ida Oelson, in 1873, who bore him three children: Levi, Dewett and Edward.

Page 581

Jerome Layman

one of the oldest residents of this county, came to this city with his parents when less than one year of age, in 1852. At that time there were but three houses on the west side of the river. He has passed twenty-seven summers and winters on the same location, corner of Eighteenth Avenue and Twenty-first street. He is a member of the Knickerbocker Furniture Company a description of which is given elsewhere.

Page 581

N. M. Learned

pastor of Franklin Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, was born in Vermont, October 29th, 1838. He was converted in 1855, licensed to preach in 1859; studied at Newbury Seminary and New Hampton Theological Institute. Received into the conference in 1863, and was ordained deacon in 1865. Ordained elder, 1867, filling appointments at Eden Mills and other places. Was sent to Stowe for two years, then to Bakersfield for two years. While there buried his wife, then went to Clambridge, then to Middletown Springs, and Clarendon Springs. Then transferred by Bishop Simpson to Troy conference New York. While at Wells, had a great revival, and over one hundred conversions, which resulted in the founding of a church, and he was unanimously invited to be its pastor, which he accepted and remained for two years. Then failing health sent him to Minnesota, and at the request of the presiding elder of the St. Cloud district, he went to Sauk Rapids. He then went to Austin, Texas, for a few months, and returning to Minnesota, was transferred by Bishop Wiley from the Troy conference to the Minnesota, conference and stationed at Clinton Avenue Methodist Episcopal church, St. Paul, for one year. Then to Farmington for two years, doing much good. Then to the Washington Avenue Methodist Episcopal church for two years; many were added to the church; he found a debt of $2,000, which was provided for. The quarterly conference unanimously voted for his return, but on account of the great strain upon his system, asked for, and was permitted to make a change. Married February 16th, 1864, to Miss Saphrona Buck, of St. Albans, Vermont, a lady of rare accomplishments, and a skilled artist, whose fame and loveliness was too soon cut off by death. Married again in October, 1873, to Miss Lucy A. Herrick, of St. Albans, Vermont, who was educated at the New Hampton Institute. She is a lady of high culture and an artist of distinction and fine taste, as the many beautiful pictures, which adorn the walls of their pleasant home will testify. They have two children, Frank H., and Mattle I..

Page 581

Julius Leber

is a native of Dresden, Kingdom of Saxony, born February 22d, 1828. He acquired a knowledge of truss making at Dresden, and worked at his trade in Liverpool, Berlin, Vienna, and other European cities, until 1849, when he emigrated to America, and worked in New York, St. Louis, New Orleans, Philadelphia and other places until 1870; he then bought a farm and located at Anoka, Minnesota. Two years later he removed to Minneapolis and commenced the manufacture of trusses, wire bolting cloth, and mechanical apparatus for deformities. The greater portion of his work is done by contract for medical men of large cities. Mr. Leber was married in 1851, to Teresa Brudj of Saxony. Their children are: William, Henry, Louisa, Julius, Jr., and Adolph.

Page 581

John T. Lee

was born in 1840, and is a native of Canada. He accompanied his parents to Vermont, and in 1856 to Lowell, Massachusetts. His father was a blacksmith and taught his son the trade, while so young he was obliged to stand on a box to strike the anvil. In 1875, Mr. Lee removed to Montreal, Canada, and there remained in the blacksmith and carriage making business until 1879, when he came to this city. He was a member of the city council of Lowell, in 1866-1867 and was trial justice in the same place fourteen years. He was married in 1863, to Miss Lucy Marsh, who bore him one son, George.

Page 581

John M. Lee

was born in New York, August 19th, 1827. He came to Minnesota in 1856 and located in St. Anthony, and worked a short time at carpentering, he then removed to Michigan where he remained until 1865, when he enlisted in the Eleventh Michigan Infantry and went to Tennessee, where he remained until September, 1865, and received his discharge. He located in McLeod county, Minnesota, on a farm, in 1868, and remained three years, then returned to Minneapolis and has since given his attention to carpentering. He was married in 1858, to Almira Jones of New York, by whom he has two children: Eliza and Agnes.

Page 582

L. A. Legg

was born in Lowell, Massachusetts February 13th, 1853. He moved to Berlin, Wisconsin, while quite young, and in. 1866 removed to Minneapolis. He has been at his present location, Fourth street south, between Nicollet and First Avenue south, about two years. He has a sale, livery, and boarding stable. He was married to Miss Annie Noren in 1878.

Page 582

John G. Lennon

was born at Bolton, England, July 6th, 1815. He came to America in 1841, as supercargo of a vessel, for the firm in whose employ he had been. He landed in New Orleans, and after delivering the cargo, passed two years in traveling through the states, and in 1843 located at St. Croix Falls, remaining two years, when he returned to St. Louis and engaged with the American Fur Company. He returned to Mendota, Minnesota, in 1846, and the next year removed to St. Paul. In 1849 he took charge of the St. Anthony outfit, and remained until 1856; then began business; for himself in the mercantile and lumbering line. This he sold in 1859, and removed to his stock-farm in Sibley county, remaining until the rebellion. He accompanied the Sibley expedition to Devil's Lake and the Missouri river, as assistant in the commissary department under Captain Forbes. He returned to Fort Snelling in the fall of 1863, then went to Memphis, Tennessee, where he was quartermaster of the first division of the Sixteenth corps under General Mower. They disbanded at Louisville, Kentucky, where he remained in the real estate business and prosecuting claims for the government. In 1873 he returned to this city, and has since continued in the real estate business. During the winter of 1877 he suffered a stroke of paralysis, from which he has never fully recovered. He was married at Fort Snelling to Mary B. McLain, in l85l. Their children are Catharine and John.

Page 582

W. H. Leonard

physician and surgeon, was born in Tolland county, Connecticut, December, 1826. He received a high school education in his native state, and one course at the New York State University, and graduated from the Yale Medical School, session of 1852-1853. He settled in Wyoming county, New York, and began his practice. He removed to Minneapolis in 1855, and has continued in practice here since. In November, 1862, he entered the army as assistant surgeon of the Fifth Minnesota Infantry, and was afterwards promoted to surgeon. He mustered out at Fort Snelling in 1865, an resumed his practice as a physician immediately after his discharge. He was health officer of the first board organized in this city. When he began in his profession, he was the youngest practitioner in the city. He was married in October, 1853, to Miss Jane Preston, of Connecticut. Their children are: William, now a physician, and Gertrude.

Page 582

John Leppla

a native of Germany, was born in 1846. He came to the United States in 1860, and passed two years in Pennsylvania and Kentucky; then removed to Appleton, Wisconsin, remaining two years. In 1864 he came to Minneapolis and engaged in milling until 1876, when he opened a saloon and billiard hall. He was married in 1871, to Lena Wistfall, who bore him three children: Lena, Annie, and John.

Page 582

G. L. Levi

and Company are proprietors of the Philadelphia One Price Clothing Store, at 205 Hennepin Avenue and 204 Nicollet Avenue. The house on Hennepin Avenue was established by Aultman and Loucheim, who were succeeded by G. L. Levi and Company, in 1877. This firm removed to their present location the next year, where they transact a jobbing and retail business. The individual members of the firm are G. L. Levi and M. Levi.

Page 582

G. F. Libby

is a native of Maine, born in October, 1834. At the age of sixteen, he learned the trade of blacksmithing in Cherryfield, of his native state. In 1854, he located in Wisconsin, and the next year removed to St. Anthony. He remained only a short time, then went to Monticello and opened a blacksmith shop. There he resided until 1858, when he returned to this city and opened an establishment at his present location, 104 First street north, it being at that time, the only one of the kind on that street. He was engaged three years in lumbering in connection with his trade. He was married to Miss Elsie Sime, of New Brunswick, in 1860. They have three sons and five daughters. Mr. Libby served two years as street commissioner.

Page 583

Joseph Libby

was born at Goldsborough, Maine, January 12th, 1805. He lived there twenty-five years, then removed to Washington county, giving his attention to lumbering. In 1850, he came to this city and almost immediately started up Rum River, on a prospecting tour. He engaged in lumbering on this river for seven years, about one hundred miles above the present site of Anoka. In 1857, he built a flat-boat, seventy-four by eight feet, and after loading it with supplies for the camp during the winter, towed and paddled it up the Mississippi about two hundred miles. He had a crew of sixteen men., eight working oxen, some cattle for beef, and one horse used to tow the boat. They were about twenty-six days on the route. Mr. Libby was the first lumberman in that region and worked there until 1877. He has since lived with his family in this city, enjoying the fruits of his labors. He was married in July, 1832, to Miss Priscilla Wilson. They are the parents of nine children, seven of whom are living, the eldest being forty-two.

Page 583

Thomas Libby

is a native of England, born August 29th, 1824. He learned the mechanic's trade at home. In August, 1850, he came to the United States and located at Middletown, Connecticut, where he remained working at his trade five years. He then removed to a farm in Wisconsin, where he resided fifteen or sixteen years engaged in farming, in connection with his trade. He removed to Baraboo, and remained until coming to Minneapolis in 1878. He married Miss Theresa Hocking, of England, in 1845. They have four children: Theresa, Thomas, Mary and William.

Page 583

N. P. Liljengren

is a native of Sweden, born in 1845. He came to America in 1873, and located in Illinois, coming to this city the next year. He worked as furniture polisher until 1877, when he started in the manufacturing business and has been successfully engaged in it since. He was united to Miss Augusta Anderson in l877. Residence Ninth Avenue south.

Page 583

H. F. Lillibridge

a well known resident of Minneapolis, was born May 26th, 1836, at Wilmington, Todd county, Connecticut. He came to this city in 1856 and after remaining a few months removed to Monticello, Wright county, where he remained eight years in the mercantile business; he was a clerk for Fox and Mealy one year, then bought Mr. Mealy's interest in 1857. He sold out his interest and returned to this city in 1865 and in partnership with J. G. Smith engaged in making sash, doors and blinds. He disposed of his interest and kept books for J. Dean and Company, and remained until he purchased the cracker bakery. Mr. Lillibridge is now conducting the leading cracker and confectionery manufactory of the north-west, located in three buildings, 13, 17 and 19 South Third street.

Page 583

I. L. Lincoln

was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, April 5th, 1818. He learned his trade, that of blacksmithing, at sixteen years of age. He passed a number of years in visiting through his native state and New Hampshire and in August, 1847, removed to Peru, South America, engaged in the pursuit of his trade and shipping provisions, until 1855. He then located in Illinois and worked in a steam saw mill one and one-half years, thence to Kankakee, residing seven years on a farm. He came to St. Paul in 1863 and two years later went to South Bend and Farmington. In 1872 he made this city his home and has since remained here in the blacksmithing business. At present he is a member of the firm of Lincoln and Lee. He has been married three times; to his present wife in 1874.

Page 583

Hans Lindas

was born in Marshall, Wisconsin, in 1854. He passed his youth in his native town and learned the trade of tinsmith. In 1875 he removed to La Crosse, Wisconsin; thence in 1876 to Chicago. The next year he came to this city continuing at his trade until 1880, when he became one of the firm of Cross and Lindas, located at 829 Washington Avenue south . He was married in 1878, to Belle Howland of Norway, who bore him one child, Charles.

Page 583

H. Lindblad

is a native of Sweden, born July 12th, 1850. He gained a knowledge of machinery in his native country, and in 1872, came to America. He was employed as a house-builder and cabinet maker, at Taylor's Falls, Minnesota, two years, and came to Minneapolis in 1874. Here he has been engaged in building, also in the different mills of the city as a millwright for two years past, and is now in the Pettit mill. He married Miss Johanna Johnson in 1874. Their children are, John, Herman and Helga.

Page 584

Thomas M. Linton

was born at Dover, New Hampshire, December 25th, 1831. He went to California in 1851, and engaged in mining three years, when he came to this city and gave his attention to lumbering five years; he was then in the employ of A. Kelly, grocer, three years. He traveled through Oregon, Montana, California, and Utah, passing two years, then returned to this city in l864. Two years after his return, the firm of Clark and Linton was established whole-sale dealers in grain, flour and feed, 505 Washington Avenue south. He was married in 1869 to Miss Mary Bean, who bore him one child, Mary.

Page 584

A. Livingston

was born in Schoharie county, New York, in 1845. He accompanied his parents to Albany in 1857. and remained there until 1864, the last three years being spent in the dry-goods business. He next removed to Janesville, Wisconsin, dealing in groceries until 1871, when he came to Minneapolis. The next year he bought the stock of groceries from Mr. George Wales at 823 Fourth street south, where he has since remained. He was married in 1873 to Lizzie Love, of Albany, New York. They have one, daughter living, Grace.

Page 584

William Lochren

of the firm of Lochron, McNair and Gilfillan, was born April 3d, 1832, at Tyrone, Ireland. He came to America at the age of two years and passed his youth in northern Vermont, and received a common school and academic education. He read law, and was admitted to the bar in Franklin county, Vermont, in 1856. During that year, he came to St. Anthony and practiced his profession there until 1869, with the exception of the time passed in the army. In 1869, the firm of Lochren and McNair was formed, which continued until 1871, when J. B. Gilfillan was admitted as partner. Mr. Lochren enlisted as private in the First Minnesota Volunteers in 1861, but in course of time, was promoted to First Lieutenant he resigned two months before his discharge. After his return, he was city attorney much of the time, until the consolidation of the two cities. He was elected state senator in 1868 from the fourth district, which then included Hennepin, Anoka, Isanti, Mille Lacs and Benton counties. He was also city attorney of this city in 1877. He was married in 1871 to Mrs. Martha Demmon, who died in 1879, leaving one daughter, Martha.

Page 584

J. E. Lockwood

of the firm of Lockwood, Upton and Company, was born in Orange county, New York, in 1832. He learned the trade of machinist at the Matteawan Manufacturing Iron Works, one of the oldest establishments in that country, in 1845. In 1854 he went to Providence, Rhode Island, where he was engaged in steam engine works, which during the war employed sixteen hundred men. In 1865 he entered the Schenck Machine Works as superintendent, remaining until 1869, when he removed to Minneapolis, and superintended the Minnesota Iron Works until 1872. He then commenced business for himself in a shop where the Humboldt mill now stands. From there he removed to his present location, and the present firm was organized. He was married in 1855 to Martha Colville. Their children living are Edwin and Mary.

Page 584

H. Lohse

a native of Hamburg, Germany, was born August 19th, 1853. He studied art in Germany from 1870 until January, 1880, when he came to Minneapolis. He worked with Mr. W. Brown a few months, then went in partnership with him, and finally bought his interest in the business. Mr. Lohse does fine work in card and cabinet photographs. His gallery is 119 Washington Avenue north.

Page 584

A. O. Loring

was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, August 31st, 1858. At the age of two years he moved with his father to Minneapolis. The firm of Weeks and Loring was organized January 1st, 1880. They are wholesale dealers in grain, mill-feed, etc., and will this year buy and sell two thousand, seven hundred and fifty car-loads, doing business mostly with New York and New England. Their place of business is 405 Washington Avenue south. He married Miss Ida Eastman in 1879. One child has been born to them, Fred. Mrs. Loring died in November, 1880.

Page 584

S. B. Lovejoy

was born at Livermore, Maine, in 1850. He came with his parents to St. Anthony in 1854. In 1868 he entered the First National Bank as collection boy and corresponding clerk, after which he held the position of assistant book-keeper, and in 1872 was promoted to chief book-keeper. In 1874 he took charge of W. Hale and Company's flouring-mill, and the next year the firm dissolved. He then became treasurer of the Rum River Boom Company, and has since held that position. He was married in this city, in 1872, to Miss Louise, daughter of George N. Morgan, now deceased, an old settler of this country. Their children are: Emma Louise, Edith, and Ethel.

Page 585

Henry A. Loverin

was born in Chicago, in 1838. He came to St. Anthony in 1849, and at the age of eighteen years went to California, remaining nine years. He returned to St. Anthony and was married in 1865, when he removed to Chicago remaining there nine years engaged in contracting and building. In 1874 he located in this city, and the year following established his present business, that of carpentering, cabinet-making and jobbing.

Page 585

F. P. Lowell

is a native of Maine, born October 28th,1852. He passed his childhood and received his education in his native place. In 1868 he went to Florida, but returned, however, the same year. In 1871 he engaged in business in Portland, Maine, but sold out the next year and returned to his native place where he opened a grocery store, in which he continued until 1876; he then sold out and removed to this city. He first had a stand in the city market and then bought the grocery store at 229 Central Avenue, where he has remained. He was married, in 1874, to Lizzie Foye, who died three years after, leaving one child, Harry. He married in 1880, Martha Hughes, who has borne him one child, Myrtle.

Page 585

J. F. Low

was born at Frankfort, Maine, in 1831. He remained with his parents until 1850, when he went to Boston and remained four years, then came west, locating at St. Anthony in October, 1854. At that time there were but two buildings on the west. side. When the news was received that that land was open to entry, over two hundred claim shanties sprang up in one night. Mr. Low traded a gold watch for a claim, which he sold two weeks later for five hundred dollars. He took out the first auctioneer's license issued in Minnesota, and in company with Mr. Sawtelle engaged in selling goods at auction in the towns adjoining. He removed to Oak Grove, on a farm, where he remained four years, thence to St. Paul two years. In 1862, he enlisted in Company G, Sixth Minnesota Infantry, and was in the Indian campaign. One year later he returned to Fort Snelling and remained five years. He was engaged in the mercantile business at Darwin, Minnesota, two years, then came to this city, taking charge of the Pacific elevator, which position he has since held. He married Miss Leathers, of Maine, who died in 1870. His second wife was Miss Cyphers, of this city. They have six children, the oldest son being a conductor on the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railroad, running from St. Paul to St. Cloud.

Page 585

S. B. Loye

is a native of New Brunswick, born July 19th, 1835. He moved to Maine in 1855, thence to Kansas, coming to Minneapolis by boat, in 1857. He learned harness making after leaving school, at the age of fifteen, and on coming to this city engaged in the harness business. He was formerly a member of the firm of Greeley, Loye and Company, this establishment being one of the first here. He was married in 1861, to Antoinette Palmer, of Hennepin county, who has borne him three sons: William, Edwin, and Albert. Mr. Loye's place of business is 118 Washington Avenue south.

Page 585

Rudolph Lueck

a native of Germany, was born February 24th, 1838. He came to the United States, in 1866, and spent one year in Wisconsin, at Milwaukee and LaCrosse. In 1867 he located in this city, being in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad car shops until 1877, when he opened a restaurant and sample room, at 1219 Washington Avenue south, where he has since remained. He married Constance Riepenzike, in 1866. They have one child: Mary.

Page 585

Mary Hale Lufkin, M. D.

was born in Jefferson county, Indiana, and received her early education there. She studied medicine, and graduated from the Hygeo Therapeutic College, of New York, in 1863, with the degree of M. D. After graduating she practiced in Indiana until 1870, when she removed to Minneapolis and has since practiced here. Her method of treatment is principally by application of various kinds of baths, on hygienic principles, such as electro-thermal, improved Turkish, etc. Her establishment is known as the Hygienic Health Institute, and is the only one of the kind in the city, Located 256 First Avenue South.

Page 585

Mr. Gus Lundell

partner in business of P. Osander, is a native of Sweden, born April 25th, 1846. He attended the public schools in his native country a number of terms, and in 1868 emigrated to Quebec, Canada. The same year he removed to Iowa, and engaged in farming until 1871, when he located in Minneapolis, and entered into partnership with P. Osander, dealing in pumps, wind-mills, and general business in wells. 257 First Avenue south.

Page 586

A. G. Lundberg

a native of Sweden, was born December 18th, 1847. Here he lived until 1870, during which time he gained a knowledge of shoe-making. He then came to the United States, locating first at Hastings, Minnesota, thence to Minneapolis in 1872, where he worked at his trade six years, then opened a shop with Mr. Odegard at 12 Second Avenue south. He married Annie Dahlgren, of Sweden, in 1877. They have two children, Ludwig and Ruth.

Page 586

C. C. Lyford

graduated from the Illinois Industrial University in 1875, from the McGill Med ical College in 1879, and from the Montreal Veterinary College in 1877. He came to Minneapolis in March, 1880, and began practicing his profession; he also practiced during vacations of school. Office and infirmary, 309 and 311 Second Avenue south.

Page 586

John Lynch

millwright of Cataract mill, was born in 1837. He learned the trade of miller in his native country, and at the age of twenty-three went to Glasgow, Scotland, and remained there until 1879 when he came to the United States and located at Minneapolis, working in the Galaxy mill eight months, and has since been in the Cataract mill. He was married in 1864 to Catharine McDounigh who bore him one child Francis.

Page 586

Michael Lyons

was born at Longford, Ireland, August 15th, 1833. He went to England at the age of twelve, with his parents, and was there reared to manhood. He came to America in the spring of 1853, locating first in New York, where he remained four years engaging in plastering, that being his trade. He then came to St. Anthony where he has since remained, working at his trade. He married Miss Rose Ann Clary, of St. Anthony, in 1866. Residence, 628 Quincy street.

Page 586

Jacob Machmeier

a native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was born November 2d, 1855. When fifteen years of age he commenced learning black-smithing and has continued the trade since. He was in different places in Wisconsin until the spring of 1879, when he removed to Fargo, and in the fall of the same year to Minneapolis. At first he worked for the street car company, then a short time for Mr. Cramsie, and is now one of the firm of Murphy and Machmeier; they do all kinds of repairing and job work, and make a specialty of horse shoeing.

Page 586

J. H. Mackroth

a native of Germany, was born in October, 1848, and was given the advantages of a college education. He came to America in 1868, and was employed by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy railroad company as civil engineer until 1870; then two years for the Missouri, Iowa and Nebraska railroad, and three years in the office of the latter company serving as auditor. After this he went in business for himself, and is now a member of the firm of Clark and Mackroth, dealers in agricultural implements. Mr. Mackroth resides at 1408 Nicollet Avenue. He was married in 1875 to Belle Kelso. Their children are Otis and Stuart.

Page 586

D. A. Macurdy

born at Dunbarton, Now Hampshire, in 1832. For many years he kept a general store in his native state. August 11th, 1862 he enlisted in the Fourteenth New Hampshire Volunteers as private, and was promoted to captain; he was honorably discharged July 28th, 1865. He went to St. Paul in November, 1878, and after a residence of a few months there, removed to this city. In June, 1879, he was employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul railroad company and has charge of shipping the lumber from this point. He married Salome Fellows in 1852., They have buried their three children.

Page 586

C. Madson

a native of Denmark, was born October 11th, 1849. He came to the United States in 1871, and located at St. Paul. He removed to Minneapolis, and was employed in the North Star Woolen Mills until the spring of 1876; in September of that year he started in the grocery trade in partnership with Mr. Johnson. They own the property they are occupying, No. 1216 Western Avenue. Mr. Madson was married in 1879 to Lotta Johnson.

Page 586

Louis Maeder

was born in Switzerland, January 1st, 1831. He came to the United States in 1854, and passed a few months in Ohio and, two years in Indiana; then spent six years in Wisconsin in the brewing business. In 1862 he came to this city and kept the toll house, at the bridge near Orth's brewery, some time, and in 1865 became proprietor of the hotel where he now is, at 229 Main street, N. E. His marriage with Theresa Schab took place August 2d, 1862. They have had five children: Elizabeth, Josephine, Charles, Albert and Louis.

Page 587

W. D. Mahaffy

a native of Ireland, was born September 25th, 1848. He was educated at Queen's College, Belfast. On leaving school he removed to Canada, and located in Toronto, where he carried on an extensive painting and decorating establishment. In July, 1880, he came to Minneapolis, and contemplates making this his home.

Page 587

Mrs. B. Mahoney

is the owner and landlady of the Excelsior House, situated at the corner of Second street and Second Avenue. This house was built in 1872; it is 33x60 feet and two stories in height. Mrs. Mahoney was left a widow in 1871, with a family of seven children.

Page 587

Captain Lewis Maish

was born July 2d, 1840, at York, Pennsylvania. When sixteen years of age, he was apprenticed to the Variety Iron Works of York, and served there four years. In August, 1860, he took an active part in organizing a company, and was appointed second lieutenant of Company B, Eighty-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers; he was promoted to captain in October, 1863. In June, 1864 he was captured and held as a prisoner of war for nine months; then he made his escape, and was mustered out of service in April, 1865. In September, 1867, he came to Minneapolis and has since been in business here; he is a member of the firm of Hashow, Maish and Davis of the Variety Iron Works. Mr. Maish was married in 1863 to Jennie Gaenslen. Their only living child is Nettie. Mrs. Maish was well known by many of the sick and wounded soldiers for whom she cared. For her persistence in aiding the wounded Union soldiers, she was arrested, by order of a rebel general and sent with forty-four Union ladies to Richmond, and incarcerated in "Castle Thunder", until exchanged.

Page 587

August Malmsten

a native of Sweden, was born in 1844. He learned the trade of machinist in the old country, and in 1869 came to America. He located in Minneapolis and worked at his trade with different firms, until he engaged in business for himself. He was married in this city, in August, 1871, to Miss Annie Johnson. Their children are: Mary, Nellie, Annie and Jennie. The family reside at 1121, Eighth street South.

Page 587

William Marriott

was born in Nottingham, England, March 27th, 1832. He came to America in 1849, and served an apprenticeship in Henry Diston's saw works at Philadelphia. After learning his trade he began business in company with Henry Diston, at Cleveland, Ohio, manufacturing saws, files, etc. He made and lost a large fortune, then became discouraged and retired from business for six years, during which time he invented Marriott's celebrated boiler compounds He came to this city in 1879, and was employed by different firms until 1880, when he again went into business, manufacturing all kinds of saws, at No. 256, Sixth Avenue south.

Page 587

Albert Marsh

born in Aroostook county, Maine, June 21st, 1840. He moved with his parents to Bangor, where he attended the public schools until 1858, when he entered Kent's Hill College, and graduated in the spring of 1861. Soon after leaving school he enlisted in the Second Maine Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded at the second battle of Bull Run, and taken prisoner, but was paroled, and returned just in time to participate in the battle of Fredericksburg; another time when he was captured he made his escape by swimming a river. His regiment was mustered out in June, 1863, and the following September he re-enlisted. He received four wounds, and was several times taken prisoner, and served until honorably discharged in 1866. He came here in 1878, and since the fall of 1879 has served on the police force. His wife was Eva Sumner. Their children are: Arnold and Fred.

Page 587

Jacob Marten

was born in Germany, in 1838. He came to the United States in 1864, and lived one year in Carver county, Minnesota, engaged in farming. In 1865 he came to this city, worked about five months in a brewery, then was employed in the woolen mills nearly five years, and passed two years in the teaming business. In 1872 he erected the building at 1501 Washington Avenue south, and for four years kept a grocery and feed store. In the summer of 1880 he built at 1507 Washington Avenue south, where he is now located. He married Mena Copul in 1867. Their children are: Anna, Mary, Amelia, Lillian, John, and William.

Page 588

H. M. Martin

came to Minneapolis in 1857, and worked at printing until 1861, when he enlisted and served three years in the First Minnesota Volunteers; afterwards two years on the frontier. In 1866, he returned to this city arid again engaged in printing until 1868, when he took up his present business. He is located at 209 Nicollet Avenue, and deals in soda, mineral and excelsior waters. October 7th, 1866, he married Matilda Peterson. They have had four children; only two are living.

Page 588

Mahlon Martindell

a native of Lambertville, New Jersey was born April 20th, 1839. He learned carpentering, and in 1870, moved to Iowa, where he remained one and one-half years. In 1872, he came here and worked in the Washburn A mill, and has since been employed as mill-wright at the different mills of this city. On the 18th of January, 1866, his marriage with Rachel Dalrymple took place. Five children have been born to them, Harry, Ella, Laura, Leva, Lille and Bessie.

Page 588

Col. Hans Mattson

editor of the Stats Tidning, was born in Onestad, Sweden, December 23d, 1832. He received his primary education at Christianstad, Sweden, and at the age of seventeen, entered military service. Two yearn later he left the service and emigrated to the United States, arriving in June, 1851. He engaged in various occupations in the eastern states, and the second winter in this country, he mastered the English language. His parents came to this country in 1853, and together they went to Illinois. In August of that year, he located with a colony of his countrymen, in Goodhue county, Minnesota, and at once took a prominent position in the public affairs of his township. He speculated in lots and lands until the crash of 1857, which left him in debt. He then began the study of law with Warren Bristol, now a judge in Arizona territory, and after one year was admitted to practice. He occupied several prominent offices in Goodhue county, and on the breaking out of the war, enlisted as captain of Company D, Third Minnesota Infantry. Was promoted through the intervening offices, and came home in 1865 as colonel of his regiment. He then engaged in the practice of law until 1866, when he went to Chicago as editor of a Swedish newspaper. January, 1867, he returned to Minnesota as secretary of the state board of immigration, and in 1869, was elected secretary of state, but went to Europe in the interests of railroad corporations, before his term expired. Remained in Europe four years, and returned to this state, and has since resided in Minneapolis. He is chief editor of the Stats Tidning, a Swedish newspaper, and general manager of the Swedish Tribune of Chicago. He was married November 23d, 1855, in the town of Vasa, Goodhue county, to Cherstin Peterson, who was born in Sweden, April 5th, 1838. Their marriage ceremony was the first performed in that township. After passing through many hardships in the course of his life, he is now enjoying the comforts of a happy home.

Page 588

Paul Marto

born January 7th, 1848, in Vermont. In 1861 he went to Fort Plain, New York, and remained until he enlisted, in 1862, in the one hundred and twenty-eighth New York Volunteers. After serving three years he returned to Fort Plain, and for five years was engaged in the manufacture of cigars. In 1870 he removed to Minneapolis. He continued in the cigar business about two years, then went back to New York for a short time, and thence to Bennington, Vermont, where he resided until 1878, when he once more came to this city, and went into business at No. 53 Central Avenue. He married Amanda Clapper, in 1869.

Page 588

George Maskell

a native of England, was born January 11th, 1839, in Essex county. In 1878 he came to the United States, and first located in Clay county, Minnesota, where he was employed in farming until 1874. He then came to this city and opened the first meat stall in the new market, where he is still located. Mr. Maskell's family consists of a wife and one son.

Page 588

William Massolt

born January 1st, 1831, in Germany. In 1850 he moved to Pennsylvania, and lived at Allentown until 1854 when he went to Seneca county, Ohio. The year following he came to this city, and hence to Stillwater, where he resided nine years, and then spent four years at Eau Claire, Wisconsin. He returned to Minneapolis in 1868, and engaged in bottling ginger ale, soda and mineral waters, etc. He is at 126 Plymouth Avenue. In 1861 he married Mary Costmann. Their living children are: Matilda, Albert, Anna, Augusta, Willie, Ida, Lillie, and Charlie.

Page 589

A. C. Matthews

was born in Montgomery county, New York, February 1st, 1832. He went with his parents to Pennsylvania, and learned carpentering. At the age of twenty-one years he removed to Ohio, and thence to Illinois. In 1861 he enlisted in the Seventeenth Illinois, Company D, as private, and was promoted to first lieutenant. He was several times wounded, and in February, 1868 resigned on account of disability. At Winona, Minnesota, he was engaged in carpenter work about ten years, and removed to this city in 1873. He was employed at the Washburn 'A' and 'B' mills until July, 1878; since that time has been at the 'C' mill. In 1863 he married Jenny Taylor. Their children are: Harry, Charles, Frank, Minnie, George, Ernest, Grace, and a babe.

Page 589

Samuel Martty

was born in Switzerland, February 25th, 1821. He came to the United States in 1848 and resided in the state of New York until 1852, when he removed to Dakota county, Minnesota, and bought a farm. He has made Minneapolis his home since 1862. In September, 1879, he opened a drugstore at 103 Plymouth Avenue. Mr. Martty married, in 1846, Margaret Hilficker. They are the parents of four children:, Mary, Sophie, Othmar, and Lizzie.

Page 589

Nicholas Mangen

was born May 6th, 1856, in Germany. In 1866 he came to Minneapolis and in 1876 commenced blacksmithing, he also learned the trade of wagon-making, and is now doing a good business. He was formerly in company with Mr. Wier, but in December, 1880, Mr. Mangen bought his partner's interest, and is now manufacturing wagons, sleighs, etc., besides doing general blacksmithiing. In 1880, he married Annie Jaspers, who has borne him one son.

