The following biographies are from "Compendium of History and Biography of Carver and Hennepin Counties, Minnesota". Edited by Maj. R.J. Holcombe and William H. Bingham. Published in Chicago by Henry Taylor & Company, 1915. Only the Carver County biographies from pages 265 - 340 are listed in this file.  The easiest way to access this file is with your computers word / term search option.

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Page 265

J.M. Aretz

Having served faithfully as deputy county auditor of Carver county during the last eleven years and as city clerk of Chaska during the last eight, J. M. Aretz, of Chaska, has fully demonstrated his ability and genuine worth as a public official and justified the confidence and regard the people of all classes in the county have for him. He has been tried in several fields of public service and been found true, capable and faithful in all, steadily widening his reputation and winning additional popularity.

Mr. Aretz is a Carver county product, born on a farm in Dahlgren Township September 11, 1870, and the oldest son of Antony and Agnes (Schmitz) Aretz, natives of Holland who came separately to the United States and located in this county in 1861. The father served in Company 1, Second Minnesota Cavalry from 1863 to 1865. He is still living, but the mother died in 1906. They had five sons besides J. M. and two daughters, all of whom are living. J. M.'s brothers are Martin, Antony and William, of Carver county, and Joseph and John, of Minneapolis. His sisters are Anna, the wife of John Leuthart, of Chokio, Minnesota, and Mary, who lives at Victoria.

J. M. Aretz began his education in the public schools of Carver County and completed it at St. Joseph's College at Teutopolis, Illinois, which he attended two years. He taught school for thirteen years in Carver and Nicollet counties, and made an excellent record as an instructor. In 1903 he was appointed deputy auditor of Carver county, and he has hold this office ever since, and from 1906 to the present time (1915) he has also served as city clerk of the village of Chaska. He belongs to the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters and the German Catholic Benevolent Society of Minnesota. In 1895 he was married to Miss Pauline Mason, of Chanhassen. They have seven children: Raymond A., Henry V., Edward M., Pauline A., Eugene E., Guy F. and Margaret A.

Page 265

Peter D. Anderson

Peter D. Anderson, for many years a prominent farmer of Laketown Township, came to Carver County in 1859. He was born at Jonkopingslan, in Smoland, Sweden, May 1, 1828. As a young man he came to the United States, arriving in Burlington, Iowa, on the twenty-fourth of January 1854. The following year he left Burlington for St. Paul where he lived for some time, employed in saw mills and hauling lumber. In St. Paul, on July 15, 1858, he was married to Caroline Johnson, a native of Sweden, born March 22, 1835, at Vastra Hair Socken, Lindkopingslan, who had come to this country when sixteen years of age. During his residence in St. Paul, Mr. Anderson was a member of the First fire department of the early days in that city and at the time of the installation of a steam engine in the equipment of the fire fighters, took part in the contest between the old time department and the new service. Soon after his marriage he secured the quarter section of land in Carver county which later became his home. For a time he continued his work in St. Paul and meanwhile hired a man to hold his land for him, paying sixty dollars for the holding of one eighty-acre tract. But in 1859 he removed to his claim, created a log house and began the development of his farm. He cleared a number of acres of timberland, hauling his cordwood to Chaska, nine miles distant and devoted untiring effort to the task of improving new land. He put thirty-five acres under cultivation and built the present comfortable farm home in which he incorporated part of the first log house. During the troublous time of the great civil conflict, Mr. Anderson recognized the call of his adopted country and in August 1864, enlisted in Company A of the Fourth Minnesota Regiment. He served in the Atlanta campaign and took part in the memorable battle of Altoona Pass and also was with Sherman on the march to the sea and hence to Washington where at the close of the war he participated in the grand review of the troops and July 12, 1865, received his honorable discharge at Louisville. As a veteran of this war he was ever a loyal supporter of the principles of the Republican Party. In his early manhood he had become a member of the Swedish Baptist church in Burlington, Iowa, the first church of this sect to be established in the United States and with which lie was actively associated for many years as a faithful member and deacon, with the same denomination at Scandia, which in time of organization is the second Swedish Baptist church in this country. He took a keen interest in all temperance reform and rendered much able service in Sunday school work. His death occurred January 10, 1906, at the close of a long career of useful and successful activity and he is buried in the cemetery at Scandia. His wife died February 10, 1913. They had a family of 10 children, Anna Louise, now Mrs. Larson of Minneapolis; Charlotte Augusta; Alice Florence, Mrs. Charles B. Norman of Maynard, Minnesota; Carolina Wilhelinina, the wife of Reverend G. A. Hagstrom, an eminent clergyman of the Swedish Baptist church and the president of the Swedish Baptist Theological Seminary at St. Paul and former pastor of the congregations of that city and of the First Baptist church in Chicago; Isabelle, who married John Swanson, a lumber dealer in St. Bonifacius and resident of Waconia; Abbie May Susan, whose death occurred soon after her marriage to Charles F. Peterson of Chicago; Charles Benjamin, who married Hilda 0. Schock of, Minneapolis and is a farmer in Watertown township; Andrew Oscar, a farmer in Laketown township; James Fritchof ; and John A., who lives in Minneapolis where he is engaged in the retail hardware business. James Fritchof Anderson was born December 17, 1876, in the house where he now lives and this has always been his home with the exception of about three years spent on a farm near Maynard in Chippewa county. He is the present owner of the old homestead and one of the successful farmers of the community, interesting himself particularly in the raising of alfalfa and red clover. He also engages in dairy farming and is a stockholder in the Cooperative Creamery Company. He is a member and interested promoter of the Fair Association of Waconia and is a frequent exhibitor at their shows. Mr. Anderson has never married and his sister, Miss Charlotte Anderson, makes her home with him.

Page 265

Emile Amblard

When Monsieur Emile Amblard died at the Swedish hospital in Minneapolis in 1914, death ended a career of unusual interest and picturesqueness. The life story then closed was full of romance and poetry. It embodied heroism of a high order, a love of adventure bordering on a passion, business capacity of very unusual extent, devotion to the true, the beautiful and the good that knew no variation or shadow of change, and love of Nature in all her moods and manifestations that was almost all absorbing. The story also embraced the loftiest ideals of friendship and unyielding loyalty to them, intense and discriminating interest in art, in literature and in all the other good things of life, and a stalwart and consistent manhood that was always true to the best instincts of human nature and yet illumined the troubled way along which it, went with the most genial and abounding sunshine for every person and object with which it came in contact.

M. Amblard was born in Paris, France, and he remained a citizen of that country to the end of his life, although from 1904 to the end he lived in Minneapolis, and for ten years prior to that time he passed his summers at his beautiful home on Coney Island in Clearwater lake, near the village of Waconia. He was a member of the French firm of F. Chauvenet & Company, wine importers, and its representative in the United States, Canada and Mexico. He was the son of a large landowner in Burgundy, near the city of Perigueux, and his father was mayor of that city. The son passed part of his youth on his father's country estate, but was sent to school and college in Paris.

He was always intensely loyal to France and the Napoleon dynasty. When Napoleon III, in 1870, found himself forced to declare war on Prussia to save his throne, Monsieur Amblard dropped all has business and other engagements, purchased horses and offered himself as a volunteer for the war. With the rank of captain he served on the staff of Marshal Bazaine, often seeing and coming into personal intercourse with the Emperor. At the battle of Forbach, while galloping with an order from his marshal, he fell afoul of a Prussian cavalry charge, and to his death bore on his breast the scar of a wicked sabre wound, which, however, he cherished with commendable pride.

When Marshal Bazaine was forced to surrender at Metz Captain Amblard became a prisoner of war with the rest of the command. He was taken to Wittenberg, in Saxony, but soon made his escape dressed in the uniform of a Prussian soldier. He got through the Prussian lines in safety, narrowly escaping capture several times, rejoined another French army corps, and gave important information of the numbers and disposition of the Prussians. He remained in the army to the close of the war, then resigned his commission and engaged in the wine business on a large scale.

Being a pioneer importer of wine in the North American continent, his business, as well as his inclination, made him an extensive traveler in Europe, Canada, the United States, Mexico and South America. He loved nature and reveled in all scenes of natural beauty, forests, flowers, lakes and running streams with mountains, plains and all other landscape features holding him in thrall with ardent admiration. His definition of Heaven was "a sunshiny day," and he often declared he loved "even a blade of grass".

On one occasion, when Monsieur Amblard was visiting an old friend, Rudolph Steinmetz, a former officer in the German army, then living in Minneapolis, he was invited to go fishing in Clearwater Lake. The beauty of the lake so impressed him that he resolved to become the owner of a part of the wooded island in its midst. The next year he secured a foothold on the island, and to this he added from time to time until he owned about one-half of it. He converted his half into a large park, building three pavilions, one for himself to sleep in, one for his wife, and the third, containing five rooms, for visitors. But he used only, a small part of his holding for himself and his friends. The greater part was kept as a park for the use of the residents of Waconia and visitors to the lake. He planted trees where there were none, flowers everywhere that was suitable, had extensive well-kept lawns and made the park as attractive and enjoyable to the public as he could.

This enterprise was his chief diversion. He had a fine artistic sense and drew his own designs for landscape and buildings, planning all the improvements and paying for them all out of his own resources. And he applied his own code of regulations to the management of his island. Every Fourth of July he gave a great exhibition of fireworks in the evening, and on other holidays he had other celebrations suited to the occasions. Through his liberality and public spirit in this enterprise the people came to call him respectfully and admiringly "the Duke of Clearwater Lake." Monsieur Amblard owned large vineyards at Nuits, France. With a brother living in Rio Janeiro, who owned extensive gold mines, he made long hunting trips into the wilderness and secured quantities of large game. But he traveled everywhere, was a citizen of the world, a captivating conversationalist and after dinner speaker, a great lover of children, and altogether an exceedingly intelligent, entertaining and lovable man. He could never reconcile himself to the French republic, yet he always maintained his citizenship in that country, and in 1913 visited his old home in Burgundy, with his wife as his companion.

In 1894 Monsieur Amblard was married in Paris to Miss Mary Wood, whom he first met in Quebec, Canada, and who is the sole surviving member of his family. She is a daughter of Hon. E. B. Wood, late chief justice of the province of Manitoba, Canada, who presided at the trial of Louis Riel, the noted insurgent, who was executed for rebellion and treason in 1885. Justice Wood was at one time at the head of the treasury department in the Dominion and wielded great power in Canadian affairs. He was a man of fine physique, very unusual talents and great breadth and comprehensiveness of learning. His widow, a lady of remarkable personality, now has her home with her daughter, Mrs. Amblard, at 2434 Blaisdell avenue, Minneapolis.

Monsieur Amblard was a member of the Waconia Commercial club, the New York Athletie, club and the famous Jockey club of Mexico, He had a very wide circle of friends in many parts of the world, and cherished them so warmly and with such consideration and discrimination that he has been called "a connoisseur of friendships." Since his death his island property has been sold, but the purchaser has indicated his purpose to keep the villa exactly as it was arranged and used by its former owner and occupant. The remains of this courtly and benevolent gentleman were laid to rest in the cemetery at Waconia in a spot chosen by himself three or four years before his death, and in a position in which, according to his own directions, he may " rest till the morning breaks and the shadows roll away," and from which, when the trumpet of the resurrection summons him, his vision may first fall on his beloved island, which he often spoke of as his heaven on earth."

Page 266

Andrew Oscar Anderson

Andrew Oscar Anderson, well known farmer of Laketown township, is a native of Carver county, born June 13, 1873, the son of Peter D. and Caroline (Johnson) Anderson, who settled in Laketown township in 1859 and whose homestead is now owned by their son, James F. Anderson. Andrew Anderson remained on his father Is place until he was twenty years of age when he left the farm and became a carpenter. He followed this trade for a number of years and during part of this time was employed in the city. In 1902 he bought the farm which is his present home, formerly the homestead of Andrew Bergquist, the first Swedish farmer in this vicinity, who in 1853 made his home on the banks of Clearwater Lake and gave that lake its name. Just two years after his purchase, Mr. Anderson suffered great loss through the devastations of a cyclone which wrecked all his buildings, including a barn which had been but recently completed. But the success of his increasingly prosperous farming enterprises enabled him to soon recuperate from this disaster and equip his place with now buildings. Mr. Anderson has especially interested himself in stock raising and dairy farming and keeps thoroughbred Guernsey stock. He was one of the promoters and organizers of the Cooperative Creamery Company in 1908 and has been prominently identified with its interests since that time, is president of the company. This is one of the thriving industries of Waconia and has proved an extensive benefit to the farmers of the county, many of whom are stockholders and patrons. Mr. Anderson has always been active in matters which pertain to welfare of the community in which he lives but has allied himself with no party in his political views, although he is in sympathy with the principles of the Prohibitionists. He has served for three years as township treasurer. He was married in 1903 to Beda Peterson, a native of Sweden who was living in Isanti County at the time of her marriage to Mr. Anderson. Five children have been born to this union, Donald, Virginia, Benjamin and Leonard and Lucille, who are the twins of the family. Mr. Anderson and his family are members of the Swedish Baptist church at Scandia, where the former is the assistant superintendent of the Sunday school. The Anderson home has been built in an unusually pleasant situation a few rods from the shore of Clearwater Lake and commands an enjoyable view of the lake and island.

Page 267

Jonas P. Akins

A prosperous farmer, now retired after a long career of useful industry; and one of the four survivors of a party of thirteen young men who enlisted from Watertown in the last year of the Civil War; a public official who has acceptably filled several local offices and ever a willing and laborious contributor to the development and improvement around him, Jonas P. Akins has many features of usefulness in his career and a host of agreeable recollections to cheer him in his declining years.

He was born in Sweden December 25, 1837, coming to America with his parents in 1851. They sailed from Gottenborg, on the North Sea inlet of Cattegat, having consumed six days in reaching the coast from their home in the interior. They were on the Atlantic three days less than three months, landing finally at New York. They journeyed by steamboat to Albany, continuing over the Erie Canal to Buffalo. They settled in Pennsylvania, Jonas remaining with them six years. Having friends at Watertown, however, in the family of Daniel Justus, he wished to be with them in the wilderness.

In 1857 he found opportunity to gratify this longing. Alone he made the trip, traveling by rail to Prairie du Chien and by boat up the Mississippi to St. Paul. Mr. Justus had located on Swede Lake in July, 1856, being the first settler there. Watertown was laid out in the spring of 1856, but Mr. Justus was the first Swede to come to this locality, and it was he who opened a road to it by way of Carver. He lived on Swede Lake three months before he knew he had neighbors. His cow wandered away, and in looking for her he heard a cowbell that was on a cow belonging to settlers at Watertown, three miles distant. Although Mr. Akins came to Carver County alone, so far as his own family was concerned, be came with three other families, the Millers, the Browns and the Johnsons. He worked on the courthouse at Chaska, carrying the hod at its construction. He also worked at Chanhassen three years, but considered Watertown his home. He bought land near Swede Lake. It was his custom to clear land in the winter, when there was no other work to be had, and in this way cleared two farms in Chanhassen township, one for an Episcopal minister and the other for an Episcopal Deacon. In 1860 he started for Illinois, having been told he could get employment there at $15 a month. In St. Paul, however, he obtained employment as a roustabout on the river at 30 cents an hour, and so continued to work on the river during summers for three years. Being anxious to obtain a home he saved his earnings, and in the last year of his service on the river built himself a frame house on land, which he had cleared in the meantime. In February, 1865, Mr. Akins enlisted in the Minnesota Heavy Artillery, being one of thirteen men who then joined that command from Watertown, and he is one, of four of them who survive. He was assigned to guard duty in the forts around Chattanoga, Tennessee, and on August 5, 1865, was discharged on account of illness, being reduced to but 94 pounds, although he had ever been of stalwart size and vigorous health. In the fall of 1864 he was married to Miss Johanna Oberg, a sister of J. A. Oberg, who is still living in Watertown, and of Mrs. A. J. Brown. Mrs. Akins died in 1880, leaving four children: E. J., who lives on his own farm in the township; Selma, a dressmaker in Seattle; Lillie, who married J. W. Wilson of Prosser, Washington, and Luella, who has lived in the family of A. J. Brown since she was two years old. In 1885 Mr. Akins contracted a second marriage, which united him with Miss Matilda J. Lundin, who became a resident of Watertown Township in 1876. Their seven children are: Nora, wife of Edward Newstrom, of the neighborhood; Arthur, assisting in the management of the farm; and Thelia, Ethel, Maud, and Willard and Willman (twins), Ethel being a student at the State University. In 1871 the family moved to the farm of Mr. Akins father- in-law, P.M. Oberg, in section 20, which he bought, and which is now owned by his son, E. J. Akins. He moved to his present farm of eighty acres one mile and a half south of Watertown in 1902. This farm was formerly school land and cleared in 1865 by P. M. Grife, a nephew of Mr. Oberg. He served some years as chairman of the township board, and in 1870 was elected county commissioner, serving one term. For many years he has been a member of the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown. In politics he is an active working Republican. For forty-one years he worked for a local mutual fire insurance company, which he helped to organize, and which has been a great source of protection to farm property..

Page 267

Edwin J. Akins

Proprietor of Unionville stock farm and enterprising breeder of high-class Holstein cattle, through which he has attracted , widespread attention to his neighborhood, Edwin J. Akins has brought renown to Watertown township in a line of productiveness that is very much to its credit and entitles him to general commendation throughout his county and the whole state of Minnesota. His undertaking is all the more worthy of praise and appreciation because it is the result of his own initiative, and was started with the primary purpose of improving live stock conditions and products in the country immediately around him, which puts it in the class of public benefactions.

Mr. Akins was born July 13, 1869, on his father's farm one mile east of the one he is now occupying as his own. He is a son of Jonas P. and Johanna (Oberg) Akins, a sketch of whom will be found in this volume, and remained at home with his parents until he reached the age of twenty-one, but his present home became the family residence when he was but five years old. At the age of twenty-one he went to Helena, Montana, and engaged in dairying, worked for Mr. H. Brass 4 years, when he started in business for himself with a retail milk route and a wholesale establishment, starting his business with thirty-five cows and extending his herd until he had eighty-five. He was in business for himself 7 years, when he sold out and moved to the farm he is now living on.

Mr. Akins went in debt to begin his business in Helena, but by the end of his first year he had paid his debt and accumulated a respectable sum of money in addition, all from the receipts from his dairy. He invested to some extent in California land, and in 1899 he bought the old family homestead of 160 acres from his father, paying $7,500 for it out of the profits of his Montana business. In 1902 he returned to this state and took charge of the farm, and since then he has remodeled his buildings, erected silos and converted the place into an unusually find dairy farm.

Five years ago Mr. Akins began breeding Holsteins and now has a herd of thirty head with Paul Lyon Hedgevelt, a very high-bred bull, at the head of it. He is a fine animal in body and pedigree and closely related to Waldessa, the world's champion of the breed. He has seven or eight choice animals which he exhibits at county fairs, and he also produces milk in quantities for the creamery. His business is a very active one, and he is in touch with every phase and feature of it all the time.

Mr. Akins is a Republican in political faith but he is not either a strenuous or an active partisan, and he has never held or sought a public office of any kind. In religious conviction he is a Lutheran and belongs to the Swedish church of that denomination . at Watertown. He was married in 1897, at Helena, Montana, to Miss Amanda Miller, a Watertown young lady and a daughter of Andrew G. and Anna (Justus) Miller, whose life story is told on other pages of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Akins have three children, Everett, Clifford and Lenore, all of whom are still members of the parental family circle. Mr. Akins is universally known and esteemed in all parts of Carver County as one of its most enterprising and progressive citizens, and, his farm is a fine body of land with excellent improvements. It is, in fact, one of the most desirable and valuable farms of its size in the county. The farm was named Unionville, after his Unionville Dairy in Helena, Montana.

Page 268

William Ackerman

William Ackerman, the oldest and yet the most active resident of Young America, was born in the province of Tharingia, Saxony, Germany, September 17, 1839, and became a resident of Carver county, in 1866. His brother Christ came over in 1859 and Julius, in 1862. Immediately after Christ's arrival he located on a farm, in Benton township, until 1863, when he left: the farm and joined Julius in opening and conducting a general store at Young America. The two also in 1865 built the mill that still stands and operated it, as they conducted the store, until 1866, when William bought an interest in both the store and mill. They continued to run both until 1892 when it was sold. In 1896 William was appointed postmaster, a position he held continuously for seven years.

In 1873 the two brothers bought land adjoining Young America, of which William became owner but which has since been sold. He has taken an active part in the public affairs of the village, serving us its president ten or twelve years. He was married in 1867 to Miss Caroline Rodh, a daughter of John Rodh, who came to Carver County in 1854 and located near Young America, where he died in 1902. For awhile he lived at Young America, and because of the marriage of his daughter to businessmen there became known as "The Father-in-law of Young America." Mr. and Mrs. Ackerman have four children: August, a feed and flour merchant at Young America; Herman, who is engaged in the grain trade at Mayer; Christ, living in the state of Washington, and Paulina.