Page 589

Nicholas Mauren

was born June 25th, 1842, in Prussia. He came with his parents to America and located at Chicago, Illinois, where he remained nine years. In October, 1861, he came to Minnesota and the year following enlisted in Company I, Sixth Minnesota Volunteers. He was promoted to corporal and served three years, being discharged with the regiment in August, 1865. On his return he located in Minneapolis, and has since resided here, engaged in the manufacture of barrels, and is the business manager of the East Side Cooperative Barrel Company. In October, 1871, he married Anna Thielen. They are the parents of five children.

Page 589

E. M. May

a native of New York, was born February 25tb, 1829, in Madison county. When comparatively young, he learned the confectionery business at Troy, New York, and has followed it ever since. In 1874 he came to Minneapolis and has become very popular here as a confectioner and caterer. His marriage with Lydia Smith took place in 1851, at Oxford, Chenango county, New York. Their family consists of two sons and one daughter.

Page 589

J. B. Maynard

was born in Montreal, Canada, January 19th, 1845. He learned milling at home and in 1869 moved to Rochester, New York, and worked at his trade there five years. After a residence of two years in Illinois, he returned to Rochester, thence to Toronto, Canada, and in January, 1879, came to Minneapolis. Since June, 1880, he has had charge of the North Star mill. His wife was Harriet Grieve, whom he married in 1875. She has borne him two children.

Page 589

S. McAninch

was born in Licking county, Ohio, December 6th, 1846. He accompanied his parents to Valparaiso, Indiana, in 1855. In 1861 he enlisted and served three years in the war of the rebellion, participating in the battles of Nashville, Altoona, Atlanta, Dalton and many others. After leaving the army he lived in Indiana five years, then went to Michigan and was employed in a barrel factory there three years. In 1873 he came to this city and was in a planing mill, and worked for Bisbee and Moses until 1877, since which time he has been running stationary engines for different parties. He married Ida Hunter in 1870. Their children are: Harry and Orvil.

Page 589

William McArdle

was born in Ottawa, Canada, October 5th, 1848. He moved to the state of New York in 1865, and lived there two years. In 1867 he spent a short time in Kansas in the cattle herding business. He came to Minneapolis and engaged in lumbering until May, 1880, since then has been in the saloon business with Mr. Walker. July 28th, 1879, he married Miss Kate Rice, who has borne him one child, Susan Kate.

Page 590

Joseph McCartin

a native of Lonsdale, Rhode Island, was born November 26th, 1857. When a boy, he came with his parents to Minneapolis, and since 1866 has been in the Union mill, with the exception of two years that he was employed in the North Star woolen mills.

Page 590

Thomas McClary

pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, was born in Canada in 1841. He was licensed to preach in 1859, and appointed to Eureka in 1860, on a salary of fifty dollars; to Glencoe one year, having a revival and making many additions to the church. At Shelbyville one year, St. Peter and Cleveland one year, at Morristown for two years, then to Anoka for three years, Red Wing two years. Then to the Seventh street Methodist Episcopal Church for three years, during which time the membership was increased from about sixty to three hundred. During that time, organized the Washington Avenue Methodist Church, which is now in a flourishing condition. Organized and built a mission chapel on the comer of Cataract and Third streets, also organized and built a mission chapel on the comer of Eighteenth Avenue south and Twenty-second street. From the Seventh street church he was transferred to the upper Iowa conference as pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal church at Davenport. Then transferrd back to Minnesota and stationed at Mankato for three years, paying in that time fifteen hundred dollars of the floating debt, and adding by conversion, some two hundred members to the church. Commenced about that time a course of temperance and literary lectures. Among his popular ones are: "Diana of the Ephesians," "Henry Wilson," "Struggle for a Home," "Joan of Are," and "Sunshine in Labor." Among the many incidents of his eventful life we cannot refrain from mentioning the following: Weary of traveling on foot over his large circuit, he bought a horse for thirty-seven dollars, paying ten dollars down, then a harness had to be improvised; some scraps of leather were obtained and with tow strings for buckles and using an old piece of the britching of an old harness for a breast plate and a bed cord for reins and a jumper for a sleigh, with a white hat on his head and a pair of green goggles on his nose, our hero in the cause of Methodism started, carrying with him in his primitive rig at times, all there was of Methodism.

At another time, the ladies made out of an old three cornered blanket, a coat for him, with the broad stripe around the bottom. When at another place a broken merchant gave him a cut away coat with the sleeves much too short for him, which he wore for a while and then traded with a Pennsylvania farmer for a capacious shad bellied one, which was afterwards cut up and made into a vest for him. At another place he received for a year's preaching one hundred ears of corn and two chickens, and had to catch them himself and carried them six miles on horseback to get them cooked. At one collection on a very important occasion, after the contents of the contribution box had been carefully examined and finding only a few pennies and a button or two in it, he with much gravity of manner told them it was not worth a benediction, and dismissed the congregation without it. Married Miss Lizzie Fowble of Ohio. They have four children: Clarence O., Clara H., Ella Zue (the elocutionist), and Corrine.

Page 590

S. J. McCarty

was born in Ireland, April 7th, 1841. He came to America with his parents in 1847, and located at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. At the age of seventeen, he commenced learning the machinist's trade, and in 1857, moved to Meeker county, Minnesota, but in about three years he returned to Pittsburgh and worked at his trade until 1862, when he came to Minnesota and taught school in Meeker county. In the spring of 1869, he came to this city and was employed four months in the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad shops, then worked six years as foreman of the North Star Iron Works, and for over two years as O.A. Pray's foreman. Since June, 1880, he has been working at mill machinery, forging and general blacksmithing. He was married in 1865 to Lizzie Campbell, who died in 1878, leaving four children.

Page 590

A. S. McCulloch

was born in 1836, in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. Until twenty-five years of age, he lived on a farm, then engaged in mercantile business six years, and was for a time treasurer and collector for the Harrisburg and Potomac Railroad Company. He came to Minneapolis in 1874, formed a partnership with D. M. Gilmore, and engaged in the manufacture of furniture. Their factory is located in South Minneapolis.

Page 591

M. McCune

a native of Ohio, was born in 1837. He moved to Ripon, Wisconsin, in 1854, and worked at farming twenty years; he then went to Austin, Minnesota, and resided until October, 1880, when he came to this city, and started in the restaurant and lodging-house business at 18 Washington Avenue north.

Page 591

Ernest McDonald

was born December 14th, 1848, in Maine. He came west when a child and located at Brooklyn, in 1853. He removed to Minneapolis in 1859; was in the grocery business and working in the pineries until 1875, when he opened a restaurant on Nicollet Avenue; he remained there about three years, then moved to his present location, Boston Oyster House No. 200 Hennepin Avenue. His wife was Annie Lewis. Their children are Nellie and Minnie.

Page 591

Francis S. McDonald

was born June 10th, 1835, in Cumberland county, Maine. At the age of seventeen he went to Saccarappa, and worked in a cotton factory through the summer, and in the fall removed to Lewiston, where he was employed in the same way. After spending one year in Massachusetts, he came to Minnesota. Served one term as county commissioner of Wright county, and was assessor of Otsego. In 1861 he enlisted as private in the Third Minnesota Volunteers, and was promoted to sergeant. He had command of his company in the Indian campaign, and was commissioned second lieutenant. He re-enlisted in Hatch's Battalion, and was detailed as clerk in the draft rendezvous at Fort Snelling until 1865, when he was mustered out. In 1866 he was appointed postmaster, which office he held about five years, when he resigned. In 1868 he come to this city, and was employed by different parties until 1874, when he was appointed deputy and afterwards elected county auditor. He was married in 1857, to Elizabeth Spencer. Their children are: Mary, Frank, Charles, and Nellie.

Page 591

James McDaniel

was born in Madison county, New York, December 1st, 1847. He went to Manlius, Onondaga county, in 1864, to learn the milling business, and worked there fourteen months. He then returned to Madison, county for one and one-half years, and after residing in Oneida county about a year, he went to Cazenovia. His next move was to Dexter, Michigan, where he remained two yean, and in March, 1874, came to this city. He worked several years in the A and B mills, and now occupies the position of head millor in the C. In 1878 he married Fannie Robie, who has borne him one child, Albert.

Page 591

John McDonald

was born November 2d, 1830, in Maine. In 1847 he went on a whaling expedition. After two years experience he gave up this business, and sailed for San Francisco. They were totally wrecked on the coast of Panama, but were picked up by another vessel and continued their journey. He traveled about from California to the Sandwich Islands, China, Cape Horn, and Columbia, until 1850, when he went to Boston, thence to Mobile, and in 1852 he came to Minnesota and made a claim of 160 acres in Wright county, which he sold two years later, and came here. In 1861 he enlisted, and since being honorably discharged has divided his time between running as pilot on the upper Mississippi and lumbering. He married Mary J. Wood, in 1862. Of their three children but one is living, Addie C.

Page 591

John W. McDonald

born January 17th, 1842, in Canada. He worked at milling there five years, and in 1866 moved to Faribault, Minnesota, continuing in the same business. He then spent two years at Clinton Falls, nine months at Mantorville, one year at Northfield, and in 1871 came here. He was employed at the Washburn B, the Zenith, the Palisade and the Humboldt mills until the explosion, since which time he has been at the Pettit. His marriage with Mrs. Sarah Coburn took place in January, 1871. Their children are: Agnes and Irving.

Page 591

P. McDonald

a native of Canada, was born April 4th, 1848. He went to Maine in 1864, and remained six months, then followed lumbering eight years in Michigan, and was two years in Wisconsin, engaged in the saloon and lumber business. In 1877 he came to this city, continuing in the lumbering business until he opened his sample room on Hennepin Avenue.

Page 591

James McGolrick

the subject of this sketch, is a native of Tipperary, Ireland, where he received a thorough theological education in All Hallow's College, Dublin. Upon the completion of his studies in 1867, he came to America remaining one year in St. Paul, where he was engaged as assistant priest at the Cathedral. In 1868 he came to Minneapolis, and soon there after secured the grounds on which his house is located; first erected a small frame building in which services were held until his new church the first Catholic church on the West Side, was built and dedicated. He has been foremost in every good work connected with his society, and is universally esteemed by the citizens of Minneapolis, irrespective of sectarian association or religious views.

Page 592

S. N. McGaughey

was born in 1827, at Mount Carmel, Indiana. In 1847 he went to Decatur county, and was in the saw-mill business nine years; then moved to Minnesota and worked at farming six or seven years. He then passed some months at Red Wing, dealing in wheat, and in 1863 came to this city. For a while he was employed in manufacturing pumps; afterward spent two years with the North Star Iron Works, and one year in the fence works. Since 1875 he has been in the Union Planing Mill. In 1848 he married Isabella Wynn. Their children are Viola, Margarette and Cora.

Page 592

William McGregor

was born in Montreal, Canada, March 6th, 1852. After receiving a liberal education in his native place, he embarked in the grocery business in 1875 and continued it until coming to Minneapolis in 1879, when for one year he was in the oil business. In 1880 he bought an interest in the meat market of Sallada and Company, 727 Washington Avenue south.

Page 592

A. G. McKenzie

born November 11th, 1821, in Beaver county, Pennsylvania. From 1840 until 1850, he acted as pilot of a steamboat on the Ohio river, and then came to St. Anthony and was in the employ of Benson and Patterson in the stage line. He was in a hotel near Fort Snelling about two years; then returned and opened a restaurant in St. Anthony. In 1863 he went East, but came here again in 1865, and went into the Sutler's department at Fort Snelling. He passed eighteen months at the Black Hills, and traveled from 1874 until 1880, when he opened a restaurant at 113 Central Avenue. His wife was Joanna Christmas; their marriage took place in June, 1852. Three children have been born to them: Don Carlos, Isaac and Harry.

Page 592

R. H. McLaskey

a native of New Brunswick, was born in 1844. He lived two years in Iowa, and in 1872 removed to Minneapolis. He was in the lumbering business three years, and for the past five years has been connected with the mills of this city. July 18th, 1867, Mr. McLaskey married Josephine Kildea. They have had five children: Henry, Frank, Willie, Cora and Ernest.

Page 592

Peter McKernan

was born in Ireland, December, 1833. He came to America in 1848, and received his education in New York. In 1857 he came to Minneapolis and worked at farming until 1861, when he enlisted in Hatch's battalion and served until honorably discharged in 1865. He returned to this city, and from 1872 acted as street commissioner, until he entered the police force, in which he serves as patrol. In February, 1857, he married Ellen Rochford. They have had five children, Ellen, Margaret, Ferrel, Peter and Mary. Only Mary survives.

Page 592

James McMillan

a native of Maine, was born October 24th, 1856, in Oxford county. In 1872 he came to Minneapolis and was employed in the North Star woolen mill, in the wool and sheep-skin department, until 1876, when, with a partner, he started in his present business. They are at 109 First Avenue south, and deal in hides, wool. tallow, etc.

Page 592

James McMullen

was born July 21st, 1824, at Reading, Pennsylvania. When ten years of age he went as cabin boy on the bark White Oak. He followed the sea, on various vessels, until 1849, Visiting all parts of the world, and the last three years being captain of vessels in the West India trade. On leaving the water, in 1849, he moved to St. Anthony, with his family. He worked several years at carpentering, and then went into the general merchandise business, with H. Morrison, at Pine Bend. He built a shingle mill on the St. Anthony Water Power Company's dam. In 1878 it was moved and his present saw mill erected. Mr. McMullen was several years a member of the St. Anthony city council. In 1849 he married Charlotte McKnight, who has borne him three children; the living are Albert and Willie.

Page 592

Albert E. McMullen

was born June 30, 1851, in Minneapolis and was one of the first white children born in this city. He attended the public schools and University and assisted his father, who was a contractor, until twenty years old, when he engaged as book-keeper and teller in the Exchange and Savings Bank. He occupied the same positions and that of cashier, in different banks until 1879, since then he has given his whole attention to the lumber mill in which he is a partner.; he is also one of the firm of Wilcox and Co., who own a general store at Big Stone Lake. In 1878 he married Minnie Wilcox; she has borne him one son.

Page 593

George McMullen

was born in March, 1819, at Ottawa, Canada. He learned the trade of contractor from his father. In 1857, he left his native city, came to Minneapolis and has since followed his trade here. As an evidence of his popularity and worth, we mention some of the leading buildings of the city which he erected. In 1860 he built Harrison's block, the oldest cut stone building here; Mendenhall's bank, residence and green house; T. A. Harrison's house; the Centenary Methodist Church; St. Mark's Episcopal Church; the Athenaeum; City Hall; Church of the Immaculate Conception; Washburn A and C mill, two stone elevators belonging to the Washburn mills, the dam wall for Washburn and Company, foundation for the Millers Association elevator, and Taylor's mill; also the anchors for the suspension bridge and finished the towers; he built the stone arch bridge; North Star Iron Works; the Pillsbury A mill; and is now at work on the James Hill canal.

Page 593

R. S. McMurdy, M. D.

was born July, 1824, at Albany, New York. He received his education there, and graduated from the Albany Medical College in 1846; for several years he was city physician of that place. He practiced for a time In Ohio, and since the spring of 1873 has been in Minneapolis. Dr. McMurdy married in 1847. His wife died, leaving one child, Robert C. His second wife was Mary Pease, whom he married in 1873. They have two children.

Page 593

W. W. McNair

of the law firm Lochren McNair and Gilfillan, was born in 1836, in New York. In 1854, he went to Wisconsin, and March, 1857, removed to this city. Soon after his arrival in Minneapolis he was admitted to practice in the United States territorial court. He has repeatedly been nominated by his party, but has never held office, with the exception of being county attorney in 1861-1862, mayor of St. Anthony two years, and several times a member of school boards. In 1862, he married Louise, sister of Hon. E. M. Wilson, of this city. They are the parents of two children.

Page 593

W. D. McNiece

a native of Vermont, was born October 3rd , 1845, in Orange county. In 1861, he went to New York city, remained eight years. He was four years in the drug trade in St. Lawrence county, and then returned to New York city, where he resided until 1878, when he came to Minneapolis and became a partner of Mr. Bohan, in the boot and shoe business, 104 Central Avenue.

Page 593

William McVeigh

a native of Ottawa City, Ontario, Canada, was born June 5th, 1839. He came to Minneapolis in 1872, and was in the carpet and dry goods business with McConnell and Company, six years. In August, 1880, he became a partner of Mr. Kenyon in an extensive wholesale and retail carpet business.

Page 593

Daniel McWaters

was born in Muirkirk, Ayreshire, Scotland. He came to America in 1866, and to Minneapolis in 1875. He engaged with the North-western foundry as foreman, and remained with the company until the spring of 1880, when he formed a partnership with R. Peet in an establishment known as the Minneapolis Brass Works. January, 1875, he married Sarah Paul. They are the parents of two children.

Page 593

J. O. F. Meagher

was born in 1852, at St. Paul. He went to Troy, New York, and learned the laundry and dyeing business. He returned to Minnesota and in 1879 bought the place where he is now in business, No. 26 Second street north. The works are run by steam, and it is in every way a first-class institution.

Page 593

George H. Mead

was born at Waukegan, Illinois, in l847. He became a resident of Minneapolis in the fall of 1865. He was in the omnibus company twelve years, then formed a partnership with Mr. Robinson. They are now proprietors of a livery, boarding and sale stable at 220 Third street south.

Page 593

Henry Melstroh

was born in 1833, in Germany. He came to the United States in 1864, locating in Carver county, Minnesota, and worked one year at tailoring. In 1865 he came to this city and the next year went to Stillwater, where he resided until 1873, when he returned to Minneapolis. In 1876 he removed to his present location in the American House, No. 800 Marshall street, East Division. January, 1869, he married Rachel Macks. They have three children; the living are: Joseph and Katie.

Page 594

R. J. Mendenhall

loan agent, was born in Guilford county, North Carolina, November 25th, 1828. He attended school a few years in New England, then went to Ohio, and in 1853 returned to North Carolina. The next year he went to New York, and in 1855 to Iowa as civil engineer; the year following he came to this city, and has since been in business here. On his arrival in Minneapolis he could not find a dray to haul his trunk and was obliged to get a wheel barrow. Mr. Mendenhall was married February 11th, 1858, to Abby Swift, of Massachusetts. They have no children.

Page 594

J. C. Menor

born December 24th, 1847, in Ashland county, Ohio. He learned the milling business in his native town, and came to this city in 1873; he remained only about three months, and went to Red Wing, where he was employed as second miller. He returned to Minneapolis in June, 1874, and was with E. V. White two years. He then went to Lanesboro, and remained until July, 1878, when he returned and fitted up the Standard mill, where he has since occupied the position of head miller.

Page 594

Gregor Menzel

was born in Bielendorf, in the province of Silesia, Prussia, August 21st, 1826. For his family record, see volume eleven, page 397, of American Cyclopedia., His father died before Gregor's birth, but his last request was that if his offspring was a boy, and lived, he should learn a trade. When five years of age he nearly lost his life in a flood, which swept away their little home and nearly all the property his mother possessed. When ten years old he went on foot across the mountains to Friedeberg, Austria, to live with an uncle, and fulfill his father's last wish. In July, 1842, having learned the blacksmith's trade, he returned on foot to Prussia, and went to work in a large machine shop, near Glatz, to learn the machinists trade. After this he considered it necessary to travel and work in different places, in order to perfect himself as a mechanic. He walked to Breslau, Frankfort, Berlin, Hamburg, and Bremen, being employed in different shops. While working near the latter place, he became acquainted with Henrietta D. Roesner, whom he married. Soon after they started for this country, stopped a short time in London, and arrived at New York April 7th, 1847. He at once commenced work with James Bogardus, the celebrated inventor (see volume two, page 780, American Cyclopedia) and worked for him until August, 1850, when he removed to Milwaukee. He was given the position of foreman in the machinery department of the Menominee Locomotive Manufacturing Company, and held the situation until December 1st, 1854, when he went into partnership with L. Keuck, and under the name of Menzel and Keuck, carried on steam engine building. In 1855, M. and M. Stone bought Mr. Keuck's interest, and the new firm name was Menzel, Stone and Company. They were also extensively engaged in manufacturing threshing machines, and in 1855, made the first threshing engine used in the west. The following year he took an active part in politics, helped organize the Republican party, and was the presidential elector from the first district of Wisconsin, and cast his vote for John C. Fremont and Dayton, in the electoral college. On the first of February, 1857, Messrs. Cummings and Goodrich bought the Stone interest. The shop was moved and enlarged, and carried on under the name of Menzel, Cummings and Goodrich. The same year the first elevator was built in Milwaukee, by Angus Smith and Company. For this he manufactured the engine, boiler, and all the other machinery and iron work. He also made the first mash machine driven by power in that city, for V. Blatz's brewery. After years of prosperity came reverses. The financial crisis of 1857 which swept the whole country, relieved him of all his hard earnings. He then devoted his time to inventions. He obtained a patent on a steam boiler, April 5th, 1859 (see Patent Office Report of 1859, and for cut see Scientific American of October 1st, 1859), and also on a fire and burglar-proof safe, April 24th, 1860 (see Patent Office Report of 1860). One of his large safes was bought by J. Dean and Company of this city in 1866. In the spring of 1860, he took an eight-stamp steam quartz mill to Colorado, put it in operation, and returned with the intention of building another quartz-mill to work the claims he secured in Colorado; but the rebellion broke out and his plans were frustrated. In the fall of 1861, he took charge of the elevator and engines for Angus Smith and Company and remained with them until June 11th, 1864, when he accepted the position of superintendent of the Bay State Iron Manufacturing Company, at that time the largest works of the kind in Milwaukee. His first work there was to build a 250 horsepower, low pressure beam engine, it being the first in that city, and was built for Mr. Smith's new elevator, A. In 1866 the steam engine, boiler, etc., were built under his supervision for J. Dean and Company's Pacific mill, and August 16th of that year he arrived in Minneapolis, to put the machinery in the mill. It was accomplished on the 8th of October, and the firm were so well pleased with his work that they presented him with one hundred dollars, as a token of appreciation. He liked this city so well that he determined to make it his home, in time. July 1st, 1868, he bought an interest in the Cream City Iron Works, in Milwaukee, and the business was carried on under the name of Menzel, Stowell and Company, until November, 1870, when he withdrew from the firm, to come to Minneapolis and accept the position offered him as superintendent of the North Star Iron Works, of this city. The following is some of the work done under his supervision: the celebrated saw-mill of W. D. Washburn and Company, at Anoka, also Isaac Staples', at Stillwater; the engine at the Nicollet House, engine and machinery in the City Hall, including passenger and freight elevator, the first in the city; the engines at Captain Rollins' sawmill, Barnard and Company's factory, etc.; he also designed all of the above machinery. On the first of April 1874, he formed a partnership with his son, Charles G., and D. C. Howard, to establish the Northwestern Foundry. The works are located on the corner of Third street and Tenth Avenue south, on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway. The first gray iron castings were made July 13th, and the first car-wheels, first in the city, were cast October 12th, 1874. On the 1st of September, L. V. N. Blakeman bought the interests of C. G. Menzel and D. C. Howard, and the business is still carried on under the name of G. Menzel and Company. It may well be said of the firm, they have a good, hard-earned reputation. His family circle, until their arrival here, was unbroken, and consisted of his wife Henrietta, Maggie H., Carrie M., Charles G., Minnie A., and Emma D.; but to his great sorrow, his eldest and beloved daughter, Maggie H., passed away, January 24th, 1872.

Page 595

T. E. Mercer

a native of Illinois, was born at Peoria, June 27th, 1850. He came to Minneapolis in 1864, and attended school several years two of which were spent at the University. He moved to Grinnell, Iowa and engaged in the hotel business and followed it until 1877, when he returned to this city and was in the grocery business until April 15th, 1880. He then opened the restaurant and oyster house on Third street, between Nicollet and Hennepin Avenue. He married Emma Brown, May 15th, 1872.

Page 595

O. C. Merriman

born July 27th, 1827, in St. Lawrence county, New York. From 1854 until 1859 he resided in Wisconsin, then removed to St. Anthony, and has since been identified with this place. For a time he engaged in the practice of law, but since 1870 has been in the lumber business, he was a member of the firm of L. Butler and Company. The firm of Merriman, Barrows and Company, as at present organized, dates from April, 1878. Mr. Merriman's wife was Hosanna Herring of St. Lawrence county, New York, their marriage took place in 1854. They have four boys and one girl living.

Page 595

Charles Metzger

was born May 19th, 1842, at Albany, New York. In 1849 he accompanied his parents to Galena, Illinois, where he lived until 1856; in the fall of that year he came to Minnesota and settled in St. Paul, where he learned the painter's trade. He enlisted in 1861 and was discharged in 1862. He re-enlisted in 1864, serving until the close of the war. Since 1870 he has lived in this city and been employed as painter and house decorator. September 12th, 1865, he married Charlotte Halgren of Illinois.

Page 595

Fritz Metzke

a native of Prussia, was born May 2d, 1827. He came to the United States in 1852 and located in Chicago. He was in the hat, cap and fur business until July, 1880, when he came here and opened what is known as the Chicago Exchange, at 117 Nicollet Avenue. In l854 he married Ino Kirchner. They have had seven children, only two are living.

Page 595

John D. Meyer

a native of Germany, was born November 28th, 1820. He came to the United States in 1852 and lived in New York two years. He moved to St. Louis and two, years later to La Crosse, Wisconsin, being all the while engaged in the dyeing business. In 1866 he came to this city; his steam dyeing establishment is at No. 2 Hennepin Avenue. He married Mary Sefried November 5th, 1857. They have six children: Amelia, Mary, Bertha, Emma, Olga and John.

Page 596

Jacob Meyrs

was born in New York, June 12th, 1840. He was employed in farming and teaming until 1866, since then he has been a resident of Minneapolis, and is a member of the firm of Meyrs and Davis, dray line. In October, 1870, he married Carrie Hinglesback. Their children are: Clara, Mary and Amelia.

Page 596

J. W. Michie

was born in Canada, in 1851. His father being a miller, he has been in that business since early boyhood. In 1876, he came to Minneapolis, and since that time, has been employed by the Pillsburys in the different mills. His marriage with Delphia Lawrence, occurred in this city, February 19th, 1879. One child has been born to them, Charles.

Page 596

W. A. Miller

manager of the Minneapolis department of the Pioneer Press, commenced his career in a printing office, where he served a regular apprenticeship of seven years, mastering every detail of the business, but having a love for mercantile pursuits, abandoned the trade. Engaging in business, became a traveler, and, in the course of time, made the grand circuit of the globe. When the war of the rebellion broke out, he was in Australia, but upon receipt of the news, immediately started for home, and entered. the Union service. He came to Minneapolis in November 1875, and at once was placed in charge of the Minneapolis branch of the Pioneer Press, to which he is at present devoting all his time and energies.

Page 596

J. H. Miller

a native of Oswego county, New York, was born December 9th, 1852. He learned the milling business at home, and in December, 1872, came to Minneapolis and engaged with C. A. Pillsbury as night grinder, after that he worked as stone-dresser. He then had charge of the Empire mill six months, after which he worked one year at the Pillsbury mill, and since August, 1878, he has occupied the position of head miller at the Excelsior.

Page 596

J. W. Miller

born April 22d, 1858 at Chateaugay, New York. At the age of fifteen, he went to Malone, learned the tinner's trade, and worked there until 1878, at which time he removed to this city. He worked for Stafford and Company until April, 1879, when he started for himself in the stove and hardware business. In September, 1880, Mr. Smith became his partner, forming a young, enterprising and Prosperous firm. Mr. Miller married in 1878, Jennie Heath. They have one child, Mary.

Page 596

Walter Miller

a native of England, came to the United States in 1869, and located in Minnesota City. He remained there two years, engaged in milling, having learned that business in England. He then lived in Lanesboro about one and one-half years, and from that time was employed in different mills in this state until May 1880; since then he has been working as packer in the Standard mill of this city.

Page 596

Sylvester Mills

came to Minneapolis in 1855, and for seven years worked a farm in this township. He now has a bowling saloon and bar at 16 Second street south.

Page 596

David A. Milne

born March 15th, 1853, in Canada. In 1864 he went to Cedar Falls, Iowa, and the next year, commenced working in a mill. He removed to Nashua in 1871, and for two years had charge of E. P. Greely's mill; he then came to this city, and was employed by Mr. Cahill one year. In the spring of 1864 he rented the Money Creek Mill, at Houston, Minnesota. From there went to Salem, Wisconsin, and in 1877, returned to Minneapolis. He was with Washburn until, July, 1879, and since then has been at the Galaxy, where he is the head miller. He married Emma Pattison, August 19th 1875.

Page 596

Charles A. Mitchell

business manager of the Tribune, was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, September 16th, 1845. His first business venture was in connection with the Boston Gold Mining Company, in the fall of 1865. The company sent him to Colorado, where he remained two years and six months. Thence he returned to Boston, remained there until June 7,1869, when he came to Minneapolis and became identified with the newspapers of this city in July, 1873, first taking charge of the circulation of the St. Paul Pioneer, in Minneapolis. He remained with the Pioneer, and its successor, the Pioneer Press until 1876, when that paper was consolidated with the Morning Tribune and the Evening Mail. Mr. Mitchell at that time purchased the circulation of the Mail and the Tribune, and continued the owner as long as the Pioneer .Press company owned the Tribune, and after it passed into the hands of the present company, up to March 9th, when he was made manager of the Tribune. Mr. Mitchell was married in November, 1878, to Miss Mary J. Church, of Boston, Massachusetts.

Page 597

Amos L. Miner

was born November 27th, 1837, in Clinton county, New York. He lived with his parents until thirteen years of age, when he went to East Salem and clerked in a store for his brother, about two years. He then removed with his brothers to Juneau, Wisconsin, thence to Horicon, and after one year to St. Croix county, where he learned the trade of millwright. In 1862 he enlisted in the Thirteenth Wisconsin Volunteers, and served three years. He came to this city in June, 1866, and was one year with Webster and Pray, then went to Polk county and worked a farm five years. In 1871 he returned, and for nearly two years had charge of the mill furnishing department of Lee and Hardenbergh's iron-works. He invented a middlings puriller, and manufactured them, in partnership with Hardenbergh and Fender, until October, 1873, when he sold his interest to O. A. Pray, and acted as superintendent of the old Minnesota Iron-Works, until June 1st, 1878, when he became a partner in the firm of O. A, Pray and Company. He married Sarah Beede in 1859. Their children are: Adella, Mary, Lydia and Charles; one died in infancy.

Page 597

John Mittwer

a native of Prussia, was born March 30th, 1844. He came to the United States in 1868, and has resided in Minneapolis most of the time since. He worked at painting, and afterward in a hardware store until 1875 when he engaged in trade for himself. He owns the building which he now occupies, 1301 Washington Avenue north, and is doing a good business in hardware. In 1870 he married Frederica Weiss, who has borne him one child, Julius.

Page 597

Louis Moelchert

born in 1851, is a native of Prussia. In 1873 he came to Minneapolis, and was employed for five years in the hardware trade, part of the time selling goods on the road. In June, 1879, he fitted up and opened his present place of business, 503 Washington Avenue north. His wife was Miss Anna Brown; their marriage occurred in 1875. They are the parents of two children: Etta and Minne.

Page 597

E. Mohr

a native of Germany, was born in 1854. He emigrated to the United States in 1871, and located at Sheboygan, Wisconsin. In 1879 he removed to Minneapolis and engaged in the bakery business at the corner of Fifth street and Sixth Avenue south. His marriage with Mary Torpe occurred September 30th, 1877. They have two children: Paul and Minnie.

Page 597

A. P. Molin

is a native of Sweden, born April 3d, 1851. He came to the United States in 1869, making Chicago his home two years. After taking a tour throughout the country he came to this city in 1873, and has since made this his place of residence. In 1876 he became one of the partners in the firm of Ryberg and Company in the Stockhobn meat-market.

Page 597

M. C. Mooney

was born October 29th, 1854, at Newport, Vermont. In 1866 he went to Boston, Massachusetts, and worked at the meat trade in Faneuil Hall Market, and in the same business at Cambridge, Massachusetts, until March, 1879, when he removed to Minneapolis, and in August of the year following, bought an interest in the firm of Barker and Company, 717 Washington Avenue south.

Page 597

John G. Moore

was born in Germany in November, 1848. His father dying, Mr. Moore in 1863, came to America with his guardian, and went to Oswego county, New York. At the close of the war, he made a tour through the South, and then went to New Haven, Connecticut. After attending school for a time, he returned to Oswego county, entered the academy at Mexico, where he fitted for college, and entered Cornell University whence he graduated after a four years course. After graduating, he held the position of instructor in German in Trumansburg Academy, in Tompkins county, for two years. In 1873 he received an offer from the State University, which he accepted, and after being employed as instructor in German for two years was appointed Professor of German, which he still retains. Professor Moore was married, in 1877, to Miss Anna Cole of Seneca, New York. They have one child, William C.

Page 597

H. G. O. Morrison

was born in Livermore Maine, January 24th, 1817. In the spring of 1834 he went into a printings office at Gardner, and from there to Bangor the following December, where he engaged on the Bangor Whig and Courier. He graduated at the Bangor high school, and read law with Appleton and Hill, the former new chief justice Appleton. He was admitted to the bar in the fall of 1838, and began practice at Sebec, Maine. He was elected to the Maine legislature in the fall of 1840, and served in the session of 1841. He continued the practice of his profession in Maine until 1855, when he came to St. Anthony, and two years later went to Dakota county and started the town of Pine Bend, remaining there twelve years. He served in the legislature of Minnesota during the sessions of 1860-1861. In 1862 was appointed by President Lincoln, assessor of the internal revenue for the congressional district, which then comprised the northern part of the state, and held the position until 1865 or 1866. He moved to St. Paul in 1869, and remained until 1872, when he returned to this city. Was deputy collector of internal revenue from 1869 to 1873, and since then has been in the practice of law. He is now a member of the firm of Morrison and Fitch. He was married in 1841 to Maria F. Lovejoy, of Maine; she died nine years after, leaving no children. He was married the second time at the cathedral, St. Paul, to Rebecca Newell. They have three children living, David Whipple, Samuel Benjamin and Stanford.

Page 598

A. C. Morrison

was born October 10th, 1841, at Northfield, New Hampshire. He came to St. Anthony in December, 1854, and worked with his father in his mill five years; then went to Castle Rock, Minnesota, and worked on a farm two years. He enlisted in the Fourth Minnesota Volunteers, and served nearly four years, after being mustered out, he returned to this city and has since been employed in the different mills here. He has acted as engineer for Wheaton, Reynolds and Company since March, 1880. He married Annette Carlton in July, 1873.

Page 598

Clinton Morrison

was born January 21st, 1842, at Livermore, Maine. He was educated in his native town, and in 1855, came with his parents to Minneapolis. In 1863, he engaged in the mercantile business, and afterwards in lumber business; since 1878 has been interested in the Minneapolis Harvester Works, being vice-president of the company. Mr. Morrison married Julia Washburn, of Massachusetts, in February, 1873. They have one child, Ethel.

Page 598

Elisha Morse

was born January 12th, 1831, at South Paris, Maine. He went to California in 1852, remained about two years, and removed to Macomb, Illinois, where he was in the real estate business until he enlisted, in 1862, in Seventy-eighth Illinois Volunteers as private, and was promoted to first lieutenant. He was captured and held a prisoner seventeen months; after he rejoined his regiment, he was commissioned captain, and was honorably discharged in June, 1865. The following spring he came here, and for a time engaged in the purchase of flour for eastern markets; then was in the wholesale grocery trade three years with Messrs. Stephens and Newell, and has since been doing an extensive real estate and loan business. April, 1859, he married Lizzie Pillsbury, who has borne him six children; the living are, George, Mary, Edward, William and Frank.

Page 598

Frank L. Morse

a native of Vermont, was born January, 1837, at Johnson. April, 1858, he came to St. Anthony. At the first Minneapolis election he was chosen alderman, and was three times re-elected to that office; he was also elected to represent this district in the legislature in 1871, and four times re-elected. Mr. Morse was married in Chicago, June, 1879, to Catherine Cummings, of Burlington, Vermont.

Page 598

George A. Morse

was born in Peterborough, Hillsborough county, New Hampshire, July 6th, 1836. He moved to Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1852, and two years later to Lewistown, Maine. In October, 1864, he come to this city, and the year following started in the book and stationery business; he is located at 206 Central Avenue. Mr. Worse's family consists of a wife and one son.

Page 598

Elias W. Mortimer

was born at Hastings, England, May 24th, 1837. He came to America and located at St. Paul in 1855, working at the baker's trade. In 1863 he enlisted in the Fifth Minnesota Infantry and served until the fall of 1865; when discharged he was orderly sergeant of company. He returned to Minnesota and has since been employed by the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba railway company. He is now baggage agent of the Northern Pacific railroad, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha railway, and general baggage agent for the Minneapolis and St. Louis railroad. His wife was Altanice Hayford of Farmersvflle, New York. Their children are: Elias, Mary Jane, Georgia and Willie.

Page 599

G. W. Mortimer

was born at St. Paul, Minnesota, July 27th, 1857. He moved with his parents to Northfield, where he worked three years in the packing department of the Ames mill. In 1870 he came to this city and for three years was employed at the Washburn B mill; he was with Mr. Cahill at Minnetonka two years, and one year at the Pillsbury mill here. He then removed to Red Wing and was employed in a mill there three years, but returned to Minneapolis in August, 1880, and went, to work at the Galaxy. His wife was Miss G. A. Foster. Their children are: Chancie and Frederick.

Page 599

Elias Moses

born April 18th, 1829, in Piscataquis county, Maine. He was left an orphan at the age of fourteen, and when eighteen years of age engaged as salesman in a general merchandise store; the next year he went into the lumber business, which he carried on in connection with farming, for eight years. He came to St. Anthony in October, 1856, and has since been in the lumber trade, having been in business for himself since 1860. He married Lydia Nichols, of Maine, in 1852. Their three children have all passed away: Hannah, Herbert and an unnamed infant. Mrs. Moses died April 4th, 1879.

Page 599

E. H. Moulton

a native of Now York city, was born January 10th, 1844. He came to Minneapolis in 1872 and has been treasurer of the Farmers and Mechanics Savings bank since its orpnization in 1874, Mr. Moulton's wife was Harriet Skiles; their marriage occured November 11th, 1874., They have two children: Kate and Eder.

Page 599

E. Moulton

was born in 1827, at Haviland, Maine. He came to St. Anthony in 1849 and worked at carpentering fifteen years. In 1864 he established the second planing mill on the east side. The firm of E. Moulton and son, commenced manufacturing farm wagons in 1879, making a specialty of "The Moulton Wagon;" shop is at the corner of Division and Taylor streets, east division. Mr. Moulton died during the winter of 1880.

Page 599

John B. Mueller

was born in Bavaria in 1850. He emigrated to America and was twelve years engaged in the manufacture of Morocco leather, at Milwaukee, and at the same time had an interest in a New York fur company. In 1862 he removed to St. Paul, where for three years he was engaged in the distillery and wholesale liquor trade. May, 1865, he came to this city, and that year the corner stone of the Mueller and Heinrich brewery was laid by Kranzlein and Mueller. In 1857 he married Rosa Smith, of Milwaukee. They have seven children.

Page 599

Louis C. Mueller

was born in Germany, March 24th, 1839. In February, 1859, he came to the United States, and lived in Milwaukee ten years, employed is salesman for a large dry goods house. He removed with his brother to Faribault in 1865, and although commencing with very little capital, they have by energy and perseverance, built up the leading dry goods house of that place. In 1876 Mr. Mueller opened, in Minneapolis, the German-Scandinavian Bank, and was president of the institution; after paying all depositors, he closed the bank in October, 1878. He has been a member of the firm of Mueller and Schulte since June, 1880; they deal in harness and saddlery hardware. Mr. Mueller married, in 1868, Matilda Hill. They have one child: Cora.

Page 599

A. H. Mudgett

a native of Maine, was born in 1824, at Hallowell. He moved to Boston in 1842, and Chicago in 1862, thence to Rochelle, and in 1875, to Tiptown. He bas been in practice as a veterinary surgeon more than thirty years. In April, 1878, he came to this city; his office is at 410 Fourth street south.

Page 599

William Mulliken

born July 19th, 1830, in Steuben county, New York. He learned civil engineering and followed that business in Ohio and Indiana until 1856, when he went to Illinois and in 1860, to Wisconsin. He came to this city in July 1863, and was employed as assistant engineer on the Minneapolis and St. Paul Railway until December, 1865, when he went to the Pennsylvania oil regions. He returned to Minnesota, and has much of the time since, been in the real estate business; he was in the United States land office from 1870 to 1874, and was one year special agent in the pension department. In June, 1880, he returned to this city and has since been dealing in pine lands. He married Sarah Cortelyon in 1859. They have one child, Ida.

Page 599

Albert S. Munger

was born March 1st, 1837, at Orwell. Vermont. In 1857, he moved to Waterford, Minnesota, and worked at farming a number of years; he removed to this city in 1867 and was engaged with George B. Wright on the Northern Pacific Railroad until 1870 when he entered the police force, and five years later was promoted to chief of police. Mr. Munger is widely known as a faithful, vigilant and efficient officer; his office is at the city station house, in the rear of 212 First Avenue south. He married in 1863, Mary Kelly, who was a teacher in the public schools of Northfield. They have one child, May Alberta Lincoln.

Page 600

J. W. Munson

a native of Maine, was born February 25th, 1820, in the town of Cooper. He learned the trade of blacksmith at East Machias and worked there until 1849, when he went to California; he remained only seven months, but went again in 1852 and stayed one and one-half years. In May, 1856, he came to Minneapolis, worked for a man named Fenderson a short time, and the year following established his own black-smith shop. December, 1841, he married Miss Abbie Munson. They have two daughters.

Page 600

A. Murphy

born December, 1834, in Ireland. When nine years of age, he came with his parents to America, and located in Senaca county, New York, where he learned the blacksmith's trade. In 1855, he removed to St. Paul, thence to Minneapolis. He has had different partners, but is now a member of the firm of Murphy and Machmeier, they do general blacksmithing at 111 Main street south. In November, 1866, he married Annie Fuer. They have had seven children, one daughter is dead.

Page 600

J. P. Musser

established his present business April 15th, 1879. He manufactures patterns, wagon jacks, step ladders, clothes dryers, ironing boards and barrel trucks. His place of business is No. 110 Main street and his residence 306 Eighth street south-east.

Page 600

W. Muther

a native of Germany, was born November 11th, 1836. He emigrated to the United States in 1865, located at Minneapolis and engaged in contracting, building and architecture. For the past year he has been employed as millwright at the Crown Roller mill. In 1867 he married Christiana Brooch. Their children are: Leo, Henry, Edward, Ludwig and Wendlin.

Page 600

C. W. Myers

was born in Lewis county, New York. When eighteen years of age he commenced to learn the trade of blacksmith. In 1873, he came to Minneapolis and has since been in business here. He is now a member of the firm of Myers and Jewett. His wife was Susie Hinton, whom he married in 1868. Mrs. Myers died February 27th, 1877, leaving one child, Mary Helen.

Page 600

W. D. Myers, M. D.

was born in Madison county, New York, February, 1830. He was educated at Washington, D. C., and graduated from the National University, medical department of Columbia College. He was one year surgeon of the Eighty-eighth Indiana Infantry, and after being mustered out, resumed his practice at Waterloo, Indiana. December, 1878, he came to this city and established the Surgical Infirmary, of which he is surgeon and medical director. It has thirty finely furnished rooms, and is situated on the comer of Second Avenue south and Third street.

Page 600

Edward Duffield Neill

was the first Protestant clergyman who settled in St. Paul. He was born in Philadelphia on August 9th, 1823, and is the son of the late Henry Neill, M. D., one of the vice-presidents of the college of physicians in that city. He was a student at the University of Pennsylvania and Amherst College, Massachusetts, graduating in 1842, at the latter institution. His theological studies were pursued at Andover Theological Seminary, and under the distinguished commentator, the Rev. Albert Barnes of Philadelphia. Declining calls to churches in 1847, he went to the neighborhood of Galena, Illinois, where he performed missionary labor among the miners. At his own request he was transferred to St. Paul, then a small hamlet, by the Presbytery of Galena, and on the 23d of April, 1849, arrived there and at once commenced his labors, and made arrangements to build the first brick dwelling in Minnesota, which is still in good preservation, situated near the corner of Fourth and Washington, opposite the Metropolitan Hotel, St. Paul. During the first year of his residence in St. Paul he also preached at the falls of St. Anthony every other Sunday afternoon, as has been mentioned in the history of Minneapolis. He erected the first Protestant house of worship for the white population of Minnesota, at St. Paul, in the summer of 1849, and in November of the same year organized the First Presbyterian Church in St. Paul. In May, 1850, the wooden church building was destroyed by fire, and a large brick church at the comer of Third and St. Peter streets was built in its place, and is now changed into stores. Resigning the charge of the First Presbyterian church he began to preach in the new and upper portion of St. Paul, where there were no churches, and in 1855 organized the church known as the "House of Hope," now the largest in that city, of which the Rev. David R. Breed is pastor. He acted as its pastor for five years, when he resigned. Williams, in his "History of St. Paul" writes: "During this period he gave great attention to educational and literary matters. He was appointed territorial superintendent of instruction in 1851, and held that office two years. In 1853 he organized and secured the erection and endowment of the 'Baldwin School.' In 1855 he secured the building of the 'College of St. Paul,' which was for several years a classical academy for young men. He was at the same time secretary of the St. Paul board of education. For several years he was chancellor of the State University. He was also state superintendent of public instruction from 1858 to 1864, and secretary of the Historical Society from 1851 to 1863." Hon. D. Burt, state superintendent of public instruction, in his report in 1881 to the legislature of Minnesota, writes: "The territorial law of 1851, requiring the governor to appoint a superintendent of schools, remained in the statutes until 1860. In that year, it was enacted that the Chancellor of the University, an officer then required to be appointed by the board of regents should be ex-officio superintendent. This act made E. D. Neill the first state superintendent of public instruction. In the first state report, he recommended the genuine township system, and the appointment of county superintendents, and also that the apportionment of school funds should be made, upon the number of scholars, attending the district school. Two of these early recommendations have been realized, and the third is yet to come. The first annual state report could contain but few statistics, since territorial superintendents had adopted no plan for gathering such data. Mr. Neill was the author of the first tenhers' register ever issued in the state, and of the first forms used for reports on the condition of schools. On the 7th of March, 1861, a law was passed requiring a joint convention of the senate and house to elect a superintendent of public instruction for a term of two years. Whatever may have been the motives dictating this legislation, it could not have resulted from any general hostility to Mr. Neill, for on the same day in which the act became a law, he was elected, in joint convention, by an almost unanimous vote, as superintendent of public instruction, for two years. But on the 29th of April, he was appointed chaplain of the First Minnesota, causing a vacancy in the superintendency, which the Governor filled by requirement of the school law."

In June, 1861, he accompanied the first troops that left Fort Snelling, for the seat of war, as chaplain of the First Minnesota Regiment, and was with that regiment, in the first battle of Bull Run, and at Fair Oaks, and in the seven day's conflict ending at Malvern Hills. He was then appointed by President Lincoln, United States hospital chaplain, and assigned to one of the Philadelphia hospitals. Early in 1864, he received an appointment at the President's house in Washington, as secretary to open and arrange all correspondence, and to sign land patents for the President. He continued on duty in the Executive mansion until he was appointed by President Grant, in 1869, United States consul at Dublin. He held the consulate for two years, then resigned, and resumed his work in Minnesota, which had been suspended by the civil war, as president of the Baldwin School and College of St. Paul, which were consolidated by the legislature in 1874, as Macalester College, so called, because the late Charles Macalester, of Philadelphia, bequeathed to the college the large five story stone edifice, built for a hotel, situated in the East Division of Minneapolis, overlooking the Falls of St. Anthony.

In January, 1874, Mr. Neill was one of the first clergymen to units in the Reformed Episcopal church movement, and, he was instrumental in the erection of Christ Church, on Hennepin Avenue, in Minneapolis, which he still serves. He has been a frequent contributor to magazines and reviews, and has published several sermons. The following books are also from his pen: History of Minnesota, in 1858, published by J. B. Lippincott and Company., pp. 628; History of Minnesota enlarged, 758 pp., published in 1873; History of Minnesota, third edition, 828 pp. published in 1878, by Johnson, Smith and Harrison, Minneapolis; Terra Mariae, or Threads of Maryland Colonial History, J. B. Lippincott and Company, 1867, pp. 260; Fairfaxes of England and America, Joel Munsell, publisher, Albany, 1868, pp. 234; Virginia Company of London, Joel Munsell, publisher, Albany, 1869, pp. 432; English Colonization of America, Strahan and Company, London, England, 1871, pp. 862; Founders of Maryland, published by Joel Munsell, Albany, 1876, pp. 193; Minnesota Explorers and Pioneers for North Star Publishing Company, 1881, pp. 128.

For many of the facts in preparing this sketch, we have been indebted to Johnson's Cyclopedia, Alibone's; Dictionary of'Authors, and Drake's Dictionary of Biography. Mr. Neill was married October 4th, 1847, by Rev. J. J. Graff, at Snow Hill, Worcester county Maryland, to Nancy, daughter of Richard Hall, of said county. His children are: Minnesota, born in St. Paul, March 28th, 1850; Samuel, born in St. Paul, December 10th, 1852; Henry, born in St. Paul, April 15th, 1855; Edward Duffield, born in St. Paul, August 1st, 1858; John Selby Martin, born in St. Paul; March 25th, 1860.

Page 602

Frank Navratil

a resident of Minneapolis since 1866, is a native of Bohemia, born October 4th, 1844. He passed his childhood in his native country, where he learned the shoemaker's trade. He came to America, and after working in various cities in this country, he located in this city and worked at his trade until 1871, when he opened his establishment, and has continued as boot and shoemaker since. His wife was formerly Mary Jelinek, of Bohemia, whom he married in 1869. Their children are: Frank, Rosie and Lucy (twins,) George and Eda.

Page 602

Andrew H. Nelson

of the firm of Malmsten, Nelson and Company, is a native of Sweden, born April 10th, 1849. Coming to America in 1866, he located first at Anoka, Minnesota, remaining there two years, when he came to Minneapolis. He engaged with E. Broad in the manufacture of edged tools, and general blacksmithing. After having learned his trade he traveled through the South, working at several places he visited. In 1872, he returned to this city, and four years later formed a partnership with E. Hernlund, and afterwards taking Mr. Malmsten as a partner in blacksmithing. His marriage with Emma Hernlund occurred in 1875. One daughter has been born to them, Olive R.

Page 602

B. F. Nelson

a native of Kentucky, was born in 1843. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1864. For a short time he was engaged in rafting lumber, then was employed in a shingle mill, and remained until 1867 at which time he assumed the control of the Butler mill, sawing shingles by the thousand until 1872. He then became a partner of W. C. Stetson. They built the Pacific planing mill, also the St. Louis mill. In 1879 this firm dissolved, Mr. Stetson taking the Pacific and Mr. Nelson the St. Louis mill, which he has had in operation since. He was married in 1869 to Martha Rose, who died in 1874, leaving two sons, William E. and Guy H. His second wife was Miss Fredingburg, whom he married in 1875.

Page 602

Thomas Nelson "Forday"

was born in Forday, Norway, June 20th, 1852. He received his education in his native town, where he lived until 1866, then came to America, locating first in Michigan. From there he went on the lakes as a sailor, thence to St. Louis, where he was in the employ of the government. In 1868 he was under General Custer in the New Mexico and Kansas campaign. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1869, and turned his attention to lumbering until 1880, when he was appointed on the police force, where he has continued. Mr. Nelson is a single man.

Page 602

A. B. Nettleton

editor of the Morning Tribune, was born in Delaware county, Ohio, November 14th, 1838, lived on the parental farm until sixteen years of age, attending the common schools of the neighborhood. In 1855 he accepted employment with a leading mercantile and lumbering firm at Lexington, Michigan. In 1857 he entered Oberlin College, Ohio. While yet at college, on April 14th, 1861, two days after the fall of Fort Sumpter, he enlisted as a private in an Ohio volunteer infantry company, under President Lincoln's first call for 75,000 troops, and was chosen first sergeant. The company was not accepted by the governor of the state, as Ohio's quota was already full. After the battle of Bull Run, in July of 1861, the subject of this sketch again volunteered for army service as a private in Company H of the Second Ohio Cavalry, then organizing at Camp Wade, near Cleveland, Ohio. Was elected first lieutenant of his company, and marched to the front in October, 1861. Served with his regiment in Kansas, Arkansas, Indian Territory, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana (in the latter states during Morgan's raid), Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina. His service was continuous from August, 1861, to June 16th, 1865 two months after the final surrender of the confederate armies, and among the officers under whom he directly served were Blunt, Burnside, H. G. Wright, G. A. Custer, Wilson, Sheridan, Meade and Grant the last year and a half of service, being under the immediate leadership of Custer in Sheridan's famous cavalry corps of the Potomac army. Was present in seventy-three engagements and pitched battles, including among the latter, Grant's campaign of the Wilderness, and Sheridan's brilliant series of victories in the Shenandoah Valley. He was successively promoted to captain, major, lieutenant colonel, and colonel of his regiment, and was brevetted brigadier-general on the recommendation of General Custer, as of date February 25th, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services in the Shenandoah campaign. After being mustered out of the army he studied law for a time at the law school in Albany, New York. In 1866 became editor and part proprietor of the Daily Register at Sandusky, Ohio. In 1868 was a delegate to the national republican convention at Chicago, which nominated Grant and Colfax for president and vice-president. In 1868 removed from Sandusky to Chicago and became publisher of the Advance. In 1870 removed to Philadelphia, and became associated with the banking house of Jay Cooke and Company in their relation as fiscal agents of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company; and also held the position of general agent of the trustees of the Northern Pacific Railroad, in connection with the land interests of that corporation. In 1875, served as general agent of the purchasing committee of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company in reorganizing the corporation. Has served for ten years as a trustee of Oberlin college. In March, 1880, removed to Minneapolis, Minnesota, having purchased a half interest in the Daily Tribune.

Page 603

H. T. Ness

a native of Norway, was born in 1843. He came to this city in 1870, and has since been engaged in the hotel business. He is now proprietor of the Western House, 119 Second street north, owned by Mr. Lawrence, of the law firm of Wilson and Lawrence. Mr. Ness was married in 1871, to Olene Peterson. The have had four children; only one is living, Ida G.

Page 603

Louis Neudeck

was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 25th, 1821. He was one of the early pioneers of this region, coming to St. Anthony in 1849. He received his education in his native city, and later engaged in the meat business, in which he continued until 1844, when he sold out and removed to Beloit, Wisconsin, remaining one year; thence to Rockford, Illinois, a few months, and next, in 1845, to Stillwater, Minnesota, where he opened a dry goods store, continuing until coming to this city. In 1855 he opened a meat market in St. Anthony, but sold out in 1861. During the Indian troubles of the next year, he assisted in raising and was one of Anson Northrup's company, which went to Fort Ridgely. In 1868, Mr. Neudeck, in company with Captain Fisk, went to Montana, and opened a ranche for the purpose of doing an extensive business in cattle raising. He returned to this city for supplies in 1864, and again started with a wagon train of seven teams. When near Fort Rice, Montana, one of the wagons needing repairing, he, with several men remained in the rear, to perform the task. While here they were attacked by Indians, Mr. Neudeck and several others were murdered. His body was never recovered. The only clue to the sad fate of this unfortunate pioneer was a revolver on which was his name, it being matched from one of the Indians. Six of the wagons with the supplies reached Fort Rice, and were sold, the proceeds being sent to the widow and children in this city. His widow was formerly Catherine Wolff, whom he married in 1848. There are five children living.

Page 604

Louis W. Neudeck

a life long resident of this city, was born May 3d, 1852, and is a son of Louis Neudeck. It was here that he received his education, and first worked for Glenn and Thompson, and afterwards for E. B. Ames. After a short trip to Duluth, in 1870, he engaged in the meat business in Austin and Red Wing, and returned to Minneapolis in 1879. Immediately after, he bought the meat market of Henry Schulze, where he has since continued. His marriage with Clam Eames, of Red Wing, occurred in 1879. They have one child, Linnie.

Page 604

Angust Newbom

is a native of Sweden, born December 3d, 1848. He lived on a farm until seventeen years of age, when he commenced his apprenticeship, as a tailor. He emigrated to America in 1872, locating at Joliet, Illinois. Here he was in the employ of a steel rail company five years, then came to Minneapolis. He was with his brother, J. Newbom, who is a tailor, until beginning alone in October, 1880, at 237 Twelfth Avenue south.

Page 604

George E. Newell

in company with Messrs. Stevens and Morse, established a wholesale grocery establishment at 9, 11 and 13 Washington Avenue north. At the end of three years Messrs. Stevens and Morse retired. The firm of Newell and Harrison was then formed, which continued until 1879, when Mr. Harrison retired. Since that time Mr. Newell has been alone, doing a successful business.

Page 604

E. Newman

a native of Norway, was born October 14th, 1845. He learned the trade of moulder in his native country and worked at it until 1863. He then emigrated to America, and the same year located in Minneapolis. He engaged in the pursuit of his trade six years, when he opened a grocery store. In 1873, he, sold, and engaged in other pursuits until 1880, when he started a grocery at his present location, 1318 Fourth street south, which property he owns. He is doing a thriving business. He was married in 1870 to Emma Evensen, of Norway. Four children have been born to them, Emma S., Clara V., Annie E., and Eddie W.

Page 604

G. H. Nichols

was born at Braintree, Vermont, May 18th, 1823. He went to Randolph, Vermont, in 1833, and in 1843, learned the building of pipe organs. Three years later, he removed to Bridgewater, Massachusetts, and engaged with C. H. Packard, who was the originator of the reed organ, from which all reed organs from that day to this have sprung. After remaining six months, he returned to his native state and commenced the manufacture of melodeons and organs. The next year he removed to Braintree, Massachusetts, continuing in the same business; he remained there until 1848, when poor health compelled him to change. He traveled through Vermont until 1856, when he came west and located at Prescott, Wisconsin. In 1862, he enlisted in the Second Wisconsin Cavalry, but was discharged after serving seven months, on account of failing health. In 1869, he began the manufacture of cabinet organs, and has since continued. He opened his salesroom in Minneapolis, July, 1879, and removed his works here in the fall of 1880. His factory is located on Second Avenue south-east, comer of Prince street.

Page 604

J. Newton Nind

city editor of the "Tribune," was born in St. Charles, Illinois in March, 1854, and is of English descent, his parents, James G. and Mary C. Nind, having removed to this country from England in 1849. His home continued at his birth-place until 1866, when he removed with his parents to Winona, Minnesota, where he won after imbibed a love for journalism while engaged as carrier on the "Republican" of that city. While so engaged, he, with four other boys, each with a cash capital of seven dollars, launched, on the 13th of February, 1869, the first copy of the "North Star," a three-column semi-monthly. At the end of the first six months Mr. Nind became the manager of the paper, and enlarged it to five columns, in which form he conducted it until August 17th, 1870. During the ensuing year he improved himself in the art of printing. In December, 1871, at Red Wing, he renewed the "North Star" as a weekly publication, which he edited, printed and published as a means of prosecuting studies at the Red Wing Institute. In December, 1872, he relinquished its management to accept a position as reporter on the St. Paul "Pioneer," and has since served at different times as reporter on the following papers: the St. Paul "Pioneer." Minne- apolis "Times" St. Paul "Press," Minneapolis "Mail," the "Pioneer Press," and has filled the position of city editor of the Minneapolis "Tribune" since September, 1877. He was married in December, 1879, to Agnes C. Williams of Red Wing.

Page 605

William C. Noble

was born at Johnsburgh, New York, December 9th, 1840. He worked on a farm until the fall of 1862, then went into the store of B. Thomas, as salesman, and two years later became a member of the firm. In 1865 he sold his interest and came to St. Anthony the spring of the next year. A few months after his arrival he was employed by O. T. Swett in a general merchandise store as book-keeper; here he remained until 1876, when in company with J. H. McHerron, purchased the grocery department of Mr. Swett's store. At the death of Mr. McHerron, in 1878, Mr. S. Armstrong bought his interest and the firm is now known as Noble and Armstrong, 22 University Avenue south-east.

Page 605

J. P. Noel

a native of Germany, was born in in 1845. He came to the United States in 1870, locating at Minneapolis. For three years he drove a beer wagon, since which time he has kept saloon at 701 Washington Avenue south. He married Augusta Engle in November, 1873. They have one child, George A. W.

Page 605

August J. Noerenberg

a native of Prussia, was born in 1853. He came to the United States in 1860, locating at St. Paul, giving his attention to hotel keeping. In 1875 he came to this city and started a brewery, in which he continued until 1879, when he opened a saloon at 1728 Seventh street south. He married Dora M. Blohn, March 3d, 1879. They have one child, August C.

Page 605

F. D. Noerenberg

is a native of Prussia, born in 1845. At the age of fifteen he came to America and located at St. Paul. He kept hotel in that city until 1870. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1875, and in 1880 took possession of the city brewery and is now engaged in the manufacture of beer. He was married in 1868 to Miss Caroline Richmond, who died in 1875. After remaining a widower three years he married Johanna Sprunkmann, who has borne him three children.

Page 605

James Nolan

was born at Quebec, Canada, July 10th, 1847. At ten years of age he accompanied his parents to. St. Paul, where he lived until 1861. He then enlisted in the Fifth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry and served four years. The following are some of the engagements in which he participated Siege of Corinth, Vicksburg, Richmond, and battle of Nashville; also many skirmishes. From 1871-1872 he was on the police force at St. Paul; he was also detective on the St. Paul and Duluth railroad one year. He was appointed on the police force in this city in 1878, where he has since remained. He was married in 1878, to Annie E. Dickson. They have three children: William, Mary and Edward J.

Page 605

L. C. Noracon

was born at Menasha, Wisconsin, November 7th, 1854. He located in Minneapolis in 1875, and worked in the "A" mill eighteen months, then in the old Humboldt, nine months. On the completion of the new Humboldt he was employed until 1880, and has since been machine man in the Cataract mill. He married Miss Ada Cook, April 22d, 1880.

Page 605

John Norman

born November 27th, 1846, is a native of Sweden. He was a farmer and grain buyer, previous to his coming to America in 1868. He came direct to Minneapolis, where he was employed as laborer in a brick yard. In 1872 he returned to his native country, and in April married Mrs. Carrie Swansen, and with his bride returned to this city. In 1879 he was appointed on the police force, which position he has since held. Two children have been born to them: Alice A. and Frank T.

Page 605

W. H. Norris

was born at Hallowell, Maine, July 24th, 1832. He prepared for college, at Dwight's High School, Brooklyn, New York, went through a full collegiate course at Yale College and graduated in 1854. He attended Dane law School at Harvard College. In 1856 he removed to Green Bay, Wisconsin, and completed his law studies at the office of James H. Howe, afterward attorney general of Wisconsini and was admitted to the bar in October 1857, and continued with J. H. Howe until 1862. He then practiced alone until 1870, and for eight years had a young partner. In 1879 he formed a partnership with E. H. Ellis, who was judge of the Tenth circuit of Wisconsin, which continued until 1880, when he removed to Minneapolis and located his office at 239 Nicollet Avenue. His favorite line of practice has been commercial, insurance and railroad law.. His marriage with Miss Hannah B: Harriman occurred at Green Bay, in 1859. They leave three children: Louise, Georgia and Harriman. Mr. Norris' library is large and complete, probably the finest in the city.

Page 606

W. S. Nott

of the firm of E. B. Preston and Company, is a native of Dublin, Ireland, born in July, l852. His parents were English, with whom became to America in 1855, locating at New York, where he received his education. He then removed to Chicago, remaining until January, 1880, when he came to this city as a member of the firm of E. B. Preston and Company, and opened business in the sale of leather and rubber belting and rubber goods of all kinds. Located at 203 Nicollet Avenue.