In 1856 Young America was laid out by James Slocum, Jr., and Dr. Kennedy Slocum, building a small gristmill which was soon burned.

Julius Ackerman became Assistant State Treasurer under Kerner, in 1892, for six years, and has since conducted a retail feed, flour and coal business in St. Paul. Christ, his partner, went to New York City in 1876 as agent in selling the product of their 125-barrel mill and remained in the East till his death in 1912. Since 1892 he operated a retail store of the same line in Jersey City.

Page 268

Michael Burns

Michael Burns, pioneer settler of Hollywood Township, is a native of Ireland, born in Carlow, county Carlow, September 29, 1826. He came to this country in 1852, a young man of twenty-six, accompanied by his wife, Bridget Farrell. They made their first residence in Coldsprings, New York, where Mr. Burns found employment in a foundry. After six mouths in New York State he removed to Cleveland and a year later moved farther west to St. Louis, engaged during this time in foundry or railroad work. In 1856 he came to Minnesota Territory, desirous of securing some of the land which was attracting settlers. For a year he lived in St. Anthony, where he kept a boarding house and worked in a quarry. But the following year he realized his intention and took up land in what is now Hollywood Township and was one of the first settlers in this vicinity. Mr. Burns prepared his 160 acres for cultivation with an axe and hoe and gave as much time as was possible to farming, but during the first few years he was compelled to employ himself in other work. Later he added 480 acres to the original quarter section and this land remains the property of his family at the present time. Through the successful labor of the first years he was soon able to transform the first shanty home of his family and the undeveloped land into a comfortable frame house and prosperous farm. The frame house has been replaced by the handsome brick home which Mr. Burns erected six years ago. Mr. Burns was one of the twelve voters who organized Hollywood township at old Helvetia and he has ever since been prominently associated with the affairs of the county, serving its interests in various offices. He was elected the first supervisor and later was made chairman of the board of supervisors. For seven years he was township assessor and chairman of the board of assessors. He is a Democrat, but has never taken in active interest in politics outside the township. Of the families who were the pioneers in this vicinity, Mr. Burns survives with George Campbell, who with his father was also a settler of 1857, and the wife of Patrick Corcoran, who lives in her eighty- eighth year on the Corcoran homestead in Hollywood township. These first neighbors of Mr. Burns, identified with him in the early development of the county, were John, Thomas and Michael Madden, Mathew Kelly, Edward Boyle, James Sexton, Patrick Craven, Edward Burns, brother of Michael; Felix Campbell; his sons, Patrick, William, John, Michael, Peter and George and daughter, Mrs. Mary Toole, and Patrick Curry, whose farm is now owned by Mr. Burns. In his reminiscences, Mr. Burns recalls the time when game was so plentiful that the deer mingled freely with the cattle and stock on his farm and were unmolested by him, although he enjoyed the sport of squirrel hunting. His wife died in 1908, six years after they had celebrated the golden anniversary of their wedding. They had six children, Margaret, who died in childhood; Edward, a farmer and insurance agent in Hollywood; Thomas, who was employed in the Pillsbury mills for twenty- nine years and died in 1907, aged fifty-two; James, engaged in farming in Hollywood township; Patrick P., salesman for L. L. May & Co. of St. Paul, and Mary, the wife of Patrick Gavin of Watertown. Mr. Burns was one of the first members of the Catholic Church in Watertown. P. P. Burns has attained marked success as salesman for the well-known nursery firm, L. L. May & Co. He entered this field after spending several years in the teaching profession. He also enjoys the reputation of having held the local heavy weight championship as wrestler for ton years. He is now a retired farmer, his operations in the past proving him a success in this as well as in other lines. He is now considering the study of law, local conditions requiring that that subject be added to his general fund of information.

Page 269

Edward P. Burns

Edward P. Burns, well known insurance man and farmer in Hollywood township, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, February 25, 1855, and is the son of Michael and Bridget (Farrell) Burns, who were both natives of Ireland, and Michael Burns was one of the first settlers in Hollywood township and is one of its oldest living residents. Edward Burns was brought to Carver county by his parents in 1856 and was reared on his father's farm, where he lived until he was twenty-four years of age. At that time he secured the agency for the Continental Insurance company and sold fire insurance in Carver and McLeod counties. His ability in this field was speedily recognized and he has continued in this work with marked success. For twelve years he lived in Norwood, giving all his attention to the insurance business. In 1893 he bought a farm near Winsted in McLeod county and began to divide his business interests. Fourteen years later, in 1907, he removed to his present home on the farm in Hollywood. This place was first owned by William Welch, who took it as a preemption claim, and it has a clean title that has never been threatened by a mortgage or claim of any sort. But one owner has intervened between the first possessor and Mr. Burns, William J., the son of William Welch, who moved to Wright county, where his death occurred in 1913. Mr. Burns has added a number of improvements to this farm, which includes one hundred and sixty acres of fine farmland, has remodeled the house and erected a large modern barn. He also owns another place of one hundred and ten acres, eighty of which were given him by his father when he became of age, and it is his intention to make this his home. In 1886 he was married to Mary McCormick, who was born in Camden township. She is the daughter of Patrick and Catherine (Glendon) McCormick, and her brother, Patrick J. McCormick, is the present postmaster at Hopkins, Minnesota. Mr. Burns and his wife have eight children and all make their home with their parents. Two daughters, Bridget and Margaret, are teachers in the schools of Carver county. Mary is a student in the high school at Watertown and Julia attends the Holy Angel Academy at Minneapolis. One son, Patrick, is a student in St. Thomas college and the other children, Catherine, Michael and Edward, are pupils in the local schools.. Mr. Burns has always taken a great interest in public affairs and has been prominent in political activities and a member of a number of conventions. He and family are members of the Catholic church at Watertown. The first Catholic service in Hollywood was held in the home of William Welch, on the site of the present Burns home.

Page 269

Alfred J. Brown

The achievements possible to industry, enterprise and thrift in this land of large opportunities are well indicated in the successful career of Alfred J. Brown, one of the leading farmers of Watertown township, and now having completed his eighth year of service as a member of the board of county commissioners. He was born in Smoland, Sweden, October 12, 1842, the son of, Peter and Helen Brown, and came with them and a sister to America when he was ten years old, locating at first in Warren county, Pennsylvania, remaining there five years.

In 1857, during the great financial stringency, the parents determined to seek a new home and a better chance for advancement in what was then the far distant West, and came to Minnesota. Alfred and one of his cousins traveled with two ox teams and two cows to Buffalo, New York, then over the lakes to Milwaukee, and again overland to Carver county, a distance of 500 miles in the last overland jaunt. In disposing of part of his live stock in Pennsylvania the father was obligated to sell two, two-year-old steers for $22 and two cows for $16. He had to take state bank paper money and which was current only locally, and even then at a discount. Fearing it would not be good at all in Minnesota, he changed what he had at Jamestown, New York, for small silver coins at 50 cents on the dollar. He had preempted land in this county at $1.25 an acre before the rest of the family arrived, but found out a little later that he could not got his claim, as it was declared all the land had been assigned. In this emergency he bought an island of thirty-six acres in Lake Okey, 100 feet from the shore, and later 40 acres, living on the latter eight years. Alfred finally bought the tract from the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad company, to which large grants had been made, at $7 per acre. The father died at this home of the family in 1872.

After the Civil war Alfred J. Brown clerked in a store for I.I. Lewis, who once owned about one-eighth of the land on which Minneapolis has since been built. I.I. Lewis was a son of Caleb Lewis, the old surveyor, who, in association with three other men, started the village of Watertown in 1856. They built a store, a mill, a hotel and other structures, invited other settlers, offered inducements for colonization, and so gave the new village its beginning in a career that has been highly interesting.

Mr. Brown went to work for Mr. Lewis in 1860. Two years later, at the age of twenty, he wished to enlist in the Second Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, but his father would not consent. So he remained with Mr. Lewis until 1865; but in 1863 he purchased sixty acres, of land of Mrs. Eliza Ann Green, widow of L. N. Green, who was killed in the war. This land cost him $275. Mrs. Green had twenty acres left, but the house being destroyed by fire, Mr. Brown bought the rest of the tract of 80 acres in 1867 for $200.

In February, 1865, Mr. Brown enlisted in the Minnesota Heavy Artillery under command of Colonel Colville, being one of thirteen men who joined the company at Watertown. The township furnished 103 volunteers, and after this last enlistment there was not a man or youth left in it between, the ages of eighteen and forty-five. His company lost thirteen men at Chattanooga, and of the thirteen who were enrolled with him but three besides himself are living. These are J. P. Akins, P.O. John- son and John A. Oberg, all residents of the township, but only one of the thirteen was lost in the war. That was Andrew Anderson, who died in hospital. The new volunteers of about 400 men journeyed from Fort Snelling on a lumber wagon to Rochester, then by rail to Winona, and thence in sleighs to La Crosse.

This command was kept on guard duty at Chattanooga, and holding thirteen forts, until discharged in September, 1865. In June, however, Mr. Brown was detailed as a clerk in the office of the inspector general, where he saw a great deal of crooked work in the sale of condemned provisions, horses, mules and other army supplies.

Turning his attention to farming, he broke up a part of his land. He also joined J. A. C. Flood in a merchandising enterprise, remaining with him until 1870. In that year Mr. Brown was married to Miss Matilda Oberg, a daughter of Peter Oberg, who was also a pioneer of 1858. He paid $600 for 160 acres of land in Watertown township, which he sold when he retired and moved to the village of Watertown, where he died in 1884.

Mr. Brown then took charge of his farm, to which he has since devoted attention. He now owns 106 acres at Lake Okey, beside his home farm at Watertown, and lives at the outskirts of Watertown. C. A. Smith, the great lumberman, now living in California, started his career about the same time, and the lady whom he afterward married was bridesmaid for Mrs. Brown.

Mr. Brown has taken an active and serviceable part in the public affairs of township, county, and state. He served on the local school board eighteen years and the same length of time as a member of the township board and as its chairman, clerk and treasurer. In 1906 he was elected to the board of county commissioners, serving continuously since, for four years being vice chairman of the board, the term expiring Dec. 31, 1914.

Mr. and Mrs. Brown have one living daughter, Minnie C., wife of Walter L. Miller, son of the late Andrew G. Miller, and who owns the Brown homestead, a sketch of whom will be found elsewhere. Mr. Brown's three sons died in early childhood, but they have also reared to womanhood an adopted daughter, Miss Luella Akins, whom they took when she was but two years old. Mr. Brown and wife are members of the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown, of which he has been a trustee for forty-seven years, being treasurer of the board during the greater part of that period, during which three churches have been built.

Page 270

Henry F. Bruckschen

Having devoted his energies as a farmer and merchant from young manhood, and having been a force for good in church and other improving agencies, Henry P. Bruckschen is one of the leading residents of Young America.

Mr. Bruckschen was born at Hamburg on Nov. 6, 1878, and is a son of Henry and Gertrude (Flusemann) Bruckschen, the former a native of the Rhine province, Germany. The father came to this state in 1855, making the journey over sea and land to Carver county alone. He took up his residence first where the village of Hamburg now stands, and lived there twenty-five Years, when he sold his farm.

He then moved to Benton township, four miles from Young America, and there the father passed the remainder of life, dying December 5, 1911. The mother is still living on the farm. The father enlisted early in the Civil war in Company D, Fifth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, serving to the close. Returning to Minnesota, he was married in 1866 to Miss Maria Buckentine, of Hamburg, who died in 1873, his second wife being Gertrude Fluseman, also of Hamburg. His offspring numbered seven. His seven children are Gerhard, living for 14 years on a farm four miles from Young America. Minnie is the wife of William Engelmann, a carpenter, at Glencoe. Mary married Fred Schneewind, also a carpenter, at Young America. Maggie married Dietrich Schneewind, brother of Fred, a farmer. Adeline is living with her brother on the farm, and Gertrude is the wife of Arnold Williamson, of Young America.

Henry P. Bruckschen remained with his parents until reaching the age of twenty-five, becoming the owner, of the old home at his father's death. He then started in business as a livery proprietor for two years, when he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, Henry Schmitz buying a hardware store at Young America.. Mr. Schmitz is still a partner, though residing on a farm. During the last three years the firm has held the agency for the Oakland and Detroiter automobiles.

Mr. Bruckschen was married May 25, 1898, to Miss Margaret Schmitz, of Young America, daughter of Henry Schmitz. They have two children: Henry B. A. and Anna Gertrude. Mr. Bruckschen was a member of the village council for a number of years, and at the last election was elected mayor, a position he is still holding. He is a member of the Reformed church at Bongard. His father was also active in church work, and helped to build the church edifices at Hamburg and Bongard.

In fraternal relations Mr. Bruckschen is connected with the Masonic Order, at Young America, in which he has held the leading offices. He is also a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen at Norwood and the Order of Hermann's Sons at Young America. In 1908 he helped organize the Commercial club of Young America, being president during the last five years. He is also president of the Eagle Publishing company of Young America, publishers of the Young America Eagle.

Page 271

Theodore Otto Broberg

Theodore Otto Broberg, a well known farmer of Laketown township, is a native of Carver county, born on the farm which is his present home, September 4, 1867. His parents were John .T. and Catherine (Johnson) Broberg, both natives of Sweden and early settlers of Laketown township. John Broberg came to Minnesota in 1855, accompanied by his brother-in-law, John Lundsten. They spent several months in Red Wing and St. Paul, finding employment as wood cutters along the river and looking about meanwhile for land where they might establish homes in this new country. The following year their quest carried them into Carver county, and here both made their permanent location. John Broberg chose land which bordered Clearwater lake, the natural beauty of the site reminding him of the old country where his home had been on the banks of a lake. The land which he preempted lay next to the farm of Andrew Bergquist, who in 1853, in search of Lake Minnetonka, was carried away from his destination by the trails and brought to this beautiful little lake and on the adjoining land he at once took up his claim. From him, its first settler, the lake received its name of Clearwater. John Broberg cleared his land as rapidly as possible, putting about sixty-two acres under cultivation and won success and prosperity from the hardships of pioneer farming by his unfailing industry and enterprising management. He was ever alert to opportunities for the betterment of his own interests or these of the community in which he lived; a public spirited citizen and progressive farmer. For years, dating from the time of the first cutting of the roads through the wilderness, he had charge of the road work and conducted this work with a keen recognition of its value to an agricultural district. He, himself, had to journey to Minnetonka mills with his wheat, haul his wood to Chaska twelve miles distant and for some time made the three-day trip to St. Paul in order to market his produce. In 1877 the log house which had stood on the place for twenty years was replaced by the farm residence which is now the home of his son. The old log house had been small, but it had not only sheltered the family, but its hospitality had made it a home for others as well. Mr. Broberg took an active and useful interest in the welfare of the community and gave his assistance freely to settlers desirous of securing claims. He died December 31, 1885, in his fifty-fourth year. His wife survived several years, her death occurring on December 19, 1889, at the age of fifty-six. She was a member of the Swedish Baptist church. Of their family of eight children, Theodore Broberg, who lives on the old homestead, is the only one residing in Carver county. The other children are Andrew, who married a daughter of Andrew Bergquist and is employed as a night watchman in St. Paul; Joseph, living in Eagle Bend, Minnesota; Enoch R., engaged in the real estate business in Minneapolis; James, who operates a sawmill in National, Washington; William, living in Seattle, Washington; Anna, the wife of Tanni Bergquist of Brooklyn Centre, Minnesota, and Amanda, the wife of Oscar Hawkins, whose home is in Westwood, California. Theodore Broberg has spent all his life on the old place, receiving from his father a careful training in the business of farming and devoting all his time and interest to his work. For fifteen years the farm has been under his capable management. He has sold some land and now owns one hundred and twenty-six acres, which he devotes to the raising of grain and fine stock. A good bank barn has been one of his additions to his equipment as a stock raiser, in which business he has been eminently successful, winning recognition at the local fairs with. his full blooded Ayrshires. Recognizing the advantages gained by the farmers from local exhibitions, he was one of the organizers and promoters of the Waconia fair and is its present treasurer. He has engaged quite extensively in the dairy business, keeping a large number of dairy cows, and is a shareholder in the Cooperative Creamery company. Mr. Broberg was married February 28, 1899, to Hannah E. Gustavson, who was born in Smoland, Sweden, and came to the United States in 1890. Five children have been born to this union, Elwill Gustav, Gordon Theodore, Waldo Edison, Catherine and Margaret Carrol Theodora. Mr. Broberg is a trustee of the Swedish Baptist church, of which he and his wife are members. He also is a member of the Fraternal Order of Modern Woodmen.

On August 20, 1904, a cyclone starting at Aberdeen, S. D., came through here of about 3 miles wide, causing great damage. Large sturdy oaks by the beautiful lake were rooted up, never to show their splendor, and Waldo, only being 3 weeks old, made it a hard stop to take up courage and start again.

Page 271

William Brandt

Living retired at Waconia in comfort after years of active and productive labor, during which he contributed his full share toward development and improvement, William Brandt furnishes a valuable example of the value of upright living and useful industry.

He was born May 12, 1843, in the province of Pomerania, Prussia, and in 1867 came to Minnesota, where he worked for two years in a sawmill. In 1869 he bought forty acres of timbered land in Carver county, for which he paid $350. He built a log cabin and cleared the land, then added forty acres, partly cleared and partly swamp, for which he paid $560. Later he paid $1,525 for seventy-five acres more, one-third of which was cleared, but he personally cleared about seventy acres. On the fine farm made of these several tracts he lived until he sold and retired from active pursuits. , Some thirty years ago he built a good dwelling with other substantial and commodious buildings. He served five years as village treasurer and has also been a member of the school board. He was married at the age of twenty-one to Miss Henrietta Holz. She died November 1, 1893, and in January, 1895, was united with Mrs. Carolina Fillbrandt, of Camden -township, who was born in West Prussia and came to Carver county, in 1867, as the wife of Frederick Fillbrandt. Mr. Brandt has three children: Anna, the wife of Charles Beiersdorf ; Lena, a dressmaker in St. Paul, and Willie, a chauffeur. All of the family are Lutherans in religious faith and affiliation.

Page 272

George J. Bradley

For thirty-three years George J. Bradley, vice president of the bank at Norwood and chairman of the Minnesota State Game and Fish Commission, has been a resident of Carver county, most of that time of Young America township. When he came to the county he was a youth of eighteen, his career being developed wholly under the observation of the people of this locality, their esteem, therefore, being based on personal observation and acquaintanceship. His sterling manhood, public spirit and enterprise, have attracted extensive attention, making him favorably known throughout the state,

He was born in Wisconsin in 1863, and came to Carver county, from Winneshiek county, Iowa, in 1881. He found employment with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad at several different points until 1891. During the next seven years he was connected with the Norwood Mercantile Company in partnership with George W. Ocobock and Henry Fabel.

In 1898 Mr. Bradley became connected with the bank, of which he is vice president. This bank was started in 1881, by James Slocum. Later it was made a state bank with a capital of $2,5,000, which has since been reduced to $15,000, and it has been prosperous and popular. Its deposits now amount to $424,000. George Dutoit is president. The bank has a high standing in financial circles, the liberal policy pursued having won unlimited confidence and good will.

Mr. Bradley has taken an earnest interest and a serviceable part in public affairs. For eighteen years consecutively he was township treasurer, now being treasurer of the village. In 1910 he was appointed a member of the State Game and Fish commission, of which he is president or chairman. In January, 1914, he was re-appointed for a second four-year term. He is a Republican, serving at different times on the state central committee and the district congressional committee. He is a Freemason, with membership in the lodge at Young America, and also belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen of America. In 1885, he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Hoeffken, daughter of Frederick Hoeffken, a pioneer who came to Carver county about 1861.