Page 606

Anson Northrup

one of the most noteworthy characters in the roll of pioneers, was born in Connewango, New York, January 8d, 1817, where he lived with his father till the spring of 1839, when he moved to Morgan county, Illinois. In October following, he left for the northern wilds, with a drove of twenty oxen for the Falls of the St. Croix, and twenty for Allen's camp, then just opened at the present site of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. Two men were sent to help him drive to Allen's camp, which was reached the latter part of November. There was but one house between Prairie du Chien and the Falls, a rude cabin occupied by one Reid, at Trempealeau Bluff. Arriving at this point, they found Reid was absent on a trip to Galena, for supplies, and his wife (a squaw) entirely out of provisions. Several "Mackinaw" boats, laden with supplies for Allen's camp, were on the way up, and thinking to fall in with them the next day, they left nearly all their provision at Reid's; but the boats had pushed through with all possible dispatch, in fear of being frozen in, and their generosity cost them a four day's fast in the then barren wilds of the Chippewa Valley. Finally, when almost worn out with hunger and fatigue, they reached Allen's camp, about midnight, but their anticipated feast was prevented by the stern refusal of Allen's squaw to give them more than a cup of tea until next morning. Mr. Northrup remained at Allen's camp about three weeks, before he could get a guide to help him through to the Falls, owing to hostilities then existing between the Sioux and Chippewa Indians, which rendered travel anything but agreeable. Finally, however, he secured the services of a guide, and made the journey in safety, arriving just before Christmas. This was the first drove of oxen ever, brought to the northern wilds, and their owners the first lumbermen in that region. Returning in the spring of 1840 to Illinois he made preparations to go north, and the next year, 1841, took boat at St. Louis and reached the Falls of the St. Croix in May, three weeks from the time of leaving St. Louis. There were no settlements above Prairie du Chien. When more fuel was needed for the boat, she was tied up, while the deck hands went ashore out and "toted" enough wood for another "run." The boat was the "Indian Queen," built to run on the Missouri, and never made a second trip to this region. In May, 1844, he moved to what is now Stillwater, and built a hotel, the first house in the place. He also bought 160 acres of land which now embraces about one-half the site of that vigorous young city.

In 1849, he sold his interest there and built the American House at St. Paul, the first all frame building in the place. The rough lumber for this building was brought from the mills at St. Croix Falls, and the flooring, siding, sash, doors, etc., from St. Louis. The American was formally opened to the public July 4th, 1850, and soon thereafter sold, after which Mr. Northrup came to St. Anthony and commenced the erection of the St. Charles Hotel, a little above the present site of Clark's mills. This was the second all frame building here, the first being a hasty constructed house built and occupied by Mr. Northrup while the St. Charles was in course of completion. The hotel was opened July 4th, 1851, the same day the steamer "Gov. Ramsey" made her first run up the river, under command of Captain John Rollins. After running the St. Charles two years, he rented it, and engaged in other pursuits. In 1858, he visited the Pacific coast, returning after an absence of four months, and bought the old steamer "Governor Ramsey," which he took up the river as far as Grand Rapids (taking it over the falls at Sauk Rapids by means of windlasses and other necessary appliances), then back to Crow Wing, where he took the machinery out, and took the boat apart above the bull. February 16th, 1859 he left St. Paul with forty teams and a crew of men, proceeded to Crow Wing, loaded the boat and machinery, and started for the Red river, cutting roads through the timbered portion of the routs, and reaching the river about eight miles below the present site of Fargo, April 8th. They had not the protection of even a tent, yet the men were all in good health and spirits, notwithstanding it was severe weather, and the snow two feet deep when they arrived at their destination. Early in the season he built the boat, run it to Lake Winnipeg, then back to Georgetown, where it was sold, and has since done good service on the Red River of the North.

At the breaking out of the rebellion, Mr. Northrup entered the army, receiving the appointment of wagon master in the First Regiment Minnesota Volunteers. In September, 1861, he was appointed wagon master in General Gorman's brigade; in March, 1862, to alike position in General Sedgewick's division, and in June following was put in charge of the trains of Sumner's corps, Army of the Potomac, where he remained until the memorable Indian massacre in August, 1862, when he obtained leave of absence, and has tened home to aid in protecting the home borders. The day following his arrival in Minneapolis, he obtained a captain's commission from Governor Ramsey, with instructions to raise a company of mounted men, and proceed with all haste to the relief of Fort Ridgely, which was then besieged by the murderous savages. As indicative of the "spirit of the trees," and the confidence reposed in Captain Northrup by his townsmen, it is only necessary to state that on the same day he received his commission, he raised a company of ninety-six men, and at nine o'clock that evening had marched them to Shakopee, twenty-five miles from Minneapolis, on the way to Fort Ridgely, The entire march was made in three days, and with a company now augmented to 140 men, he reached the beleagured fortress just at daylight, having marched all night.

It is but simple justice to state here that Captain Northrup was the first to relieve the distressed inmates of the fortress. Others, with less modesty, and as surely with less honesty, have claimed the laurels due only, to this old patriot, who never courted even a passing compliment for his timely services.

Since the close of the war, Capt. Northrup's life has been marked by the same spirit of change and adventure that characterized his previous years. For two years he kept the First National Hotel, five years was spent at Duluth, mainly in contracting and jobbing for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, and in 1874, leaving Duluth, he came to St. Paul, then took a short trip to Texas, from whence he returned to St. Paul, and remained until May, 1880, when he removed to Fort Snelling and opened a boarding-house. Mr. Northrup put up the first brick building in Minneapolis, now known as the Bushnell House, on Fourth street, near the court-house. It is impossible to here enumerate all the noteworthy incidents connected with the career of this veteran pioneer, whose life is remarkable for its restless, energetic character, and ever varying hues. Anson Northrup married Miss Betsey Jane Edwards, August 23d, 1838 at Waterbury, N. Y., by whom he has had ten children, six of whom are now living.

Page 607

W. H. Nudd

was born at Wakefield, New Hampshire, July l6th, 1831. He came to Minneapolis in 1857 and was in a bakery seven years, then engaged in farming in St. Anthony. In 1870 he entered the firm of which he is now the head. The firm name is Nudd and Knight, and they manufacture wood eave troughs, etc., on Main street, south-east. He married Miss Laura Shepherd of Bangor, Maine, in 1859. Their children are: Lottie S., Henry A., Benjamin F., and Edwin F.

Page 607

W. Nyberg

of the firm of Lockwood, Upton and Company, is a native of Sweden, born May 2d, 1852. He came to America with his parents in 1858, and received his education in the schools of this city. In 1869 he apprenticed in the St. Anthony Iron Works and after finishing his trade remained until its destruction by fire in April, 1879. In June, following, he formed a partnership with Mr. Upton in the Union Iron Works, afterwards taking Mr. Lockwood, which formed the present firm. Mr. Nyberg is unmarried.

Page 607

Dennis O'Brien

is a native of Ireland, born December 15th, 1844. He came to the United States in 1866, locating in this city, engaged in lumbering for W. D. Washburn. He remained in that business five years, then went on the Northern Pacific railroad, building bridges he continued in that business two years, returning to this city in 1873 and working at lumbering for Robinson and Company until 1875, and since that time has been in the flouring mills. He is now in the feed department of the Cataract mill.

Page 608

Gustav Marcilius Oftedal

was born in Stavenger, Norway, February 22d, 1846, where he attended a preparatory school during his boyhood. In 1868 he accepted the position of "watch inspector" of a telegraph station at Arendal, where he remained almost permanently until his call to America in 1877. While at Arendal he passed "examen candidatus juria," at Christiana University in 1872 also spending some time in the study of theology at Arendal. In 1877 he received a call from the congregation in Minneapolis and at once started for this field of labor, completing his theological course at Augsburg Seminary and ordained at the latter place.

Page 608

S. Oftedal

was born in Stavenger, Norway, in 1844. He attended college in his native town until he was eighteen years of age, when he entered the university at Christiana, where he passed the degrees of "exanaenatium" and "exanien philosophicum," and spent the next six or seven years traveling, in England, France, Spain, Italy, and the United States. In 1871 he took the degree of divinity at the university, and in 1873 came to Minneapolis, and has since held an important position in the faculty of Augsburg Seminary.

Page 608

John E. Ofstie

was born in Norway. He came to America in 1868, locating in Minneapolis. He clerked in the dry goods store of William Gaslin; then went to Chicago, and was employed in a wholesale and retail clothing house until 1876, when he returned to this city, and established the Boston Square Dealing One Price Clothing House, at 227 Washington Avenue south. He remained there until 1878, then removed to his present location, No. 2 Pence Opera House.

Page 608

J. H. Oleson

is a native of Norway, born August 13th, 1850. He came to Dakota county, Minnesota, in 1866. He commenced learning photography in 1870, with W. H. Jacoby, of this city. He opened an establishment in 1874, at 307 Washington Avenue south. He makes a specialty of card and cabinet photographs. He married Miss Annie G. Johnson of this city, July 11th, 1874. Their children are: Iver W., Gustave H., and Albert J.

Page 608

H. C. Oliver

was born at Sterling, Cayuga county, New York, July, 1842. He lived on a farm in early life, then moved with his parents to Corning, New York. In 1867 he removed to Champaign, Illinois; thence in 1870 to Indianapolis, Indiana, and remained there until coming to Minneapolis in 1880. He was railroading sixteen years prior to his locating in this city, thirteen years of the time being a conductor. He was married in 1869, to Miss S. K. Lower, of New York. They have one daughter.

Page 608

Simon Olesen

was born in Norway, in 1837. He came to the United States in 1869, and located at La Crosse, Wisconsin, where he was in the timber business four years. In 1873 he became a resident of Minneapolis, and has been at work in the Union Planmg mill since. He married Carrie Johnson in 1876. Their children are: Carrie S. and Mary I.

Page 608

Otto T. Olson

was born in Sweden, in 1852. He came to Iowa in 1872, thence to St. Paul in 1875. He was in the hardware business in each place. He located in Minneapolis in 1880, opening a sample room at 1229 Washington Avenue north, where he still remains.

Page 608

C. D.O'Neil

was born September 25th, 1849, at Plymouth, Wisconsin. He attended school in his native town until twelve years of age, when he went to New York city to live with an uncle and attend school, also to learn the trade of sign-painting and graining. He finished learning his trade in 1867, and worked at it in New York and Brooklyn, until 1869. Was in Rochester one year, thence to Chicago, here he remained until May, 1879. He then located in Minneapolis, and was employed by Adams and Skinner, painters, and remained with them until commencing business alone, on the comer of Nicollet Avenue and Third street. He makes fine graining a specialty. He was married in 1873, to Miss Guera F. Van Dusen of Michigan. Their children are Clarence and Nina.

Page 608

George W. Orff

was born at Bangor, Maine, in 1836. He remained at Bangor until 1861, when he went to Boston and learned the profession of architect. He remained at Boston ten years, then returned to his native to town where he remained until 1878, being constantly engaged in his profession. He came to this city, and in the spring of 1879 established his office at 250 First Avenue south.

Page 608

Alexander T. Ormond, Ph. D.

professor of mental and moral philosophy and history at the University, the subject of this sketch, was born in Punxsutawney, Jefferson county, Pennsylvania in 1847. When five years of age, moved with his parents to Armstrong county, near the Allegheny river. Was reared on a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits, with occasional interruptions, until he was twenty-four. Received the ordinary public school education, which was supplemented by a term or two at an academy. Began teaching in the public schools when seventeen years old; teaching winters and working on the farm summers. In 1870, went to Oxford, Ohio, and spent sub-freshman year in Miami University. Returned home at the close of the year and resumed teaching and farming. In 1872-1873 was principal in a soldiers' orphan school at Dayton, Pennsylvania. In the autumn of 1873, went to Princeton and entered the freshman class. Experienced the usual ups and downs of college life, and graduated in 1877, in a class of one hundred and ten. Won by competition the Mental Science Fellowship, which decided the special direction of his future course. Remained at Princeton doing post-graduate work until last June, when he went through the necessary preliminaries and received the degree of Ph. D. Came to the State University of Minnesota in September, 1880, where he occupies the chair of philosophy and history.

Page 609

John Orth

was born in 1821, in France. He remained there until 1847, when he emigrated to America, locating at Erie, Pennsylvania, and lived at or near there until he came to Minneapolis in 1850. He started the first brewery and sold the first beer in the county. He first made three barrels which lasted the town of St. Anthony one week. His old brewery occupied the same ground on which is now his large establishment which makes four hundred and eighty barrels of beer each week. He was married in 1849 to Miss Mary C. Weinel. They have had five children: John W. born at St. Anthony in 1850, is the oldest living child born in this city.

Page 609

Edward Orth

is a native of this city, born October, 4th, 1856. He received his early education in this city and finished at Minneapolis Business College. In 1873, he was apprenticed to F. Whale and Company, liquor distillers. In the fall of the next year, he went to La Crosse where he was engaged in lumbering. In 1876, he returned and began work in his father's brewer where he has been since. He married Miss Kate Loftus, a native of Wisconsin, May 4th, 1877. They have two children Maud and Edward.

Page 609

P. Osander

was born in Sweden, September 7th, 1843. He emigrated to New York in July, 1869, and came direct to Webster county, Iowa, thence to Minneapolis, in 1870. After visiting several points in the state, and working on the Mississippi river, the next year he located permanently in this city, engaging in the manufacture of pumps. He entered into partnership with Gus Lundell in 1876, which has since continued. Mr. Osander was married in Iowa, September 24th, 1869, to Carrie Oleson, of Sweden. Their children are: Peter W., Eda K., Fred A., and Will V.

Page 609

J. C. Oswald

a native of Switzerland, was born May 20th, 1824. He came to New York in 1847, and remained two months, then went to Cabell county, Virginia. He was one of the first settlers in Dutchtown in that county. He opened a general merchandise store, and was also agent for New York parties, for the sale of land. The spring of 1857, he sold and removed to Minneapolis. In 1862 he bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, west of the city limits, on which he lived and devoted his time to raising small fruits, from which he made wine, mostly sold for medicinal purposes in home market. In 1866, he engaged in wholesale wines and liquors in this city, in which he still continues. He married Miss Lisette Scheitlin, in 1847. Their children living are: Matilda, Lisette S., Bertha M., and Emma W.

Page 609

J. W. Overacker

was born in Onondaga, county New York, in 1829. He resided in, New York, California, Illinois and Missouri, came to Minneapolis in July, 1874, and has since been a resident of this city. He is at present, secretary and treasurer of the Cooperative Barrel Company. He resides at 721 Seventh street south.

Page 609

E. W. Overlock

a life long resident of Hennepin county, was born at Brooklyn Centre, August 7th, 1859. He acquired a knowledge of drugs, with W. C. Colbrath, of this city. In April, 1880, the firm of Overlock Brothers was organized.

Page 609

James H. Overlock

was born at Brooklyn Centre, Hennepin county. He has ever since been a resident of this county. He studied drugs with T. K. Gray, and worked for W. C. Colbrath and Mr. Rose, both of this city. In 1880, he became a partner in the present firm of Overlock Brothers at 102 Central Avenue.

Page 610

E. A. Owens

a native of New York city, was born June 27th, 1859. He accompanied his parents to Chicago in 1875 and completer his education there. In October, 1879, he removed to Iowa and studied law at the University in Iowa City. The following year in June, he came to Minneapolis and associated with W. D. Myers as partner and business manager of the surgical infirmary, which is the only institution of general surgery in the north-west. In October, 1879, Mr. Owens married Mamie Evans, of McGregor, Iowa.

Page 610

A. J. Palmes

was born at Le Roy, Genesee county, New York. He came to Minneapolis in 1875, and engaged with Mr. Eames, and has since been general superintendent of O. Eames' barrel factory. He resides at 711 Fourteenth street South.

Page 610

Jonathan Palmer

is a native of Ohio born at Massillon, in 1852. His father died when he was four years of age, and in 1866 he moved with his mother, to Plymouth, Indiana, remaining five years; then removed to Huntsville, Alabama; thence to Princeton, Indiana, in 1872, and established a bakery. Three years later he came to Minneapolis, and in 1880 he purchased the Home Made Bakery and took a partner, Mr. H. W. Drew. He also owns the Vienna and Nicollet Avenue Bakery. He was married to Miss Nellie Gowthorp in 1875, who has home him one child: Frank C.

Page 610

G. W. Parmenter

Was born at Utica, New York, in 1848. He went to Marquette county, Wisconsin, at seven years of age, and two years later removed to Kansas, and there learned carpentering. He traveled through the northern states until the fall of 1871, settling at that time in Calumet county, Wisconsin. He resided there until 1878, when he came to Minneapolis. The firm of Parmenter Brothers, contractors and builders consists of G. W., C. E. and H. M. Parmenter. Contract's us taken by them in any part of the state. Office on Eighth street, between Hennepin and Nicollet Avenues.

Page 610

C. H. Parker

was born at Remsen, Oneida county, New York, in 1832. His father being a veterinary surgeon, he studied with him when a small boy, and was raised in the profession. In 1847 he went to Madison, Wisconsin, remaining five years in practice for the Great Western Stage Company, thence to Waupaca county, Wisconsin, in 1853, remaining four years; he resided in Houston county, Minnesota, four years, then removed to Oswego county, New York, and enlisted in the Second New York Cavalry; in which he served two years, then re-enlisted in the Thirteenth New York Cavalry and served until his discharge in 1865. He then resided in various places in this state until 1875, when he located in Minneapolis. During the entire time he practiced his profession as veterinary surgeon. He was married in 1877, to Mary Izenburger.

Page 610

David C. Parker

was born at Medford, Massachusetts, in 1852. He was educated in the public schools and remained with his parent, until eighteen years of age. After finishing his education he was engaged in the wholesale and retail drug business for seven or eight years at Boston. In May, 1878, he came to Minneapolis and has since been in the employ of Upham, Wyman and Company as head book-keeper, and fills the position with credit. His marriage with Florence J., daughter of John W. Eastman, occurred September 8th, 1880, in this city.

Page 610

L. N. Parker

was born at Chester, Vermont, December 14th, 1823. At eight years of age he accompanied his parents to Illinois, locating in Madison county. He lived on a farm until eighteen years of age, and in 1841 removed to St. Croix, being a lumberman there until 1849, when he located at St. Anthony. He carried the first mails between St. Paul and St. Anthony, and ran a line of stages on this route four years; was also engaged in lumbering. In 1854 he was, the proprietor of a sale and livery stable, and also practiced as a veterinary surgeon; he has continued in the practice since, at 102 First street north. He married Amanda Huse in 1849. They have two daughters and four sons; two sons have died.

Page 610

F. F. Patterson

was born in Illinois in 1849. His parents moved to New York when he was two years old, where he lived until 1865. At the age of twelve he began in the coasting service in which he continued four years, sailing from New York to different points on the coasts. When sixteen years of age he had the command of a schooner for a New York firm. In 1865 he came to Rochester, Minnesota, settling on a farm on which he lived until his removal to this city in 1872. He is now a contractor and builder. He was married in 1871 to Miss Emma Leet of Rochester, Minnesota.

Page 611

John Patterson

is a native of Montreal, Canada, born in 1832. He learned the mason's trade with his father, and has made it his life business. In 1854, went to Monroe, Wisconsin, and two years later made St. Anthony his home. He is the oldest contractor now doing business in this city, and worked on the Cataract. Anchor and Zenith mills. Patterson and Baxter, in 1868, built the masonry for the bridge across the east side channel. The firm of Stevens, Patterson and Company was made in 1873, and existed until the present firm of Patterson and Aronson was formed. He was married to Sarah A. Burton in 1865, who has borne him five sons.

Page 611

Levi N. Patterson

of the firm of Patterson and Chilstrom, druggists, was born in Oneida county, New York, in 1848. He came to Minnesota in 1854, and located at Mankato, where he passed his youth, and learned the drug business in St. Peter with Henry Jones. In 1872, located in this city and worked in a drug store until 1874, when he became a partner in the firm of Young, Patterson and Company, but sold his interest five years later. In October, 1880, the present firm was formed and has since continued. He was married in 1875 to Eva M. Tibbetts, of Mankato. They have one child. Russ. Mr. Patterson's father was one of the pioneers of Blue Earth county, and was a member of the legislature at the time of his death in 1861.

Page 611

J. H. Paul

was born near Salem, Indiana, in March, 1847. He came to this city in 1871, and engaged in the manufacture of church, school and office furniture, in which business he is at present. He was married in March, 1875, to Miss Ida Mertens. Their children are: Joseph and Margaret. Residence, 871 Sixteenth Avenue south.

Page 611

Leonard Paulle

was born at Buffalo, New York, in 1854. There he received is education and learned his trade as show-case maker and engaged in the manufacture of them. He remained at Buffalo until 1876, when he came to Minneapolis and pursued his trade. He is located at 123 Washington Avenue south, where he is doing a large and thriving business.

Page 611

James Pauly

is a native of France, born in 1826. He came to the United States in 1849, making Woodbury, Connecticut his home seven years. In 1856 he removed to Reed's Landing, Minnesota, where he engaged in hotel keeping twenty-three years, five of which was passed in the Bullard House, and ten in the American House. He bought and took possession of the Pauly House of this city in June, 1879. He was married in 1857, to Miss Margaret Simon. They have two sons and two daughters.

Page 611

F. M. Pieronnet

was born in Pennsylvania, in 1858. He accompanied his parents to St. Louis, Missouri, at the age of fifteen. His father being a physician, he studied with him until June 1878. Having no taste for his father's profession he came to Minneapolis in that year and was employed in the Crown Roller mill one year and has since then been engaged as book-keeper. At present he has charge of the books and financial department for L. Paulle, show case manufacturer.

Page 611

John W. Pence

was born in Warren county, Ohio, February 11th, 1830. He lived with his father on the farm until eighteen years of age, then engaged with a partner, dealing in grain, general merchandise, etc., for eight years with marked success. In 1856, he went to Columbus, when he was again a dealer in grain, stock, etc., until 1865, when failing health induced him to change. He came to Minnesota, and from Faribault to St. Paul, by stage, thence to this city. In 1866, he bought the lots where now stand the City Bank, and Opera House, which bears his name, being at that time among the first three-story buildings in the city. Mr. Pence has been president of the City Bank, and has heavy mining interests near Leadville, Colorado, and owns with S. P. Snyder, forty thousand acres of rich rolling prairie south of Jamestown, Dakota territory. He was married at Minneapolis in 1871 to Miss Laura Enell, of Maine, who died January 6th, 1878.

Page 611

I. L. Penny

a resident of Minneapolis, was born in Maine, in 1834. He located here in February, 1855, he is the proprietor of the Minneapolis drill manufactory at 315 Third Avenue south. He was married in 1857 to Miss Rhoda V. Bean, whose parents came here in 1849. Their children are, Herbert E., Fannie F., Georgia.L., and Mabel.

Page 612

George F. Perkins

was born at Westminster, Massachusetts, June 9th, 1852. He moved with his parents to near Monticello, Minnesota, in 1855, and worked on a farm until sixteen years of age. In the fall of 1869 he returned east to attend school, but instead, chose to learn the machinist's trade and served his apprenticeship at Fitchburg, Massachusetts, with the Fitchburg Machine Company, and returned to Minneapolis in 1876. He entered the shops of Walker Brothers and during the same year opened a shop of his own on a cash capital of but seventeen dollars. Owing to economy, energy and perseverance he is now at the head of his large establishment.

Page 612

Herman J. Peters

was born at Dayton, Ohio, in 1855. When a boy he moved to Kansas City, Missouri, and learned the trade of miller while there, in the Demond mill. He worked there ten years then went to Houston, Texas for two years, thence to this city in June, 1879. He was first in the employ of the Empire mill, then in the Cataract as miller, where he has since remained.

Page 612

Andrew Peterson

of the firm of Peterson and Henland, is a native of Sweden, born October, 4th, 1844. He came to the United States in 1866, first locating at Hastings, Minnesota. In 1867 he went to Montana, where he worked at the blacksmith's trade until 1871. He then came to this city and engaged in the Monitor plow works. In April 1880 he began dealing in oysters and fish. He was married in 1872, to Sarah Anderson, a native of Sweden. They have four children: Carrie, Annie, George W., and baby.

Page 612

A. G. Peterson

a resident of Minneapolis, was born in Denmark, October 1st, 1853. He came to the United States in 1868, locating at Fairfield, Connecticut, and remained there until 1870, then came to this city, and in 1871 entered a grocery store as clerk; three years later he started in the grocery business with his brother, H. C. Peterson. In 1879, he sold his interest to his brother and engaged in business for himself, at 1203 Third Avenue south. He married Amelia J. Hanson, of New York city, in 1878. They are parents of one child.

Page 612

H. O. Peterson

a native of Norway, was born in 1849. He emigrated to the United States in 1869, and first located in St. Cloud, Minnesota. The next year he removed to Minneapolis, where he worked in the saw mills of the city until 1877. He then clerked in a grocery store two years, then opened an establishment, doing business for himself. During the same year, he added a stock of crockery ware, and in March, 1880 a full line of dry goods was added. He now occupies two stores at 1422 and 1424 Washington Avenue south. He was married in 1871, to Christine Blecken of Norway. They have four children.

Page 612

I. C. Petersen

is a native of Denmark, born December 13th, 1836. He learned the shoemaker's trade in his native country. In. 1873 he came to the United States, making Faribault, Minnesota, his home until 1877. In that year he removed to Minneapolis and worked for C. A. Heffelflnger two years, when, he opened a shop of his own and still continues. He married Miss Anna Larson, of Norway, in 1859. They have had ten children, five of whom are living Elma, D., Charles, Jennie and Fannie.

Page 612

Martin Peterson

was born in Sweden, in 1845. He emigrated to America, in 1868, and settled at Lansing, Iowa; thence to Keokuk. In 1871, he came to Minnesota, and worked at railroad contracting in Houston and Winona counties, until the fall of 1878, then came to this city and started in the grocery business at 1501, Washington Avenue south.

Page 612

Oliver Petersen

is a native of Norway, born October 2d, 1851. He came to the United States in 1866, locating at La Crosse, Wisconsin, remaining three years, dealing in groceries and dry goods. He then removed to Rushford, Minnesota; thence to St. Paul in 1870, and was employed five years by the St. Paul and Sioux City Railway Company. In 1877 he returned to his native country, remaining three years. He then made Minneapolis his home, and engaged In the saloon business at 821 Washington Avenue south. He married Carrie Davison la 1879, who bore him one child William.

Page 612

John Petrasch

was born in Bohemia, October 12th, 1829. Here he spent his youth, and became familiar with the shoemaker's trade. He emigrated to the United States in 1859, and after passing one year at St. Louis, came to Minneapolis, and at once opened a boot and shoe store at 25 First street south, where he still continues.

Page 613

M. Pettingill

was born at Cambridge, Maine, in 1832. At eighteen years of age he joined his parents at Omro, Wisconsin, they having moved there one year previous. After a stay of two years duration, he returned east and was employed in the cotton factories eight years, after which he removed to Iowa, but finding the country too new for business, he again returned Omro, and, with his father, opened a boot and shoe store. He traveled through the northwest and obtained patents, particularly for the Pettingill draw-bar for car coupling, but lacking the necessary means he was unable to introduce them into general use. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1871, and opened a restaurant, with a shoe shop in the rear. Four years later he leased the Chalybeate Springs, where he now resides. His marriage with Miss E. D. Harrington occurred in October, 1855. They have six children, all living at home.

Page 613

E. J. Phelps

of the firm of Phelps and Bradstreet, furniture dealers, came to Minneapolis in April, 1878, from Aurora, Illinois, and in company with J. S. Bradstreet established the furniture business at 421 and 423 Nicollet Avenue. Residence at 1027 First Avenue north.

Page 613

William Phipps

was born at Maine, Broome county, New York in 1829. He lived on a farm until twenty-one years of age; then apprenticed as a carpenter. In 1855 he was employed by the government, and went to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, but soon returned to Illinois on account of ill-health. He worked at his trade until 1857, when he came to Minnesota. After being in the employ of the government, working in different states, he located at Minneapolis in 1872, where he has since lived, employed as a contractor and builder. In 1858 he was married to Miss Kate Arnell, who died in June, 1864. His second wife was Arbilla C. Wilmot, whom he married in 1866, and by whom he has three children: Ross V., Willie H. and Clifford. Residence at 25 Seventh street.

Page 613

John Sargent Pillsbury

Governor of the State of Minnesota, is a native of Sutton, Merrimac county, New Hampshire, born July 29th, 1828. His educational advantages during boyhood were limited to the common schools of his native town. At an early age he commenced learning the painter's trade, but when about sixteen he entered the mercantile business as salesman in a store at Warner. When twenty-one years of age he formed a partnership with Walter Harrimon, afterwards Governor of New Hampshire, which continued two years. He then removed to Concord, where he remained four years in the business of merchant tailor and cloth dealer. In 1853 he made a tour of observation throughout the western states and in 1855 he located at St. Anthony, Minnesota, engaging in the hardware business with success. In addition to the losses by the panic of 1857 his establishment was destroyed by fire, entailing a loss of twenty-two thousand dollars, with no insurance; but by hard, honest labor and indefatigable energy, he recovered, and in five years was again a prosperous merchant. In 1858 he was elected a member of the city council and re-elected for six successive years. When the rebellion broke out he rendered efficient service in organizing the First, Second and Third Regiments of Minnesota Volunteers, and in 1862, in company with others, raised and equipped a mounted company for service against the Indians. In 1863 he was appointed one of the regents of the University of Minnesota, and its present gratifying condition is largely owing to his prudent endeavors. In 1872 he engaged in the manufacture of flour in Minneapolis, with his nephew, C. A. Pillsbury. The firm of C. A. .Pillsbury and Company is one of the largest manufacturers of flour in the world. In 1868 he was elected state senator from Hennepin county, and re-elected for four following terms, and again in 1872 and the succeeding term. In 1875 Mr. Pillsbury was elected Governor and re-elected in 1877 and 1879. His administration has been marked by a thorough devotion to the interests of the people of this state. He married in Warner, New Hampshire November 3d, 1866, Miss Mahala Fisk. They have had four children: Ida, Susie May, Sadie Belle and Alfred Fisk.

Page 613

Charles F. Pillsbury

lawyer, was born in Kingfield, Franklin county, Maine, January 31st, 1828. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in Somerset county, Maine, in l854. He practiced his profession in Somerset and Franklin counties until September, when he came to Minneapolis and was admitted to practice in the courts of Minneapolis by Judge Vanderburgh in December of the same year. He has been engaged in real estate business in connection with his law practice. He is one of five brothers, born on the farm at Kingfield, where they all remained until twenty-one years of age. Two of the brothers are lawyers, one a minister, one a merchant, and one a physician. Mr. Pillsbury's marriage with Francis H. Boynton, of New Portland, Maine, occurred in 1856. They have had four children, two of whom are now living, a son and daughter. In 1871, a son, aged twelve met his death by a fall on the ice on the river.

Page 614

George A. Pillsbury

son of John and Susan Pillsbury is a native of Sutton, Merrimac county, New Hampshire, born August 29th, 1816. He received a common school education in his native town, and at the age of eighteen, he went to Boston and secured employment as clerk in a grocery store. He remained at Boston only a little over one year, when he returned to Sutton and began the manufacture of stoves and sheet-iron ware in company with his cousin, J. C. Pillsbury. In 1840, he removed to Warner as clerk for J. H. Pearson, and in July following, he purchased the business and conducted the same. He was postmaster at Warner from 1844 to 1849, also held other offices of trust and prominence. In 1851, he received the appointment of purchasing agent for the Concord railroad, and occupied that position until 1875. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1878, and still resides here. He is a member of the firm of C. A. Pillsbury and Company, and also holds other positions of prominence. He married Margaret S. Carleton in 1841. They are the parents of two sons, Charles A., and Fred. C., both associated with him in business. Charles is a graduate of Dartmouth College and a member of the Minnesota state senate.

Page 614

C. E. Ploch

a native of Germany, was born May 22d, 1838. He emigrated to America in 1854, making New York his home where he learned his trade, that of shoe-making, and worked at it until 1860. He then removed to South Carolina, remaining seven years, then came to Minneapolis. He was employed at his trade by different firms until 1873, when he opened a store of his own at 508 Washington Avenue north. He married Doretta Wille, of Germany in 1865. Their children are: Amelia, Clara, Alicia and Cecilia.

Page 614

Frank Plummer

was born at Brooklyn, Hennepin county, Minnesota, June 10th, 1855. He lived on a farm until 1868, then attended the graded schools of St. Paul until 1871, when he entered the University and finished his studies in 1873. He entered the city engineer's office and remained three years, and the next spring went to the Black Hills, remaining two years. In May, 1880, he returned and opened his present office, in company with F. H. Nutter, as civil engineer. In the fall of 1880, he was elected county surveyor, which office he now holds.

Page 614

George Pomarleau

was born in Canada, in 1845. He came to Hennepin county in 1853, and for ten years lived with his parents on a farm. The next eight years he was employed by the government, teaming from Fort Snelling, and Fort Abercrombie. He is now proprietor of the "Philadelphia Exchange," of this city, 215 First street north. He was married, in 1873, to Miss Victoria Blondio. Three children have been born to them.