Page 272

James K. Blackketter

James K. Blackketter, of Minneapolis, is a retired business man of that city and for a number of years was a farmer in Carver county. He was born near Columbus, Indiana, October 9, 1845, son of Wesley and Spicy (Harris) Blackketter, the latter a native of Nashville, Tennessee, and a descendant of the old Virginia family of Harris. Wesley Blackketter was born in Fairfax county, West Virginia, and was reared in Kentucky. In 1818, soon after his marriage at Perrvville, Kentucky, the home of the Harris family, he went to Indiana and located on land near Columbus, in what was then wild and uncultivated country. He cleared his land of its heavy timber and spent forty-six years on this farm, and here his family were born and reared. In 1865, past the prime of life, but still possessed of the hearty spirit of the pioneer, he left his Indiana home and came farther west to Forest City, Meeker county, Minnesota, and in the fall of the same year removed to Carver county, where he bought the northeast quarter of section 1, in Hollywood township, with the purchase price of a little less than $9 an acre. This was the largest farm in the township, with good log buildings and about twenty acres of cleared land. Mr. Blackketter again engaged in the laborious task of developing new land, and in a few years had seventy acres under cultivation. He selected a pleasant elevation and there erected a comfortable house of hewed logs, a very fine home, judged by the standards of those days, and a new barn, making one of the most attractive farm homes in the neighborhood. During the six years of his residence in Carver county he acquired large land interests in both Carver and Wright counties, owning nineteen hundred acres at the time of his death. He was a Democrat and was always actively identified with activities of that party. In religious belief he was a zealous member of the Christian or Campbellite church. Having been a generous donor to the building fund of the schoolhouse two miles east of Watertown, he was allowed the use of it for church purposes, and through his efforts meetings were held here for several years, Elder Gale of Minneapolis being one of the ministers who officiated. But there was no permanent organization effected, and after the death of Mr. Blackketter the meetings ceased. His death occurred May 31, 1871, and his wife died four years later. They had ten children: William, who died in Watertown; Spencer, a farmer in Carver county for several years, who died at Weston, Missouri; Elizabeth, the wife of Daniel Babb of Wilmost, South Dakota; Lucinda, who married Thomas Wiggs and died at Lester Prairie, Minnesota; Spicy, the wife of Herod Bradford, whose death occurred in Indiana; Wesley, who died at Howard lake, Minnesota; John, living at Watertown at the time of his death; Thomas J., deceased; Mary P., who was the wife of Thomas Barrett and died at Havre, Montana, and James K. of Minneapolis. Mack Blackketter, the son of Spencer, is a farmer in Watertown township and the sons of William, Ollie and James live on the old Blackketter homestead in Hollywood. Will Bradford, son of Spicy (Blackketter) Bradford, is a resident of Minneapolis. James K. Blackketter was twenty years of age when he came with his father to Carver county, of which he was a resident for fifteen years, prominently identified with all matters that tended toward the welfare and progress of the community and serving in several public offices. His marriage to Samantha A. Doyl, who was born at Canton, Ohio, and thou living in McLeod county, occurred at Waconia, April 9, 1869. Her parents, John and Lucinda Doyl, had come to McLeod county in 1864 from Indiana, locating in Victor township. After his marriage Mr. Blackketter was given a farm of eighty acres by his father. This land was but a short distance from the Blackketter farm, where he continued to make his home until the death of his father in 1871. A part of the old homestead was then added to his eighty acres as his share of the paternal estate, and for the next few years he was busily occupied in the management of his farming interests. In 1880 he removed to Minneapolis, where he now lives in his home at 1943 North Oliver street, the oldest resident of this section of North Minneapolis, which but ten years ago was practically unpopulated. During a long period of business activity he operated a prosperous trade as well contractor, covering a large territory, Which included Hennepin, Wright, Carver, Scott and Meeker, with other counties. For several years he also engaged in the feed business in Minneapolis. In 1913 he retired after thirty-three years of. creditable achievement in the business world. He has always taken the keenest interest in the growth and progress of his home city, and as a member of the Democratic party is actively identified with local political matters. He joined the Masonic lodge in Watertown township, October 16, 1866, and there has continued his membership and is now its oldest living member. A family of thirteen sons were born to Mr. Blackketter and his wife, seven of whom survive and reside in Minneapolis near the home of their parents. Charles P. and Ernest A. Blackketter are engaged in the decorating business, the former at 1001 Nicollet avenue and the latter as foreman with Colson & Co. John A. Blackketter is a resident of Minnesota and Carl E. is in the saloon business. The other three sons, Plainy M., William T. and James H., are employed as painters and decorators.

Page 273

Frank Beiersdorf

Frank Beiersdorf, a farmer of Waconia township, was born in Manister, Michigan, May 2, 1864. His parents, Carl and Maria Beiersdorf, were natives of Pomerania, Germany, and came to the United States in 1863. During the ocean voyage to the new home two of their children sickened and died. They located for a short time in Manister, Michigan, where Carl Beiersdorl found employment in a sawmill. In 1864 he removed with his family to Carver county and for a year lived on rented land and worked for the neighboring farmers. He then purchased the farm on Clearwater lake, which is the present property of his son, Frank Beiersdorf. This was a tract of one hundred and eight acres, with a purchase price of eight hundred dollars, of which he was able to pay but a small share at this time. He began the breaking and cultivating of the land with a team of oxen and built the first home, a log house, on the banks of the lake. In 1879 he erected the present farm residence, choosing a pleasant location which commands an enjoyable view, of Clearwater lake. Thrifty management and industry soon added to the original capital of three hundred dollars with which he reached Minnesota and enabled him to invest in other farm properties. He bought the two farms in Watertown township which are now owned by his sons, Charles and Hermann Beiersdorf. In 1892, having improved his place in Waconia, putting some fifty acres under cultivation, he removed to one of the Watertown farms and after several years here made his residence on his other farm in that township. This continued to be his home until his death, in the spring of 1905, in his seventy-seventh year. He was one of the original members of the Lutheran church at Waconia. His wife survives him and resides in Waconia. Of their family, ten children are now living: Frank; Albert, a hardware merchant in New Germany; Tillie, who married Alex Hohnen of St. Paul; Hermann, a farmer in Watertown township; Augusta, the wife of Henry Schwalbe; Charley, farming in this county; Richard, a resident of Minneapolis; Ida, the wife of August Zabel, and living at Mayer; Otto, and Minnie, the wife of Charles Bergquist, now residing in Minneapolis. Frank Beiersdorf was reared from infancy on the farm to which he has devoted his life and best interests. He received his early education in the local schools and for a few years attended the school in Decatur. For some time he assisted his father in his work and continued this association until 1890. In April of this year he was married to Miss Mollie Thun. She was born in Laketown township in 1870 and is the daughter of Gottlieb and Wilhelmina (Gatz) Thun, who settled in the county in 1863. After his marriage Mr. Beiersdorf began farming independently, buying the old place from his father. Here he has pursued a successful career, engaged in various agricultural enterprises. He has given especial attention to the dairy business and horticulture and has a large apple orchard which has proved a profitable investment. He is stockholder in the co-operative creamery at St. Bonifacius. His farm comprises ninety-two acres and is traversed by the Great Northern railway. Mr. Beiersdorf and his wife have eight children, Mary, Emma, Oscar, William, Fred, Edwin, Dora and Alfred. Mr. Beiersdorf and his family are members of the Lutheran church at Waconia. In his political belief he is an active supporter of the principles of the Republican party.

Page 273

Charles Beiersdorf

Living on his fine farm of 125 acres, which was redeemed from the wilderness by his parents, and exerting important influence in the general progress and improvement Charles Beiersdorf is one of the prosperous and useful citizens, furnishing an impressive illustration of commendable and enduring qualities.

Mr. Beiersdorf was born on his father's old Clearwater lake farm, May 26, 1872, and has since been a resident of the county. When he was about ten years old the family moved to the farm which he now owns, and where, with little exception, he has ever resided. He is a son of Charles and Mary Beiersdorf, the latter of whom is living in Waconia. The father died April 1, 1904, at the age of seventy-four. The first place the parents occupied was on Clearwater lake, some six miles east of Charles' present home, and upon which they located about thirty years ago. Their son Frank is the present owner of this farm, after living two years on another 160-acre farm about one mile west of Charles', which the father also secured when new and partially cleared, erecting the buildings. This is now owned and is the home of another son, Hermann Beiersdorf. The parents were members of the Lutheran church at Waconia. Ten children, all of whom survive, were born in this country, two born in Germany dying during the voyage across the Atlantic.

Charles Beiersdorf greatly improved the farm and buildings, it comparing favorably with any other in the county. He grows wheat extensively and carries on an active dairying business, milking ten to twelve cows. He was married in 1895 to Miss Anna Brandt, daughter of William Brandt, a retired farmer now living at Waconia, who formerly lived on the adjoining farm, so that the children were schoolmates. Their six living children are Louisa, Harry, Emma, Freda, Henrietta and Leona. All are Lutherans, belonging to the church at Waconia.

Page 273

Edward Bachmann

Trained to useful labor at the carpenter's bench in early life and for over thirty years in business as a druggist at Young America, Edward Bachmann has passed a busy and useful life. He was born in Benton township on May 28, 1863, and is a son of Charles W. and Ida (Maekenroote) Bachmann, natives of Saxony, Germany, who came to Carver county in 1858 from Newark, New Jersey, where they had come from the old country three years before.

He was an architect, contractor and builder until the Civil War, when he enlisted in the Fifth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and served to the close of the war. After his return he took up his residence at Young America, in 1866, and there died September 3, 1889. The mother died January 14, 1914. They were the parents of eleven children, two of whom died in Eastern Pennsylvania while the family was on its way to this state. Charles is a contractor and builder at Perham, Minnesota; Laura, who became the wife of A. O. Malmgren, died some years ago; Robert, who was also a carpenter at Perham, died in 1909; Emil, who was formerly associated with his brother Edward in the drug business, is now a contractor for the Great Northern railroad; Ida, who married Frederick Gley, of Young America, died in 1906; and Selma and Emma are now living in St. Paul.

Edward Bachmann was educated in the district schools and learned the trade of carpenter with his father, and for some time was associated with him in business. In 1882 he started the drug business which he is now conducting, his brother Emil being his partner. He also took a course in architectural drawing and for some years continued the contracting business of his father, erecting, in 1891, the public (non-parochial) school building.

On September 1, 1890, Mr. Bachmann was married to Miss Hannah Mutschler, of Perham. They have five children: Freda is a stenographer for the Rush B. Wheeler company, of St. Paul. Laura is a student at the St. Cloud Normal school. She taught two terms in Carver county. Martin was graduated from the high school in 1914 and is now a student of pharmacy. Rieta and Ida. Mr. Bachmann has served several terms as township trustee. Fraternally he is a Freemason, with membership in Humbolt Lodge No. 132, and a member of the Order of Sons of Hermann, serving as president of his lodge three years. He is also president of Pioneer Maennerchoir, which his father organized in 1861, and of which he has himself been a member for thirty-three years.

Page 274

Frank P. Crawford

Ranking among the enterprising and progressive farmers of Carver county, Frank P. Crawford is exemplifying lessons of his youth, and adhering strictly to the line for which he was trained.

He was born October 6, 1857, and is the son of John and Jane (Little) Crawford natives of Maine and New Brunswick, and who came to Minneapolis in the middle fifties. Having worked in the woods in the East, he naturally sought the same employment, spending a few years in the lumber woods and mills of Farnham & Lovejoy, until he obtained possession of land one mile south of the present farm of his son Frank.

He traded half of 160 acres to get money to complete the entry of the rest. As it lay off the road, he sold and bought another 120 acres in the same neighborhood, which he also afterward sold, purchasing the farm which has remained in the family since, now being owned by Frank.

This purchase, one mile east of Watertown, was made near the beginning of the war. His desire was to enlist, but when he offered his services he was rejected for physical disability. His place being now, hard and constant labor was necessary to make it productive, or even yield a living. Adding to the difficulties, his wife died about two years after he settled on it, leaving five small children, another already, having died in infancy. The situation was now very trying, but was relieved in a short time by his marriage to Amanda Elizabeth Hedges. She survived him eight years, being killed by a runaway team in November, 1890. Her two children are. Celia, wife of A. C. Hillman, and Arthur W., both residing in Minneapolis. Four of the first children besides Frank reached maturity. Emma married S. D. Hamilton, and died in Minneapolis. Matilda is the wife of Fred Bonebach, and Belle is Mrs. J. S. Gillespee, and both live in Minneapolis. Wilbur was reared from infancy by an English family named Langdon, and at 14 was taken by them to England, where he grew to manhood supposing that they were his true parents. Early in the nineties he came to North Dakota to obtain land. Inheriting part of the Langdon estate, he returned to England and then learned that he was only an adopted son. Coming back to the neighborhood of his boyhood he ascertained who were his real parents, joyfully renewing the relationship. He is now an extensive firmer near Rugby, North Dakota. John Crawford died November 22, 1882, in his fifty-fifth year.

Frank P. Crawford remained with his father till his death, continuing to manage the farm for his stepmother until her death, as mentioned. He and his half-brother then bought the other interests owning and operating the farm in partnership for twelve years, when he became sole owner. General farming occupies his principal attention, rather emphasizing milk production. The farm embraces 120 acres and is well improved with good buildings, including a fine bank barn, and compares favorably with any in the county. He has taken a helpful interest in public welfare, serving four years as township treasurer and two as supervisor. He is a Republican, but in local matters considers the best selection to office without regard to partisanship. December 2, 1891, married Miss Berths Schultz, a native of Hinter, Pommern, Germany, who, as a young lady, accompanied her sister to the United States. They have six children: Frank William, Allie Bertha, Mabel Grace, Irene Louise, Laura Isabel and Gordon Plummer. Allie is a 1913 graduate of the Watertown high school, and is now a Carver county teacher. Mr. Crawford is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America.

Page 274

JOSEPH B. CONNOLLY.

For twelve years continuously Joseph B. Connolly has most acceptably filled the office of county auditor for Carver county, and there is no sign at present to indicate that he will not continue to fill it as long as he desires, for he has fully met the wishes of the people in the manner in which he has discharged the duties of the office, and is popular and highly esteemed. They find him capable, faithful and honest, and, they wish to continue to have the benefit of his excellent services as long as he is willing to render them.

Mr. Connolly was born in Minneapolis, January 19, 1867, and is a son of Lawrence and Catherine (Cunningham) Connolly, natives of County Armagh, Ireland, who came to the- United States about 1849. They located first in New Jersey, and from there moved to Pock Island, Illinois. In 1856 they followed the tide of emigration still farther westward and, took up their residence at St. Anthony. Some years later they moved across the river to Minneapolis, and in 1868 became residents of Carver county, locating in Hollywood township, where they passed the remainder of their lives. The father improved a farm in that township and filled several local offices. They were the parents of four sons and three daughters, all of whom are living, and all belong to the Catholic church, as their parents did.

Joseph B. Connolly grew to manhood in Carver county and obtained his education in its district schools. He was reared on his father's farm and himself followed farming as a part of his industry, but also taught country schools for fourteen years. In 1899 he was elected a member of the board of county commissioners, being re-elected in 1901. In 1902, however, before the end of his second term as commissioner, he was chosen auditor, and this office he has filled ever since, winning at each subsequent election without difficulty or any danger of defeat, although he has been a lifelong Democrat and the county is normally Republican by a large majority. His strength before the people lies in superior ability for the duties demanded, his faithful attention to them, his sterling and upright manhood, his progressiveness and public spirit and his genial, obliging and companionable nature.

Mr. Connolly was married in 1898 to Miss Ellen Sexton, a native of Carver county and a daughter of Thomas and Ellen (Farrell) Sexton, two of the county's esteemed pioneers. Six children have been born of the union: Ellen, Catherine, Mary, Margaret, Lawrence and Thomas, the. two last being twins. Fraternally Mr. Connolly is connected with the Order of Foresters, the Knights of Columbus and the Modern Woodmen. No citizen of Carver county is more widely known or more highly esteemed.

Page 275

ANDREW L. CORNELL.

The career of this prosperous and successful Watertown township farmer furnishes a fine illustration of what a poor immigrant can accomplish by industry, frugality and thrift in this country of great opportunities. He came to the United States and Carver county, Minnesota, without capital in money, and now he owns an excellent farm in a condition of abundant productiveness and enriched with commodious, comfortable and attractive modern buildings and other improvements of a high standard, located in section 19, Watertown township, two miles south of the village of Watertown.

Mr. Cornell was born in Sweden, October 7, 1846, and came to this country in 1869. He is a cousin of Alfred J. Brown, of Watertown, and came here under the persuasion and through the assistance of that gentleman. His brother Charles followed him to this county in 1870, and in 1871 together they purchased the farm which Andrew now owns, but which they owned and operated in partnership for a few years. During the two years before the purchase of his farm Andrew worked for Mr. Brown.

When Mr. Cornell and his brother bought their land only five acres of it had been cut over, and that was not wholly cleared. They were obliged to go in debt for nearly all of the purchase price, as Andrew had sent his earnings to his native land to bring his father and mother, one sister and his brother Charles to this country. The father and brother arrived in the spring of 1870 and the mother and sister in the following fall. The sister now lives in the state of Washington, and Charles resides near Watertown.

The parents of the brothers helped them clear some, of their land and Andrew worked at his trade of stonemason six seasons in Minneapolis and also for a time at Watertown and other places in this county. He was able to leave the farm and do this work, and it helped him and his brother to clear up the indebtedness on their land. They succeeded in getting about thirty-five acres cleared and broken up, and then Andrew bought his brother's interest in the place. He kept on sending for friends in Sweden, who would come over and work for him to repay the cost of their transportation to this country, and go his progress was rapid. Some eight or ten men came to this neighborhood through his assistance, and they are all now loyal American citizens, proud of their adopted land and its progress and possibilities, and earnestly interested in everything that promotes its welfare and the substantial and enduring good of its people.

Three different dwellings have sheltered Mr. Cornell and his family on this farm. The first one he occupied was later transformed into a barn. The second, which was constructed of logs with frame additions, was destroyed by fire after being used fifteen years, very little of it or its contents being saved, and the third, which is now occupied by the family, was erected in 1898. It is a large house, of attractive design, and stands on an elevation overlooking the surrounding country for a considerable distance. The farm is a fine one, too, with about 100 acres of cleared and cultivated land and some sixty acres yet in timber.

Mr. Cornell's farming is general in its scope, but devoted mainly to raising grain. He also raises live stock in quantities, and has bred some swine of superior strains. As he is a stockholder in the Co-operative Creamery company, he keeps regularly about twelve cows for furnishing milk to the creamery. He has taken no part in the public life of the township or county as an officeholder, but has been callous in the discharge of all the duties of citizenship, and in political faith follows the principles of the Republican party. His religious connection is with the Watertown Swedish Lutheran church, which he has long served as a deacon.

Mr. Cornell was married in 1883 to Miss Christine Carlson, who came to this county in her girlhood with her parents, Charles and Anna Christina (Swenson) Carlson and began to make her own living as soon as she was large enough. Seven children have been born of their union. Carl Oscar Alexander is connected with the Watertown Auto Company garage (operates a garage) at Watertown. He is a graduate of a business college. Selma Wilhelmina is living with her parents. Carlotta Caroline is the wife of Christian Johnson, a dairyman in Minneapolis. Andrew John is also connected with the Watertown Auto Company (his brother's) garage at Watertown. He also attended the Minnesota Business college, and Oscar was assistant station agent at Osakis, Minnesota, until injured by an engine. Reuben Stefanus, deceased. Dorothea Eleonora is living at home, and Martin Luther Herman is a student at Minnesota college. The daughters are musicians and have been well educated in science and art of music, and all the children of the family are active in the work of the Young People's Society of their church.

Page 275

ELIAS CEDERSTROM.

Elias Cederstrom, farmer in Hollywood township, is a native of Sweden, born December 27, 1849. He came to this country when twenty years old and located in Minnesota. He was reared on a farm and chose farming as his life's occupation. In 1876 he became the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of land in Hollywood, for which he paid about eleven dollars an acre. With thrifty management and industry he has developed a fine farm property, increasing the value of his investment from eleven to one hundred and forty dollars an acre. The land was an old homestead claim, belonging to Mr. Chinbloom and at the time of his purchase had been little improved, fifteen acres cleared and log buildings. Mr. Cederstrom burned most of the timber and sold but little cordwood, adding rapidly to his cultivated land. He has reclaimed some land with tile drainage and now has fifty acres under cultivation and some twenty-five acres of meadow land. In 1888 the present comfortable home was built and a few years later he erected a large barn. He also owns a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Watertown township. He has engaged in both grain and stock farming and has met with steady prosperity and success in all his enterprises. He keeps a number of dairy cows and sells milk to the Co-operative Creamery Company. During the many years of his residence in the township he has ever taken an active interest in the public welfare of the community and has given able service in the offices of assessor and supervisor. In 1875 he married Albertina Nelson, a native of Sweden. She was the daughter of A. P. Nelson and had come to Watertown in 1866. Of their family, five children are now living: Arthur, who lives in the state of Washington; Alma, the wife of G, A. Sandquist, of Hollywood township; Arvid, living on his father's farm in Watertown township, and Henry and Herbert, who are at home with their parents. Mr. Cederstrom is a member and deacon in the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown.

Page 276

MICHAEL P. CAMPBELL.