Page 614

E. F. Pomeroy

was born at Granville, Massachusetts, June 7th, 1833. He came to Minneapolis in May, 1880, from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he had been engaged in the manufacture of soap. He has a wife and five children all living in this city. He is of the firm of Pomeroy and Benner, Minneapolis Soap Works.

Page 614

J. L. Pomeroy

is a native of Southhampton, Massachusetts, born November 3d, 1818. He located at Bassett's Creek in 1855, engaging in milling under the firm name of Pomeroy, Bates and Company, in which he continued four years, then in company with Mr. Bassett built a distillery, and sold out in 1862 and engaged in the liquor business in this city. In 1874, in company with E. N. Bates and Joseph Day, he built a flour mill at Piedmont, Missouri, and the next year returned to this city and engaged in the liquor business at the corner of Second street and First Avenue south. He married Lydia T. Thomas December 3d, 1840. Their children are: Martha E., Julia C. and Edward T.

Page 614

T. L. Power

pastor of the Church of the Holy Rosary, was born in Waterford county, Ireland, March 17th, 1830. He attended St. John's College in his native country, in 1849 came to America, and went to St. Rose, Kentucky, where he became a member of the Dominican Order. After completing his theological studies there, he went to Sinsinawa Mound, Wisconsin, and in July, 1856, was ordained at Milwaukee, by the now venerable Archbishop Henni. He remained several years at Sinsinawa Mound, then went to Memphis, Tennessee where in 1867 he suffered a severe attack of yellow fever. In 1868 he returned to Sinsinawa Mound, where he remained three years, then went to Washington, District of Columbia, where he assisted in the erection of St. Dominica's Church. In 1878 he came to Minneapolis, purchased the present site of the Holy Rosary, and at once commenced its erection, as well as that of the convent, which is under his supervision. Father Power states that upon his arrival here he bought an old building used as a Swedish Church, and had it moved to his grounds for temporary purposes. In this old building, while it was yet on rollers, in the middle of the street, he celebrated his first mass.

Page 615

J. M. Pottle

proprietor of the Minnehaha Carriage Works, established his business in 1862, and eight years after, his son J. H. Pottle, was taken as partner, making the present firm of J. M. Pottle and Son. This firm employs twenty-five men, doing first-class work, which is nearly all done to order, and consists of buggies and light carriages. Their works cover an area of 125 x 160 feet, at 117 Second street south.

Page 615

F. E. Pratt

manufacturer of carriages, sleighs, wagons, etc., was born at Bangor, Maine, in 1842. He enlisted in 1861, and served until his discharge in 1865. He made Michigan his home for three years, and in 1875 returned to his native state, remaining two years; then came to Minneapolis, where he has since resided and conducted a lucrative and thriving business. He was married in February, 1864.

Page 615

Otis Arkwright Pray

was born at Livermore, Oxford county, Maine, February 28th, 1833. His great grandfather Pray, who was a soldier in the revolutionary way, emigrated from Scotland to Connecticut, thence to Oxford, Massachusetts. Otis' father being a millwright and farmer, at the age of eighteen he decided to follow his father's trade, and was apprenticed as such at Lewiston, to D. Beede. After serving, three years as an apprentice, he formed a partnership with Mr. Beede, which continued three years, during which time they were engaged in mill building throughout Maine. In 1857 he came to Minneapolis, and first built a saw-mill up the river; then was employed by W. D. Washburn to assist in building the great Minneapolis mill-dam. After the dam was finished, he built the Cataract mill, which was the first flouring-mill on the west side. He then removed to Afton, on St. Croix Lake, and engaged in building; then returned, and erected the Union mill; thence to St. Cloud, where he built and operated a mill until 1866, when he again returned to this city, and has been connected with the business interests since. He is a member of the firm of O. A. Pray and Company, iron manufacturers. He married June 17th, 1858, at Wilton, Maine, Miss Frances A. Fenderson. They have one son, Albert Fenderson.

Page 615

A. R. Prescott

is a native of Vienna, Maine, born August 28th, 1838. In 1875 he went to New Brunswick, and sold goods on the road from St. Johns. In 1877 he located at Sussex, New Brunswick, and for three years kept restaurant; then made this city his home, and opened a restaurant at 217 Central Avenue. He was married to Mary E. Bridges, in 1860, who bore him one child, Charles A. Mrs. Prescott died in 1864. His second wife was Lydia A. Bridges, whom he married in 1865, Children: Mary E., Lorinda I., Lydia E., and Emma; Laura and Effie, died.

Page 615

Charles H. Prior

was born August 1st, 1833, at Plainfield, Connecticut. He moved with his parents to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1836, where he attended the public schools until 1848. He attended Oberlin College of Ohio, two years, then at Cleveland University, two years, completing a course as civil engineer in 1852. He engaged in the pursuit of his profession until 1860 on the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern railroad, the Louisville and Sandusky City railroad, and the Milwaukee and Madison railroad. He was then employed in the operative department of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul railroad; he is now and has been for ten years past, superintendent of that company's lines, in Iowa, Minnesota and Dakota. He was married in 1860, at Cleveland, Ohio, to Miss Delia M. Noyes. Their children are: Nellie D., Joseph H., and Edith L.

Page 615

L. A. Priest

of the firm of L. A. Priest and Company, commission merchants, was born at Boston, March 17th, 1844. He first located in business at Walpole, Massachusetts, remaining until 1877, when he Settled for a short time in Chicago; thence to Deadwood, Dakota territory, where he was connected with mining interests until his removal to Minneapolis in 1880. He has been unusually successful as a commission merchant, the stock in trade being fruits, produce, poultry, game, etc. He was married in 1878, to Mary Van Norman of Ontario, Canada.

Page 616

W. H. Priest

was born in Essex county, New York, in 1841. In early life he accompanied his parents to Illinois, remaining there two years; then removed to Appleton, Wisconsin, where he remained until coming to this city in 1874. He engaged in coopering, and was foreman for Hall and Dann for four and one-half years. He entered the Hennepin County Barrel Company in May, 1880, and is now a member of that organization. He was married in 1863 to Miss Louise Osborne. Residence at 610 Fourteenth Avenue South.

Page 616

Charles Proehl

dealer in lime, hair, cement, plaster, etc., was born in Germany in 1827. He attended the public schools until fourteen years of age, then learned the trade of stone-mason. He emigrated in 1854 to Illinois, and after remaining a few months came to Minneapolis and has since made this his house. He first worked on the old suspension bridge, and in 1854 he took a claim of one hundred and sixty acres in the township of Plymouth, which he gave to his brother-in- law and half-brother. In 1856 he commenced business as contractor for stone mason work, in which he continued until 1867, when he began his present business. He was the first regular dealer in hair, lime, etc., in the city. It was he, who built the first stone foundation for a building in the city, which now stands on the comer of First street and Fourth Avenue north. He was married in St. Anthony by "Squire" Bostwick, in 1855, to Lena Peters of Prussia, then living in Minneapolis.

Page 616

J. J. Provan

was born at Glasgow, Scotland, May 3d, 1827. He learned the tailors' trade the year in which Queen Victoria was crowned. He came to America in 1852, locating at Boston, where he remained until coming to Minneapolis in 1866. He first opened a shop on Main street, East Division, where the Pillsbury A mill now stands. He opened a store of gents furnishing goods, in connection with his merchant tailoring under the Pence block. In 1869 he removed to his present location, 8 Washington Avenue north. He was married in Boston, to Miss Hannah Howley, in 1865, who died December 3d, 1873. He was again married in 1875 to Ellen F. Holmes of this city.

Page 616

Peter Quady

is a native of Germany, born in 1847. He came to the United States when a small child, locating in Jefferwn county, Wisconsin, and lived on a farm until seventeen years of age, then went in the woods winters and worked in the saw-mills summers. In 1874 he opened a hotel, and has since been in that business. In 1879 he became one of the proprietors of Quady's hotel, in this city. He married Miss Hannora Carroll, November 19th, 1877. Michael E., and Robert L., are their children.

Page 616

Robert Quady

was born in Jefferson county, Wisconsin, January 6th, 1856. He came to Minneapolis in 1870, and for six yews worked in the woods, also in the mills. In 1876 he leased the Green Mountain House, of which he was proprietor three years, then, in company with his brother opened Quady's Hotel, in 1879. He married Miss Maggie O'Brien in 1877. Their children are: Maggie and Mary A.

Page 616

Thomas G. Rainey, M. D.

was born at Belfast, Ireland, March 27th, 1845. He came to the United States in 1863. His education was obtained partly in Ireland, also at Hillsdale, College, Michigan. He studied at the Medical University of that state, and graduated with the degree of M. D. in March, 1872. He commenced his practice immediately at Ionia, and remained two and one-half years, then studied in New York and London one year. He returned to America in 1876, locating at Portland, Maine, and resumed practice. In 1879, he became a resident of Minneapolis, where has since practiced his profession.

Page 617

John P. Rank

a native of Germany, was born in 1829. He came to the United States in 1843, and remained eleven years with his parents on a farm in Canada. In 1854, he came to Minneapolis and worked in the woods one winter, the year following engaged in the grocery business. In 1863, he bought a building in which he kept saloon until it burned in 1868. He erected a new building on that site, and in 1874 again opened a saloon where he now is. He married Miss Mary Gluck in 1859, Edward, John, Louisa, Kate, Henry, Louis, Anna, Frederick and Otto, are the children.

Page 617

N. Raths

was born at Luxembourg, October 27th, 1839. He came to the United States in 1855, locating first in Iowa. In 1864, he removed to Minnesota and engaged in farming in the suburbs of Minneapolis, until 1870, when he started a grocery store at 1307 Washington Avenue north, in which he is still doing a thriving business, and owns the property on which he is located. His marriage with Anna Bofferding occured in 1867. They have five children living: Maggie, Nanny, Willie, Philomena and George.

Page 617

Jacob Rauen

is a native of Prussia, born November 1st, 1836. At twenty years of age, he came to the United States and first located on a farm in Crystal Lake, Hennepin county, Minnesota. Here he remained until 1868, when he removed to this city, and the next year built the Harmonia House, which he still owns. This hotel was managed by him until 1877, when he retired from active business on account of poor health. He was foreman of the old Germania Hose Company four years, and assistant engineer of the Minneapolis fire department two years. He married Miss Ernestine Stultzman, of Germany in 1865. They have three children living, Henrietta J., Annie C. and Charles.

Page 617

Peter Rauen

a native of Germany, was born October 17th, 1834. He came to the United States in 1854, and remained in Chicago two years then located in St. Anthony, and is one of the old pioneers of this region. He removed to St. Paul and remained until 1859, when he returned and commenced in the grocery and general Merchandise business, at the corner of Plymouth and Washington Avenues, which he has since continued. He is now the oldest German grocer in the city, and has accumulated much valuable property. He was married in 1854 to Christina Thielen, of Germany. They have had twelve children; six are now living. Annie, Jacob, Mary, Susan, Josephine and Lizzie.

Page 617

Thomas Raymond

was born in Rindge, New Hampshire, May 2d, 1830. In 1855 he went to Moline, Illinois and engaged in manufacturing pails, and tubs for nine years. He removed to Minneapolis in 1864, was in the same business for five years, and for six years following was employed in flouring mills and furniture factories. Since 1876, he has been in the employ of Washburn and Company. His marriage with Miss Hannah Longton occurred in 1856. They are parents of five children: William S., Ida I., Lulu L., Charles and George.

Page 617

L. W. Raymenton

was born at Chester, Vermont, November 18th, 1852. He received an academic course at Burr and Burton's Seminary, at Manchester, Vermont, in 1872, and attended Middlebury College one year, after which he returned to his native town. He read law at the following places: at Chester, with Hugh Henry; at Uxbridge, Massachusetts, with George W. Hobbs; at Worcester, with C. A. Merrill, and in the summer of 1879 was admitted to the bar. He removed to Minneapolis the fall following, and opened an office in company with G. W. Hael in April, 1880. The firm is known as Hael and Raymenton.

Page 617

Judge John P. Rea

was born October 13th, 1840, in Lower Oxford township, Chester county, Pennsylvania. His father owned a woolen factory, and he passed his time there and attending school, until September, 1870, when he went to Piqua, Ohio, where he taught school. He enlisted in 1861 in company B, Eleventh Ohio Infantry, being one of the first in the state to enlist. He served in that regiment four months, when he was commissioned second lieutenant of company I, First Ohio Cavalry; he was promoted to first lieutenant March 12th, 1862, and in April of the next year to the rank of captain, and soon after was brevetted major. He served in the regiment three years and four months, having been absent only ten days, seven of which, he was a prisoner and three days sick. In 1865 he entered the Wesleyan College at Delaware, Ohio; he graduated in the classical course in June, 1867.During the vacation of 1866 he entered the office of Hon. O. J. Dickey, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, as a law student and was admitted to the bar there in August, 1868. In March of the next year he was appointed one of the three notaries public of Lancaster, by Gover- nor Geary. April 12th, 1869 he was appointed by President Grant, assessor of internal revenue for the Ninth district of Pennsylvania, which office he held until it was abolished by law in 1873. He continued practicing law in Lancaster until December, 1875, when he removed to Minneapolis. January 2d, 1876, he became editor of the Minneapolis Tribune and remained in that connection until May, 1877. He once more resumed his practice and in November of that year was chosen probate judge and re-elected in 1879. He married Emma M. Gould of Ohio, October 26th, 1869.

Page 618

Gustavus Rees

a native of Germany, was born June 18th, 1848. He came to America in 1854, was in the mercantile business until 1871, when he came Minneapolis, and became a partner of his brother in a clothing establishment.

Page 618

R. Rees

was born in Germany, in February, 1842. He came to America in 1854, and engaged in the mercantile business, until 1869, when he located in Minneapolis, and opened a clothing store. The firm name is R. Rees and Brother.

Page 618

Louis Rehl

a resident of Minneapolis, was born in Germany, in 1849. He came to the United States in 1865; and was in the Lake Superior copper mines, working at his trade, that of blacksmith, three years, then came to this city. He was employed as a blacksmith several years, then opened an establishment of his own at No. 1817, Riverside Avenue, corner of Fourth street south. He is a manufacturer of wagons also the patent meat blocks for butchers. He married Henrietta Paul in 1868, who bore him four children.

Page 618

L..M. Reid

was born at Cedarville, Ohio, June, 1852. He came to Minneapolis in 1865, and attended school here, after which he clerked for Kelly, Reid and Wagner. He had an interest in the North Star Boot and Shoe Company for three years, then went into the present, business of plumbing, gas fitting, etc. The firm name is Cauvet and Reid. Mr. Reid was married in l876, to Miss Frankie Cook, of this city. They have two children: Finley Earle and Harry Fayette.

Page 618

A. M. Reid

president of the North Star Boot and Shoe Company, was born in Greene county, Ohio, in 1829. Here he received his early education, and upon reaching man's estate was in manufacturing and general merchandise business for fifteen years. Having concluded to go west he visited all important cities west of the Mississippi, for the purpose of finding a desirable place in which to permanently settle. Upon arriving at Minneapolis he decided to look no further, but returned to arrange his business, which he did, and located here with his family in November, 1865. He did not resume an active business life until he became one of the firm of Kelly, Reid and Wagner, wholesale grocers in 1870. He was one of those who organized the North Star Boot and Shoe Company, and was secretary and treasurer of the company until 1877, when he was elected its president. He was married in 1848, to Julia Miller, of Ohio. Finley M., Lafayette M., and Ada Viola, now Mrs. F. E. Hesler, are their children.

Page 618

F. M. Reid

secretary of the North Star Boot and Shoe Company, was born in Greene county, Ohio, July 15th, 1850. He came with his parents to Minneapolis in 1865, and received his education at the common and high schools of the city. His first experience in mercantile pursuits was with the firm of Kelly, Reid and Wagmer, wholesale grocers, his father being a member of the firm. He was employed next by the North Star Boot and Shoe Company as their first book-keeper. He opened and kept the first set of books used by the company. He was soon promoted to the position of secretary, which he still holds with credit. He was married in 1878, to Jennie M. Higgins, daughter of M. L. Higgins, of Minneapolis, who has borne him one child, Bessie M.

Page 618

William R. Reid

is a native of Ontario, Canada, born May 17th, 1856. He learned milling at home and worked four years at Spicerville, Canada, and has since then worked in mills at different points in Minnesota and Wisconsin. He came to Minneapolis, March, 1880, and engaged with the Pettit mill as grinder, and has since been with this firm.

Page 618

S. T. Rhuart

was born at Cleveland, Ohio, December 27th, 1850. During the spring of 1871 he came to Minneapolis and for six years worked at blacksmithing. In 1877 he became the proprietor of the Washington Avenue House, which is owned by C. M. Warner. He married Miss Mary Sexton, March 4th, 1877. Albert H. and Maggie I. are their children.

Page 619

S. M. Rich

was born in Boston, December 2d, 1851. He came to Minneapolis in 1879, and engaged in dealing in oysters, salt, dried and canned fish, which is exclusively wholesale. His trade extends throughout Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin and Dakota, and its growth has been very extensive. Mr. Rich was married in 1873, to Mary A. W. Brigham, of Boston. They have three children: Mortimer B., John H. and Henry L.

Page 619

Edward A. Richards

was born in Berlin, Wisconsin, September 17th, 1850. He came to Minneapolis in 1872 and worked in the Washburn A mill five years. After the explosion he was employed in the Pillsbury mill until the Washburn C started, and since been in this mill. He married Mary Eckes in 1877. Their children are, Nellie and George.

Page 619

C. H. A. Richter

is a native of Prussia, born June 4th, 1837. In October, 1863, he came to the United States. He made Springfield, Illinois his home two years, then to Brownsville, Minnesota. In 1866, he came to Minneapolis and worked two years at tailoring, then removed to St. Peter and taught school two years. He returned to this city in 1870, and has since been in the saloon business at 317 Washington Avenue north. He married Mary L. Kletzin in 1868. Henry, Fritz, Emma and Ida are their children.

Page 619

F. C. Rideout

was born in Maine, in 1852, and there received his education. In 1876, he came to Minneapolis and at once commenced dealing in flour and feed. He and his partner, Mr. Albert Bailey, are owners of a feed mill of one ran of stone at 401 Sixth Avenue south, and a two-run mill at corner Second street and Fourteenth Avenue north. Mr. Rideout was married to Miss Mary E. Bailey, November, 8th, 1879. Residence 407 Fourth street south.

Page 619

Theodore Miles Riley

rector of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, was born at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, June 9th, 1842. He was a member of the class of 1861 at Dickinson College, Pennsylvania, and of 1863 of the Theological Seminary of New York. Was ordained deacon in June, 1863, by Bishop Potter of New York, and passed his deaconate at Newburgh, New York, as assistant to the Venerable Dr. John Brown, rector of St. George's, Newburgh. Ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Potter, June 10th, 1866. First parish was All Saints Memorial, at Highlands, Navasink, New Jersey, from January, 1866 to 1868. After spending the winter in Oxford, England, returned and accepted the rectorship of St. Paul's, Winona, Minnesota, remaining there until October, 1872. He then being elected rector of St. Cumming's parish, Philadelphia, entered upon its duties the first Sunday in Advent of the same year, there remaining until the imperative order came to leave the laborious charge to return to Minnesota as rector of Holy Trinity, of Minneapolis, January 15th, 1876. He also performed the duties of rector at Fort Snelling for several years. He is a member of the ecclesiastical court of this diocese, one of the bishop's examining chaplains, and was twice a supplementary deputy to the general convention, taking a seat as deputy in the latter part of the general convention of 1880.

Page 619

John Ring

was born in Sweden in 1859. Was in the army thirteen years; entered as a private and was promoted to an officer. He was converted while there and held prayer meetings in camp, converting many; was honorably discharged for holding divine service in camp; then went into missionary work and was, confined in prison thirty-one days for preaching between the hours of ten and twelve on Sunday, it being a law that none but regularly ordained Lutheran ministers should preach during that time. He converted the jailor while confined. Came to America in 1866, and organized a church in Chicago; preached three years, commencing with thirty and leaving with 150 members. Went to Wisconsin in 1869 and organized a church at Trade Lake, and one at Grantsburg; preached there three years. Came to Minneapolis in 1872 and organized the present church. Went to Omaha in 1874, preached three years there and in Council Bluffs. Then to Kirwan, Iowa, in 1877, to the Swede Baptist church for three years, then returned to Minneapolis in July, 1880. Was married in 1850, to Miss Erickson, who died in 1856, leaving three children: Martha, Christian and John. Married again in 1875, to Martie C. Wicklund.

Page 619

Andrew Rinker

city engineer, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 15th, 1849. After completing his education as civil engineer, he obtained the office of surveyor of the ninth district of Philadelphia in 1866, which position he filled four years. He was then engaged as draughtsman in the registry bureau one year, when he came to Minneapolis and accepted the office of assistant city engineer, and served until 1875. He then formed a partnership with George W. Cooley, civil engineer and surveyor, of this city. In 1876 he engaged in business for himself, and in 1877 was appointed city engineer, which he still holds. He was married in 1876, to Miss Susie E. Johnson. They have one daughter, Florence. Residence, 18 Tenth street south.

Page 620

Lewis Rober

was born at Baldwinsville, Onondaga county, New York, November 11th, 1855. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1880, and engaged in the North-western mill as machinist. He resides at corner of Eighth Avenue and Fourth street south.

Page 620

William P. Roberts

was born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, but when quite young accompanied his parents to Hartford county, Maryland, where his father died in 1858. They returned to the old homestead in Pennsylvania where he passed his time until 1863, when he enlisted in the Forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia, but was soon commissioned as second lieutenant in the Forty-fifth United States Colored Infantry, then was promoted to first lieutenant in August, 1865, and was discharged December 15th of that year. In January, 1866, he entered the State Normal School at Millersville, Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in 1867, and immediately entered the law school at Ann Arbor Michigan, graduating in March, 1869. He was admitted to the bar by the circuit court of Washtenaw county, Michigan, the same year. He soon came west and began his practice in Nebraska City, Nebraska. In 1874 he came to Minneapolis and the following spring opened an office where he has passed the greater portion of the time since in the diligent practice of his profession. He is now a member of the law firm of Benton, Benton and Roberts. His marriage with Miss Anna M. Pugh, occurred at Oxford, Pennsylvania, in 1869. He was made a widower in 1870. Six years after, he married Miss Agnes D. Taggart. They have two children.

Page 620

James Robertson

head miller of the Model mill, is a native of Scotland, born October, 1842. He came, with his parents to America when a babe, and located at Racine, Wisconsin. He learned milling at Racine, where he remained until 1871, when he removed to Lanesboro, Minnesota; he remained three years, then located in this city in 1875. He was employed in the Dakota mill three years, and has since been in charge of the Model mill.

Page 620

L. R. Robertson

was born near Ithaca, New York. September 3d, 1847. He acquired a knowledge of telegraphy when fifteen years of age, and operated at Ottawa, Canada, nine months. He was then transferred to Rouse's Point, New York; he was at that place when the news of the assassination of President Lincoln was sent over the wires. In 1865 he came west, his parents having preceded him, to Wisconsin, and was soon after sent to Minneapolis by the president of the North-western Telegraph Company. On coming here he took charge of the office in 1866, and is now manager of the same. He was married in 1870, to E. Louisa Waters, of this city. They have two children: Phillip W. and Raymond.

Page 620

D. L. Robinson

was born at Falmouth, Massachusetts, in 1845. He located in Minneapolis in the fall of 1875, and was one year with S. B. Mattison in the omnibus business, also one year with W. L. Nichols. The firm of Robinson and Mead was then formed. Their livery stable is of stone 47xl74 feet; with room for ninety horses, located at 220 Third street south. Mr. Robinson was married in 1871 to Ellen E. Kimball of Winona. Ethel W. and Ella O., twins, and Louis K., are their children.

Page 620

A. C. Robinson

was born in St. Lawrence county, New York in l841. He learned the carpenters trade at the age of fifteen, and has been engaged in the pursuit of his trade continuously, except three years passed in the army. He enlisted in the fall of 1861, in the Sixtieth New York Volunteers. He received a wound at Lookout Mountain from which he suffered for five years. He was discharged from the hospital in 1864, and at once returned to St. Lawrence county, remaining until 1866, when he removed to Marseilles, Illinois, engaged in contracting and building. After the Chicago fire he passed the winter there taking contracts. In the spring of 1872 he located at Worthington, Minnesota, making it his home eight years, when he came to Minneapolis and at once made himself known as a contractor and builder, which business he still follows.

Page 621

Charles Robinson

register of deeds of Hennepin county, was born at Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, September 11th, 1839; he moved to New Castle and there remained until 1857, when he came to Minneapolis and worked in a harness shop one year, then learned photography and began business, continuing until the spring of 1862. He then went with the army of the Potomac as mail agent, suttler's clerk, etc., until the seven days' retreat, when he returned home, but soon after entered the western army, with the intention of taking pictures, but was taken prisoner at Fort Pillow; his apparatus was burned and he was robbed of his money and all his clothing except what he had on. He borrowed money enough to return home. On arriving he began working on a farm, continuing until the spring of 1868, when he entered the register of deeds office as clerk. He was deputy register six years and was elected register in 1877, and re-elected in 1879. He was married at Minneapolis in 1871 to Mrs. Annie Merritt. Two children have been born to them Charles and Florence P.

Page 621

S. C. Robinson

was born in Cumberland county, New Jersey, March 1st, 1831. At the age of fifteen he went from home to work on a farm and two years later apprenticed as carpenter, and served until twenty-one years of age. He then moved to Millvii1e, New Jersey, and engaged in his trade. In 1858 he removed to Minneapolis. For six years he was foreman for Eastman, Gibson and Company, in the coopering department, then engaged in contracting and building. In 1876 he entered the firm of Bardwell, Robinson and Company. He was married in 1852, to Miss Mary Dare. Their children are Charles N., and Mary W.

Page 621

Charles N. Robinson

was born at Millville, New Jersey, January 11th, 1853. He came with his parents to Minneapolis, when five years of age; attended the city schools and for two years was a student at the University. Since leaving school he has been in business with his father, S. C. Robinson, in contracting and building, with the exception of one year, during which he was employed in scaling logs for Day and Son. He is now a partner of the firm of Bardwell, Robinson and Company, in the manufacture of sash, doors, blinds, etc., at the foot of Thirteenth Avenue south. He was united in marriage to Miss Kate Eveland in 1875. They have one son, Frank. A., son George D., died in infancy.

Page 621

M. Roeller

was born in Ohio in 1845. He accompanied his parents to St. Paul in 1852, where he received his education, remaining until 1864. After spending some time in traveling, he located at Chicago; thence removing to New Haven, Connecticut, where he remained six years. He then came to Minneapolis, where he has since resided. He is extensively engaged in the manufacture of carriages. His marriage with Miss Paulina Dolson of St. Paul occurred June 10th, 1873. Residence, 1212 Seventh street south.

Page 621

B. C. Rogers

was born in Vermont in 1836. He came to Minneapolis in 1878, and since February, 1880 he has been proprietor of the New York restaurant at 114 Hennepin Avenue. It has a seating capacity for seventy-five. Mr. Rogers married Elvira Walker in 1874, who bore him one child, Leroy C.

Page 621

G. D. Rogers

was born in Pennsylvania September 30th, 1830. At eight years of age he moved to Oswego, New York, remaining until 1847, when he returned to Pennsylvania. In 1854 he removed to LaFayette county, Wisconsin, and engaged in farming and milling until 1862. He enlisted in the Thirty-first Wisconsin Infantry, commissioned as captain. After serving nine months as such he was promoted to the rank of major; one month later he was commissioned lieutenant colonel and next colonel. In the fall of 1865 he was discharged, after which he went to Iowa, speculating in grain. In 1874 he came to Minneapolis, where he has since been engaged in the wholesale grain and commission business. He married Sarah M. Gillett in 1853. Their children are Plum A. and Emma.

Page 621

N. Rogers

was born at Adrian, Michigan, in 1836. At the age of seventeen, he went with his parents to Decorah, Iowa, where they had a saw and grist-mill. He remained there six years, when the whole family removed to Leavenworth, Kansas, in l861. His father built a steam saw and grist-mill at that place which he, N. Rogers, run two years. He spent a number of years in Iowa and Wisconsin, coming to Minneapolis in 1874, and has been in the Cataract and Standard mills since. He married Miss Lydia Griswold in 1859. Their children are Albert, Harlan, William F., Edward F. and Clarence E.

Page 622

Richard Rogers

was born at Ripley, Maine, June 8th, 1835. He worked with his father at mill-wrighting and milling. In 1853, he went with Gov. Stearns on the Oregon expedition as far as Cheyenne river; he returned alone, and on foot as far as Sauk Rapids. In 1859, he went from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Honey Lake Valley, California. Returned to Illinois, and in 1861, enlisted in the Forty-seventh Illinois Brigade; was three years with that brigade, Eighth Wisconsin, Eleventh Missouri and Fifth Minnesota, known as the Eagle Brigade, commanded by J. Mowers. He contracted a disease of the eyes which at first was not thought serious, but finally resulted in total blindness, in June, 1871. He has received full pension since his discharge. His wife was Miss Nora Jones, of Peoria, Illinois, whom he married in 1865. She died at Peoria in 1871. He lives at 128 Flournoy street, Chicago.

Page 622

Richard C. Rogers

was born at Hopkins, New Hampshire, April 20tb, 1802. In early childhood he accompanied his parents to Ripley, Maine, where he lived until 1848, when he came to Fort Snelling. Fifteen hundred Indians arrived the same day, on route for Crow Wing and adjacent points, sent from former localities in Wisconsin. In 1851 his family joined him here, locating where he now lives at 207 Second street south, East Minneapolis. The west side was then included in the military reservation. Mr. Rogers worked first on a mill near the mouth of Bassett's creek. He made two trips to California, and with that exception has lived here since his first arrival. He has retired from active life, and now enjoys the fruits of his labors. He married Miss Mary Watson, who bore him five children. She died in 1860 during Mr. Roger's absence in California. Six years later, he married Mariam Cobb.

Page 622

John Rollins

one of the earliest pioneers of this region, was born in New Sharon, Franklin county, Maine, March 23d, 1806; lived at or near his birthplace until 1837, when he removed to Penobscot county, and for two years kept a trading post and stopping place for travelers, on the military road between Bangor and Houlton. He then removed to Old Town, where for three years he engaged in lumbering; then settled in Aroostook county, where for nine years he operated as contractor and route agent, and had charge of the state appropriations for both Maine and Massachusetts. He also kept a hotel, and opened up a farm during his stay there. In the fall of 1848 he came west by the route then known as "round the lakes," landing at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, thence by team to Prairie du Chien, from which point he and his partner, A. Godfrey, came to this region, having hired a Frenchman, with three ponies, to bring them through. This journey is fraught with amusing and interesting incidents, some of which will be given a place in this work. When Capt. Rollins arrived at the site of our now prosperous city, there were only two frame houses, one "block" or "timber" house, and one shanty. These were on what is now Second street, near the foundry. One of the frame houses was occupied by R. P. Russell, then newly married, and with whom Mr. Rollins stopped during his stay here. It was the 5th of December, 1848, when Mr. Rollins arrived here. He found the water so low that fording was safe in many places, while above the falls the river was frozen sufficiently to admit of crossing on the ice, something that has not occurred since. On the 25th of December, Mr. Rollins set out for home, making the journey in safety, and the following spring he removed here with his family, and at once mingled in the busy scenes incident to frontier life. He built a house on Main street, near the present location of the great lumber mills. Soon after he formed a partnership with Governor Ramsey and others, and built a small steamboat named the Governor Ramsey above the falls, the machinery for which was shipped from Bangor, Maine, and reshipped at Boston, New Orleans, St. Louis and Dubuque, to St. Paul, from whence it was brought by ox team to its destination. (This machinery is now doing good service on the Red River). After two years of river navigation, Captain Rollins sold his interest in the "Governor Ranasey" and with other parties built and operated the Island flouring mills. Their wheat was shipped here from Wisconsin and Iowa, little or none being raised here at that time. After three or four years of milling, the captain invested in the "Clark" lumber mill, in which he was interested for about ten years. Since then his interests have been varied, but principally given to lumbering and farming. He has now a fine residence, comer of Seventh street and Eighth Avenue south-east, in front of which may be seen a row of beautiful cottonwoods planted by him twenty-four years ago, and now from two and a half to three feet in diameter. Captain Rollins was married to Miss Betsy Martin, June 9th, 1832, at Newport, Maine. Nine children have been born to them, seven of whom are living, and all within four blocks of the homestead.