Michael P. Campbell, a prominent citizen and farmer of if Hollywood township, is a native of Ireland, born October 24, 1852, and came to Minnesota with his father in his early childhood. The latter, Patrick Campbell, on coming to this country, had located first in New Jersey with his father, Felix Campbell, and brothers, and lived there until 1858, when the family came to Carver county. In April, 1865, on the day which lives in the memory of the nation as the date of the assassination of President Lincoln, Patrick Campbell settled on a farm in the western part of Hollywood, near the farms of his brothers, Thomas and John. They were the first settlers in this vicinity and were notably identified with its early development. A lake near here has always been known as Campbell Lake. Another brother, Michael, bought a farm adjoining Patrick's in 1860. John Campbell left his place Some years before his death, but Thomas continued to live on his homestead and died there October 8, 1881. Patrick Campbell owned two hundred acres in his place, fifty of which he had cleared and cultivated. He died August 16, 1885. He married Margaret Woods, who was of English descent, and they had three children, Michael, John and Henry. Her death occurred in New Jersey. In 1870 he was married to Bridget Sexton, who was an early resident of Hollywood township. Her nephew, Thomas Sexton, is a well-known farmer of that place. One daughter was born to this union, Rose Campbell, who married Laurence Litfen of Winsted, Minnesota. Michael Campbell left the home farm when he was fourteen years old, ran away and embarked on an independent career with a capital of five cents. He spent the next seven years in various employment, traveling about and working in Montana and other places. As a lad, he was determined to secure an education and managed to attend school despite many difficulties which opposed his ambition. During the winter months he would work for his board and would often continence the day's work at three o'clock in the morning by driving six miles for a load of wood and returning with it before time for the school to convene. When he was twenty-one years of age he returned to Carver county and for three years worked for an uncle, Peter Campbell, a merchant in Watertown, employed in the store and in driving when produce had to be hauled to Minneapolis and mercantile stock back to Watertown. After leaving here he spent several years on a truck farm near Minneapolis. In 1879 he moved on the eighty acres of land in Hollywood which he owned and since that time has devoted his attention to the business of farming. This land had been part of his father's farm and he later purchased another eighty acres from the old place. The first tract was timberland, and but ton acres had been cleared when he took possession, and all of the farm is now under cultivation. Mr. Campbell has won his way to successful accomplishment in all his enterprises with characteristic perseverance and faithful industry. He now owns two hundred and forty acres of fine farm land and has given eighty acres to his son, Paul Campbell. His present home, an attractive brick residence, was built about twenty years ago. He has engaged extensively in stock raising and for some time was the largest milk producer in the county, keeping a herd of twenty-four cows. His farm is equipped with large, modern barn, which has stabling capacity for one hundred head of stock. Mr. Campbell was married in 1879 to Mary Neaton, a native of Indiana. She came to Carver county in her childhood with her parents, Dennis and Mary (Kennedy) Neaton. They were among the first settlers and lived on the hill two miles west of Watertown, which is now the home of their grandson, Michael Neaton. Four children were born to Mr. Campbell and his wife: Dennis, who was a hardware merchant at Winsted, Minnesota; Michael; John, identified with the National Furniture Company of St. Paul as salesman and stockholder; Paul, a farmer in Hollywood, and Martin, in the medical supply business. Michael is on the farm with his father. Mr. Campbell has living with him a step-daughter, Mary, whose husband, James Carr, is dead, her three children, Thomas, James and Mary Carr, and the three children of his son, Dennis Campbell, Dennis, Clara and Paul. Mr. Campbell is a Democrat and has always been actively interested in the affairs of the county. He has served as township supervisor and for twenty-nine years has been a member of the school board, of which he is now treasurer. He is a member of the Catholic church at Winsted, and in the early days, when his father was among those who were instrumental in establishing the church there, helped haul the logo for the first building.

Page 276

GEORGE CAMPBELL.

George Campbell, retired in Waterton, was one of the first settlers of Hollywood township and was prominently identified with its growth and development during the many years of his residence there. He was born in County Louth, Ireland, April 1, 1842; son of Felix and Margaret (Tranor) Campbell. The former was a native of County Monaghan and his wife was born near Dublin. Two of their sons, Thomas and Michael Campbell, came to the United States and in 1852 were joined by the rest of the family. They located first in New Jersey, gradually moving westward, living subsequently in Illinois and Wisconsin, the father and sons finding employment in the construction of the new railroads. In the spring of 1857 Felix Campbell and four of his sons, Thomas, Michael, John and Peter, came to Carver county and Michael took land in Watertown township. Later George Campbell and his brother Patrick located in Hollywood township. This family of sturdy pioneers have been an important factor in the history and development of this section of the county from its earliest days to the present. The homestead of Michael Campbell is now owned by his son, John H. Campbell. Michael P. Campbell, son of Patrick, is a farmer in Hollywood. It was in September, 1858, that George Campbell, with his mother, followed the others to the new home in Minnesota and his father secured a preemption and a homestead claim, the preemption claim later becoming the farm of George Campbell and the present home of his son, Edward. George Campbell worked with his father until he was twenty-eight years of age when he began to farm independently on the preemption land. He cleared his land of timber and put sixty acres under cultivation, erected now buildings and built up one of the fine farm properties of the district. His untiring efforts and thrifty management met with constant prosperity and he was able from time to time to add to his estate until he owned a half section of land. From this he has given eighty acre farms to three sons. He was married February 27, 1870, to Rosa Boyle, who was sixteen years of age at the time of her marriage. She was born in Pennsylvania, the daughter of Edward and Ann (Patten) Boyle, who settled in Carver county in 1856. The latter with her son, John Boyle, is living on the Boyle homestead, part of which is now occupied by the school house at Hollywood. Eleven children were born to Mr. Campbell and his wife and his family has ever been his first interest, receiving every encouragement and assistance from him in the shaping of their several careers. Six of his children are residents of Carver county; Joseph and Edward, both farmers in Hollywood township; Anna, who taught in the county schools for a number of years and married Claud Tees, editor of the Carver County News at Watertown; Nellie, the wife of Martin Gothmann, who is a merchant in Hollywood and clerk of the township; Bridget, the wife of Maurice Rasmusson, manager of the creamerv at Hollywood, and Alice, who is a graduate of the high school at Watertown where she lives with her parents. Another son, George P. Campbell is the owner of a farm in Hollywood but lives at Ray, North Dakota, which is also the home of Peter, Rosa and Margaret. Peter Campbell was a teacher for six years in Carver county, later graduating from the law department of the University of Minnesota and is now engaged in the practice of his profession at Ray. Rosa, after 6 years service as clerk in general stores, married Frank Crawley, and Margaret, since the death of her husband, Charley Madden, who died from injuries while mail clerk on the Great Northern R.R., has lived on her homestead in Dakota; Mary, the eldest in the family, is the wife of Pat Craven of Winsted, Minnesota. In 1914, Mr. Campbell retired after forty-four years of successful achievement as a farmer and a long career as a useful and active citizen and has since made his home in Watertown. He has served in a number of local offices; as supervisor, treasurer of the township and as a member of the school board, was treasurer of that body, ably discharging his duties as a public official

Page 277

FREDERICK E. DU TOIT.

Frederick E. Du Toit, proprietor and publisher of the Weekly Valley Herald, of Chaska, and at the present time (1915) mayor of that city, was born at Harrisville, Lewis county, New York, September 24, 1845, the son of Frederick C. and Eliza (Gresset) Du Toit, the former a native of Switzerland and the latter of France. They were married in France and came to the United States in 1841. In 1855 they became residents of Chaska, which at that time was only a straggling hamlet. The father was a merchant in the Old Country, and after locating at Chaska he was employed for a time in the store of the Chaska Townsite company.

He found his duties in the service of the company agreeable and he rendered his employers the best return he could for their confidence by fidelity in the performance of his duties in the store to the full measure of his capacity. But the needs of the community for men of superior attainments in the public service were great and the supply for the demand was small. Mr. Du Toit was therefore practically drafted into the ranks of official life as deputy clerk of the court and deputy register of deeds. He was afterward elected clerk of the court and still later register of deeds, which latter office he held at his death in 1863, when he was about fifty years of age. The mother died in 1874. Three of their sons, Frederick B., George A. and Alois, and three of their daughters, Emma, Constance and Lucy, grew to maturity. George A. is president of the Carver County State Bank at Chaska. Alois was associated with his brother Frederick in the publication of the Weekly Valley Herald until his death at the age of thirty-five. Mrs. Emma Taylor, the present postmistress of Chaska, is the only one of the daughters who is living. Constance was the second and Lucy was the first wife of W. C. Odell. Both have been dead a number of years.

Frederick E. Du Toit obtained a grammar school education and early in life began to learn the trade of printer, serving his apprenticeship on the Belle Plaine Enquirer. On September 26, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Fourth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, under Captain, afterward Judge, Baxter, and was mustered out of the service July 9, 1865, at Louisville, Kentucky. In October, 1864, he was promoted second lieutenant of the First Minnesota Heavy Artillery at its organization at Fort Snelling. He had previously been sergeant of the Fourth Minnesota Regiment, under Col. John B. Sanborn, and had been detailed to come North as a drill master and to send recruits South.

In 1866 Mr. Du Toit bought the Weekly Valley Herald, of Chaska, of C. A. Warner & Company, and from then until now he has been its owner and editor. With one exception he is the oldest editor in Minnesota who is still working as such at the head of a newspaper.

In 1867 Mr. Du Toit helped to organize. the Minnesota Editorial Association, which began its activity in St. Paul that year. Only four of the men who helped to start it are now living, Mr. Du Toit, H. A. Castle, Irving Todd and E. H. Cornwell. The Weekly Valley Herald is an independent Democratic paper, and its editor has taken an active part in the politics of Carver county as a Democrat, but always with the desire and the effort to aid in keeping his party organization true to the loftiest ideals of public duty. He was elected township clerk in 1868 and afterward county commissioner. In 1872 he was county superintendent of schools and the same year was elected a member of the state house of representatives. While in that body he introduced a bill providing for biennial sessions of the legislature.

In 1874 Mr. Du Toit was elected sheriff of Carver county, and for twenty-one years thereafter he was continued in the public service of the county as the incumbent of that office, and in 1898 he was elected a member of the state Senate, and reelected in 1902 and again in 1906, serving three full terms, twelve years in all. At the time of this writing (1915) he is mayor of Chaska and president of its Commercial club. His long record of official life, instead of weakening his hold on the confidence and regard of the people, has only intensified it and endeared him to them. He is probably the best known man in Carver county, and is certainly one of those most highly and most deservedly esteemed.

Mr. Du Toit was married, in 1882 to Miss Anna M. Kunz, a Carver county lady. They have had three children, of whom Frederick E., Jr., and Gertrude are living and George died in childhood. Throughout his long residence of sixty years in this county this veteran editor has been earnestly and intelligently interested in its welfare And that of its residents, and he has made every effort to promote their enduring good and wholesome progress that his opportunities have allowed. No undertaking for the advancement of the county has gone with out his active and effective support, and no worthy agency at work among its people for their improvement or the increase of their comfort and happiness has ever lacked his aid. He has been faithful to every trust and obedient to every call to duty, and the record of his life is one of unselfish and discriminating usefulness.

Page 278

MICHAEL DIETHELM.

Michael Diethelm, a prosperous farmer of Laketown township, Carver county, was born December 21, 1850, a son of Charles Diethelm, deceased, the worthy pioneer whose sketch appears in this volume. He resides on a portion of the old homestead, which has been his home for sixty years. He received eighty acres from his father in 1876 and then for a while managed the entire farm, while his father was in Big Stone county. On his farm he erected good buildings, making it one of the beat farms in the county. His interest in dairying led to his becoming one of the promoters of the creamery in 1897, a co-operativ6 institution with buildings erected at a cost of $2,823.85, with fifty-eight original members and the membership, now largely increased. Michael Diethelm was the first president of the association. In 1913 over $60,000 were distributed to producers. The first butter sold brought thirteen cents a pound and it was then that the earnest efforts of Mr. Diethelm were required to maintain the association. Since thou the price of the product has steadily increased. Mr. Diethelm himself keeps twelve or thirteen cows. In 1897 Mr. Diethelm, in association with his father, built the first store in Victoria and established a mercantile business in which be was quite successful. This he sold in 1904 and since then he has devoted himself to the farm, and those business and social relations that belong to the energetic and prosperous citizen. He is one of the stockholders of the Victoria State Bank of which his son, J. A. Diethalm, is the cashier. He is in politics a Democrat. For eighteen years he was a member of the board of supervisors and he is now chairman of the township board. Mr. Diethelm was married at the age of twenty-three years to Mary Dohmen, a native of Germany, and daughter of the late William Dohmen, who was a soldier in the Civil War. Thirteen children have been born to them: Frank C., a farmer near Victoria; John A., cashier of the Victoria State Bank; Theresa, wife of A. R. Thompson of Kingfisher, Oklahoma; Joseph, who died from accident at seventeen years; Elizabeth, wife of M. F. Schweich, of North Dakota; Frances, wife of C. J. Schweich of Hampton, Minnesota; Mary, wife of Matt Koehnen, of near Chaska; Catherine, teacher in Saskatchewan, now at home; Anthony and William, at home; Julia, lately a teacher in Saskatchewan, now at home; Esther, at home, and Raymond, a student at Saint Joseph college, Illinois. Five of the daughters have been well-known as teachers.

Page 278

CHARLES DIETHELM.

Charles Diethelm, one of the pioneers of Minnesota and one of the founders of Victoria, was born at Galgane in Canton Schwyz, Switzerland, and died at his home in Carver county March 20, 1901, at the age of seventy-nine years. His wife, who was Elizabeth Fessler of Alpthal in the same canton, born November 11, 1820, is yet living. Charles Diethelm and his wife read of the attractiveness of Minnesota in a book of Von Humboldt's, while they were yet in Switzerland. December 8, 1853, they left Switzerland for the New World. Sailing from Havre, they reached New Orleans after a voyage of thirty days. Then followed a journey of two months by boat up the Mississippi to Dubuque, where they were obliged to stop and bury ten or twelve passengers who had died of the Cholera. At Dubuque Charles Diethelm stopped a while, his money having given out, but his brother, Michael, went on to Saint Paul. In the fall of the same year Charles, with a little capital he had earned and two cows, joined his brother, who had settled on the site of the present Saint Victoria Church, and built him a log house. Then Charles, with his wife and two children, began their experience in opening up a new country. They secured a claim of 120 acres adjoining the brother, and cut, down timber to build a log cabin. In 1876 he went to Big Stone county and. preempted land, but about six years later he sold this and in 1865 bought forty acres of his brother Michael, and in 1872 he acquired eighty more from his brother, enlarging his farm to 240 acres. The brother, Michael, removed to Shakopee and later to Chaska, where he died about 1895. In 1897 Charles Diethelm and his son, Michael built the first store at Victoria, and for some time they were in business as partners. About this time also, be built him a home in Victoria, leaving the farm, which he had turned over to his children. Some seventy-five or eighty acres of this farm he had cleared. Charles Diethelm and his brother were devoted Catholics. The first services of the church, in 1855, were held at their homes, and they donated ten acres for parochial purposes. The church was organized in 1856 and the first building, a log house, was erected in the spring of 1857.. Among the men who with their families united in this pioneer organization were John Meyer, Martin Schmidt, Frank Kessler, Michael Kessler, Henry Kessler, Engelbert Schneider, John Schmieg, Paul Mattly, Peter Gregory, Leonard Celestine, who also donated twenty acres to the church, John Wey, Nicholas Wey, Hubert Wey, Leonhard Breher. In 1871 the log church was replaced by one of brick. Also a parochial school has been built, to be used as a supplementary to the public school, and the building and grounds donated to the school district. The Franciscan Fathers, from Chaska, have been in charge since 1877.

Charles Diethelm's children were Michael, whose sketch appears in this work; Theresa, wife of Arnold Notermann, of Victoria, Katie, wife of Joseph Steiner of San Francisco, California; Lizzie, wife of Anton Ruegg, of San Francisco, California; Frances, wife of Patrick Ryan of Big Stone county; Mary, wife of George Zanger of Minneapolis, and Joseph, who lives on the old homestead.

Page 279

J. A. DIETHELM.

J. A. Diethelm, cashier of the Victoria State Bank, is a native of the county, a son of Michael Diethelm, whose sketch also appears in this work. J. A. Diethelm was born on the old farm at Victoria, May 24, 1877. It is as a businessman that his career is notable, and in this department of activity he has achieved high success, His first venture was as a partner in the general merchandise house of Diethelm & Notermann, at Victoria. This business was established in 1897 and disposed of in 1905. After that he became associated with the Luse Land & Development Company, at Saint Paul, dealing in Canadian land and promoting the development of the Northwest. Mr. Diethelm traveled in the central states for this company and for four years was state manager for Indiana, promoting emigration and organizing colonies. During this period he had no small part in the development of the Canadian northwest. He himself made considerable investments in Saskatchewan and yet retains his interests there. He now gives all his time to the Victoria State Bank, the widely known and substantial financial institution of which he is the cashier. This bank was founded in 1911, the date of organization being July 13, and began business on February 13, 1912, in its own commodious building, erected upon a very advantageous site, especially for this purpose. Charles Klein has been the president of this bank since the organization; Michael Notermann vice-president, and there are twenty-eight stockholders, of whom twenty-five are citizens of Victoria. The capital stock is $10,000, surplus, $2,000, deposits $10,000. Mr. Diethelm was also actively instrumental in the organization of the co-operative association of farmers about Victoria. He felt that such high valued land should produce more than wheat and the ordinary crops and lie gave to the enterprise his earnest and effective support. Mr. Diethelm is a member of the Catholic church. He was married in 1903 to Miss Mary Hester of Saint Paul.

Page 279

HENRY R. DIESSNER, M. D.

Dr. Henry R. Diessner, of Waconia, has been a resident of that town since 1874 and actively engaged in the practice of medicine since 1883, when he succeeded to the practice of his father, who was also a physician and had practiced his profession in this country fifteen years and at Waconia nine previous to his retirement. He was Dr. C. A. F. Diessner, and the mother was Henrietta Arndt before her marriage. They were natives of Hanover, Germany, and lived in that province until 1868, when they came to the United States and located at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. There the father practiced medicine two years, then moved to Richfield, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1874, when he removed to Waconia. He died about 1893 and the mother two years later.

Both were engaged in medical work. He was wholly devoted to his profession and had a very large and active practice. She was a professional midwife, a graduate of a German institution, and she also had a large and successful practice, being widely known for her skill and much preferred for service in her branch of the medical science. In her professional work she attended several thousand cases, attaining an enviable reputation for superior ability in obstetrics. They were devoted members of the Lutheran church taking an active part in the work of the congregation. Dr. Henry R. Diessner was born in Hanover, November 4, 1853, and came with his parents to the United States in 1868. The family consisted of himself; his brother, C. T. H. Diessner, who was formerly a Lutheran teacher in Carver county and is now a resident of Chicago, and their sister Hattie, who died in Wisconsin. Henry R. obtained a high school education and in 1879 became a student in the Hahnemann Medical College of Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1883. He at once located at Waconia, assuming the extensive practice of his father. He has since been actively devoted to his professional work, and thus the residents of Waconia and the surrounding country have all the benefit of medical attention from representatives of the same family for a continuous period of forty years without a break. In that period there have been several epidemics in this county, but having been promptly and effectively dealt with did not prove to be specially serious.

Dr. Henry R. Diessner has served as coroner of the county twice. In 1910 he was elected representative in the legislature from the Twenty-fifth district, which consisted of Carver county, and served on the committees on pure food, roads and bridges, drainage, printing, state hospitals, banks and banking, corporations and sleeping car and private car lines. He was not a candidate for re-election in 1912, but has maintained an interest in public affairs and his loyalty to the Republican Party. He has served as chairman and as treasurer of the county central committee of the party, being chairman at the time of the election of President Roosevelt and a staunch supporter of his candidacy.

In professional circles the doctor is connected with the American Institute of Homeopathy and for twenty years has been an honorary member of the Minnesota State Institute. He owns a farm of 100 acres, which includes the peninsula in Clearwater lake. He was one of the organizers and the first president of the Waconia fair, is vice president of the Waconia State Bank and was postmaster of Waronia for ten years prior to 1904. In 1885 he was married at Waconia to Miss Emnia C. Kuntz, daughter of Henry and Helen Kuntz, late of Watertown township, of whom further mention is found elsewhere in this volume. She and husband are the parents of three sons: Henry D., a physician in active practice at Chaska; Charles O., a druggist in Waconia, and William D., who is a student of dentistry.

Page 280

HENRY D. DIESSNER, M. D.

This active, progressive and highly esteemed physician of Chaska is a son of Dr. Henry E. Diessner of Waconia, and represents the third generation in direct and successive descent of the same family in the medical profession in Carver county. A sketch of the doctor's parents will be found in this work. He was born in Waconia January 8, 1886, obtained his early education in the public schools and for three years attended the University of Minnesota.

The doctor's professional training was obtained at the Hahnemann Medical College in Philadelphia, from which he was graduated with the degree of M. D. in 1909. He was then engaged in hospital work in Fergus Falls and at the City hospital in Minneapolis until he began the private practice in Chaska in which he has ever since been occupied. He has a steadily increasing practice and is widely known and generally highly esteemed throughout the county, for his professional knowledge and skill are extensive and he is a wide awake, enterprising and progressive citizen, warmly interested in and zealous in promoting the welfare of his county.

Dr. Diessner was married January 4, 1910, to Miss Bertha Newkirk, of Minneapolis. They have two children, Sylvia and Viola. The doctor is a member of the Minnesota State Homeopathic Society and the Masonic order, holding membership in the latter in the Lodge in Chaska. He is also the coroner of Carver county, and is rendering valuable service.

Page 280

THOMAS FRANCIS DEVINE.

The subject of this memoir bad an interesting history. He came with his young wife from a foreign land at the age of twenty-three, with high hopes of success and advancement, and with the necessary force of character and mental equipment. He encountered great hardships, enduring them cheerfully and in the full measure of opportunity overcame difficulties.

Thomas Francis Devine was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, in 1829, and at twenty was married there to Miss Mary Kagan. In 1852, they came to the United States residing at South Dedham, Massachusetts, for ten years. In 1862 they tame to Minnesota, and took up a homestead of eighty acres in Watertown township, two miles and a half east of the village of Watertown where his family still reside. They were the first settlers on the Devine road, which he opened to a highway.

In the midst of arduous labors, although health was failing, he, late in 1864, was conscripted into the army. He served in several important expeditions, and was returned a hopeless invalid to Fort Snelling, where he died July 22, 1865. He was buried at Watertown, but a memorial slab at Fort Snelling commemorates his record.

He and wife were the parents of five children, John, Thomas, Michael W, Martin and Catherine, who remained with the. mother on the farm until September 24, 1874. On that fateful day the engine of Peter Burke's threshing outfit exploded and killed five persons, one of whom was Catherine, the only daughter of the Devine household, then aged sixteen.

Other lives sacrificed were: Dr. S. D. Grant, of Watertown; Margaret Bernick, sister of Mrs. Devine, Perry Burke and Mrs. A. Cunningham. Perry Burke died a short time after the accident and Mrs. Cunningham fourteen days later. One of Martin Devine's shoulders was broken and three other persons less seriously injured. John Devine was drowned in the Crow river in 1882, and Thomas was killed by a kick of a horse about 1894. Martin went West some years ago and has not since been heard from. The mother died March 27, 1900, after a residence of thirty-eight years on the farm over which so heavy a pall of sorrow was drawn.

Michael W. Devine, who succeeded to ownership of the home, was born August 19, 1854, at South Dedham, Massachusetts, and died at the homestead July 26, 1913. He began his education in the common school, later attending a graded school at Delano. He was of a studious and thoughtful nature, having attainments in scholarship and general information of a superior quality. An old boyhood companion says: "He was one of the most genial and kind-hearted men who ever lived in Carver county, always spreading sunshine, never allowing a needy person to go empty-handed from his door and ever ready to divide his last dollar with a distressed friend." He passed the whole of life on the old homestead except twelve years, during which he was engaged in the commission business with a partner it the old City Market at Minneapolis. He soon was convinced of unfitness for commercial life, and he soon got away from it returning to the farm, where his death came from malignant cancer of the stomach.

He was married November 20, 1888, to Miss Mary Schmelz, of Brown county. Five children were born who with their mother remained on the old homestead. They are John, Louis, Thomas, Edward and Alton, Louis conducting the farming operations for his mother. All are identified with the Catholic church at Watertown, being loyal in devotion and faithful in efforts to promote its welfare as also that of the community in general.

Page 280

AUGUST DOMRES.

The interesting subject of this brief memoir was fourteen years of age when he became a. resident of Carver County and twenty-four when he located on the farm in Watertown township which he still owns and on which he lived until recently.. The farm is in the southwest quarter of section 32 and borders on the boundary line between Watertown and Waconia townships. It comprises 120 acres and about one-half of the land is cleared and in cultivation. Mr. Domres has improved it with a good dwelling house, a commodious barn and other necessary structures, and everything about the place indicates that it has long been the home of a progressive and successful farmer.

Mr. Domres was born in West Prussia, Germany, March 8, 1859, and in 1873 came to the United States and Carver county, Minnesota, with his parents, Christian and Amalia Domres. The family located on the farm on Goose lake on which the father still lives, and on which the mother died in 1900. This farm is in Waconia township, and the well applied industry of the family and good management of the father have made it one of the desirable ones in that township. In this family there were eleven children, but two died in Germany and one in America in early years. Seven of them are now living (1914), one son, Julius, having died at Watertown in 1913 leaving 8 children and wife. Carl is living on the home farm and Gustav and August have their homes in Watertown township.

August Domres remained at home until his marriage on February 13, 1883, to Miss Bertha Kowalkie, a daughter of August and Caroline Kowalkie, who settled on the farm they still own fifty-two years ago, or about 1862. The father cleared his land and made a productive farm of it. He now lives at the village of Mayer, and has retired from active, work. His daughter Bertha was about one year old when he and his wife brought her to Minnesota. She grow to womanhood on her father's farm, and in August after her marriage to Mr. Domres they took up their residence on his Watertown township farm, about thirty acres of which were then cleared and in a productive condition. But the present highly improved and richly fruitful state of the place is the result of their steady and systematic industry.

Mr. Domres has been very successful in his farming operations, which have been general in scope and judiciously conducted. He formerly owned another farm, which is in Waconia township, and which he gave to his son Herman a few years ago. He has passed all his years on his own farm since he first located on it, and has made it comfortable to its occupants as a home. Its development and improvement has been his chief concern, and to this he has devoted nearly all his time and energy. In politics he is independent and in religious faith a Lutheran, holding membership in the church of that denomination at Mayer, while his father belongs to the, Lutheran church at Waconia. Mr. and Mrs. August Domres have eight children. Amalie is the wife of Gustav Thun, of Waconia. Herman lives on the farm adjoining his father's. Lena is the wife of Edward Molnau, of Laketown township, and Henry, Lydia, Gustav, Elsie and Minnie are still members of the parental family circle and assisting their parents in the management of the farm and the affairs of the household.

Page 281

FREDERICK DAMMANN.

No class of immigrants to this country has contributed more substantially to its development and improvement than the German, and none has exemplified in a more sturdy and sterling manner the best traits of American citizenship. Two generations of the Dammann family have been potent factors in the advancement of Carver county along lines of material and fruitful progress, all their representatives being held in high esteem for genuine work.

Frederick Dammann, one of the substantial farmers of Young America township, near the village of Hamburg, is one of the most estimable representatives of the family. He was born in Carver county, in 1863, on October 14, and is a son of Frederick and Anna (Windman) Dammann, the former a native of Hanover, Germany, and the latter of St. Louis, Missouri. The father came to the United States a young man. He lived for some years in St. Louis, Missouri where he was married, and in 1857, brought his wife to Carver county, where they obtained the farm now owned and occupied by their son Frederick.

The father preempted his first 160 acres and later bought an additional tract of 153 acres, all of both tracts being now owned by Frederick. He has two brothers and two sisters living in Minnesota. Henry and William are farmers in McLeod county. The father died in the winter of 1907 and the mother when Frederick was but six years old. . They were members of the Lutheran church at Hamburg, to which Frederick also belongs. He remained at home until his father's death, then succeeded to the ownership of the farm, to which he has given close and constant attention, allowing no temptation, political or otherwise, to allure him from it. General farming operations and the raising of cattle for creamery and butter purposes have wholly occupied him, prosperity being attained through constancy of purpose and good business management. His farm is well improved and skillfully cultivated, and his herd of cattle is large and select. In 1891 he married Miss Sophia Heuer. They have nine children, Otto, Anna, Arthur, Tillie, Frederick, Edward, Herbert, Martha and George.

He has two sisters, both living, Bertha, now Mrs. Christ Panning, residing on a firm in Sibley county near the Carver county line. Martha, now Mrs. Herman Kohls, residing in Plato, McLeod county.

Page 281

J. P. DAHLIN.

After many years of useful and productive labor in several different lines of endeavor, J. P. Dahlin, of the village of Watertown, has recently given up all active regular labor and is living retired and at his ease, except that he is superintending the erection of a new dwelling house in Watertown, in which he contemplates passing the remainder of his life. He was born in Sweden June 8, 1858, and came to the United States in 1880, locating in Wisconsin. A year later he first came to Minnesota and took up his residence in St. Paul, where he was employed with the wholesale house of McKibbin & Company eight years.

Since then Mr. Dahlin has spent three years farming in Wisconsin, and nine years farming in Maple Plain, Hennepin county, Minnesota, has also passed a number of years in Minneapolis engaged in various occupations. In 1914 he moved to Watertown, having decided to relinquish all active pursuits. He was married in 1892, in Minneapolis, to Miss Augusta W. Swanson, a daughter of the late Charles and Caroline M. (Miller) Swanson, long residents of Watertown.

Mr. and Mrs. Dahlin are members of the Swedish Lutheran church and actively interested in all its work for the improvement of the community in which it is located. They are also attentive to the claims upon the public of all other good agencies working for advancement, and encourage the off orts of all with practical aid and support according to their opportunities and the character and importance of the work such agencies have in hand. They have no children of their own, and their interest is earnest and helpful in behalf of the needs of the public around them. The now home they are building will be an attractive one and a welcome evidence of the spirit of progress that is so wide-awake and fruitful in Watertown.

Page 281

JOHN ENGHOLM.

The late John Engholm, one of the progressive farmers of Watertown township, was born in Sweden February 24, 1846, and came to this country and Carver county, Minnesota, in 1863, when he was seventeen years old, with his parents, Anders and Kate Engholm. On their arrival in this township they located at once on the farm on which John's widow and children now live. it was a farm of 107 acres at that time, but only seven acres, of the tract were cleared, and the dwelling was a small log house. The farm lies on the northern shore of Swede Lake, and during his lifetime and occupancy of it John Engholm added sixty-five acres to its extent, making it a tract of one hundred and seventy-two acres at the present time.

The parents passed the rest of their lives on this farm and converted it from its wild condition into one of the best and most valuable country homes in the township. The father, who was born in 1813, died here in 1888, aged seventy-five. The mother survived him twenty years, dying March 28, 1908, aged ninety-three, her life having begun January 23, 1815. Her death occurred but a little over four months before that of her son John, who died July 4, 1908. For some years before his death she lived on another part of the farm, but during the last twenty of her life she was a member of his family. She was remarkably well preserved in her advanced old age, never using spectacles, and always keeping herself well informed. From the time her arrival in Carver county she belonged to the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown and was one of its most regular attendants as long as she was able to get about freely and without discomfort.

Andrew Engholm, John's only brother, studied for the ministry. He came to Carver county six years before his parents, and at the beginning of the Civil war enlisted in the Union army. Before the end of the war he died in the service, of fever, which attacked him and carried him off at the age of twenty-seven. There were five daughters in the family. Anna is the wife of Peter Knudson, and lives in Beltrami county. Christina is the wife of John Backman, and has her home in Douglas county. Mary became the wife of Isaac Oberg, and died in Douglas county in 1913. Kate married August Sahlmark, and lives in Canada, and Martha died in St. Paul in 1888, the year of her father's death.

Before his death John Engholm planned now buildings for his farm, but only succeeded in getting a granary erected. One year after his death the family built a fine large barn on the plan suggested by hint, and in 1912 the present dwelling house on the farm was erected. John took charge of the farm when he reached the age of twenty-one and continued to cultivate it for six years. He then passed two years in Wisconsin, and on his return to this county bought the place of his father. He cleared all the land he desired to have cleared and put it into a fine state of cultivation, making it one of the best farms in the township. Nearly all the woodwork in the house and barn was made from timber cut on the farm.

Mr. Engholm's health was delicate for some years before his death, but notwithstanding this his end came unexpectedly. He was an active member of the Swedish Lutheran church, serving it as a deacon for a number of years, a quiet, unobtrusive man, an excellent citizen and a great lover of his home. Four children were born to him. Anna, Andrew and Victor are living with their mother. Emma, the second daughter, died at the age of nineteen. All of the children are zealous workers in the Young People's Society of the church.

Page 282

HENRY EIDEN

Henry Eiden, one of the prosperous farmers of Dahlgren township was born in that township and the whole of life has been passed in contributing to its development and improvement. His life began May 1, 1859, being the sixth of the eight children of Nicholas and Katherine (Weiss) Eiden, natives of Prussia, where they were reared, educated and married. They came to America in 1855 and soon afterward located in Dahlgren township, where they passed their remaining years. The father died November 22, 1877, at the age of sixty-two, and the mother October 24, 1892, aged seventy-two.

Henry Eiden owns 296 acres of excellent land, all under cultivation and which has been brought to a high state of development by skillful and progressive methods. It is improved with good buildings, and is one of the county's desirable rural homes. Mr. Eiden has also taken a helpful interest in public affairs, and has served the township as supervisor and chairman of the board, and also as township assessor for a number of years. In addition he has long been treasurer of the Carver county Co-operative Creamery, and aided materially in building that institution up to its present state of prosperity and usefulness.

Mr. Eiden adheres to the Democratic party, being locally influential in its councils. He was married in Benton township, November 24, 1886, to Miss Anna Scheppers, who was barn in Chanhassen township June 6, 1865, and is a daughter of Joseph and Philomena (Dols) Scheppers, natives of Holland.

Mr. and Mrs. Eiden have ten children, Joseph N., Philomena, Frederick, Henry H., Leonard J., Rosa, Katie, John, Lizzie and James. All the members of the family belong to the Guardian Angel Catholic church at Chaska.

Page 282

WILLIAM H. EFFERTZ.

"Shall I not take mine ease in mine inn?" Asked Falstaff in one of his periods of greatest need, and his question voices the universal longing for and appreciation of a good, homelike, comfortable hostelry among civilized men. William H. Effertz, proprietor of the Effertz hotel at Norwood, keeps such a hosterly and is widely esteemed as an admirable boniface, for his hotel is extensively patronized, he taking charge of it as successor to his brother Christian, its successful and popular manager for 12 years. The hotel was opened by Peter Effertz in 1873, and it has been conducted by some member of the family until the present time.

William H. Effertz was born at Norwood August 19, 1872. He obtained his education at the school in the village and in early life worked as a welder for his uncle, Frank Chapman, an old resident of Norwood. He also passed some years as a clerk in the store of Nugent Brothers, wrought as a carpenter at his trade and followed building and contracting for six years. For another period he was engaged in the lumber trade. He has been a member of the village council and has taken part in the public affairs of the community in other ways. He has touched life at many angles, therefore, and his experience, so long extended and so varied in character, has made him a well informed and serviceable man and citizen.

On August 19, 1895, Mr. Effertz was married to Miss Caroline Hermann, a daughter of Michael Hermann, of Norwood, who formerly owned a farm five and a half miles southeast of the village. Nine children have been born to this union, seven of whom are living: Mary Elizabeth Lenora; Peter Michael Harold; John Frank Ambrose; Dominick Vincent Roy; Lucas Hermann; Carroll and Raphael. Francis L. and Elizabeth died in childhood. The parents are Catholics in the Church of the Ascension.

Page 283

FRANK J. EFFERTZ.

The Farmers State Bank of Waconia is an institution well deserving of the high place it holds in the estimation of the people of Carver county and of banking men and interests generally. It was organized in July, 1899, with a capital of $10,000 and the following official staff: George A. Du Toit, president; George J. Bradley and Garhard Hoeffken, vice presidents; and Frank J. Effertz, cashier. The president and cashier are the same as at the start, but Charles Henning is now the vice president. The capital stock has been increased twice. It is now (1914) $15,000, the surplus is $15,000 and the deposits aggregate $260,000. The growth and expansion of the business of the bank is the best proof of the excellence of its management and a high tribute to the capacity and business enterprise of the men at its head. The residents of Waconia and the surrounding country patronize the institution liberally, and thereby give evidence of their confidence and the strong appreciation they have of its value as a convenience and help to the community.

Frank J. Effertz, the cashier of this bank from the beginning of its history, was born at Norwood, November 15, 18-73. He is a son of Hon. Peter and Elizabeth (Born) Effertz, whose life story is briefly told elsewhere in this volume. He was the first child born at Norwood, and grew to manhood and began his education there, afterward attending the parochial school two years and St. John's University at Collegeville one year. In May, 1892, entered the employ of the bank at Norwood as bookkeeper and later became its assistant cashier. From 1895 to 1899 he was bookkeeper in the St. Paul Book and Stationery company store in St. Paul, when he was chosen to his present position.

Mr. Effertz was one of the promoters and organizers of the new bank at Norwood, the Citizens State Bank, and has been its vice president front the start. He is interested chiefly in the banking industry, in a business way, and while the public affairs of the community, and its welfare enlist his earnest attention and active support, he has never sought a political office or any other distinction outside of the line of endeavor with which he is directly connected. But the strong and determined demand of the people made him village treasurer for four terms and president of the Waconia Fair association two years.

When the Waconia Commercial club was organized Mr. Effertz was elected its president, and he continued to serve it in this capacity two or three years. He is also a member of the Norwood-Waconia Hunting club, an enterprising organization which holds annual outings at Itasca lake. On April 25, 1900, he was united in marriage with Miss May Klosterman, of St. Paul. They have five sons, Howard, Ralph, Frank B., Albert and Edgar. The family belongs to St. Joseph's Catholic church at Waconia, and the head of the house is a member of the Order of Knights of Columbus.

Page 283

PETER EFFERTZ.

Orphaned by the death of both of his parents when he was young, Peter Effertz, proprietor of the Superior Stock Farm at Norwood, has been obliged to make his own way in the world, and his success, which is considerable, has been the result of his own native ability combined with persistent and well applied industry. He was born August 24; 1845, at Darshofen Kreis Bergheim, Koln, Germany, and there obtained a fair education and learned the carpenter trade, working at this craft four years. In the spring of 1864 he and his brother Christ came together to the United States and located in Carver county.

On December 10, 1870, Mr. Effertz was married to Miss Elizabeth Born, whose life began at Kenton, Ohio, August 24, 1853, and who came to this county in 1860 with her parents, Jacob Born and wife, natives of Hutvill, Canton Berne, Switzerland, whence they emigrated to the United States in 1850, and on their arrival in this county they took up their residence at Young America. In the summer of 1872, when the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad opened its station Young America, where is now the village of Norwood, Mr. Effertz and his wife bought the first property sold there and built a dwelling house that fall. The next spring they opened a hotel and saloon in a part of the present Effertz hotel, the small building in which they began operations being still in use as a part of the present hotel, which was built in 1878, and which is now kept by their son, William H. Effertz, the father having retired from the business in 1900.

During the period of his residence in Carver county, Mr. Effertz has followed farming as part of his industry. He erected his present residence in 1900. It is one of the beat in the county, located a short distance from the hotel in the village and overlooking his fine stock farm of 220 acres. This land is of excellent quality and the place is known as the Superior Stock Farm. On it are bred Red Polled cattle, keeping a herd of 35 to 40 head.

Mr. Effertz was the principal organizer of the Citizens State Bank of Norwood, which was opened June 20, 1914, with himself as president; his son, Frank J. Effertz, vice president; and his son-in-law, Albert Kehrer, as cashier. However, November 2, 1891, the Bank of Norwood was organized with him as one of its stockholders and directors, a relation to it which he maintained, for a number of years. He has always been a firm and loyal Democrat, and has taken a helpful interest in public affairs. He served the village six years as president and several as a member of the council. He has also been and is a member of the school board almost from its formation.

In the fall of 1906 Mr. Effertz was elected a member of the House of Representatives, being the only Democrat sent to that body from Carver county in the last twenty years. He served on the committee on Banks and Banking and several other important ones, proved himself to be a hard worker in the committee room ever standing for program and improvement. He earnestly advocated general road improvement and many additional lines of betterment. In the election of 1908 he was defeated.

Sixteen children were born in the Effertz household all but two now living. They are. William H., proprietor of the Effertz hotel; Frank J., cashier of the Farmers State Bank at Waconia and vice president of the Citizens State Bank at Norwood; Gottleib G.; Christian, formerly proprietor of the hotel and now agent of the Minneapolis Brewing company; Hermann, who conducts the operations of the farm; Matilda E., wife of Henry Bovy, a merchant at Norwood; Julius S., cashier of the bank at Belle Plaine; Gertrude E., wife of Michael Fallon, of the St. Paul police force; Edward B., civil engineer for the United States government in St. Paul; Margaret, wife of Albert Kehrer, cashier of the Citizens State Bank at Norwood; and Angelia B., Paul R., Fred N. and Cecilia. Loretta And Peter J. died in childhood. All are Catholics, the family belonging to the Church of the Ascension.