Page 623

Mortimer B. Rollins

was born at Old Town, Maine, January 26th, 1837. He came to St. Anthony in 1849 with his father, who was among the earliest settlers in the county. In 1860, he engaged in lumbering in which he continued ten years. He then began in the milling business at the Zenith mill, the firm name being L. Day and Company; which firm the fire of 1878, was the means of dissolving. He was married in 1858 to Miss Abby M. Day, who bore him two children, Fred. and John L. Mrs. Rollins died in 1871. His second wife was Maria Ferkins and to them have been born two children, twins, a boy and girl; Harry and Maud.

Page 623

W. T. Rolph

of the firm of Salisbury, Rolph and Company, mattress manufacturers, was born in Lewis county, New York, October 20th 1857. He moved with his parents to New York city, where he received his education. He came to Minneapolis, October 1st, 1880, and entered into partnership with T. G. Salisbury and Company in the manufacture of mattresses. Located on 110 Main street, south-east.

Page 623

J. W. Rootes

is a native of England, born at Kent, September 15th, 1841. He learned the miller's trade in his native country, and emigrated to America in 1860, and located at Troy, New York. In 1861, he enlisted in the Second New York Volunteers, served two years and was honorably discharged. This regiment was the first that camped outside Fort Monroe. Was taken prisoner at Fair Oaks and held five days. He was employed in mills in Ohio and New York, and in 1869 came to Minneapolis. In 1877, he formed a partnership with Russell and Hineline and built the Model mill, and has since been conducting it. He was married to Rebecca Ann Van Epps, March 9th, 1864.

Page 623

Nic. A. Rosbach

was born in Carver county, Minnesota, July 10th, 1856. In 1858 he came to Minneapolis; he learned the business of a butcher when quite a young man, and has been in the business a greater part of his time. In May, 1880, he opened an establishment at 201 Twentieth Avenue south, where he keeps wines, liquors, cigars, and, confectionery. He married Mary Brinkman, May 9th, 1877. Their children are: Cordelia and Christina P.

Page 623

A. S. F. Rose

is a native of Upper Canada, born in 1834. He learned the trade of millwright at Buffalo, New York, 1846, and followed that business until August, 1878, when he came to Minneapolis and began work in the Humboldt mill, and until the fall of next year was employed in different mills throughout the north-west, and has since been in the Crown Roller mill. His marriage with Miss Elizabeth Choles occurred at Buffalo, New York, in 1879.

Page 623

T. L. Rosser

was born in Campbell county, Virginia, October 15th, 1836. At the age of thirteen he went to Texas with his parents settling in Panola county, where his father owned a plantation. In 1856 he was appointed a cadet to West Point Military Academy, from which he graduated in 1861, and returned to the south. He was commissioned first lieutenant in the artillery service of the confederate regular army but was elected captain of the Washington artillery, from New Orleans, and accepted that position instead. He participated in all of the battles fought by the army of Northern Virginia until the battle of Appomattox, having risen in the mean time to the rank of major-general. He was wounded several times, once quite seriously. At the close of the war he entered the Washington Law University, at Lexington, Virginia, graduating in law, in 1866. He then took charge of the southern division of the National Express Company with headquarters' at New Orleans. The fall of that year, he went to Baltimore and made a hydrographical survey of the harbor there. On coming west he engaged, with the Northern Pacific Railway, as chief engineer of construction. In 1879, he resigned, and engaged in business as railroad contractor. His wife was Elizabeth W. Winston, of Virginia, married in 1863. Their children are, Sarah O., Thomas L., William W. Elizabeth F., and Margaret.

Page 624

H. A. Roth

was born in New York city, in 1854. He came to Minnesota about 1860, locating with his parents on a farm in Le Sueur county. He came to Minneapolis in 1870, having been engaged in farming and carpentering until that time. In 1879 he opened an establishment, dealing in new and second hand furniture, stoves, crockery, guns, etc., located at 23 Washington Avenue south. He was united in marriage to Miss Maggie Delbon, in 1877.

Page 624

Barney Roth

was born at Washington, District of Columbia, May 21st, 1853. When a child he accompanied his parents, to Richmond, Virginia. In 1870 he removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and became familiar with the bakery business, in which he has since engaged. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1876, filling responsible positions in different establishments for three years, and has since kept one of his own, at 928 First street north.

Page 624

Charles L. Rothaker

is a native of Switzerland, born in 1828. He came to the United States in 1848, going first to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, thence to Cincinnati. He engaged in the bakery and saloon business in Missouri, Wisconsin, and Minnesota until 1868. He then came th Minneapolis and opened a bakery at 709 Nineteenth Avenue south. He was married to Susanna C. Eschler, in 1857. Their children are, Eliza M., Mary L., Charles B., Emil O., Fred J., and Ida J

Page 624

C. H. Rowe

of the firm of Grove and Rowe, wood merchants, was born at New Sharon, Franklin county, Maine, in 1845. He went to Farmington, Maine, in 1867, and attended the Normal school two years. He removed to Illinois in the spring of 1869, and in the fall came to Minneapolis. After teaching school one term at Excelsior he began in the grocery business with W. B. Jones. He engaged in different lines of business until 1874, when he bought a home in this city, and with his partner has pursued his calling as wood merchant. He married Ellen C. Jones in 1870, who died in 1871, leaving one daughter, Mary E. His second wife was Anitte A. Hankinson, who bore him three children: Francis A., Charles R., and Agnes H.

Page 624

August H. Runge

a citizen of Minneapolis, was born in New York city, February 12th, 1852. At the age of twelve years he entered the United states navy as naval apprentice, on board the school ship "Sabine." In June, 1865, was transferred on board the flagship "Colorado" of the European squadron; two years later he was again transferred to the Pacific squadron and remained until his discharge as an able seaman. He then went to the Pennsylvania oil regions to study practical and mechanical engineering. In 1873 he returned to New York and entered a machine shop, here he remained until called to Minneapolis to superintend the steam heating department and engine of the City hall. He volunteered in the fire department in 1874, and was promoted to assistant foreman, and in 1879 was appointed by the city, foreman of Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, in the paid department. He was married in 1876, to Miss Louisa Ende. One daughter was born to them, Mabel S.

Page 624

Roswell P. Russell

one of the oldest settlers in this county, was born at Richland, Vermont, March 15th, 1820. At the age of thirteen he went to Burlington, where he remained three years; then went to Michigan, and passed two years at Detroit and Kalamazoo. He was a school-mate of H. M. Rice, and both came to Michigan at the same time. Rice went to St. Louis, Missouri, where he engaged with McKenzie to go to Fort Snelling and take charge of the stock of goods taken there by Baker. Needing an assistant, Rice sent for Russell to accompany him. The journey to Prairie du Chien was not difficult, from there to La Crosse they came in a Mackinaw boat, but at the latter place the boat was frozen in and they were obliged to pursue their journey on foot, but being unused to walking, their distress was great. The second night out, they took possession of an old Indian farmer's place, he being absent, and in the morning purchased three pounds of pork of the missionary, for which they paid the modest sum of two dollars. They arrived at Fort Snelling about the 5th of November, 1839 and he remained there until 1847, when he and Findley made a claim on the east side, extending from Boom Island to the present stone arch bridge, and back indefinitely; two years after, they sold this claim to Pierre Bottineau. In 1847, Mr. R. P. Russell opened the first store in St Anthony, in a two-story building of hewn logs, erected by Franklin Steele. The dam was commenced about this time, and the workmen, together with a few French families, were Mr. Russell's customers. One and one-half years later he went to St. Paul, but soon returned and continued his merchandise business until 1854, when he was appointed receiver in the land office, which position he filled three years, a part of the time requiring four or five clerks, the business was so great. In the fall of 1858 he bought the hardware stock of Spear and Davison, which he sold two years later and turned his attention to farming until 1862, when he, in company with George Huy, erected a planing mill; in 1878 they added to the building and converted it into the flour mill. He was also one of the firm who, in 1870, built the Dakota mill. Mr. Russell has been active in both public and private life; has served one term in the legislature, and often in town offices; he was the first chairman of the town board, and holds that position at the present writing. October 3d, 1848, his marriage occurred, with Marion Patch. The children born to them are: Lucy, now Mrs. W. C. Colbrath; Charles, In trade at Fargo, Dakota; Roswell, Jr., book-keeper for B. F. Nelson, (his wife was Caroline Beach); Mary, who is at home; Carrie, now Mrs. Frank Lovejoy; Fred and Frank, twins; George B. McClellan, Willie and Eddie.

Page 625

Albert W. Russell

was born in Vermont in 1839, where he lived until seventeen years of age. In 1856 he took a prospecting tour through Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan. In 1850 he learned carpentering and joining. He enlisted in 1861 in the Second Vermont Infantry. He was in many of the prominent conflicts, having his gun shattered into fragments, when in his hands, without being wounded. In 1864 he was discharged, but after a quiet life of two months, he re-enlisted in Company E, Seventh Vermont, and served until 1865. He then returned to Vermont where he speculated in real estate and lumber; thence to Wisconsin, where he traveled for a wholesale house. He located in Minneapolis in 1877, and has since been dealing in sewing machines. He was married in 1866 to Sarah Scribner, by whom he had two children. His wife died in 1876. His second wife was Amelia Lockwood, of this city.

Page 625

George H. Rust

was born July 26th, 1839, at Wolfaboro, New Hampshire. He attended the Academy at his native place, also at Thetford, Vermont and graduated as civil engineer from the Kentucky Military Institute near Frankfort in 1856. He at once engaged in the pursuit of his profession, on what is now the La Crosse division of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway, He came to Minneapolis in 1857, and has since made this place his home. In 1863, he entered the commissary department of the military division of the north-west, where he remained until 1866. On returning to this city, he became a partner of S. C. Gale, and soon after engaged alone in real estate and insurance business. He married Josephine Varney, of Boston, in 1865. They have one child, Gertrude.

Page 625

John W. Ryan

was born at Syracuse, New York, May 31st, 1853. He came to Wisconsin when one year old with his parents. After coming to Minnesota, he farmed one year, then was employed on the railroad and ran a train three years, then surveyed for the Chicago and North-western railroad five years. He began milling in March, 1873 for the Pillsbury company, and has remained with them since. He married Miss Mary Rouike, July 24th, 1876. Their children are: Anne and Joseph.W.

Page 625

Samuel W. Ryan

of the firm of Ryan, Wales and Company, was born at Sharon, Hillsborough county, New Hampshire, November 24th, 1836. In 1854, he moved to California, where he remained until 1856, when he came to Minnesota and took a claim near Litchfield. Three years later, he removed to Miami county, Indiana, engaged in farming eight years. He then located on a farm at Brooklyn, Hennepin county, Minnesota which he still owns. In 1880, he became a partner in the firm of Ryan and Wales, in which he still continues. He was married in 1859 to Hattie J. Joslyn of New Hampshire. They have five children: Mary B., Marcellus M., Hannah J. Martha C. and Clistie.

Page 625

John Ryberg

is a native of Sweden, born April 18th, 1851.. He came to America in 1872 and two years later located at Minneapolis. He worked at lumbering four years, then became a member of the firm of Ryberg and Company; the firm consisting of John Ryberg, A. P. Molin and C. Johnson. They have the Stockholm meat market at 1410 Washington Avenue south, established in 1876. Mr. Ryberg was married in 1874 to Augusta Oleson, of Sweden, who has borne him three children, Wolfred A., Charles O. and Nellie.

Page 626

A. H. Salisbury, M. D.

was born at Canandaigua, Ontario county, New York, July 22d, 1840. Graduated from the State University at Madison. Wisconsin, in 1864, then studied medicine and graduated at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College of New York. Practiced at Mazo Manie, Wisconsin for a time; then came to Minneapolis in March, 1874, and has since followed his profession here. He was associated with Dr. A. A. Ames about five years. Dr. Salisbury's office is now at 257 Nicollet Avenue. He was married in 1869, and has two children.

Page 626

T. G. Salisbury

a native of New York, was born February 10th, 1831. Moved to Iowa in 1857, and in August, 1861, enlisted in the Thirty-first Iowa Volunteers; he was lieutenant, and was the first Union officer who entered Columbia, South Carolina. He was eventually promoted to captain. Mr. Salisbury came to Minneapolis from Cedar Falls, Iowa, in 1878, and is now one of the firm of Salisbury and Rolph. He had been in the mattress business there, three years. His marriage with Mariam Richardson took place in June 1854. They have one child, Fred R.

Page 626

Henry R. Sallada

was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; after leaving his native place he lived one year in Oil City, then removed to Chicago, where he was in the insurance business five years. In 1879 Mr. Sallada came to this city, and is engaged in trade at 727 Washington Avenue south; he deals in meat, butter, eggs, game, etc. In 1880 he married Mary Devlin of Washington, D. C.

Page 626

Louis Salzeder

was born February 25th, 1846, in Bavaria, and pursued classical studies at Munich, in the college of the Benedictine Fathers, coming to America in December 1868. He at once went to St. Vincent's Monastery, Pennsylvania, and entered the Order of St. Benedict, January 1st, 1869. After finishing his course there, he came, on the 10th of January, 1870, to St. Louis Abbey, now St. John's, at St. Cloud, Steams county, where he finished his theological studies. He then, on March 25th, 1873, was established as assistant pastor in Assumtion Church, St. Paul, and remained there until November, 1878, when he came to Minneapolis.

Page 626

Robert P. Samplel

pastor of West-minster Church, Minneapolis, was born in Corning, New York, October 19th, 1829. His mother died when he was quite young. He spent part of his boyhood at Geneva, in connection with the Lyceum, under the care of the Rev. Mr. French. After completing his academic course he entered Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, Dr. Robert J. Breckenridge being president. Was converted during the junior year in college. Graduated in 1849. Entered the Western Theological Seminary in 1850. During the senior year, was called to the First Presbyterian Church of Mercer, Pennsylvania. After three years of labor, he resigned the charge, and accepted a call to Bedford in April, 1856, in the hope that the mineral water of that place would improve his declining health. He remained there for ten years. Still influenced by considerations of health, he moved to Minneapolis, to the supply of the Andrew Church, until March, 1868, when he was called to the Westminster church. The church grew under his care necessitating an addition to the edifice, which was made in the summer of 1870. The same year he made a trip to Europe, his people kindly furnishing the money; sailed from New York in June, visiting the holy land and the historic places mentioned in the Bible, returning to his church and people in December, 1872. Had a severe attack of congestion of the lungs the following June, and in feeble health made a visit to Colorado, spending most of the summer and returning in September. His health not being fully established, returned to Colorado in January, 1874, remaining there until the following May, when he returned to his charge and has performed full ministerial duty ever since. A few Sabbaths after his return from Colorado a great revival commenced, continuing for nearly a year; about sixty additions were made to the church on profession of faith. Was called twice to the seventeenth street church and afterwards to the Central Church, Colorado, also to the church of Allegheny City. Among his many literary products are his Memoirs of J. C. Thorne, pastor of Pine street Presbyterian Church, St. Louis. Four volumes for Young Christians, published by the Presbyterian board, namely: "Enquiring the Way," "The Afflicted," "Young Christians" and "Religious Despondency." On the twenty-fifth anniversary of his marriage, his parish presented him with an elegant gold watch and chain, ' the watch elaborately engraved. At the marriage of his daughter to the Rev. J. B. Donaldson, pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Hastings, she was presented by his people with a large quantity of silver ware, many articles of furniture and a beautiful gold watch and chain. On the 13th of November, 1878, she was married in her father's church, her father performing the ceremony. Dr. Sample married Miss Manda M. Backen, daughter of Henry Backen of Cannonsburgh, Pennsylvania. They have five children; Mary E., Anna J., Robert W., John W., and Walter B.

Page 627 

W. W. Satterlee

pastor of the Seventh street M. E. Church, was born at Laporte, Indiana, in 1837. Moved to Stevenson county, Illinois, then to Richland county, Wisconsin:. converted at thirteen; licensed to preach at nineteen; ordained at twenty-three, preaching in Richland county, Wisconsin. He came to Le Sueur county, Minnesota, in 1863, and commenced the practice of medicine doing work at the same time as local preacher. United with the M. E. church in Waseca in 1867, preached there for three years, and in St. Cloud two years. Then to the First M. E. Church in Minneapolis two years, in the mean time completing the present Seventh street church. In 1873 appointed agent of the Minnesota Temperance Union, and continued the work for about seven years. Married December 24th, 1856, to Miss Sarah Stout, have six children: Mary P., Clara A., Willie E., Fanny O., Phoebe A., and Harry B. Is an earnest worker in the temperance cause, a keen debater, Speaking with great power and effect. He obtained about 50,000 signers to the pledge, and for the prosecution of the work obtained notes, subscriptions and collections to the amount of $25,000, and was the temperance candidate for governor in 1880.

Page 627

A. Sanborn

a native of Maine, was born at Charleston in 1853. Learned the jeweler's business at Bangor, and worked there until 1877, when he came to Minneapolis and engaged in business as manufacturing jeweler and watch maker; he is located at 219 Nicollet Avenue. His wife was Mary F. Beebe, whom he married in 1878; she has borne him one son, Ralph R.

Page 627

N. W. Savage

born May 15th, 1842, at Augusta, Maine. At the age of eighteen, he went to Lewiston and worked in the cotton mills one year. In 1861, he enlisted in the Eighth Maine and served until 1864, the next year he went to Tennessee and worked for the government in building the railroad from Chattanooga to Atlanta; he then returned to Maine, and afterward spent one winter in Michigan. He was at Sacramento, California, eleven months, and in Nevada one and one-half years; then passed about fourteen months in Maine again, farming and in the grocery business. In 1872, he came here and engaged in the fish trade and the ice business. The winter of 1875-1876. he spent in Tennessee. Now deals in new and second hand goods of all kinds. He married in 1866, Miss E. J. Watson. They have one son, N. W., and a daughter, E. J.

Page 627

John Savory

a native of Italy, was born in 1835. Came to the United States in 1855, and to this city in 1868, the first year after arrival, he worked in the woods; then for two years, kept a hotel on Main street near Fourth Avenue, and four years at the corner of Main street and Central avenue. In 1875, he built the Nicollet Avenue Hotel, No. 49 Central Avenue; it is 32x32 feet, three-stories high and basement.

Page 627

Albert Schafers

a native of Prussia, was born September 13th, 1847. Came to the United States in 1863, and was two years in a commission house in New York; he then removed to Iowa for one year, thence to Rochester, Minnesota, and in 1868, to this city. Was employed by the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway Company until 1874; he built a store at 1501. Sixth street south, which was destroyed by fire in 1880, but rebuilt the same year; he now has a billiard hall, summer garden, and very pleasant bowling alley. In October, 1867, he married Dina Kleinsmith. They have one child, John.

Page 627

Godfrey Scheitlin

was born in Switzerland, February 18th, 1821. From 1841 until 1848, he carried on a very extensive business in the manufacture of cotton and woolen goods. In the spring of 1848, he started for America, located in Cabell county, West Virginia, where, in 1856, he received his naturalization papers. During his stay there, he engaged in mercantile pursuits. Came to Minneapolis in October, 1856 and continued the same business about three years, then invested in the ginseng trade; he met with a loss of $108,000 in 1864, and in 1868 left that business and erected the mill, now occupied by the Minnesota Linseed Oil Company. January 1869, the firm of Scheitlin, Bell and Sidle was organized, and Mr. Scheitlin has since superintended the business. He was married in New York in 1863 to Sophia Benn, of Altona, Germany. They are the parents of eight children, only three of whom are living.

Page 628

Charles Scherf

a native of Germany, was born in 1836. Came to America in 1854, and resided one year at New York city; then removed to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he lived nine years and after a residence of three years in St. Paul, came, in 1867, to this city. He manufactures kegs, barrels.. and casks. Mr. Scherf married, in 1857, Emma Nimon. They have four children.

Page 628

M. F. Scofield

was born December 28th, 1849, in the state of New York, and grew to manhood there. Was educated at Rochester University, and taught school several years in his native state. In 1873 he came here, and went into the commission business with Wakefield and Company. In 1875 the firm was changed to Scofield and Beeman. Since 1878 he has been in the grocery business. His wife was Abbie Brown, of Warren, Ohio. Their marriage took place in 1875. They are the parents of one child, Raymond.

Page 628

William Scharf

was born in Germany, and emigrated to the United States in 1872. Is a merchant tailor, his place of business being No. 118 Central Avenue. Mr. Scharf was married in 1875, to, Emma Reiseike, who has borne him two children, Edward and Willie.

Page 628

A. Schelling

a native of Switzerland, was born in 1839. Came to America in 1874, and lived at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, one and one-half years. From there he removed to Iowa, where he was employed as civil engineer for nearly four years. Mr. Schelling came to this city in Feb.1880 and opened his billiard hall at 118 Thirteenth Avenue north. He also keeps confectionery and notions. In 1879 he married Mary Probst.

Page 628

Charles Schmidt

was born in Germany, in 1846. Came to America in 1868, and lived about four years in Connecticut. In 1872 he came here for a short time, then removed to McLeod county. After a residence there of about eighteen Months, he again came to this city, and worked at his trade of baker two years. Then he spent the same length of time in McLeod county, after which he returned to Minneapolis, and opened a bakery at the corner of Washington and Seventh Avenues south. In October, 1875, he married Mary Mayer. She has borne him three children, two of whom are living.

Page 628

John A. Schlener

a native of Pennsylvania, was born February 24th, 1856, at Philadelphia. Since 1857 he has been a resident of Minneapolis. After leaving school, Mr. Schlener worked for the well known firm of Bean, Wales and Company, dealers in books and stationery. In 1878 he became a partner and in August of the year following the firm sold their business to Kirkbride and Whitall; Mr. Schlener is in the employ of the new company.

Page 628

Paul Schmedeman

was born June 7th, 1855, at Madison, Wisconsin. Came to Minneapolis in March, 1879, and worked a while the cigar-manufacturing business. He was afterward employed by Daily and Reed, proprietors of the place he now runs, having bought of them in November, 1880; it is a sample room and billiard hall at 205 Nicollet Avenue.

Page 628

G. Schober

a native of Germany moved to Minneapolis in 1855, and has been in the milling business since 1861. He is one of the owners Of the Phoenix mill, a description of which may be seen elsewhere in this work. Married in 1866, Mary Goehringer. Their fice children are: Carl, John, Mary, William and Edward.

Page 628

J. Schneider

pastor of the First German Methodist Episcopal Church, the subject of this sketch, was born in Pennsylvania, August 11th, 1843. Moved to Galena, Illinois, resided there two years, removing to Platteville. Wisconsin, where he received his education; converted at twelve years, joined the church, and was elected superintendent of the Sunday school at twenty. Entered the army as soon as his age would permit. Enlisted in the Forty-seventh Wisconsin, remaining with his regiment for a short time, then detailed to the general headquarters, remaining there until the close of the war. In 1866, married Miss Metha Schneider, and moved to Charles City, Iowa; joined by letter the German Methodist Episcopal Church; elected Sunday-school superintendent, holding the position for nearly three years. He was a licensed exhorter, then local preacher, starting out as assistant to the pastor in charge of the Charles City mission, which comprised five counties. In the fall of 1869 was appointed to Rush Creek and Jewell's Prairie, Illinois, remaining there three years, doubling the membership, building a church and paying for it. Was then appointed to Fort Dodge for one year and Alden two years; transferred to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he built a church and parsonage, and largely increased the membership. Stationed at East Minneapolis for two years, and from there to his present charge.

Page 629

John Schockweiler

was born in Luxembourg, September 17th, 1821. Is a self-educated man, having attended school but three months. In 1852 he emigrated to Detroit, Michigan, and in 1854 came to Minneapolis; he was the second man here engaged in the lime business. His location at present is 15 Third street south; he deals in lime, hair, cement etc. His first wife was Anna Nercyer, who died in 1854; they had one daughter. His present wife was Louisa Mande; they have no children.

Page 629

Joseph Schulenburg

came to Minneapolis in 1866. Kept the Pacific House two years, then engaged in farming the same length of time in Rice county; he afterward worked a farm in Plymouth two years, thence to St. Anthony where for eight years he was proprietor of a boarding house. Since November 1st, 1880, he has kept the Medina House, previous to which he ran the Hennepin House. In 1851 he married Margaret Baker. Their children are Mathew, Caspar and Lizzie.

Page 629

Fred Schroder

a native of Germany, was born November 24th, 1834. Came to America in 1853 and located at Manitowoc, Wisconsin, where he resided until 1876, when he removed to California. In July, 1880, Mr. Schroder came to this city, and engaged in the meat business at 403 Plymouth Avenue. He was married in 1866 to Miss D. Inkenky.

Page 629

Henry Schulze

a native of Germany, was born January 28th, 1842. Came to America in infancy, and lived until 1859 at Chicago, Illinois; he then removed to St. Paul and worked at the meat business there about five years. In 1864 he came to this city and started a meat market, which he sold in April, 1880, to L. W. Neudeck, but still retains his position as manager of the business. In 1875 he married the widow of the late Louis Neudeck of Minneapolis.

Page 629

Henry H. Scott

was born in Penobscot county, Maine, September, 1846. Lived on a farm with his parents until the age of twenty years. In 1863 he enlisted in the First Maine Heavy Artillery; served two years, engaged in thirty-two battles and was twice wounded. Came here in 1866, and has since been in the lumber business. He is also proprietor of the Cottage House, on Second Avenue north. In 1874 he married Josie Fashant. William Henry is their only child.

Page 629

I. C. Seeley

was born January 22d, 1833, in Allegan county, Michigan. When seventeen years of age he attended Richland Seminary, Kalamazoo county, and afterward taught Enlisted in the Fourth Michigan Cavalry, and served three years, being in fifty-seven different engagements; was held a prisoner of war over five months, nearly three months of the time at Andersonville, and is a living witness of the horrors of that prison-pen. After the war he prepared for college at Kalamazoo, then went to Olivet and graduated from the college there in 1868; he also graduated in law at Ann Arbor in 1871, and was in the office of Severance and Burrows of that city until 1872, when he came here and has since been in the real estate and insurance business. In 1876 he married Julia M. Willard. She has borne him one child: Edith.

Page 629

Henry E. Selden

a native of Connecticut, was born August 4th, 1835, at Portland. When five years of age he moved to New Haven, and resided there until 1860, when he came to St. Paul, and two years later removed to Minneapolis; he has been very successful in his business of contracting and building. Mr. Selden enlisted in the Sixth Minnesota Volunteers in 1862; he was through the Indian war, the regiment marching 3,200 miles, and was in the service until 1865. On his return he built his present residence at 14 Tenth street south. His wife was Eleanor Stevens, whom he married in 1860. They are the parents of seven children: Lewis, Emma, Mabel, Frank, Kittie, Eleanor, and Henry.

Page 629

George Sermon

veterinary surgeon, graduated at Edinburgh, April 23d, 1862; at the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, April 30th, 1862, and has a diploma from each. In 1869 he moved to Montreal, Canada, and followed his profession there nine years. Since November, 1878, he has been in practice in Minneapolis.

Page 630

George Kittredge Shaw

editor of the Evening journal, was born in Exeter, Penobscot county, Maine, June 23d, 1841. His parents removed to Galena, Illinois, in the fall of 1851, and in that city Mr. Shaw grew to manhood, receiving his education in the public schools of that place. Having learned the printing trade he made his first business venture in 1862 purchasing the Platteville, Grant county, Witness, which he owned and conducted successfully until 1867. In 1868 he enlisted in the Forty-third Wisconsin Infantry, was elected captain of company B, and served till the close of the war, receiving a commission as major in 1864. In 1867 he came to Minneapolis, and was made editor-in-chief of the Minneapolis Morning Tribune. That position he held for three years and then resigned on account of ill-health. In the summer of 1870 he founded the Daily Evening News, which was the first daily evening newspaper, receiving telegraphic dispatches, started in this city. In June, 1873, he sold the News, and removed to Bay City, Michigan, where he was employed for five years as editor and manager of the Daily Tribune of that place. Returning to Minneapolis in the winter of 1878, Mr. Shaw purchased an interest in the Evening Tribune, remained with that paper as writing editor until May 1st, 1880, and on that date sold out his Tribune stock and afterwards purchased a half-interest in the Evening Journal. Mr. Shaw was married September 13th, 1871, to Miss Anna E. Jones, of Detroit, Michigan, and has three sons and one daughter.

Page 630

J. M. Shaw

was born December 18th, 1833, in Penobscot county Maine. Was educated at Exeter and East Corinth. In the spring of 1862 he came to Minnesota and resided at Cottage Grove, then removed to Galena, Illinois, where he was seven years, employed as book-keeper in a mercantile house. In 1856 he began reading law and in 1859 entered the office of A. L. Cummings. Was admitted to the bar by the supreme court of Illinois, and remained at Galena until 1862, when all he removed to Wisconsin. He enlisted in the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin and was made second lieutenant of company E; was first engaged in frontier service, then went south in 1863 and served until June, 1865 ; he was mustered out as captain. In October of the same year he came to Minneapolis and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession here, He is a member of the law firm of Shaw, Levi and Cray. In September, 1864, he married Ellen A., daughter of Dr. J. S. Elliot of this city.

Page 630

C. W. Shatto

a native of Warren, Ohio, was born in November, 1840. At the age of ten years he accompanied his parents to Minnesota, and followed farming until 1868, when he enlisted in the First Minnesota Volunteers, and served until the expiration of his term of service. Then worked at freighting from Omaha to Denver until 1866, when he came to this city and was employed by Gould and Company, the pioneer agricultural implement firm, until engaging in business for himself. In 1872 he married Miss Sarah Tinkham, in Minneapolis. They have one child.

Page 630

John W. Sherwood

was born December 17th, 1817, at London, England. Learned the book- binder's trade in his native place and came to America in 1848; he resided in New York four years, and three years in Connecticut, thence to Woodstock, Canada. December, 1855, he came to Minneapolis and established the first book bindery in the city; he does edge gilding and all kinds of work pertaining to his business. His wife was Lucinda Marston. The children born to them were: Lucy, John, Rachel, Reuben, John, Nelson, Cedric, Mary and Naomi; four of these have passed away.

Page 630

M. R. Sherwood

son of the above, was born in London, England, September 12th, 1846. Came to the United States in 1848, and in 1865 to Minneapolis. He commenced the manufacture of paper boxes in 1872 and was the first in the city to make a specialty of that line of work; he is now doing a large business at 123 and 125 Nicollet Avenue. Mr. Sherwood was married in May, 1877, to Julia Anderson of Iowa. They have one child, Frederick.

Page 630

Sherburne and White are proprietors of the Windsor House, located on Washington Avenue, at the corner of First Avenue north. The building is owned by L. L. Cook; it was erected by W. F. Hanscom in 1867; it has a frontage of sixty-six feet on Washington Avenue and a depth of one hundred feet; the house is three stories high and there are fifty-four rooms. Messrs. Sherburne and White leased, refitted and refurnished the house; they are old and popular hotel men who always endeavor to please their guests.

Page 631

B. P. Shuler

a native of Pennsylvania, was born September 18th, 1829, in Lycoming county. Came to this city in 1852, and was employed as mill-wright until 1871, when for two years he engaged in the milling business, in company with Mr. Hineline, at the Richfield mills. He went to California in 1873, returned the following year, and went into business at the Arctic mill, under the firm name of Hobart, Shuler and Company. In 1863 Mr. Shuler married Abbie E. Tidd, of Minneapolis.

Page 631

R. G. Shuler

born at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in 1827., At the age of seventeen he commenced learning the trade of millwright, at which he worked in his native state until 1853, when he went to Indiana, and resided one year; then removed to Minnesota, and lived at Anoka, farming, building, and in the livery business, until 1864. He then accompanied Fisk's Indian expedition to the plains. Since 1866 he has lived in this city, engaged in the millwright and building business. Having assisted in erecting some of the principal mills here. In 1859 he married Lucretia Foster, of Maine. Their children are: Alfred, Harry, and Florence.

Page 631

Frederick Sievers

pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church, was born in Frankenlust, Saginaw county, Michigan, June 2lst, 1852. Received his early education from his father at home. After confirmation he went to Concordia College, Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1866, where he remained until 1872. In the same year he went to St. Louis, and entered the Concordia Theological Seminary, graduating June 29th, 1875. August 29th, same year, was ordained at St. Charles, Missouri, remaining there as assistant pastor until 1859, when he received a call from this church. He is the son of Rev. F. Sievers, who organized the congregation in 1856.