Page 284

SWAN FREED.

Swan Freed, who is one of the progressive and enterprising farmers of Watertown township, has been a resident of Carver county Since two years old, having been brought to it by his parents, Peter J. and Hannah (Swenson) Freed. He was born at O'Hus, in the province of Christianstadlan, Sweden, November 14, 1870 and reared in Laketown township on an improved farm bought by his father.

After fourteen years they removed to the shore of Swede lake in Watertown township. Later the father bought another farm two miles and a half east of the village on the Minneapolis road. On this farm the parents died, Hannah at the age of sixty-eight and Peter J. at that of seventy-six. He became a citizen and a Republican, but favoring prohibition of the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors, often supported the candidates of the Prohibition party. They were both members of Scandia Baptist church in Laketown township, joining it when first organized, and their remains lie at rest in the burying ground at that church.

Six children were born in the Freed household, four still residing on the old family homestead. Nellie is the wife of A. J. Lindgren, with her home in Chippewa county. Frank is operating the homestead; and Anna, Emma and Oscar have been public school teachers in Carver, Hennepin and Chippewa counties.

Swan Freed remained at home until his marriage October 4, 1905, to Miss Anna Sophia Oberg, daughter of John A. and Anna (Anderson) Oberg. She was born in Watertown township September 1, 1874. Mr. Freed rented his father Is farm on Swede lake, and there lived until the fall of 1910, when he bought his present farm in section 11, and which was a part of the Benjamin F. Light estate. It comprises eighty acres, for which he paid $6,600, is well improved with good building and has a fine location overlooking Oak lake. It is directly on the road from Watertown to Minneapolis, a distance of twenty-five miles from that city.

Mr. Freed is an active and progressive general farmer and a, large producer of milk, being a stockholder in the Farmers Co-operative Creamery. He is township supervisor, a member of the township board and connected with the management of the schools in his district. The Luce line railroad is built through his farm thus giving important transportation facilities. He is a Republican in political affiliation and his religious connection is with the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown. They have two children, Wendell Kermit and John Olof. The latter being named in honor of two grandfathers and one great-grandfather, Olof Anderson, who was born just one hundred years before the boy.

Page 284

DR. H. P. FISCHER.

In discovering the sulphur spring in a peat bog half way between Shakopee and Chaska, in Carver county, and turning it into a mud bath sanitarium for the cure of certain diseases and the general improvement of health, Dr. H.P. Fischer rendered a signal service to humanity, great in magnitude, continuous in endurance and constantly expanding in benefits. Mudcura sanitarium is now one of the well established and widely known curative institutions of the United States.

Dr. Fischer is a native of Canada, and obtained his academic education at St. Jerome College in Berlin, Ontario, as Bachelor of Arts. He then entered the Detroit Medical College, from. which he received the degree of M. D. in 1894. He located at Shakopee, and there was actively engaged in a general practice of his profession for seventeen years. In the meantime he discovered the sulphur spring which was the foundation of his sanitarium, which he named "Mudcura," and which has become famous under that name.

Close investigation revealed to him that both the spring and the soil surrounding it were heavily impregnated with sulphur, and he conceived the idea that they must, in the nature of the case, have positive and valuable curative powers for human ills. He thereupon busied himself in making his discovery beneficial by establishing an institution whereby its hygienic properties could be used in the service of suffering humanity. He succeeded in financing his project and erected a building with accommodation for forty patients, and on July 26, 1909, Mudcura sanitarium was opened with four inmates requiring and ready to receive treatment.

Since then the demands on the facilities of the institution have increased to such an extent that in 1912 it became necessary to erect a forty-foot, three-story addition to the original building and to add another, or third story, on the original building. Still the facilities were insufficient to meet the demands on them, and in 1913 a twenty-six room dormitory was put up. This gives the institution capacity for 100 patients. The doctor's residence is outside, so the whole extent of the sanitarium buildings is devoted to its needs. The residence was built in 1911.

This admirable curative establishment is located on a farm of 120 acres on which a large herd of high grade Holstein cattle is kept for the use of the sanitarium, and the patients are furnished with pure milk which is provided for them with every possible care in the way of sanitation and cleanliness. A. large sanitary barn has recently been completed. The patients are drawn mainly from the Twin Cities and other parts of Minnesota and the four states which adjoin it, but there are some from every section of this country, including Alaska, and, many foreign lands, the number from abroad increasing every year.

The reputation of "Mudcura Sanatorium" rests on the demonstrated benefits derived from the use of its mud and water. But in addition medical and electric treatment are administered as individual cases may require. The soil surrounding the spring is so impregnated with sulphur and other mineral substances that when it is heated it throws off a strong odor. Every day wagon loads of this soil are brought to the building and put through expensive machinery which softens, and pulverized it. It is then steamed and moistened until it is of the proper consistency.

In the regular treatment the patient is carefully packed in the hot mud and allowed to sweat profusely, after which he is given a tub bath, then wrapped in woolen blankets for a sweat out and then placed in the cooling room, where be gradually cools; while resting., Finally the patient is taken to a massage room, and there the disease is literally rubbed out of the body by the best trained masseurs that can be obtained.

Rheumatism is the disease which receives special consideration at this sanitarium, and every form of it is treated with the utmost care under the highest scientific knowledge. The cure of rheumatism is, in fact, the specialty of the institution but kidney, stomach, liver and nerve troubles also receive treatment in accordance with the latest medical discoveries and in connection with the mud and water applications, and many remarkable cures of each are recorded to the great credit of the sanitarium and its system.

Other features of value in connection with the establishment and helpful in its work are fine natural scenery, beautifully laid out grounds and a social atmosphere of great cheerfulness and hopefulness. Dr. Fischer, the head of the institution, is a member of the American Medical Association and the State and County Medical societies. He is a diligent student of his profession and keeps in touch with its latest thought and discoveries. He has written extensively, too, on medical topics, especially on sciatica and kindred ailments. His attendance at the sanitarium is constant and he conducts all the examinations of patients and superintends all the treatments administered. The doctor was married in 1895, in Canada, to Miss Minnie Huck, a native of that country. They have four children, Marie, Georgina, Antoinette, and Jerome.

Page 285

JOHN J. Farrell

This enterprising business man and industrial promoter became a resident of Carver, Minnesota, in 1886, coming to this state from Ohio, where he was employed in the creamery and cheese factory of S. Straight & Son, who were among the founders of the creamery industry in the Middle West. When he came to Minnesota Mr. Farrell first located at Rochester. From there he moved to St. Paul, where he was connected with the Crescent Creamery company, the pioneer in the creamery business in this state. At the time alluded to cream was brought to the creamery by farmers, there being no separators in use. The first separator in Minnesota was installed by the Orweiit Creamery company of St. Paul in 1888, and its value in the butter and cheese industry was soon fully established and widely appreciated.

Mr. Farrell was the first to buy butterfat by the Babcock test in Carver county. He now has two creameries, one five miles west of Carver and another at St. Johns with a buying station at San Francisco.

Carver county butter is of excellent quality and most of the product is shipped to Chicago, New York and Philadelphia, where it finds a ready sale because of its Superior merits. It is shipped mainly in sixty-pound tubs made expressly for the purpose and with all the requirements of the trade in view, so that their contents will not deteriorate or be injured in transit. Mr. Farrell is one of the most extensive and most careful shippers, and in consequence of the vigilance with which he guards every step in manufacture and transportation his products hold among the highest rank in the markets.

In order to extend and amplify his knowledge of his specialty Mr. Farrell attended the state dairy school, he was elected a member of the National Dairy School alumni. He is serving his fourth term as president of the National Creamery Buttermakers' association, which holds meetings in Chicago and other cities of the Middle West. He is also director of the National Dairy Show, which makes exhibits of dairy goods, cattle and merchandise, and a member of the National Dairy Union, which was organized to protect the interests of dairymen throughout the country. He is the son of Daniel and Mary Guyton) Farrell. The mother died in 1910. The father is now living in Cleveland, Ohio. During the Civil War he was in a Pennsylvania regiment from 1862 till the close of the war. Mr. Farrell belongs to Carver Camp of the Modern Woodmen of America and is a member of St. Nicholas Catholic church. He has taken an earnest interest and an active part in public affairs and has been mayor of Carver nine years. In 1914 he was defeated for the State Senate.

Mr. Farrell was married in August, 1901, to Miss Mabel Sanborn of Faribault, a daughter of W. N. Sanborn, a prominent business man. They have three living children, John, Jr., Robert and Elizabeth. Walter was drowned in the Minnesota river November 22, 1910, aged 4 1/2 years.

Page 285

JOHN J. FAHEY.

With a solid and well-earned reputation as a lawyer, an enterprising and progressive citizen and a capable and faithful public official, John J. Fahey, couny attorney, stands high in the estimation of Carver county residents. He is a native of Minnesota, born in Washington Lake township, Sibley county, October 2, 1876, and a son of Michael and Elizabeth (Conway) Fahey, natives of Ireland, the former of County Roscommon and the latter of County Mayo. The father came to the United States in 1854 and the mother the next year, and they were married in St. Paul in 1856.

Immediately after their marriage the young couple located on preempted land in Sibley county, where the father's parents, John and Maria Fahey, also lived and where they finally laid down their trust well advanced in years. Michael and his wife also died on their Sibley county farm, he aged seventy- six and she seventy-seven. He owned 300 acres of land, about 200 of which he put under cultivation, and was an enterprising and successful farmer and a progressive citizen, taking an active part in public affairs but never seeking office. He voted with the Democratic party, as do all his sons except John J., and all the members of the family belonged to the Green Isle Catholic church, of which the parents were original members.

All of the five sons and two daughters born in the household are living. James P. is a lawyer in active practice at Owatonna. William is in the service of the United States government in the revenue office at Emerson, on the boundary line between Minnesota and Manitoba. Henry is operating the old family homestead and Michael is a merchant at Green Isles, the old home village. They are all men of genuine worth and usefulness, standing well in the regard of their fellows. The daughters are held in esteem and exemplify in their daily lives the lessons taught them at their parental fireside.

John J. Fahey was graduated from the high school at Henderson, in his native county, in 1894, and afterward taught school for a time. Intending to become a lawyer, he entered the University of Minnesota, and was graduated from that institution with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1902, and from its law school in 1903. But he continued in school work two years longer, being superintendent at Barnesville, where he had nine assistants in the high school and over 300 teachers under his supervision in the county.

In 1905 Mr. Fahey located at Norwood and began the practice of his profession. He has allowed nothing to interfere with the large general practice he has built up, but has devoted his time and attention wholly to that and the public duties growing out of it. In 1908 he was elected county attorney as the Republican nominee, and in 1910 and again in 1912 was reelected. In the course of his official career he has prosecuted two important murder cases unassisted, obtaining a conviction in each. In political faith and allegiance Mr. Fahey is a Republican and has been of service to his party, attending state and county conventions as a delegate and doing effective campaign work on the hustings at the solicitation of the state central committee. He is also in demand for addresses at teachers' meetings, on memorial occasions and at high school and college commencements.

On October 13, 1903, Mr. Fahey was united in marriage, with Miss Mary A. Schram, of Green Isle, the daughter of a neighbor family. They have four children, Louise, Gregory,

Dolores and Elizabeth. In religion the family is connected with the Church of the Ascension at Norwood. Mr. Fahey is Chancellor of the Lodge of Knights of Columbus at Green Isle, and also belongs to the Norwood Commercial club, in which he is a zealous worker for general improvements. His lines of recreation are hunting and fishing, in which he indulges as opportunity offers.

Page 286

JOHN RIPPEL.

John Rippel, a well known farmer of Laketown township, was born in Indiana, May 15, 1855, and in the same year was brought to Minnesota by his parents, who settled in Chanhassan township in Carver county. Here John Rippel was reared and spent his early manhood. In 1878 he began farming on the Carl Steager place which was about five miles from his old home, owning at that time seventy-one acres of the farm which comprised about two hundred acres. He now owns one hundred and forty acres, a great deal of which he has cleared himself and has sixty-two acres under cultivation and fine meadow land that has been developed by a drainage system. As a dairy farmer and public spirited citizen, he took great interest in the organization of the Cooperative Creamery Company at Victoria, in which he is a shareholder and was activity associated with its incorporation and early management, serving as secretary at the same time that Michael Diethelm was president of the company. Mr. Rippel was married May 22, 1878, to Margaretta Goldschmidt, daughter of E. F. Goldschmidt, a pioneer farmer of Laketown township, whose sketch appears in this work. They have three children, Carrie C., who married Ed Fink and resides in Chanhassen township; John F., who is associated with his father in the management of the farms and Henry H., living at home.

Page 286

E. F. GOLDSCHMIDT.

E. F. Goldschmidt, a farmer of Laketown township, settled in Carver county in 1855. He was a native of Germany, born in Saxony. When he was nineteen years of age, he came to the United States and for several years lived in Illinois. He was married in 1855, in Cook county of that state, to Margaretta Trapp and in the same year came to Minnesota and located in Laketown township on the land adjoining the farm of Carl Steager. And here, in the following year, was born the eldest daughter, Margaretta, wife of John Rippel, who is the present owner of old Steager farm. Mr. Goldschmidt devoted his life to the development and management of his farm and accomplished the clearing of some seventy-seven acres for cultivation and erected new buildings. He always took a keen interest in local political affairs and was a voter at the first election held in the township. He was one of the original members of Moravian church in Laketown and throughout his life its faithful supporter. Mr. Goldschmidt died in 1892 and his wife survived him for a number of years, her death occurring in 1908. They had twelve children, one of whom, Hermann Goldschmidt, died at the age of twenty-eight. The other children are, Margaretta, the wife of John Rippel; Anna, who married John Busch of Minneapolis; William B., and Fred, who own the old home farm; Mary, Mrs. John Walter, a widow and living in Laketown township; Lena, the wife of Charles Reimer and Ida, the wife of E. J. Mueller, both residing at Gaylord, Minnesota; John, who lives at Faribault, Minnesota; George, living at Waconia, and Henry at Chaska. Emma, who married William Fink, lives on a farm near her old home.

Page 286

FREDERICK GLOEGE.

Frederick Gloege, a prominent farmer of Hollywood township, was born in Schoenwerder, Germany, December 5, 1849, and came to tile United States in 1867. He is the son of Gottlieb and Louise Gloege, the former, a native of Prussia, born at Jago, Brandenberg, October 31, 1813. His wife, who was a distant cousin, was born at Schoenwerder in Pommern. In his early boyhood, Frederick Gloege became interested in this country through the letters which an uncle, living in Wisconsin sent to the home in the fatherland and he determined to go to this new world and take advantage of the opportunities of which he heard and become the owner of a piece of land. He often begged to be allowed to make the journey but not until he was eighteen did he realize his ambition. At that time, the uncle and a cousin, Carl Block, sent passage money for Frederick and his brother, Gottlieb, and be, in company with his sister, Wilhelmina, made the voyage across the water in a sailing vessel which was ten weeks in crossing. Frederick had been given a coat and cap by his mother, and he took great pride in possession of the latter, carefully carrying it in his hand on days when the wind swept the dock, but always keeping it with him that others might observe that he was a properly equipped traveler. But he was destined to come to his new home without his cap, it being accidentally struck from his head into the sea by a follow passenger. Shortage of funds made the purchase of another impossible, and he made the rest of his journey without a cap. For two years after reaching Wisconsin, the brothers worked industriously that they might repay the money which had brought them from Germany, and invest in some land. In 1869 they incurred another debt of $300, and with this money sent for their parents. A few years later a sister, who had gone to Minnesota, persuaded them to come to Minnesota and in 1874 Gottlieb Gloege came to Carver county and in the following year was joined by his parents and brothers, Frederick and August Gottlieb and Frederick Gloege disposed of their land in Wisconsin for nine hundred dollars and bought land in Hollywood township, the former in section 25, and Frederick one hundred and twenty acres in section 26. For this he paid eleven dollars an acre. Some of the land had been cleared and there were a few buildings on it. In 1884 he sold part of this land and purchased an adjoining eighty acres of cultivated land, on which he moved and where he has continued to make his home. In the following year he added forty acres of wild land to his place, making a firm of two hundred acres, which he has developed into one of the fine properties of the county, with a comfortable farm home and modern, basement barn. He has met with marked success in all his enterprises and engages in grain, stock and dairy farming, keeping a number of dairy cows and selling milk at the Hutchinson creamery at Hollywood. His parents made their home with him until their death. Gottlieb Gloege, senior, had been a watchman in Germany and had herded cattle or in the winter months worked in blacksmith shops. Here he was associated with his sons in farm work. He died in 1905 at the advanced age of ninety-two years and his wife's death occurred in 1899. Of their children, three are now living in Carver county, Frederick, Gottlieb and Wilhelmina. The latter is the wife of H. Zilmar and came here from Wisconsin in 1912. August Gloege, after a number of years on his farm in Hollywood, which is still his property, now resides in Hutchinson, and Mary Gloege, who married Charles Engleke, formerly a well-known resident of Hollywood, makes her present home in Minneapolis. This family has ever maintained the closest of relations, which have been particularly evidenced in the association in work and interest of Frederick and Gottlieb as neighboring farmers and life-long companions. Frederick Gloege has achieved a successful career as a farmer and American citizen and reached the consummation of his early ambitions through hard labor and native ability. He takes a keen interest in the questions of the time and is active in any cause which tends to promote the general welfare. He still retains his boyish enthusiasm for the land of his adoption and his faith in the opportunities it offers to all who possess perseverance and industry, fixing the blame for failure not on the country but the man. He was reared in the Lutheran church in Germany and is now a faithful member of the Evangelical Association. His political affiliations are with the Republican party. He was married February 24, 1879, to Anna Wetter. She is the sister of William Wetter, a prominent farmer of Hollywood, whose sketch appears in this work, and was born on her father's farm near her present home. They have a family of two sons and four daughters: Amelia, the wife of Henry Ulmer, of Omaha, Nebraska; Emma, who married Alvin Lange and lives in Cumberland, Wisconsin; Albert, employed as a painter in Omaha, Nebraska; Lena, the wife of Leo Mielke, of Montrose, Minnesota; and Henry and Anna, living with their parents.

Page 287

HON. JOHN GLAESER.

Having been elected, on November 3, 1914, judge of the probate court of Carver county for the sixth successive term, Hon. John Glaeser showed thereby that his hold on the confidence and esteem of the people of the county and their high appreciation of the value and character of the service he has rendered them are not only undiminished, but have been extended and intensified as the years have passed. He assumed the office on December 1, 1903, to fill a vacancy, being appointed by Governor Van Sant, and has been elected at the end of each term since.

Judge Glaeser was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, February 27, 1859, and there lived until the age of nine, when he came with his parents to Carver county. They located on a new timber farm in Young America township, of which only two acres were cleared. The judge still owns that farm, but he has added to its extent until it now comprises 140 acres. He also erected the present buildings and made other improvements. His home, however, is in the city of Chaska, the farm being under the management of a tenant.

The judge served six or eight years as township supervisor and for a portion of the time was chairman of the board. He also served a number of years as county commissioner, and for a time was president of the Young America Fire Insurance company. He helped to organize and was the first president of the Carver-Sibley-McLeod German Mutual Storm Insurance company of those counties, and continued to hold that office until he assumed the duties of his present position.

In political allegiance the Judge is a Republican, but earlier in life he was a Democrat, representing his locality often in conventions. He owns other farm lands besides the old home place, and has always been practically interested in general farming.

On May 11, 1883, Judge Glaeser was united in marriage with Miss Martha Schweikert, a daughter of George and Sophia Sehweikert, of Young America, in which Mrs. Glaeser was partially reared. Her parents came from Wurtemberg, Germany, to Canada, and there their daughter Martha was born. Both died at Young America. The mother of the judge is still living, far advanced in age, and makes her home with him. The judge had one brother, Reinholdt Glaeser, who died about 1908. He was one of the beat and most extensive farmers in Sibley county, and a man of prominence and influence there, serving as supervisor, county commissioner, and in other local offices from time to time.

Judge Glaeser, his parents and his brother originally belonged to the Lutheran church at Young America, he now being related to the church of the same denomination at Chaska. He and wife are the parents of ten children. Two died in infancy and another at the age of fourteen. The seven living are: Lydia, the wife of E. W. Differt, operating the old farm. Eleonora, the wife of G. F. Atrops, of Sherwood, Oregon; Edwin W., who operates his father's farm in Mahnomen county, Minnesota; Paul, who is employed in the First National Bank at Chaska; and Selma, Martha and Edna.

Judge Glaeser is diligently attentive to his official duties, but is fond of fishing and hunting, and in vacations enjoys trips for the indulgence of sporting tastes. He is a genial and entertaining gentleman, and has hosts of friends.

Page 287

HENRY GERDSEN.

Henry Gerdsen, a well-known pioneer farmer of Laketown township, is one of the few men now living who were identified with the early history of the county. He is a native of Germany, born in the grand duchy of Oldenberg, February 13, 1827, and at the age of sixteen accompanied his parents in their quest of a home in a new land. They settled in Cincinnati, and here Henry Gerdsen apprenticed himself to the trade of machinist and was employed in this work for a number of years. But through a friend, John Salter, who had gone to Minnesota, he heard of the opportunities offered for land investment in the northwest, and in 1856 set out for Carver county, where Mr. Salter had settled, his claim being the present site of Victoria. He was accompanied by his brother-in-law John Holtmeier, whose sketch appears in this work. They traveled down the Ohio river to the Mississippi river in a now big steamboat to St. Paul and thence on the Minneapolis river to Chaska, where they found that most of the land had been preempted. But they chose a quarter section, beautifully situated between two lakes, with fine meadowland, and Henry Gerdsen bought the preemption rights of the man occupying it. The small shanty on the place was replaced with a large house of hewed logs, and Mr. Gerdsen returned to Cincinnati for the two families. About two years later, when the land came into market, they made the payment of one dollar and a quarter an acre. This was the time when many of the settlers lost all or part of their claims, being unable to make the payment, and those with money for investment profited by the conditions and large, land holdings were readily acquired. Mr. Gerdsen made the trip to the land office at Litchfield in company with Mr. Zoerb, Mr. Walter, E. P. Gold5chmidt and three other neighbors. They were a week on the trip, being delayed for several days in Litchfield and walking the greater part of the way; but this tramp with his companions in the fine October weather has always been an enjoyable reminiscence. For several years the partnership with John Holtmeier was continued and during this time Mr. Gerdsen worked at his trade in St. Paul, supplying financial support for their interests, and Mr. Holtmeier was in charge of the work on the farm. Later Mr. Gerdsen built a residence on. his land, and has since devoted his attention to his farm. He has ever recognized his duties and responsibilities as a public spirited citizen and much of the organization of the life of the community has been the result of his efforts. In his home the first services of the Moravian church were held and there the Sunday school was organized and the meeting; held until 1858, when he donated the land for the church and cemetery and the Moravian church of Laketown was built. The first building was of logs, and in 1878 this was replaced by the present modern brick structure. He took a keen interest in providing educational advantages for the neighborhood and was active in the organization of the district school and for the first terms of its existence gave his services as teacher. The first schoolhouse was a small log building, equipped with desks and blackboard constructed by local workmen, and often hold from sixty to eighty pupils. From this start the district now claims a creditable share in the modern educational system; employs two teachers and enrolls about forty pupils. He attended the first meeting in the township, when it received the name of Laketown because of the numerous lakes within its boundaries. From the first political activities in the county his ability and earnest work for the public welfare are recognized by his fellow voters without regard of party lines, and for thirty-five years ho served as a public official. He was judge of the first election and was there elected assessor, and two years later made chairman of the board, and a little later elected to the office of township clerk, to which he continued to be re-elected for a period of over thirty years. He also was justice of the peace for six years. Mr. Gerdsen's farm comprises one hundred and ninety acres, and the greater part of this he has developed into valuable land, clearing the timber land and reclaiming the lowland with ditches, and has seventy-five acres under cultivation. In late years he has devoted much attention to the raising of alfalfa, taking a great interest in this branch of his work, and has a former friend and neighbor who has acquired a world wide reputation as a grower of alfalfa. In 1863 he began raising fruit and now has a fine orchard of apple and plum trees. He is a shareholder in the Co-operative creamery at Victoria. Mr. Gerdsen is the only survivor among the original members of the Moravian church in Laketown, and has always been one of the its most active and faithful supporters, and for many years was superintendent of the Sunday school which had been founded in the shelter of his home. He is now living at the old home at the advanced age of eighty-eight after many years of notable activity, during which he has ever exerted a forceful influence for the betterment and progress of the community in which he lived. His life has been that of an earnest and sincere Christian gentleman who has sought the guidance of his faith and has been a faithful practicer of the principles which he professes. Mr. Gerdsen was married in Cincinnati to Mary Wulfeck. She was his faithful companion for almost fifty years, and died April 11, 1903. Six children survive her: Herman A., a pastor in the Moravian church and located at Lancaster, Pennsylvania; Emma E., living in the old home; Henry G., a piano salesman in Minneapolis; William C., employed in the examining department of the patent office in Washington, D. C.; Albert, the manager of the farm; and Mary, the wife of Clement Hoyler, bishop of the Alberta district of the Moravian church of Canada, whose residence is, at Edmonton, Alberta. Bishop Hoyler was born in Laketown township, where his father, the Reverend Jacob Hoyler, was pastor for several years. He was reared in Watertown, Wisconsin, and received his education in the seminary at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. As a member of the clergy of the Moravian church, he has been eminently associated with the work of the organization, is a member ex-officio of the board of managers of the American church and six years ago was made a bishop in the Canadian church in which he has served for a number of years.

Page 288

JOSEPH GAST.

One of the thoroughly enterprising, prosperous and substantial farmers of Watertown township, of German nativity and ancestry, is Joseph Gast, whose fine farm of 200 acres, which he has himself redeemed from the wilderness and reduced to cultivation, lies in section 24, and is one of the desirable ones in the township. Mr. Gast was born in Bavaria, Germany, March 4, 1830, and became a pioneer of 1855 in this county. In 1852 he came to the United States and located for a short time in Iowa, then went to Kansas, where he also remained a short time.

In 1855 Mr. Gast reached St. Paul, and a friend of his then living at Scandia indorsed him for the sum of $200 with which to buy land that he expected to sell within two or three years. He purchased a tract of government land at $1.25 an acre, and at once went to work to clear it and make it productive. For two weeks, while building a cabin of poles cut in his own woods by himself, he slept under a tree. Then, in that cabin he lived by himself, providing for his needs as best he could, for four years he continued clearing his land and while waiting for crops dug ginseng root, which he traded for flour at Shakopee, carrying the flour home on his back, a distance of twenty miles. He also worked out hewing logs and doing other hard labor to got food and make progress toward the comfort and independence for which be longed.

Mr. Gast was married in 1860 to Miss Mary Lenz, a girl of fifteen who lived with her aunt, Mrs. George Pabst, on an adjoining farm. She came to Carver county from Ohio in 1857, and was, at the time of her marriage, one of only a few young women in the neighborhood. By the time of his marriage Mr. Gast had eight acres of his land cleared and two rooms to his house. The furniture was all homemade but the stove. They had a plank for a table, a crude bedstead of his own manufacture, and other articles in keeping with these. But by that time flour could be got at the mill in Watertown, and the conveniences of life were becoming generally more plentiful and easier to get. But the husband kept on hewing logs and digging ginseng root, and within a short time after his marriage he became the owner of an ox team.

Prosperity was increasing with him now, and he built a better house of logs hewn on the inside. Some years later he built a large residence of logs hewn on both sides, and in 1900 he erected the dwelling in which the family now lives, which stands at an elevation and commands a fine view of the surrounding country. His farm now comprises 200 acres, and he has about forty acres cleared and in a high state of productiveness. His land is worth $125 or more an acre at a conservative estimate. In religious faith Mr. Gast is a Catholic and one of the oldest members of the church at St. Bonifacius.

Mr. and Mrs. Gast have five children. Their sons Joseph and Aloysius live with them on the farm. Josephine is the widow of the late John Stein, of Delano, Wright county. John is a resident of St. Bonifacius, in Hennepin county, and Mary is the wife of Frederick Ehalt, who operates the home farm, he and his wife living with Mr. and Mrs. Gast. Mr. Gast is a man of excellent qualities of citizenship. He is quiet and unobstrusive, but always ready to do what be can for the welfare and improvement of his township. Mrs. Gast has met her responsibilities as a wife and mother in an admirable manner. She speaks the English language fluently and is an exceptionally bright and well informed woman. Both are generally esteemed throughout the township.

Page 289

CHARLES G. HALGREN.

The useful life of this prominent citizen and successful businessman of Watertown, which extended over seventy years, fifty-four of which were passed in Carver county, except the time of the Indian uprising and the Civil war, ended on May 15, 1910, his death closing a career of unusual constancy of purpose and fidelity to duty.

Charles G. Halgren was born in Sweden February 2, 1840, and at the age of fourteen came to the United States with his parents, Swan and Christine Halgren. They located in Illinois, and the mother died of cholera in Chicago soon afterward. The father in 1857 came to Carver county and pre-empted 160 acres of land just below the village of Watertown, and there passed the rest of his life, dying at about the age of seventy years. By his first marriage he was the father of six children. Charles G. Solomon A., a retired merchant at Detroit, Minnesota. Charlotte C. is the widow of Charles Metzger, late of the Minneapolis police force. John died as the result of service during the Civil War. William died of an accidental gun shot wound in his young manhood. Frank was a mail clerk on the Great Northern railroad for several years, and died at about thirty-five. Mr. Halgren's second wife he married in Illinois, who died at Watertown in old age. Their children are David, a resident of California, and Huldah, wife of B. P. Washburn, of Minneapolis. Emma was wife of Wm. Williams and died a young woman.

Charles G. Halgren as a boy entered a printing office at Fulton, Illinois, and in the summer of 1857 he and his sister joined their father at Watertown. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Ninth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. He was discharged at Fort Snelling August 24, 1865, after a service of peculiar interest, great activity and numerous adventures, once being held up with a number of his comrades and robbed.

For a short time he was associated with I.I. Lewis in merchandising at Watertown. He then engaged in silver mining at Clancy, Montana, for three years and for one year was similarly occupied at Ketcham, Idaho. Returning to Watertown he bought a drug store, which he conducted for a number of years, being also postmaster for several years. In 1881 he was elected to the state legislature as a Republican, and was twice re-elected. He was later defeated for the senate. It was largely through his influence and that of a few other men that Carver county became Republican after having long been a Democratic stronghold.

Mr. Halgren was a Freemason for nearly fifty years. He was a charter member of Watertown Lodge No. 50, serving several terms as its Worshipful Master and was its secretary at death. The lodge officiated at his funeral, Rev. J. S. Montgomery preaching an eloquent sermon. The Minneapolis Commercial club and other organizations adopted resolutions of respect strongly commendatory of his excellence as a man and citizen and the serviceableness of his busy life.

On June 14, 1869, Mr. Halgren was married by Rev. D. B. Knickerbocker, pastor of Gethsemane Episcopal church, Minneapolis, to Miss Lovina Cunningham, daughter of Luther and Elizabeth (Leighton) Cunningham, the former of Scotch nativity and the latter born in the United States of English parents. Mrs. Halgren was born in Maine February 13, 1848, and came direct from that state to Delano, Wright county, Minnesota, where her father preempted land in 1856. He converted 320 acres from its wild condition into one of the best farms in its neighborhood, thereon passing nearly fifty years.

At the Indian uprising in 1862 Mr. Cunningham opened his farm gate and left everything to the mercy of the savages, himself going to Minneapolis to enlist to fight against them and his family taking a boat down the river to the stockade at Greenwood, now Rockford. There a body of men was organized to join those from Minneapolis. Mr. Cunningham was one of the first to volunteer against the Indians, and remained in service until the outbreak was suppressed. His wife soon had preparations made for the comfort of her family, who were well provided for during their three months absence from the farm. When they returned they found all stock and poultry in. good condition having suffered no loss, although a neighbor's family, the Dustins, living three miles distant, were all killed. Some years ago the Cunninghams sold their property in Minnesota and moved to Bellingham, Washington, where the father died in 1895, the mother then returning to Watertown where she died August 10, 1902.

Mr. and Mrs. Halgren were parents of four children. Harry A., an eminent surgeon at Watertown. Guy E., a druggist, optician and jeweler at Watertown. Lottie Elizabeth is the wife of Dr. E. E. Shrader, of Watertown, and Arthur C. a partner of his brother Guy. Mrs. Halgren, as also her sister- in-law, Mrs. Metzger, are members of Loring Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star, in Minneapolis.

Page 290

HARRY A. HALGREN, M. D.

Dr. Harry A. Halgren, one of the leading physicians of the Northwest, has attained eminence in one particular branch of his profession by specializing and devoting his time, study and energies mainly to the mastery of its intricacies and the newest thought and discoveries in connection. He is in general practice as & physician, but his specialty is surgery, and his faculties tire never more completely at his command than when called upon to perform a major operation.

Dr. Halgren was born in Minneapolis April 30, 1870, the son of the late Charles G. and Lavina (Cunningham) Halgren, a sketch of whom will be found on another page. The doctor obtained his academic education in the public schools, from private tutors and under private instruction of Rev. Father Crawley. He attended the Minnesota Institute of Pharmacy under Professor Drew, and passed the state board examination with distinction, being at the time the youngest licensed druggist in this state.

After clerking in a store at Pipestone for a few months, he took charge of his father's drug store at Watertown, his father being occupied as the manager of the mill with the medical profession in view as his proper field of labor, the young men entered the medical department of the University of Minnesota, from which he was graduated in the class of 1897. For a few months he had charge of the Minneapolis city dispensary in connection with work at the City hospital. He then gave attention to the practice of Dr. R. J. Fitzgerald during his absence as surgeon of the 3rd Regiment, Minnesota National Guard.

In March, 1898, Dr. Halgren began practice at Watertown, attending to the demands of a growing general practice, but making advanced surgery his chief object of study and close application. He has won an enviable name and reputation, standing at the head of the profession in this part of the state, being the only surgeon in Carver county who performs major operations, no matter how intricate or demanding what delicacy of touch. He is frequently called to other counties and the cities to perform or aid in the performance of critical operations.

He has ever taken a deep and helpful interest in the welfare of Carver county, and has served as coroner several terms. He also aides in building and improving by dealing in and being an extensive owner of real estate. He finds pleasure and social relaxation in the Masonic fraternity, and enjoys the use of good horses and fishing in the many local lakes. In 1904 he was married to Miss Elsie Belton, of Montrose, Wright county. They have one child, Ardis Lucille.

Page 290

JOHN HEBEISON.

John Hebeison, one of the leading merchants of Carver, and a pioneer of the county, was born on the Berne's Alps, Switzerland, in 1844.

In 1849, in company with his parents and two brothers, and two sisters, emigrated to the United States and first settled in Holmes county, Ohio. From Holmes county, Ohio, they removed to Bluffton, Ind., where they remained until the spring of 1855.

They had heard wonderful tales of the richness of the soil of the Minnesota Valley and that the land could be had for the asking. So in the spring of the year the entire family started for the Northwest and the father secured a homestead in Benton township, section 24, of Carver county, and were the first white settlers in the township.

Young Hebeison grew to manhood on this farm in the wilderness and early became enured to the dangers and hardships of the frontier life. He remained at home, assisting his parents in making a home until the call to arms came in 1862 when he enlisted in Company H, 9th Minnesota Infantry, and faithfully served as bugler for three years. He took part in the battles of Gun Town, Tuble, Nashville, Spanish Forts, besides many skirmishes.

After being honorably discharged from the service he returned to Carver county, and in 1870 engaged in the hardware and farm machinery trade, which he has successfully followed since that time at Carver. Mr. Hebeison was married in November, 1870, to Miss Sophia Samberg, a native of Sweden, and to them have been born five sons and two daughters, George P., Fred. W., Edward, John E., Milton B., Ida and Myrtle.

The father of these children has done his full part in the reclaiming of Carver county from a wilderness and making it into one of the most productive in the great state of Minnesota. He enjoys a wide acquaintance throughout the county and stands high in the estimation of the people, both as a merchant and a citizen.

Page 290

VINCENT HECK.

A mechanic, a soldier, a farmer, and at times a public official, the late Vincent Heck, of Watertown, who died in that village April 1, 1914, proved himself to be a man of sterling worth in all the relations of life and a valuable citizen of two of the great northwestern states of the American Union. He was born in the province of Baden, Germany, January 22, 1840, and in 1856 came to the United States with an uncle and located in Wisconsin. There he learned the trade of tinner, serving his apprenticeship at Sauk City and becoming a journeyman. He then decided to turn his attention to farming, and that occupation he followed until the beginning of the Civil War.

Soon after that sanguinary conflict started Mr. Heck enlisted in the Ninth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry at Sauk City, and in that regiment he served until he veteranized as a member of the Forty-fifth Wisconsin. He rose to the rank of first lieutenant, passing through all the grades from corporal, remaining with his regiment until his discharge from the army at Nashville, Tennessee, July 17, 1865.

Soon afterward Mr. Heck came to Watertown to purchase a hardware store, and during the next thirty years, or longer, he kept this store and conducted his tinning trade in connection with it. When he retired he turned the business over to his son. He became well satisfied with Watertown and took an active part in its public life, serving as township treasurer, and aiding in promoting the welfare, of his township and county in many other ways. He was a Republican in politics but had no special church affiliation.

Mr. Heck kept up his interest in farming to the end of his life and became the owner of several farms, but he lived for twenty seven years in the residence in which he died, having built it himself, and having always kept it in an excellent state of repair, as he did all the buildings he owned, although he was for a number of years an invalid. Early in his manhood he was a member of the Order of Druids and active in the organization in it to which he belonged. But some years ago that organization went out of existence, and he never transferred his membership to another.

The memories of the war and the companionships it brought him were very agreeable to Mr. Heck, and he kept them alive by active membership in Hanlin Post, Grand Army of the Republic, at Watertown. He was also fond of a quiet little gathering of friends at which he could indulge his enjoyment of the card games of his native land, such as pinnacle, sixty-six, and others. His widow and two of their three children are living, the mother having her home at Watertown. Julia, their oldest child, married P. F. Sexton and died at the age of twenty-two. Eugene lives on a farm in Wright county, this state, and Vincent, the youngest child, also owns a farm but lives at the old Watertown family home with his mother.

Page 291

John M. Monson

John M. Monson, a retired farmer of Hollywood township, was born in Sweden, December 19, 1830, and spent his early manhood in his native land. In 1869 he invested his savings in the bringing of his wife and children to the United States, retaining a small capital with which to secure a home in the new land. He came to Carver county, where his brother, C. P. Monson, had located a year previous, and bought eighty acres of land in section 22 of Hollywood township. He built a log shanty and began to develop the farm, burning the timber and clearing the land for cultivation. Watertown, six miles distant, Was the nearest trading center, but there were no roads near his place and he had to cut his path of communication through the forest. He had added one hundred and sixty acres more of wild land to his first tract, and for forty-four years devoted every interest to the

improvement of this land, putting the greater part of it under cultivation. The present farm house was erected about twenty-five years ago on the site of the first home. Mr. Monson is a member of the Lutheran church at Watertown and his political affiliations are with the Republican party. His wife was Clara Peterson and their two children, Christina and John August, were born in Sweden. Christina married Charles P. Hendricks, whose farm was part of the old place, the rest of the land being the property of John A. Monson, who owns sixty-five acres of the paternal estate. The latter was born July 23, 1866, and has lived in his present home since early childhood, assisting his father and serving a faithful apprenticeship to the occupation of farming. The experience and native ability which he brought to his work has assured the success which attends his prosperous farm property. He was married June 4, 1899, to Manda Hultgren, daughter of Johannes Hultgren, and they have three children, Arnie, Ines and Rosella. He has been prominent in the affairs of the township through big active interest in public matters and has served his fellow citizens in the offices of treasurer and supervisor.

Page 291

CHARLES F. HENDRICKS.

Charles F. Hendricks, a prosperous farmer of Hollywood township, was born in Pennsylvania, October 6, 1856, and came to Carver county in his early childhood with his parents, John P. and Anna Charlotte (Miller) Hendricks. His father settled in Watertown township and there Charles Hendricks grew to manhood, sharing in the labors of the pioneer farm and working on other farms. He was married August 4, 1883, to Christina Ann Monson, only daughter of John M. Monson, a prominent farmer of Hollywood, and for several years lived with Mr. Monson assisting in the management of the firm. In 1887 he began farming independently on eighty acres of this estate. The land was in good cultivation, and with the erection of the present home made a good farm property. Soon after this he purchased fifteen acres more of Mr. Monson, and later added another forty, the last tract being wild land, most of which he has cleared. He now owns one hundred and thirty-five acres of the old Monson place, and with capable management and progressive methods has steadily improved his farm. He has been eminently successful in all branches of farm industry; his fertile fields, some of which have been developed by open ditching, are productive of large grain crops, and for a number of years he has been a patron of the creamery business, keeping a number of dairy cows. Aside from his farming interests, he was partner with his brother, John Hendricks, in the proprietorship of a sawmill and threshing outfit, and during the eighteen years of his successful association with the latter enterprise became widely known throughout the county. In this employment he counts a lucky escape through a chance absence on the day of the explosion in 1874 on the Devine farm of the threshing machine of William Burke with which he had been working. Mr. Hendricks takes a. public spirited interest in all local affairs and is a member of the Republican party, but not a strict partisan in his political sympathies. He has given valuable service to his follow citizens during the many years of his able discharge of the duties of various offices on the township boards of supervisors and school trustees. He has been a member of the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown and a faithful supporter of its interests for a number of years. No children were born to Mr. Hendricks and his wife, but they have reared a foster daughter, Clara Anderson, whom they took in their home when three years of age. She married Titus Hultgren, a descendant of a pioneer family, and they have always made their home with Mr. Hendricks, who is now contemplating retiring.