Page 631

P. Simonson

a native of Norway, was born in 1841. Emigrated to America in 1866, and located in Minneapolis the same year. He was four years employed in the car-shops, and two years stair-building for J. Harrison. In 1872 he commenced business for himself, building stairs and railings. His establishment is the only one of the kind in the city, and he has been very successful. He was married in February, 1873, to Martha Anderson. They are the parents of three children. Mr. Simonson's residence and stair-building shop are at 1006 Washington Avenue south.

Page 631

C. M. Skinner, M. D.

was born at Waukesha, Wisconsin, in March, 1841. He was educated in his native county, afterward studied medicine and graduated from Rush Medical College, Chicago, in 1876. For one and one-half years he was house surgeon of the Cook County Hospital at Chicago; then practiced at Hartford, Wisconsin, about fifteen months, and since June, 1878, has been in practice in Minneapolis. Dr. Skinner resides at 1001 Washington Avenue south. His marriage with Calista Rowell, of Wisconsin, occurred in 1863. They have one daughter.

Page 631

L. J. Skinner

was born at Brooklyn, New York,. April 4th, 1853. At the age of sixteen he was employed as clerk in the dry goods establishment of E. H. Van Ingen and Company, of New York city, and remained till 1879, when he came here, and engaged in the paint business, as dealer and contractor, firm name, of Adams and Skinner. After a few months he bought Mr. Adams' Interest and continued alone nearly a year when he became associated with W. W. Sly, and the manufacture of paints was added to the business. Their works are on Nicollet Island. Mr. Skinner married Elizabeth M. Bradley, in 1879. They have had one child, who died in infancy.

Page 631

O. B. Skinner

a native of New York, was born August 3d, 1844. in Essex county. Learned the drug business at Elmira, New York, went to Kansas in 1869, and was in business there about two years, then resided in Vermont till 1876. Since that time he has been in the drug trade at Minneapolis, with very profitable results. He occupied the whole of the building where he is at present located,. 1121 Washington Avenue north. In 1870, he married Miss C. L. Baldwin, of Waverly, New York. Of their four children only one survives: Clara. Mrs. Skinner died August 1st, 1880.

Page 631

Thomas Sloan

a native of Preble, Cortland county, New York, was born in 1857. When a babe he came with his parents to St. Anthony and at the age of eleven went to work in the mills of Minneapolis. For the past seven years he has been employed at the Cataract mill. Mr. Sloan is an unmarried man, and lives with his parents at No. 2 First Avenue south.

Page 631

William Wesley Sly

was born July 9th, 1848, in Oakland county, Michigan. At the age of sixteen he went to sea, and before he was twenty-one years of age he circumnavigated the globe. He lived in England two years, engaged in painting, for which he had a natural ability; from there he went to Italy, Asia, East India, China, and was in the Abyssinian expedition with supplies; he was at Ansley bay at the time King Theodore suicide. In 1869 he returned to Bombay, and there went on board the Great Eastern, laying cable. He served in the late war, and after peace was declared, he again went to sea. In 1872 he engaged in the paint business in Detroit, and remained there, with the exception of one schooner trip to Duluth, in which he was shipwrecked and nearly lost his life, until 1878, when he came to Minneapolis and took charge of the Minnesota Linseed Oil Company's paint works. In 1880 he formed a partnership with L. J. Skinner, known as the Minneapolis Liquid Paint Company. He married, in June, 1880, Mary, daughter of Rev. L. D. Brown of St. Paul.

Page 632

C. H. Smart

florist, 514 Sixteenth Avenue south. Mr. Smart is a native of England, and was born March 28th, 1828, at London. In 1868 he moved to the state of New York, where he worked at his trade, blacksmithing, until 1871; since that time he has resided in Minneapolis. While still working at his trade, he has engaged in the cultivation of plants and flowers, and has made good progress in that enterprise. He married, in 1846, Eliza Maddin of London. Their two children have passed away.

Page 632

Fred. L. Smith

was born in the town of Lee, Maine, July 2d, 1843. Received an academic education at Lee Normal Academy. Came to Minnesota with his parents in June, 1857, and located in St. Anthony. Was the first carrier boy of the Falls Evening Journal, a daily paper started in the fall of 1857, by Messrs. Croffut and Clark, in whose office he learned the printer's trade. Was foreman of the Pioneer job department in 1863 and 1864, and in 1865 became associated with Col. John H. Stevens, Col. L. P. Plummer and others in the publication of the Minneapolis Daily Chronicle. When that paper was merged into the State Atlas, and the Minneapolis Daily Tribune was started, he engaged as general superintendent of the mechanical department of that institution, in which place he continued until August, 1871, when he formed a partnership with Chas. W. Johnson in the job printing business. Is now a member of the firm of Johnson, Smith and Harrison, the printers of this history. He has been an active member of the masonic fraternity, having served three years as Master of Cataract Lodge No. 2, A. F. and A.M., during which time their new hall was built. Has also been High Priest of St. Anthony Falls Royal Arch Chapter No. 3, Thrice Illustrious Master of Adoniram Council No. 5, and Eminent Commander of Darius Commandery No. 7, of this city. Is also a Scottish Rite Mason. Was elected Alderman of the fifth ward in the spring of 1878, for two years. Was re-elected in the spring of 1880 for three years, and on the organization of the city council, was made its vice-president. Was elected president of the city council at its organization in 1881, which position he now holds. Was married in December 1868 to a daughter of Henry Sinclair. Has two children.

Page 632

Albee Smith

born November 25th, 1845, at Orange, Massachusetts. Attended the graded schools of Cambridge and in 1863, entered the University of Chicago, the next year he went to Middlebury College; during the two years he was there, he read law with Sandford B. Perry and Walker, Dexter and Smith. He returned to Chicago, entered the law school, and in 1867, was admitted to the bar at Ottawa, Illinois. Came to Minneapolis the same year and opened a law office in company with M. D. L. Collester. In 1871, he returned to Chicago, but was burned out during the great conflagration, and coming again to Minneapolis, has since continued in his profession here. He married Mollie McClelland in 1870. Their children are, Robert, Albee and Orvell.

Page 632

C. H. Smith

a native of New Hampshire, was born June 26th, 1859, at Salisbury. Resided there until 1877, when he came here and worked for the firm of Smith and Day, the former being a brother of his. In September, 1878, he became a member of the firm of Smith and Miller; they deal in hardware at 231 Sixth Avenue south.

Page 632

Charles W. Smith

born November 14th, 1848, at Greenville, Illinois. Moved with his parents to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and attended school there until 1862, when he went to Europe, and entered the Liverpool Free College; he graduated in 1865, and then traveled through Europe. In 1866, he crossed the isthmus and went to Calcutta, India, from Madras. Returned to America in 1867, and from here visited Buenos Ayres in the ship Kossuth, in which he was part owner, and was pay-master of the first railroad built in the Argentine Confederation in 1868. He took charge of a steamer which went to the relief of a Welch colony in Patagonia, and returned overland to Buenos Ayres, from where he made a trip on horse back across the Andes to Chili, returning through Paraguay and Brazil, thence homeward in 1870. Since that time he has been engaged in teaching in Minnesota. In 1873, he moved to this city, and in 1875 was appointed superintendent of schools, and was elected to the office in 1877, and re-elected in 1879. Mr. Smith married Electa Hawkins in l872. Arthur Garfield is their only child. The have an adopted son Benjamin W.

Page 633

E. M. Smith

a native of Michigan, was born February 10th, 1843, at Pontiac. Moved to Winona, Minnesota, in 1867, and for three years was engineer on the Winona and St. Peter railroad. In 1870, he came to this city and ran an engine two years on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul railway. Since the Union Planing Mills started, he has been employed there as engineer. His wife was Effie Jones; their marriage occurred in March, 1869; Burtie, Daisy, Roy and Ida, are their children.

Page 633

George Smith

a native of Wisconsin, was born July 25th, 1856, in Walworth county. Went to Winona, Minnesota, in 1875, and two years later removed to Minneapolis. He is now employed as miller at the Osborne feed mill. His address is 616 Fifth street north-east.

Page 633

George Smith

born in Picton county, Nova Scotia, September 6th, 1846. First engaged in the business of hides, tallow, pelts, etc., at Chicago, in 1870, and afterwards with prominent firms at Milwaukee and Eau Claire, Wisconsin. In 1875 he was employed as salesman for Oberne, Hosick and Company, of this city, 103 and 105 Second street south, and has been promoted to manager.

Page 633

George F. Smith

was born at Salisbury, New Hampshire, September 1st, 1842. Enlisted in 1862 in the Sixteenth New Hampshire Infantry, and served one year. On being mustered out, in 1863, he came to Minneapolis, but the next year went south to work, and laid the first sill of the Cumberland hospital, at Nashville. He returned in 1865, and worked in the hardware business for J. S. Pillsbury, until starting for himself in 1872; the firm of Smith and Scribner dates from May, 1876. Mr. Smith married Miss Connor of this city, in 1867. Their children are: George, Ralph and Cyrus.

Page 633

J. R. Smith

a native of Salisbury, New Hampshire, was born April 21st, 1851. Since 1871 he has been a resident of Minneapolis. He worked for George F. Smith four years, and in 1876, entered into partnership with Mr. Day in the hardware business. Mr. Smith's marriage with Leonora Day took place in 1875. They are the parents of two children; J. R., and Rena. They reside at 915 Seventh Avenue south.

Page 633

J. A. Smith

a native of Germany, was born in 1850. He accompanied his parents to America in 1855, and removed to Minneapolis in 1874; since that time has been engaged in the manufacture of barrels, and is now president of the Cooperative Barrel Company.

Page 633

Jason W. Smith

was born October 23d, 1840, in Penobscot county, Maine. Remained on his father's farm till 1860, when he went to Bangor, and engaged in mercantile pursuits. In July, 1870, he removed to this city and clerked in a grocery store three years, then went into the grocery trade at 101 Central Avenue, in partnership with W. W. Hawes. His wife was Emma Maxim; they were married in 1865. Of their four children, three are living: George, Edith and Jessie.

Page 633

Theodore W. Smith

a native of New York city, was born August 25th, 1860. Commenced working at milling in 1874, at Ashland, Ohio; removed to this city in October, 1878, and was employed one year at the Crystal Lake mill. Since that time has been engaged with Hawthorne Brothers at the Trades mill. His marriage with Julia Desjardin occurred August 3d, 1880.

Page 633

C. L. Snyder

born February 1st, 1831, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania. In 1857 he came to Minnesota, located at Glencoe and for three years followed lumbering and farming; he was sheriff of McLeod county in 1857-1858. In 1861, raised company B, of the Fourth Minnesota; he was promoted captain of this company and served three years; after being mustered out in 1864 he went to Pennsylvania and raised a company of artillery there, and served as captain until May, 1865. In the fall of that year he came here and was in the wood business two years then formed a partnership with Mr. Keator; for thirteen years, they were carriers of the Minneapolis Tribune, and have been in the bill posting business a number of years. Mr. Snyder was elected to the city council in 1878 and 1879 ; was president of the city council in 1880. In 1855 he married Margaret Cunningham. James, Anna, Grace and Charles are their children.

Page 634

S. P. Snyder

born April 14th, 1826, at Somerset, Pennsylvania. He received a common school education and started life as clerk in an uncle's store. In 1847 he purchased a stock of dry goods and located at. Berkley's Mills; he sold in about two years and removed to Ohio, where he followed the same business in company with his brother, he sold again in 1855, came to St. Anthony, and formed a partnership with W. K. McFarlane for the purpose of locating lands. In the fall of 1855 removed to the west side, returned to Ohio, was married and came back to Minneapolis, and for a time occupied J. H. Stevens's pre-emption house. In 1857 because a member of the firm of Snyder, McFarlane and Cook, bankers and real estate dealers; in the summer of 1857 purchased eighty acres and platted it as Snyder and Company's first addition to Minneapolis; Tenth street now passes through this. Mr. Snyder was one of the many to suffer in the financial panic of 1858, but afterwards recovered and in 1876 built a fine large block, on the same spot where twenty years previous he had placed his land office. In 1880 he sold both block and lot, as a building site for the new Union depot. In 1856 he married Mary Ramsay. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Snyder are Frank, Fred and Mary.

Page 634

Joseph Sonnen

was born in 1832 in Prussia, Came to America in 1855, located in the state of New York and resided there about eight years. In 1873 he removed to Minneapolis, and worked as pattern maker for the St. Anthony Iron Works until 1878. Since that time he has been successfully engaged in manufacturing furniture.

Page 634

W. A. Spaulding

Dentist, was born in Penobscot county, Maine, March 7th, 1842. Moved to Wright county, Minnesota, in 1856, and settled at Monticello. In l862 he enlisted, and was three and one-half years in active service; mustered out in 1865. Since the war he has made this city his home. In 1870, assisted in the location of the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railroad, and had charge of bridge building on that line until 1872, when he engaged in surveying townships in north-western Minnesota. Mr. Spaulding graduated from the Ohio college of dental surgery March 4th, 1875, with the degree of D. D. S.; since that time has been in practice. His wife was Miss J. C. Johnson; they were married in 1866. Three children have been born to them: Willie, Susie and one who died in infancy.

Page 634

Edward Spear, Jr.

was born in 1828. at Warren, Ohio, and received his education in his native place. Was in the army five years; was in command of an Ohio battery three years of the time, and then was paymaster of the army of the Tennessee; after the war he passed five months in Europe. In 1878 he came here and established the North-western Stove Works, located in South Minneapolis. Mr. Spear married, in 1856, Emma Louder. Their children are. Louie, Edward, Bertha and Harry.

Page 634

R. Speck

a native of Germany, was born September 14th, 1841. Came to the United States in 1864 and resided at St. Paul until 1874 when he came here and for about one year was in the produce and commission business, since then he has had a grocery and general merchandise store, his present location being 501 First street north.. His marriage with Mary Joungclaus occurred in 1872. Of their four children, those living are: Carl, Gustave and Adolph.

Page 634

David Spillane

a native of New York, was born August 15th, 1855, at Dunkirk. When a babe he moved with his parents to Fillmore county, Minnesota. When seventeen years of age he commenced the milling business at Whalan. In July, 1879, he came to Minneapolis and engaged with the Standard mill, where he occupies the position of grinder.

Page 634

J. H. Stahr

was born December 29th, 1842, in Denmark. Came to this country, worked one year at farming in Indiana, six months in a rolling mill, and then was engaged as clerk in a hotel, previous to returning to Denmark on a visit. In 1866 he removed to Wisconsin and engaged in the grocery business; came here in 1876 and was in different lines of business till 1880, when he opened a second-hand store at 208 Plymouth Avenue. In 1865 he married Christine Hanson. They have had nine children; only three are living.

Page 635

Carl G. Stammwitz

was born in Germany in 1831. Came to St. Anthony in 1858, and was head miller for Morrison and Prescott, at the Farmer's mill, six years. Lon 1865, bought the St. Anthony mill in company with G. Schober; they purchased a half interest in the People's mill in 1870, and the next year disposed of the St. Anthony mill; in 1875 they took the machinery out of the People's mill and built the Phoenix. Mr. Stammwitz married Caroline Peterson in 1861. Their children are Carl, Annie, Frederick, Olga, Adolph, Otto, Augusta, Bertha, Henry, Alice and Alvin (twins,) and George.

Page 635

C. M. Stebbins

a native of Long Meadow, Massachusetts, was born in 1829. Lived with his parents until sixteen years of age, when he went to Connecticut and worked at carpentering four years. In 1849, returned to Massachusetts for one year; then went again to Connecticut and remained till July, 1878, when he came to this city; his place of business is 218 Second Avenue south. Mr. Stebbins was married in l856 to Miss Langdon. They have two children, Hattie and Henry.

Page 635

E. S. Stebbins

was born in 1854, at Boston Massachusetts. Moved to Troy, New York, in 1868, and two years later went to Saratoga. In 1872 he commenced the study of architecture. Went to Boston and attended the Technological Institute two years. He worked with E. D. Harris three years on the Grand Union Hotel, Saratoga, and the fourth year had entire supervision of the work. In 1877 he came here. His office is 304 Nicollet Avenue. Mr. Stebbins drew plans for the Hennepin county jail, Christ Church, Hennepin county poorhouse, Richfield town hall, and several public buildings at Grand Forks, Dakota. He was married in 1880.

Page 635

Franklin Steele

The following memoir, by Rev. E. D. Neill, was read at the meeting 6f the department of American History of the State Historical Society, in October, 1880. " In memoriam: Franklin Steele. This evening we assemble under the shadow of a sudden and painful loss. Among the twenty-five or thirty present at the September meeting of this department of the State Historical Society, he who attracted the most attention by his fine presence and in any form was its chairman, Franklin Steele. Those who saw him on that evening, in perfect health, presiding so courteously, yet unobtrusively, can with difficulty realize that on the third night after, he was silenced by death, and that in less than a week his lifeless body was carried to its last resting place in the beautiful cemetery which overlooks the capital of the republic. Not only as a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society , and chairman of the department of American History, but as one of the founders of the commonwealth of Minnesota; is he deserving of some brief memorial.

While the French were still occupying the valley of the Allegheny, the region between the Delaware and Susquehanna rivers, in Pennsylvania, was fast filling up with industrious farmers from Wales, Ireland, Scotland, and Germany. Among the hardy men who found homes in what is now Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, was the paternal ancestor of Franklin Steele, and the wife of this pioneer was of Scotch descent. Frugal and persevering. they raised a large family, and four sons, at least, attained manhood.

Archibald served under the lamented Montgomery in 1775, in the expedition against Quebec, and during the revolution became deputy quarter-master general for the troops of the western. division of the army in Pennsylvania.

John, who was born in the town of Lancaster, was about seventeen years of age and going to school when the thrilling news arrived that the farmers near Lexington had peppered the British soldiery from Boston, with the contents of their fowling pieces. It stirred the blood of this boy, and soon he was found enlisted in the war for independence. At the battle of Brandywine, in September, 1777, he received in his shoulder what was supposed for a time to be a fatal wound. On one occasion he swam across the Delaware, while ice was floating, with orders tied in a silk handkerchief around his head. Although benumbed, he reached the Jersey shore, and gave an alarm, which baffled the enemy. In March, 1778, Lieutenant John Steele was recommended to the executive council of Pennsylvania as "an officer well qualified to recruit in Lancaster county."

William was a third son, and a letter is preserved which was written by John to his brother, dated Morristown, New Jersey, June 4th, 1780, and from which is this extract: "I at present enjoy myself incomparably well in the family of Mrs. Washington, whose guard I have had the lion or to command, since the absence of the general, and the rest of the family, which is now six or seven, days. I am happy in the importance of my charge, as well as in the presence of the most amiable woman on earth, and whose character, should I attempt to describe, I could not do justice to, but will only say that I think it is unextionable."

James, a fourth son, was the father of the subject of this memoir. During the war of 1812 he was inspector general of Pennsylvania, and had represented his follow citizens in the legislature. Subsequently he was an enterprising citizen in the valley of the Octorara, the stream which separates Chester and Lancaster counties. Engaged in farming, owning a store, a flour and cotton mill, he was the center of a neighborhood.

Franklin Steele, in 1813 was born at his fathers residence near the western boundary line in Chester county, and as he approached manhood, was actuated by the laudable ambition to depend upon his own exertions, and obtained a position in the Lancaster post-office. In this place he was brought in contact with James Buchanan, after-wards president, and others who had known his father, and also liked him for his own cheerful spirit. From the desire to act well his part in life, he looked toward the distant west as a broader and more rapid field for development. In view of the treaties about to be made with the Chippewa and Sioux Indians for the lands between the St. Croix and Mississippi. Franklin Steele, and two or three others, in the summer of 1837; in a birch-bark canoe propelled by eight men, left the mouth of the Minnesota river and descending the Mississippi, entered the St. Croix and ascending to its falls, laid claim to the valuable water-power by erecting a claim cabin of logs.

After General Dodge made a treaty with the Chippewas at Fort Snelling, a delegation of Sioux were taken by the Indian agent at Fort Snelling to Washington, and there they also, on the 27th of September, 1837, signed a treaty by which the pine forests of Minnesota were effectually opened to the axe of the lumberman.

Mr. Steele passed the winter of 1838 at Washington and elsewhere, but on the evening of the 18th of June, on the steamboat Burlington, arrived at Fort Snelling. Among his fellow passengers were Capt. Maryatt, of the British navy, the well-known novelist, and a number of others, ladies as well as gentlemen. With them, he rode out for pleasure to the Falls of St. Anthony, then the ultima thule a point at which he was destined to erect the first permanent structure, and in which, after it became a city of forty-eight thousand inhabitants, he was suddenly to die.

On the 20th of June, the steamboat Ariel arrived at Fort Snelling, and one of the passengers said that the senate had ratified the treaty, but it was not until the 15th of July, that the Palmyra brought the official notice.

Mr. Steele now made another trip to the falls of St. Croix and on the 16th of August he came back to the fort. Disposing of his interests at the falls of St. Croix, he turned his attention to the development of the claim at the falls of St. Anthony, and in 1838 engaged a man to cultivate six or eight acres there, the land having not yet been surveyed. It was not until 1848 that there was a sale of lands by the government, and this year he completed the first saw-mill on the east side of the falls.

In 1851 he secured a site for the preparatory department of the University of Minnesota, and was the largest contributor toward the erection of the first academic building. The academy was opened in October, 1851, and until destroyed by fire stood in the east division park, opposite the stone edifice now owned by Macalester College.

After the treaties of 1851, settlers began to dwell on the prairie on the west side of the falls of St. Anthony, and in a few years were more numerous than those on the east side. With an abiding faith that in time, the roar of a great city would drown the "voice of many waters," Mr. Steele, before patents were issued from the general land office at Washington for the land on the west side, contracted for the swinging of a wire suspension bridge over the Mississippi, just above the cataract, the first bridge of any description , which spanned the great river from Lake Itasca to the gulf of Mexico.

After its completion, the Minnesota legislature in the winter of 1855, adjourned for one day to be present at the formal opening of the artistic structure, which for years was not only a great thoroughfare for immigrants, but admired by travelers and tourists as a thing of beauty. About this time his name was appropriately given by the state to one of the counties made out of the lands which had been ceded by the Sioux.

The month of August, 1862, can never be forgotten by the settlers of Minnesota. The Sioux, taking advantage of the civil war that was then raging, rose like demons incarnate, and without warning began to attack the settlements of the Minnesota river, and murder and scalp defense- less women and children. Volunteers from St. Paul and Minneapolis hurried to the scene of slaughter, and Mr. Steele followed as soon as possible with the necessary supplies. The drivers of the supply trains at length faltered and said they dared not go on, when Mr. Steele, with characteristic quietness and efficiency, headed the column, riding in an open buggy, night and day, and restored confidence.

In April, 1843, he was married, in Baltimore, by the Rev. Dr. Wyatt, to Anna, daughter of William C. Barney, and grand-child of Commodore Barney of the United States navy, and also of Samuel Chase, the Maryland states-man, one of the signers of the declaration of independence, afterwards judge of the supreme court of the United States.

With his bride he came to Fort Snelling when it was surrounded by Indians, and in his wilder-ness home he always exhibited a generous hospitality. As his daughters began to grow up, he felt it desirable to have a family residence where they could obtain a proper education, and during the latter years of his life he passed the winters in Washington, but always spoke of Minnesota as home.

Unobtrusiveness was a marked characteristic of our late associate. His voice was not beard in the streets. Persons would associate with him for months in the midst of this city, and would never think that he had a right to say "Quorum magna pars fui." But while retiring he was affable. A gentleman by instinct, be avoided topics and allusions which would be painful to those with whom he conversed.

Among those in whom he had confidence he loved to indulge in pleasantry. By prosperity he was not puffed. Weak human nature is often made very stiff and consequential by an increase of this world's goods, but he showed none of that disagreeable consciousness which money gives to some people. No poor man was ever humiliated in his presence. Of an inquiring mind, with good perceptive powers, interested in public questions, and holding social intercourse every winter with some of the best men of the republic, he was able to impart valuable information and engage in agreeable conversation. Thrown much of his life-time with frontiersmen, he admired their energy, but did not adopt their standards. He did not soil his mouth with coarse, profane or indecent utterances. The slang of the roaring fellows in a loggers' camp, or at a military post had no charms.

While the soul is immortal and more valuable than the mortal body which encases it, yet the Hebrews acknowledged that it was a privilege to have a fine physical presence. The sacred writers turned aside from mightier matters to mention that there was not among the Children of Israel a "goodlier person" than Saul, who from his shoulders upward was higher than any of the people, and that David "was ruddy and withal of a beautiful countenance." The Subject of our memoir was excelled by few in the symmetry of his physical development. As a young man his presence was noticeable. An old army officer saw him conversing with a young lady at a party given by a member of congress in Washington He asked his name and when told that he was from what was then called distant Iowa Territory, he replied: "No matter where he resides; God never made a finer form."

An old English writer, speaking of a statesman of the days of James I., wrote: "As Ammianus describes a well-shaped man: 'Ab ipso capite, usque, ad ungitim summitates recta erat lineal mentorum compagel'; 'from the naits of the fingers, nay, from the sole of his foot to the crown of his head, there was no blemish in him.' And yet his carriage, and every stoop of his deportment, more than his excellent form, were the beauty of his beauty.' Does not this description recall the late chairman of this department of the Minnesota Historical Society? At our meeting in September no one could have looked upon his clear-cut features, his fine expression, his manly, erect and matured form, without feeling that he was endowed with a frame superior to most men. "Death found strange beauty on that polished brow, and dashed it out."

After breakfast on the 9th of September, he was riding with an acquaintance, when he was seized with dizziness. Soon after he lost consciousness; and at an early hour next morning, while it was yet dark, in the presence of a brother and a son and a few friends, his spirit departed to his God. A beloved wife and a portion of his family hastened to his side, but not until the heart ceased to beat did they arrive. Lovingly ,and tenderly the widow carried his lifeless form in a special car, surrounded by her two sons and three of her daughters, to the family residence at Georgetown, and on Thursday afternoon, the 16th ult., his body was borne to St. John's Church, Washington, D. C., where the family had attended, and services were conducted by the Rev. Mr. Carke, assisted by the Rev. Mr. Lindsay, of Georgetown.

The same hymns that had been sung at the services in Minneapolis were sung there, and the same flowers which loving friends laid on his coffin in his son's parlor in this city, were also used. The church was filled with citizens of Washington, who had learned to respect the quiet, gentle man. From the church he was borne to Oak Hills cemetery and placed in his last resting place, next to the grave of his daughter's husband, the, historic commander of the Cumberland in the memorable conflict of Hampton Roads.

It will be long before his friends and his family will forget Franklin Steele: To live in hearts we leave behind Is not to die. After the reading of the memorial, on motion of W. W. McNair, resolutions of respect were adopted."

Page 638

Franklin Steele, Jr.

son of the late Franklin Steele, and one of the first white natives of Hennepin county, was born in 1849. Since reaching his majority he has been engaged in business at Minneapolis. Mr. Steele studied law, and was admitted to practice in 1872, by Judge Wilkin, of St. Paul, passing his examination with great credit. He was married in February, 1872, to Kathleen Lynes. They are the parents of two children. He is a member of the firm of Franklin Steele, Jr., and Company, dealers in agricultural implements, wagons, etc., corner of First street and Second Avenue south. Residence on Nicollet Island.

Page 638

E. H. Steele

a native of Vermont, was born in 1846. Was employed in 1868, by the firm of Whitten, Burdett and Young of Boston, as traveling salesman, and continued with them until 1874, at which time he established the clothing business which he is conducting so successfully in this city. Mr. Steele's family consists of only himself and wife. They have a fine residence on Eighth street. This building is heated by steam, fitted with electric bells, burglar alarm. etc.

Page 638

Nicholas Steffes

a native of Germany, was born December 10th, 1848. Came to America with his parents in 1855. and lived on a farm in Wright county, Minnesota, until the age of eighteen, when he volunteered in the Tenth United States Regulars at Fort Snelling, and served his full time of enlistment. He has since resided in Minneapolis. He joined the volunteer fire department in 1875, and served as driver until the organization of the paid department, when he was appointed foreman of Hose Company No. 4. In 1876 he married Kate Bofferding. Their children are Annie and John.

Page 638

J. F. Stephens

was born July 4th, 1852, in Chester county, Pennsylvania. His father was a miller, and he learned the trade with him, in his native place. He worked at farming for four years previous to coming west in 1872. He reached this city December 1st of that year, and commenced work in the Minneapolis mill, filling a minor position at first, but by industry and attention to business advanced to the position of head miller, which position he fills to the entire satisfaction of his employers.

Page 638

Frank L. Stetson

born December 19th, 1853, in Knox county, Maine. He moved with his parents to Boston, in 1865, and there attended graded schools, afterward went to the Dean Academy at Franklin. In the spring of 1869 he came here and sought employment in the lumber mills; he had charge of the Northern Pacific railroad company's mills at Brainerd in 1878, returned here and until the spring of 1880 was foreman in Leavitt, Chase and Company's mill, since that time has filled the same position with Merriman and Barrows. He is second chief engineer of the fire department of which he has been a member since 1872. Mr. Stetson's wife was Ida Winslow, their marriage occurred in 1877. They have had one child.

Page 639

H. A. Stetson

a native of Lincolnville, Maine, was born in 1849. Came to Minneapolis in the fall of 1867 and was employed in saw mills five years; then in company with W. C. Stetson, his brother, built the mill which bore their name; after operating it three years disposed of his interest and went to work on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul railway. In April, 1879, engaged to work in the mill for his brother, who sold in 1880 to Wheaton, Reynolds and Company, and he has been with them since. He married Lillie Howe, in 1876. Blanche and Alice are their children.

Page 639

W. C. Stetson

was born October 16th, 1841, in Waldo county, Maine; he came to St Anthony in 1857 and worked in different mills fourteen years. In 1861 he enlisted in the Ninth Minnesota Volunteers. After service he returned to Minneapolis and in 1871, built a planing mill, in company with his brother; they operated the mill eight months, then he bought his brother's share and sold a half interest to B.F. Nelson. In l878 they built the St. Louis, and the year following Mr. Stetson closed out his interest in both mills. He built in 1880 the Farnham and Lovejoy mill, and has since operated it for them. In 1859 he married Catharine Griffin.

Page 639

Frank Stevens

a native of Worcester county, Massachusetts, was born July 5th, 1853. Worked in that state at different lines of business until April, 1878, when he removed to Minneapolis, and after clerking in a grocery store until 1879 he embarked in the same for business himself. He had a fine trade up to December, 1880, when, desiring a change he sold, with the intention of engaging in other enterprises.

Page 639

Col. John H. Stevens

the pioneer of Minneapolis proper, is a native of Lower Canada. His parents, who were natives of Vermont, emigrated from there to one of the eastern townships of Lower Canada, where John H. was born, June 13th, 1820. The family trace their descent to the so called French Huguenots, who emigrated to New England, coming over with other Puritans in the Mayflower. Gardner Stevens, His father, was an extensive farmer, and gave his sons a liberal education. At an early day Mr. Stevens determined to become one of the pioneers of the far west. His first move was to the lead mines of Illinois and Wisconsin. During the war with Mexico, he served with the army of invasion and after the war closed he came to the territory of Minnesota, which had recently been set apart from Iowa. He located on the original townsite of Minneapolis, opposite the beautiful and picturesque Falls of St. Anthony; here he lived alone and desolate with the Indians. The nearest habitation of white men was Fort Snelling. Since that time vast and wonderful changes have been made, such as but few men have witnessed in the short space of thirty-two years. He has lived to see grow from his humble home a city of fifty thousand souls, and should he be spared until he reaches his three score and ten, he will doubtless behold a city of over one hundred thousand inhabitants. He has frequently been honored with seats in the senate and house of representatives in the state legislature, and has also held high and responsible offices of trust and honor, both civil and military with the greatest success and credit. He was married May 10th, 1850, in Rockford, Illinois, to Miss Francis H. Miller, of Oneida county, New York. Their children living are, Kittie D., wife of P. B. Winston Esq. of this city; Sarah, who resides with her parents; Orma, a graduate of the city high school; Francis H. Gardner, their only son, is a civil engineer.

Page 639

Daniel Stewart, D. D.

pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, Minneapolis, the subject of this sketch, was born in Amsterdam, Montgomery county, New York, July 17th, 1811, spending most of his early life in that vicinity, pursuing academical studies at Johnstown, under the Rev. Gilbert Morgan. Entered Union college in 1830, graduated in 1833. After graduating went to Europe, traveling in England, Scotland, Germany and France; on returning, entered the Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, in 1835, graduated in the class of 1837-1838, under Drs. Alexander and Miller. After leaving the seminary, was called, accepted and settled over the first church at Amsterdam, New York, in 1839, remaining there for about one year, when he received a call from Ballston Springs, where he remained for nearly four years, from thence to the First church in New Albany, Indiana, where he ministered to them for about four years; from that charge to the care of the Theological Seminary, where he remained until the spring of 1853, when he again went to Europe, going as far as Italy, with his wife, who is a daughter of Asa Mann, of New Albany, Indiana. On his second return from the Old World, was called to the charge of the First Presbyterian Church of Camden, New Jersey, ministering to them until 1861. From Camden went to Johnstown, New York, remaining there until 1869. While in Johnstown his efforts were marked with success exceeding the expectations of his most sanguine admirers. Finding the church somewhat disrupted, in debt, without an organ, and no income; leaving it united, with one of Hook's best organs, out of debt, and with an income of five thousand dollars. The one ever-to-be remembered. day in the history of this church was when on that day he took into the church one hundred and fifty members, one hundred and thirty of them being on profession of faith; a large number of them between the ages of fifty and seventy. When in Camden, found the church on the mission board, raised it to a self-sustaining church, besides sending out a colony, which became self-sustaining, building a new and elegant church, and is the second church in Camden. From Johnstown again to New Albany, where he preached in the pulpit of the Second church for two years. In 1871 came to Minnesota on account of a serious trouble with his eyes, expecting to remain but for a brief time; was invited while here to supply the Andrew church which he consented to do, and remained with them for two years, when he came to the West Side, June 1st, 1875, as stated supply, where he has remained up to the present time. His first wife was the daughter of Peter Vain, merchant, of Albany, New York, with whom he lived for about six years, having one daughter, now the wife of cashier Harris of the Northwestern bank, and one son by the present wife, J. C. Stewart, now with the Monitor Plow Works. Walter M. Stewart died at twenty-four years of age, after finishing his studies for the profession of medicine.

Page 640

Levi M. Stewart

is a native of Maine; received there an academic education, and afterward graduated from Dartmouth college: is also a graduate of the law school at Cambridge. After practicing law successfully for a time in his native state he came West, and has been a resident of this city since 1856. His office is at the corner of Washington and Nicollet Avenues.

Page 640

C. F. Stimson

was born April 19th, 1822, in York county, Maine. He was in the lumber business at Washington, Maine, four years; in June, 1848, removed to Stillwater, and the same year to St. Anthony, being engaged in lumbering most of the time until 1879. He, in company with William Simpson and A. Rogers, built the mill now owned by Farnham and Lovejoy, also the building now occupied as a paper-mill. Mr. Stimson served one year as treasurer of Ramsey county, while St. Anthony was in that county. He moved to his farm near Elk River in 1879. His marriage with Olive Estes occurred in 1850. Children: Albert, Ella, William and one who died in infancy.

Page 640

E. H. Stockton, M. D.

was born October 4th, 1827, in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. Attended school at Trenton, New Jersey, and studied medicine at Philadelphia. In 1849 he attended two courses of lectures at the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati. Followed his profession in Ohio and Indiana until 1865; since that time he has been in practice at Minneapolis. In 1869 he was made a member of the State Medical Society, and is one of the city board of health. Dr. Stockton married, in 1871, Miss Rose Wilson of Indiana.

Page 640

Alvin Stone

was born in Salmon Falls, New Hampshire, October 13th, 1825. In 1848 made an extended tour in the South; returned the next year, and in 1850 come to Minneapolis. His principal occupation has been painting; he has been a member of several different firms, and has done a very large business by contracts. In September, 1851, Mr. Stone returned to his native state; the following March married Elizabeth Goodwin, at Lowell, Massachusetts, and at once came West. They have had seven children; those living are Hattie and Harris.

Page 640

E. E. Strothman

a native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was born August 18th, 1845. Learned the machinist's trade at the Bay State Iron Works, and after serving his apprenticeship remained with the firm four years. In 1867, in company with his brother, he commenced manufacturing steam engines, but in 1870 he came to this city and was with the North Star Iron Works until he started his present business. His wife was Etta Banker, whom he married in 1868, at Milwaukee. They have two children, Clarence and Herberd.

Page 641

J. F. Stranahan

was born July 18th, 1854, at Bunker Hill, Michigan. In 1856, accompanied his parents to Minnesota and located in Goodhue county. At the early age of fourteen he commenced learning carpentering; went to Northfield in 1870 and two years later removed to St. Paul, where he assisted in building S. Mayall's block, Dr. Dewey's residence, and several other fine buildings. Since 1879, has lived in Minneapolis. He married Jerusha Hamilton in 1877. They have one child, Winnie.

Page 641

J. H. Strothman

a native of Wisconsin, was born August 18th, 1845, at Milwaukee. Attended school there, and served an apprenticeship as machinist in the Bayfield Iron Works. In 1869, came here, and was at the North Star Iron Works until 1872; since that time he has been in the employ of O. A. Pray and Company as foreman. Was married in March, 1872. Of their four children. Morris only, survives; Nellie, Jennie and an infant have passed away.

Page 641

Daniel Sullivan

a native of Maine, was born in 1847. He came to Minnesota in 1878, and located at Minneapolis. His place of business is No. 18, First street north.

Page 641

Elmer H. Sumner

born at Bangor, Maine, January 3d, 1853. Came to this city in 1877 and engaged in lumbering during the winter months: Kept a restaurant two years on Nicollet Avenue, and since August 1880, has been in the same business at No. 1, First street north; his wife has the management of the restaurant in his absence. Mr. Sumner married Mary Fay in 1872. They have one son, Eugene.

Page 641

Byron Sutherland

born July 15th, 1846, in Westfield, New York. Moved to Pennsylvania and enlisted in 1862; he was wounded at Spottsylvania in 1864, and the next year was transferred to the veteran reserve corps on account of disability; in July 1865, he was honorably discharged. He attended school in Pennsylvania until 1870, and then read law at Jamestown, New York. In the fall of 1872, taught in Pennsylvania, and the same year was elected superintendent of schools in Warren county; he continued reading law and was admitted to the bar in 1875; the next year, removed to Minneapolis; his office is at 201 Nicollet Avenue. He married in 1877, Sarah Brown; she has borne him one son, Renne.

Page 641

George Sverdrup

was born in the western part of Norway. December 16th, 1848. He attended school at Christiana from 1862 to 1865, when he entered the University in the city of Christiana. During 1870, he traveled through Italy and Germany, and in 1871, passed theological exanimation at the University. The year 1873, he spent in Paris, in the study of the Semitic languages, Assyrian antiquities and other sciences connected with the study of the old testament. In 1874, he received a call from this conference since which time he has been closely identified with the history of Augsburg Seminary.

Page 641

W. D. Sutton

a native of Louisville, Kentucky, was born in 1837. Enlisted in 1861 and served three years. In 1864 he went to Chicago and followed his business of contracting and building for seven years, then after a short residence at St. Louis removed to Memphis, and three years later to Iowa. In 1875 went to Wright county, Minnesota, and bought the farm he still owns. In October, 1880, he came here to work at his trade. His marriage with Martha Lawson occurred in in 1865. They have one child, Minnehaha.

Page 641

N. P. Swanberg

a native of Sweden, was born in 1838. Emigrated to America in 1869, and located at Hastings, Minnesota, and engaged in carriage making. In 1870, removed to this city and after working about three years for different parties established the Minneapolis carriage works at 605 Third street south.

Page 641

Peter P. Swensen

born in Sweden, February 10th, 1844. When ten years of age came to America with his parents and lived on a farm in Minnesota until 1861, when he enlisted but was rejected because of being under age; he then went to Dubuque, Iowa, enlisted in the regular army and served three years. He then went to Tennessee and engaged in the grocery business; afterward removed to Cincinnati, where he owned an interest in a planing mill. In 1869, after a two years residence in St. Louis, came here; his principal occupation since has been salesman. In 1871 he married Annie Johnson. Their children are: Charles. Harry and Bertha.

Page 642

O. T. Swett

born at Limerick, Maine, September 27th, 1832. For a time was employed as salesman by a grocery firm at Cambridge, Massachusetts. In the spring of 1856 he came to St. Anthony and engaged with Hayes and Stimson in their meat market; the next year he made two trips to Galena. Illinois, to purchase groceries and provisions, but met with an accident which disabled him for nearly one year. In 1857, after the fire on Main street, he, E. Hayes, and Charles Straw started a general store, having purchased the remainder of a stock of dry goods and groceries from Carpenter and Andrews, who suffered from the fire. Mr. Swett has been alone in the business since 1862, in 1877 he disposed of the groceries and has since handled dry goods, notions and gents' furnishing goods. He was alderman from 1859 till 1861. Married in 1858, Sarah Hayes, who has borne him two children: Ella and Arthur. Mr. Swett has been in the dry goods business continuously in this city longer than any individual or firm.

Page 642

Joseph Swick

was born March 5th, 1825, in Germany. Was educated in his native country, came to America in 1851, and located in New York; removed to Connecticut and worked at his trade of cabinetmaking. In 1855 he came to St. Anthony and worked in L. Johnson's furniture manufactory until they sold to Barnard and Company. He lost two fingers by a circular saw, but as soon as he was able to work, went into the same shop and remained seventeen years with the latter firm. From 1857 to 1861, his wages were one dollar per day, and during that time he did not receive a dollar in money, being paid with orders on stores. Since leaving that business he has been farming. He married Christiana Frost, in 1851. Their children are Joseph, Annie, William, Sarah and Charles. Three are married and all live near the old homestead.

Page 642

E. T. Sykes

a native of Uxbridge, Massachusetts, was born October 12th, 1850. When a child he moved to Melville, and there received his education. He was in business eight years at Waitham, then in 1879. came to this city and engaged in plumbing and gas fitting. At first he required the services of only three men, but his business has grown to such proportions that he now employs twenty-five. The firm name is Sykes and Andrews; No. 256 Hennepin Avenue.

Page 642

J. W. Tamm

was born at Logansport, Indiana, in 1848. Learned milling at Maumee City, Ohio. In 1872 he became a resident of Minneapolis and engaged in the Arctic mill; he had charge of that mill for six years. Next he was employed in the Phoenix and has superintended it since. He was married in 1875 to Miss Alice Isenberger of Logansport.

Page 642

Melvin C. Tate

was born at Peekskill, New York, February 1st, 1851. Went to Duluth, Minnesota, in 1871; remained three years working in a general merchandise store, also a short time in a hotel, In 1874 he came to St. Paul, the next year locating in Minneapolis. In October, 1880, in company with Mr. Boardman, he opened a restaurant at 2l4 Nicollet Avenue. He was married in 1875 to Theresa Windolph, who has borne him three children. Laura is the only one living.

Page 642

A. B. Taylor

a resident of Minneapolis, came from New York four years since. Is a wholesale dealer in grain, and is the first and only man here who makes a specialty of wholesale dealing. Previous to starting in business in 1879 he bought wheat for the Millers Association. Office over Security Bank.

Page 642

B. L. Taylor, D. D. S.

214 Nicollet Avenue, was born at Westchester, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Received the principal part of his education in his native place. He came to Chicago in 1856, and two years later to Minneapolis. He graduated from the Pennsylvania Dental College at Philadelphia in 1869, and has since been in dental practice in this city. He was married in 1866 to Harriet Hurlbut, of Little Falls, New York. Alice and Henry are their children. Residence 620 Fifth street south.

Page 643

F. C. Taylor

was born in Lewis county, New York, October 12th, 1846. There he received his early education and training. He located in Minneapolis, December, 1871, and was employed as clerk in a grocery store until 1876, when he started in the same line for himself and has since been doing a prosperous business. He was married in 1870 to Mary Hinton, of Lewis county, New York. They have two children, Charlotte A. and Frank G.

Page 643

C. E. Tenant

was born at Lisbon, Lawrence county, New York, in 1845. At the age of nine years, he accompanied his parents to Wisconsin. He resided in that state until 1878, removing in the spring of that year to Red Wing, Minnesota. He remained one summer, then removed to Stillwater, where he resided until his coming to Minneapolis in 1880. He joined the Hennipen County Barrel Company the same year. In 1863, he enlisted in the Thirty-second Wisconsin, under Col. De Groat, and served until the close of the war. Resides at 412 Twelfth Avenue south.

Page 643

G. H. Tennant

was born in St. Lawrence county, New York, 1847. Came to Minneapolis in 1867 and for three years was engaged in manufacturing shingles, with Bassett one year and with Morrison Brothers two years. He was then in St. Louis one and one-half years in the in the manufacture of eave-troughs. On returning he entered into partnership with Witbeck, Potter and Company in a planing mill and box factory and two years after added the manufacture of sash, doors and blinds. In 1875 the firm dissolved. Mr. Eldred then became proprietor of the planing mill, which Mr. Tennant superintended for him two years. In 1875, in company with Mr. Russell, built the East Side planing mill. He was married to Elizabeth Blackney, in 1870. Their children are: William S. and Grace.

Page 643

Johannes Temstedt

was born in Westmandland, Sweden, June 22d, 1847. After finishing his theological studies at the Lyceum, at Stockholm he came to America in August, 1875. After remaining in New York until the following summer, he was ordained at Jamestown, New York, on the 25th of June, 1876. Thence coming west to Illinois, he presided over churches at Batavia, Bethlehem and Aurora for about two years. July 20th, 1878, he removed to Minneapolis, and has since presided over Angustana and Bethlehem churches.

Page 643

Andrew Tharalson

was born in Norway, January 9th, 1846. Here he passed his youth and acquired a knowledge of cabinet making. He emigrated to America in 1866,settling at Chicago, Illinois, where he worked at his trade until 1869. He then removed to Minneapolis, following his trade until 1870, when he started in the grocery business which has been growing rapidly. He was elected to the state legislature of Minnesota, in 1878, and re-elected in 1880. His marriage with Tirja Tentz took place in 1868, in Norway Their children are: Taly, Emma, Edward, Conrad and Amalie.

Page 643

Charles Theilen

is a native of Prussia, born June 5th, 1812. Received his education there and served in the Prussian army three years. In 1853 he came to America, locating in Indiana, thence to Chicago, and on to St. Anthony by team. Was one of the early pioneers and endured the hardships of frontier life. In 1859 he purchased the lot where he now lives, and erected a stone house which has since been his home. He worked in saw mills for five years, after which he engaged in mercantile business, continuing until 1878. He then sold to his son, retiring from active business life. Was married in Prussia, 1837, to Miss Mary G. Schildgen, who bore him eight children, four of whom are living: Nicholas, Anna M., John and Annie. Mr. Theilen was a member of the city council in 1874-1875.

Page 643

Louis Theobald

is a native of Germany, born in 1831. Came to the United Stated in 1851, remaining in New York nine months; thence to St. Louis where he resided about four years. in 1856 he removed to New Ulm, Minnesota, being in the mercantile business twenty years; was also engaged in a grist and saw mill. Located in Minneapolis in 1874, and opened a saloon in 1880, known as the Teutonia Hall. He was united in marriage with Anna Meyer, in 1855. Sophia, Bertha and Victor H. are their children.

Page 643

B. Thibodeau

was born in Aroostook county, Maine, in 1846. Here he remained until 1864, then went to Bangor where he learned the trade of shoemaker, and worked at it in various places throughout the country. He removed to Minneapolis in 1878 and after a short period he resumed his trade and also made boot and shoe pacs for a firm at St. Paul. In April, 1880, he opened an establishment of his own for the special purpose of manufacturing boot and shoe pacs. Married in 1871 to Mary Poirie, of Nova Scotia, who has borne him five children, three living: John, Clara and Joseph.

Page 644

Anthony Thomley was born in Norway, 1838. Came to the United States in 1854. He went to Wisconsin, where he remained six years, with the exception of a few months passed in Minnesota. In 1862 returned to his native country, remaining eight years. He then came to the United States, locating at La Crosse, Wisconsin, remaining also a short time at Eau Claire. In 1879 he became a resident of Minneapolis and opened a saloon at 223 Washington Avenue south. He married Mary Johnson of Eau Claire, in 1874. Ira A., and Annie are their children.

Page 644

E. P. Thompson

was born at Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1849. Moved to Zumbrota, Minnesota, in 1865, and in 1869 went to St. Paul to learn the jeweler's trade and remained until coming to Minneapolis in 1872. He began in the business soon after his arrival and has since continued, having a thriving trade. Located at 105 Washington Avenue south. He married Lizzie C. Hall in 1876. Lottie M. and Clara L. are their children.

Page 644

John Thompson

was born in 1832, and is a native of Canada. He moved to Milwaukee, remaining one and one-half years, thence to New Lisbon, Wisconsin, where he remained four years. In 1873 he located at Minneapolis, and five years later joined the Co-operative Barrel Company, and has remained with them since. Is a cooper and has followed his trade twenty-eight years. He was united in marriage, in 1854, to Miss Maria Powers. They are parents of six children. Residence, 1407 Fourth street south.

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John Thompson

a resident of Minneapolis, is a native of Norway, born in 1843. Learned the trade of ship-carpenter in his native country, and in 1865 came to America. For seven years he resided at LaCrosse, Wisconsin, being employed in Davidson's shipyards, two years, and was in the saloon business five years. He removed to Minneapolis in 1872, and has since been engaged in the saloon business. He was married to Miss Lena Johnson in 1874.

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J. H. Thompson

was born in York County, Maine, August 17th, 1834. Learned the tailor's trade at North Bridgeton, after which he removed to Augusta, thence to Minneapolis in 1857. He has been continuously in business in this city since. He was married in this city to Miss Ellen M. Gould of Minneapolis, in 1880. They have had three children: Mattie C., William G., and Nellie H. Resides 613 Hennepin Avenue.

Page 644

J. M. Thompson

was born at Brooklyn, Minnesota, October 4th, 1859. He passed his early boy-hood on a farm with his parents, then entered the Minneapolis Mill, in the employ of Crocker, Fisk and Company. He learned the miller's trade, and has been engaged with the firm since.

Page 644

R. B. Thompson

was born in Kane county, Illinois, in l849. He came to Minneapolis in l865, and was with Captain Rollins four years. He attended the University one and one-half years. Through the influence of Captain Rollins he secured a situation with H. J. Taylor of St.. Paul, in the lumber business, and remained with him five years. He then returned to this city and engaged with Merriman and Company, which firm still retains his services. Married Miss Gussie Ringer in 1875. They have one child: Arthur.

Page 644

T. Thompson

is a native of Norway, born in 1853. Came to the United States in 1866, locating at Empire, Minnesota, remaining three years; thence to Minneapolis. Three years later he went to Chicago, and the next year returned to his native country. In 1878 he again became a resident of Minneapolis dealing in flour and feed at 926 First Avenue south. His wife was Annie M. Oleson, whom he married in 1880.

Page 644

Isaiah Tidd

was born, March 14th, 1827, at Passadumkeag, Penobscot county, Maine. Engaged in lumbering there until 1851; He then came to St. Anthony, and in the fall of 1852 went up the Rum river exploring for Blaisdell and Jackins. He was lumbering for them three years, and was with a brother in business seven years. He joined the North Star Barrel Company in 1879, and in 1880 bought into the East Side Co-operative Company as a cooper. He was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Fleatham, a native of New York, August 13th, 1854. This was the first marriage in Minneapolis township. They have two children: Etta May and William R.

Page 645

J. B. Tinkelpaugh

is a native of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, born in 1827. His early years were passed in mechanical pursuits, in the states of New York and Indiana. He came to Minneapolis in 1857, and as a mechanic was engaged in the erection of some of the first buildings in this city and Anoka. In 1863, removed to Michigan, and three years later went to Bates county, Missouri, where he resided eight years. In 1877, returned to this city, and has since been manufacturing confectionery in East Minneapolis.

Page 645

Felix Tissot

was born December 21st, 1834, in Lyons, France, in which city he was partially educated. In 1854, he came to America, and after a brief visit to St. Anthony, repaired to the Barrens, St. Mary's College Mission, where he completed his theological education, and on the fifteenth of August, 1858, was ordained at Dubuque, Iowa, after which he was stationed at Wabasba in charge of all the parishes in Wabasha and Goodhue counties until his removal to Minneapolis in 1866.

Page 645

E. M. Titterud

was born in Norway, January 17th, 1833. Learned the shoemaker's trade in his native country, and in 1866, came to the United States. Settled in Minneapolis, and after being a journeyman for Dillingham and Veazie a short time, he started a shop of his own in which he still continues at 1110 Washington Avenue south. He was married in 1866 to Miss O. B. Berg, a native of Norway. They have had eight children, five now living.

Page 645

O. H. Titus was born in Onondaga county, New York, February 10th, 1849. He came to Afton, Minnesota, in 1865 and remained one year and returned to New York. In April I871,came to Minneapolis, and was with the Pillsburys eight months; then was with G. H. Christian in the Washburn B mill one year; thence to Chicago where he ran the State mill one year. Was also engaged in milling in other places and returned to this city in 1878. He was employed in the Zenith mill three months, then entered the Pettit mill where he has since remained as stone-dresser. He married Emma Lamson, November 17th, 1872. Albert H. and Carrie, are the children.

Page 645

Julius C. Todd

was born in Alabama, September 30th, 1847. He is of African descent and was a slave in the south until released by President Abraham Lincoln's proclamation. In 1864 he came north to Minneapolis, where he has since resided. He is now doing a prosperous business as an expressman.

Page 645

R. C. Todd

was born at Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, December 24th, 1818. He became familiar with the mason's trade at Newark, New Jersey, in 1833, and commenced business as a contractor in 1847, which he still follows. Was a resident of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, seven years, removing to Madison; thence to Red Wing, Minnesota. Located at Minneapolis in 1870, and has superintended the erection of nearly all the principal buildings in the city which have been erected since his coming. Some of them are: Harden-bergh mill, First National Bank, Warner's block, Harrison's block and others. He was united in marriage in 1841, to Miss Mary J. Agens, of Plainfield New Jersey.

Page 645

A. Tollefson

is a native of Norway, born February 8d, 1837. At the age of fourteen he learned carpentering, and has followed it since. He came to America in 1861, locating at Lansing, Iowa. He built thirteen churches at and near that town. In partnership with his brother, dealt in lumber in connection with his trade, from 1872 until 1878. He removed to Minneapolis in 1878, and has since been doing a fine business as contractor and builder. Married Miss B. Knutson, of Norway, in 1860, who has borne him three sons and three daughters. Residence, 900 Fourteenth Avenue south.

Page 645

L. Toscany

proprietor of the Quebec House, is a native of France, born in 1842, and came to the United States at two years of age. In 1874, removed to Minneapolis from Bay City, Michigan, where he had resided fifteen years in the hotel business. He has been proprietor of the Quebec House since May 15th, 1880. It is located at 228 First street north.

Page 645

L. M. Towne

was born in Kent county Michigan, July 17th, 1857. Became a resident of La Crosse in 1865 where he remained until coming to Minneapolis in 1874. Worked for the North-western Telegraph Company until December 1879, when he bought stock in the Telephone Company, and was first treasurer, which position he held till the election of Mr. C. H. Prior. Mr. Towne is at present, auditor of the company.

Page 646

Gustaf Edward Tornqvust

was born in Westergotland, Sweden, November 27th, 1850. Attended the Lyceum at Stockholm, where he studied theology. Came to America in August, 1877, and went to California as a missionary to the Scandinavians. In 1879 returned to Chicago, was ordained and went back to San Francisco, where he remained until August, 1880. He then received a call from the congregation at Minneapolis, and at once took charge.

Page 646

F. E. Towers, M.D.

was born at Richmond, Vermont, March 6th, 1851. He was educated at Barre, Vermont, graduating from the Goddard University at that place in 1872. He studied medicine at Burlington Veterinary Medical College and graduated from the State University of New York with the degree of medical doctor. After graduating he studied one year with Professor A. D. Loomis, M. D., taking a special course in physical diagnosis. He practiced in Corry, Pennsylvania, four and one-half years, coming to Minneapolis in May, 1880, where he has since practiced. Located 1119 Washington Avenue north.

Page 646

S. I. Towers

was born at Richmond, Vermont, September 11th, 1853. After receiving a liberal education in his native town he went to New York city in 1874, where he worked one year. He then went to New Jersey, being engaged in the drug business. In 1877 he went to New Orleans and after a short stay returned to his old home, remaining until 1880. He located in Minneapolis in June of the Same year and started in the boot and shoe trade, at 1119 Washington Avenue South.

Page 646

O. V. Tousley

superintendent of public schools in Minneapolis, was born at Clarendon, Orleans county, New York, March 11th, 1834. He was educated at the common school, Albion Academy, two years at Oberlin, Ohio, and at Williams College where he graduated in 1854. While in college he studied law, and after graduation went to Albany, New York, into the office of Hill, Cagger. and Porter. Soon after was admitted to the bar and spent some time reading law, history, and in general study in the state library. The next three years he spent settling up the estate of his father who had died a number of years before. His mother died when he was thirteen years of age. In 1857, he came west, stopping for a time in Illinois and Iowa. He invested his patrimony in such channels as to turn his attention from law to teaching, and went to Tennessee where he taught two years. When war was breaking out he came to Indiana, and at New Albany taught in Tousley's Academy for ten years. In 1869 he came to Minneapolis and entered the office of Judge Atwater, remaining about six months When he was called to take charge of the high school, and in 1871, was appointed superintendent of the city schools to take the place of Professor Hiskey, deceased. Since that time he has continued to raise the standard of the schools, until now Minneapolis has one of the finest systems of schools in the United States. Professor Tousley was married in 1858 to Miss Susan S. Toll.

Page 646

G. B. Townsend

was born at Jay, Maine, May 2d, 1845. He lived with his parents on the farm until sixteen, then went to Massachusetts and worked one season on a farm and returned. In 1864, enlisted in the Thirty-first Maine. Received his discharge at the end of eighteen months, having participated in many of the hardest fought battles of the war. He returned home, and the next year went to Portland, Maine, and attended the Bryant and Stratton Business College. In 1877, located at Minneapolis, engaging in different occupations for one year, then was employed by C. A. Pillsbury. His position at the Excelsior mill is that of shipping clerk and salesman.

Page 646

C. W. Tracy

was born in Windsor county, Vermont, in June, 1847. Remained there until the age of fifteen, then went to New York city and engaged in the produce, commission and whole-sale grocery business for four years. he then removed to Green Bay, Wisconsin, and remained in grain speculations until coming to Minneapolis in 1876. In the fall of that year entered the Millers' Association. In January, 1880, took charge of "Elevator A" for the Minneapolis Elevator Company, and has since held the position of superintendent. He was married in May, 1871, to Miss Mary E. Durkee of Vermont. Their children are Martha, Sherman and Minnie Lee.

Page 646

August Traeger

is a native of Prussia, born August 4th, 1821. Came to the United States in 1852, and worked at tin-smithing in Ohio three years; then removed to Fort Wayne, Indiana, thence to Decatur, where he attended to hardware business until coming to Minneapolis in 1866. He began the manufacture of eaves-troughs; also sold lightning-rods throughout the country. Since 1879 has been proprietor of a billiard hall and sample room. He was married to Mary Briske. Their children are Emma A., Maria L., August C., Theresa J., Wilhelm F., Bertha C., Louise P., Charles J. and Adolph G.

Page 647

James A. Tyler

was born at Machias, Maine, in 1851. Came to Minneapolis in the spring of 1872, and learned the carpenter's trade; has since continued in that business. He married Miss Ella L. Wilkins, of Middletown, Massachusetts, in 1879. Residence, 216 Twentieth street north. H. M. Leighton, his partner, is also a native of Maine. They are doing an extensive business as contractors and builders. Office and shop located on Fifth street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues south.

Page 647

T. S. Tyler

was born in 1837 in New York city. In early life he moved with his parents to Michigan. He has traveled through many of the states engaged in the Coopering business. In 1876, removed to Minneapolis and has lived here since that time. He is one of the directors of the Cooperative Barrel Manufacturing Company.

Page 647

A. Ueland

attorney, a native of Norway, was born February 21st, 1853. He attended school in his native country, came to America, June 1871 and attended a course at Barnard's Business college. Located at Minneapolis and read law with Judge R. Reynolds; was admitted to the bar in May 1877. He was married in this city to Miss Anna Ohlhouse in 1879. Their union was brief; she died in March 1880. O. G. Ueland, his father, was a member of the Norwegian Parliament from 1833 till the time of his death, in 1870.

Page 647

John Unsgaard

is a native of Norway, born January 14th, 1841. On arriving in the United States, located in Michigan, and dealt in lumber; thence to Minnesota and worked on a farm two years in Goodhue county. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1870, and for three years was in the employ of L. Day and Sons in lumbering, then for four years worked for different boot and shoe firms. March 20th, 1878, he opened the St. James restaurant at 122 Washington Avenue south. He married Anna Hegstad in 1873, who bore him one child, William.

Page 647

Charles H. Upton

of the firm of Lockwood, Upton and Company, was born in Maine, June, 1830. He learned the trade of machinist with P. Muzzy at Bangor, Maine. He worked one year in Boston, and came to Minneapolis in the spring of 1858. A shop was opened under the firm name of Scott and Morgan, which was burned in l862. Went to Montana and remained two years, returning to this city at that time. He was foreman of the St. Anthony Iron Works until 1879, after which he became a member of the present firm. He was married in 1857 to Maria Fenton. Their children are: Horace C., Harvey L., Robert, George and Mabel.

Page 647

Franklin M. Upham

was born at Chelmsford, Massachusetts, in 1846. Received his education at Lowell commercial school. In 1866, went to Arlighton, and engaged in the wholesale meat and provision business; he remained about eleven years, having a very successful trade. He came to Minneapolis in 1878 and purchased a building site on the east side near the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Short Line railway. He returned to his native state and disposed of his property there, on returning, he formed the company of Upham, Wyman and Company, who built a large refining house, and are now doing an extensive business. At the age of twenty-one his sole property consisted of one horse and wagon. His business now amounts to $150,000 annually. Was married to Miss Mary Lawrence, in 1874. They have two children. Laura and Mary.

Page 647

R. P. Upton

was born at Dixmont, Penobscot County, Maine, December 9th, 1820. Came to St., Anthony in June, 1850, and started a nursery and poultry-yard on Nicollet Island in the spring of 1851; the summer following he opened a grocery on Main street. He conducted the nursery two years, and in 1853 added to his grocery a general variety. The next year he went into partnership with Rollins and Eastman in a flouring mill, under the firm name of Rollins, Upton and Eastman. After three year's existence the firm changed; Upton and Brother owned one half interest in the mill. In 1858, removed to Kingston, Meeker county, and ran a mill four years. During the Indian outbreak he built a stockade, around his mill, and continued to run it. In 1862 he returned to Minneapolis, and the next year took a trip to Nevada, remaining five years, then returned to this city. He was agent for the Millers' Association one year, in the employ of the Northern Pacific railroad six months, then started the Minneapolis Spice Mills in company with T. Ray. In 1872 sold out to Mr. Ray and opened another called the Eureka Mills, and in 1880 moved the works to the Island. Mr. Upton is one of the early pioneers.

Page 648

Horatio Phillips Van Cleve

adjutant general of Minnesota, was born at Princeton. New Jersey, November 23d, 1809. His paternal ancestors were from Holland, while the maternal were from Great Britain. He was a student at Princeton College, and left that institution to accept a cadetship at West Point, from which school he graduated in 1831, receiving a commission as second lieutenant in the Fifth United States Infantry, July 1st of that year. In September, 1836, he resigned his commission and removed to Michigan, where-he engaged in the more peaceable pursuit of civil engineering, farming, etc. In 1856 he located at Long Prairie, Minnesota, and turned his attention to stock raising. At the breaking out of the rebellion he tendered his services to his country. The governor of Minnesota gave him the command of the Second Minnesota regiment, in July 1861, which he conducted bravely through all the conflicts in which they engaged until March, 1862, when he was promoted brigadier general. While commanding his division at the battle of Stone River, December 1st, 1862, he was disabled by a wound and compelled to retire from the field. Upon his recovery he resumed the command of his division. He was mustered out in August, 1865, after four years of active and efficient service. On