Page 291

OSCAR E. HENDRICKS.

Oscar E. Hendricks, a well known farmer of Waterloo township and proprietor of the Orchard Stock farm, is a native of Carver county, born on the farm which is his present home, May 4, 1863, the son of John Peter and Anna Charlotte (Miller) Hendricks. His parents were born in Smoland, Sweden, John P. Hendricks, March 18, 1835, and Anna Miller, August 30, 1838. In 1853 they came with their respective families to the United States and two years later were married in New York state. From there, in 1857, John P. Miller, a brother of Mrs. Hendricks, journeyed to Minnesota and decided to locate in Watertown township. On his return to New York his report of his new home was such that his family and a number of friends decided to accompany him in his removal to the western state and he was soon joined in Minnesota by his parents John and Anna Margaret Miller, Charles and Gus Miller, Peter Brown and his son A. J. Brown and other friends. These were followed by John P. Hendricks and his wife in the spring of 1858, who completed their long journey to the new country by walking from Chaska to the home of John P. Miller. John Hendricks secured twenty acres in section twenty of Watertown township and went about the work of making a home for his family in the wilderness. He built a small log house on the hill which is the site of the present house and where he lived for the remainder of his life. He was compelled to turn over the development of his land which was covered with heavy timber to his children and hired labor while he occupied himself at his trade of carpenter. He was a highly efficient workman and found ample employment in Watertown and the surrounding country, and built a great number of houses in this neighborhood. During the years spent in the east he had served at the trade of coffin building and had become in expert in his line and for a number of years he engaged in this industry. In 1871 he replaced the first home with a larger frame house, which he built himself, even constructing the doors and sashes by hand. Later he erected another house on his farm, which now included 140 acres, but his death August 28, 1885, came before the removal of the family into the new home. Both he and his wife were among the earliest members of the Swedish Lutheran church. Mr. Hendricks was a Republican and always actively interested in the affairs of the township, serving for a number of years as chairman of the board of supervisors. His wife spent the last years of her life with a son in Hollywood township where she died, December, 1913, at seventy-five years of age. They had thirteen children, six of whom lived to maturity, Charles F., a farmer in Hollywood township; Albert, who was also a farmer in that township, who died at the age of thirty; John, who lived near Watertown, whose death occurred in his forty-second year; Ida, who married John P. Hutgren of Watertown and died in l884; Oscar E. and Clara, wife of C. G. Thurene who died, aged twenty-eight. Oscar E. Hendricks, with the exception of two or three years, has always lived on the land on which his father settled in 1858. At twenty years of age he assumed the entire management of the farm and in 1906 bought out the other interests and became its sole owner. He has been very successful as a stock farmer most particularly interested in dairy cows. Orchard Stock farm is equipped with modern buildings and fine Holstein cattle of which he is a frequent exhibitor at the local fairs. He is one of the original stock holders in the Farmers Co-operative Creamery. Mr. Hendricks is a Republican, but holds liberal views on political questions. He has given able service to his fellow citizens in the office of supervisor for a period of fifteen years. He was married November 22,1885,to Louisa Johnson, born at Menominee, Wisconsin, the daughter of Andrew M. and Anna Margaret Johnson. Andrew Johnson is living at the advanced age of ninety years in Watertown township where he settled in 1866. Five children have been born to this marriage, Arnie E., a farmer in Watertown township; Delia T.; Lambert M., who for two years was principal of the schools at Donnelly, Minnesota, and is now a student in the Dental college at the University of Minnesota; Luella R.; and Robert N., student in the St. Cloud Normal School. Mr. Hendricks is a deacon in the Swedish Lutheran church of which his family are members.

Page 292

AUGUST HENNING.

Born in Sweden September 13, 1846, and reared to the age of twenty-seven in that country, where be was trained to the labor of making his own way in the world without extraneous help or fortunes favors of any kind, August Henning, one of the enterprising and progressive farmers of Watertown township, came to this country and Carver county in the very prime of his manhood and prepared in ability and spirit to confront and overcome every difficulty that might stand in the way of his advancement, and he has had his share of trials and has triumphed over them all.

Mr. Henning became a resident of Carver county in 1873. He at once obtained employment cutting cord-wood and working in the pine woods in the winter, and at saw mills in Minneapolis, handling lumber, at other seasons. He was industrious and frugal, and in the course of a few years was able to obtain a tract of land in Watertown township, paying $600 for nearly ninety-four acres, and getting some cows, an ox team and wagon and a few other necessaries in his bargain. There was a clearing of only a few acres on the land, but there was a log house on it built by the former owner, who had committed. suicide. Alfred J. Brown was the administrator of the deceased's estate, and Mr. Henning make his purchase of him as such.

From that time to the present (1915) Mr. Henning has devoted all his energies to clearing, improving and cultivating his farm, and he now has about thirty-five acres yielding him good crops in general farming and also keeps regularly ten to twelve cows for the production of milk for the Co-operative Creamery company, of which he is a member., He has thriven and flourished in his undertakings, and is now reckoned among the substantial and well-to-do farmers of the township.

In 1908 Mr. Henning built the modern, up-to-date farm house on his land in which he now resides. The farm lies along Swede lake on the northern side, and the new dwelling house stands on a commanding elevation overlooking the beautiful sheet of water which has been a source of enjoyment to thousands of persons and of profit to all who dwell at or near it. Mr. Henning is interested in the welfare and advancement of his township and county as a good citizen, but he takes a very small part in public affairs. When he votes he supports the candidates of the Republican party but he has never sought or desired, a political office, for himself.

On July 4, 1882, Mr. Henning was united in marriage with Miss Johannah Hagen, like himself, a native of Sweden. She came to the United States and this county in or young womanhood, and has ever since resided here. Prior to his marriage his mother and her second husband, Jonas Ohman, were living with him and helping him to make farm productive and his home comfortable. After his marriage they gave way to his wife, who then took charge of his household affairs. Seven of their children grew to maturity. Paulina E. is the wife of Benjamin Hanson, of Chicago. Carl W. and John B. are living with their parents on the farm and assisting in its labors. Elsie E. is a professional nurse in Minneapolis. Minnie S. and Lillian B., twins, are teachers in the public schools of Carver county, and Amanda O. is preparing herself by a course of instruction to be a teacher of music. All the members of the family belong to the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown.

Page 293

CHARLES HENNING.

During all of the forty-three years of his residence in this country, Charles Henning, the leading general merchant of Waconia, has been connected with mercantile life, as be was from youth in his native land. He now has the largest and best store at Waconia, and conducts his establishment in full accord with the requirements of up-to-date, present-day business methods and conditions. His enterprise and progressiveness have won and enabled him to hold widespread popularity, his business keeping pace with the development and improvement of the community.

Mr. Henning is a native of the province of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, where he was born June 6, 1849. He came to the United States in 1871, and, after passing six months in the city of New York, took up his residence at Jordan, Scott county, Minnesota. At Jordan he was engaged in merchandizing from 1872 to 1876 then moved to Boone, Iowa, six months later returning to Minnesota and located at Helena, in Scott county. There for one year he conducted a general store and flourmill and served as postmaster. In 1877 he changed to Chaska, forming a partnership with his brother under the firm name of F. W. Henning & Bro. and dealt in general merchandise and grain for three years. F. W. Henning was a merchant at Chaska from 1865 until he died in 1899.

Charles Henning started his present business at Waconia in 1881 with a capital valued at $3,900, including the store building which he now occupies. The sales for the first year amounted to about $10,000. They have now reached an annual aggregate of $30,000 and are still on the increase with a sure and steady advance. He carries a full line of general merchandise, except hardware and shoes, and his stock now .requires more than three times as much space as it needed formerly, all investment of more than $20,000 being necessary. He is the sole owner and manager and employs, three assistants.

Mr. Henning is vice president of the Farmers State Bank of Waconia. He has Served as a member of the village council and in many other ways also he has shown an intelligent and serviceable interest in the welfare of his home community. Fraternally he is connected with the Order of the Sons of Hermann. In 1881 he was married at Chaska to Miss Louisa Meder, a native of Germany, like himself, and a daughter of H. Meder, a well-known and prosperous wagonmaker at Chaska.

Page 293

LOUIS HILL.

Among the farmers of Carver county who are entitled to special commendation for the success and fruitfulness of their operations Louis Hill of Watertown township is easily in the first rank, in respect to both the extent of his holdings and business and the intelligent and progressive manner in which all his undertakings are conducted. His farm at the present time (1915) extends one mile and a half from north to south and is half a mile wide throughout. He has about 225 acres under cultivation, producing large crops of grain and bay and quantities of other farm yields, and he also supplies the creameries with milk on a liberal scale.

Mr. Hill was born in Hesse, Darmstadt Germany, May 24, 1845, and in 1854 came to the United States with his parents, John and Catherine (Buchman) Hill. The family located in Washington county, Wisconsin, and remained there, twelve years. In 1866 it moved to Minnesota and the parents obtained possession of a part of the farm now owned by their son Louis and occupied by him and cultivated under his supervision. The father began his career as a farmer in this country with forty acres of land in Wisconsin, and to this tract he added by a subsequent purchase. On his arrival in Carver county, Minnesota, he bought the Northeast quarter of section 32, which then had about twenty acres under cultivation, with a small log house on it for a dwelling. He paid $2,000 for his 160 acres, and then died, at the age of fifty-five within a month after coming to this state.

On the death of his father Louis Hill took charge of the farm, and two years later he bought the adjoining 160 acres, which was all in timber at the time and cost him $1,000. In 1869 his older brother Adam came to this county and took over the management of the home farm for his mother, and Louis began operations on his own quarter section but also continued to work for his brother. The mother died in 1884, aged seventy-six, but Adam remained on the farm until 1896, when Louis bought it. Adam is now living in Superior, Wisconsin. He served once as assessor for Watertown township, in Carver county, and for two years was a member of the board of county commissioners.

Mr. Hill has since bought an additional tract of 120 acres south of the old farm and in line with it. In clearing his land, so desirable was it for him to have speedy results that he burned off a great deal of valuable timber. But he has since been more frugal of the natural growth and has sold large quantities of cord-wood from his clearings. His farm is near Goose lake, and the dwelling house, which was erected in 1899, faces the lake. With its fine location and its advanced development and scientific cultivation taken into account, along with the natural fertility of the soil, it is easy, to agree with the general estimate that the farm is one of the best and most desirable in Carver county.

In addition to his general farming operations Mr. Hill raises and feeds large numbers of hogs for the markets, averaging about seventy-five head a year. He also keeps a good herd of cows and furnishes milk to the creameries. For many seasons he has operated a threshing outfit, beginning with the horse-power machines of long ago and ending with the present day steam giants which have contributed so extensively and essentially to making possible the enormous farming industry of our time. To his present threshing outfit he has a saw mill attachment for sawing both building lumber and firewood

Mr. Hill was married in 1874 to Miss Bertha Seltz, whose parents, Frederick and Henrietta (Burandt) Seltz, brought her from Germany in 1862 to a farm in this county one mile South of Waconia. It was a new farm, which they improved and on which they both died, the father in 1884 and the mother in 1887. They had three sons, and two daughters. Two of the sons, Charles and Gustav, are living on the home farm. Louis, the other son, resides in Washburn county, North Dakota, and Henrietta is the wife of Ernest Stahlke and lives near the village of Waconia.

Mrs. Hill was twenty years old when she was married. She at once took charge of her husband's household affairs, and has managed them with admirable skill ever since. Eleven of the seventeen children born of their union are living. Adam, the oldest son, Albert the fourth, and John, the sixth, are managing the operations of the home farm. Louis, the second son, is a farmer in Waconia township. Henry, the fifth son, is a member of the hardware firm of Schmidt & Hill at Mayor. Lena is the wife of Herman Zummach, a plumber at Mayer. Elizabeth is the wife of Ferdinand Schmidt, the other member of the hardware firm at Mayer, and Martha, Ella, Louise and Lillie are all living at home with their parents. A daughter named Anna became the wife of Gottfried Littenmaier and died at the age of twenty-nine, and three sons and one daughter of the household died in early childhood. For forty years Mr. Hill was a member of the Lutheran church at Waconia, but he now belongs to the church of the same denomination at Mayer.

Page 294

N. J. HOLMGREN.

During all of the last forty-four years N. J. Holmgren has been a resident of Carver county and taken an active part in its development and improvement. He is now retired from all active pursuits and resides in the village of Watertown. His life began in Sweden December 6, 1843, and in that country he was reared and learned his trade of carpenter. On November 8, 1867, he was married to Miss Christina Johnson, and about two years later, in 1870, he yielded to a long cherished desire and came to the United States, leaving his wife in Sweden. After passing a few months in Duluth he changed his residence to Carver county before the end of the year, locating at West Union.

There, Mr. Holmgren worked for the railroad, at his trade and in other lines, and as soon as he could sent for he wife. In 1875, for $630, he bought eighty acres of timberland in Hollywood township and started, converting it into a home, transferring an old log house ten feet square from another tract. In this cabin he lived eight years, and then built a larger log dwelling, which served until 1889, when he -erected his present substantial frame house. He devoted himself to the improvement of his farm and placed about sixty acres under cultivation, making his one of the best farms in the township, and putting up on it in 1898 a large basement barn. His wife died February 3, 1895, but he continued to operate the farm until 1900. In 1908 he moved to the village of Watertown where he bought some property and erected a modern dwelling house. He later bought more property in Watertown.

Mr. Holmgren was impressed early with the possibilities of milk production in this locality and was with the first man in this locality and was with the first man in Hollywood township to haul milk to the creamery. The neighboring farmers soon saw the benefits to he derived from his enterprise and followed his example, all of them being engaged in producing milk for the creameries.

For many years Mr. Holmgren voted loyally with the Republican party in all his activity in public affairs, but he is now properly classed as an Independent. His religious affiliation is with the Swedish Lutheran church. He has four children. Emil John, of Watertown; Henning Rudolph, of Minneapolis; Edward, who is a farmer of Watertown township, and Effie, who is the wife of Albert F. Malmquist, of Minneapolis.

Page 294

JOHN HOLTMEIER.

John Holtmeier, one of the early settlers of Laketown township, was born in Hanover, Germany, November 6, 1821, and died on his farm in Carver county, on. July 9, 1890. When he was twenty years of age he left his native land and act out alone for the United States, coming first to Cincinnati where he was joined a few years later by a sister and half-brother. He found employment for a time as coachman for a physician and then secured a position in a store along the river front. He remained in the Ohio city for a number of years and during that time, in 1850, was married to Gesina Gerdsen. In 1854, accompanied by his brother-in-law, Henry Gerdsen, he went to Minnesota to secure some of the new land which they had heard of through John Salter, an old friend, who had settled, in 1852, in what is now Laketown township. They bought the preemption rights of a settler and in partnership became the owners of a quarter section. Mr. Gerdsen then returned to Cincinnati for Mr. Holtmeier's wife and child and a home was established in the wilderness. They erected a two story house of hewed logs which was the home of both families and because of its unusual spaciousness for those days accommodated neighborhood meetings and Sunday school services were all organized and held here. For twelve years Mr. Holtmeier and Mr. Gerdsen were associated in their farming interests and during the greater part of this time, the latter worked in St. Paul and the management of the farm was under his partner's direction. In 1876 Mr. Gerdsen removed to an adjoining farm. Mr. Holtmeier cleared some forty acres of his land and in 1889 erected the present comfortable farm home. His property comprised two hundred and twenty-one acres which later was divided into two farms. This land is beautifully situated between three lakes and has extensive natural meadows. Mr. Holtmeier and his wife were charter members and faithful supporters of the Moravian church in Laketown. He donated a part of the ground for the church property and for a number of years served as an officer. He took an active interest in political matters as a member of the Republican party and voted at the first election held in the township. He also gave efficient service on the school board. Mrs. Holtmeier died January 5, 1893, two years after the death of her husband. Eight children survive them, one daughter, Carrie, who married Christ Fink, a neighboring farmer, died at the age of thirty years. The other children are: Mary, the widow of C. H. Fairchild and living in Minneapolis; Gesina; Annie,. Mrs. August Lueck of Wright county; Christina, the wife-of Christ Fink, whose first wife was Carrie Holtmeier; John; William; Sam and Hermann. Hermann Holtmeier was educated as an engineer in the University of Minnesota and was sent to Alaska by the government as an industrial teacher. Here he became interested in the problems of the country and is devoting his life to the service of the natives. He has established a mission of the Moravian church and has sought to organize the industrial and communal life of the Eskimos, operating a saw mill and store. He is also in charge of the post office at Bethel, Alaska. John Holtmeier, junior, the present owner of the old homestead, was born in the pioneer home, April 21, 1862. His brothers being absent, he was his father's assistant from early youth. Thorough training and natural ability have brought success to his agricultural enterprise which has been mainly directed to dairy farming. He was active in the organization of the co-operative creamery at Victoria and is now identified with its interests as president of the company. He owns one hundred and twenty-nine acres of the old place, the rest of the estate being the property of his brother, Samuel Holtmeier, and this land he has developed into a farm of particular value as a stock or dairy farm, erecting good barns and adding to the natural meadow acreage by ditching. He has served for six years as clerk of the district school board. William Holtmeier lives at the old home with his brother, and their sister, Gesina, is their faithful housekeeper. They are all members of the Moravian church.

Page 295

Philip O. Johnson

This venerable and venerated pioneer of Watertown township, Carver county, Minnesota, who is now living retired from active pursuits on the land he redeemed from the wilderness and converted into a valuable and productive farm, was born at Smolands, Sweden, December 30, 1833, and passed his boyhood on a farm in that country. His mother died when he was five years old, and when be was nearly eighteen he came to this country, arriving in Boston, Massachusetts, June 28, 1851. He had three brothers and a sister already in Pennsylvania, and another sister came over and died in that state. Two of his brothers came west, one of them, Andrew P. settled in Goodhue county, Minnesota, and the other died in Paxton, Illinois.

Mr. Johnson joined his sister and brothers in Pennsylvania and worked on farms in that state six years. He saved his earnings, although they were very small, beginning at $4 and gradually rising to $15 a month. He bought a piece of heavily timbered land and cleared several acres of it, on which he built a barn. But the west still had a persuasive voice for him, and in 1857 he came to Minnesota, arriving in Carver county August 1. He paid a squatter $150 f or his claim, on which three-fourths of an acre had been cleared of underbrush, but on which the large trees were still standing.

Mr. Johnson at once built himself a log cabin, and on December 24, 1857, he was married to Miss Josephine H. Brown, a sister of Alfred J. Brown, who had come to the county with her parents in the preceding October and was twenty years old at the time of the marriage. Theirs was the first wedding in Watertown, and it was solemnized at a Baptist feast on the shore of Clearwater lake about 8 miles from Mr. Johnson's farm, the ceremony being performed by Rev. Frederick Nelson, a Baptist clergyman, and the wedding party consisting of J. P. Akins, J. P. Miller. and Miss Matilda Miller, besides the bride and groom. Miss Miller was married during that same winter to Charles Swanson, theirs being the second wedding in the township, and the subsequent death of their child the first death in it, the burial of the child at Swede lake being the first funeral.

Mr. Johnson and his bride took up their residence in the log house he had built the evening after their marriage. Mrs. Brown had prepared a supper for them there, and they then begin a home life in that house which lasted twenty years. Their benches were made of split logs, their bedposts were stakes driven into the ground, and all their other furniture was homemade except their stove. Mrs. Johnson's father brought one cow with him from Pennsylvania; Mr. Johnson bought two pigs in Scandia the first winter he lived here. Corn for bread sold at one dollar a bushel at Scandia, eight miles from his home, and he was obliged to carry it home on his shoulder after buying it. He also bought half a barrel of flour at Carver, at the rate of $11 a barrel, and had to pay $5 for having it hauled to his house.

His first improvement in his house was laying a board floor. He paid $20 a thousand feet for the lumber and $5 for having it hauled to his house by ox team. He cradled wheat near Chaska for two weeks at $1 a day, and by this and other work managed to make a living. In his first year he raised a few potatoes and some corn. But the corn failed to mature and was hauled to Chaska and fed to stock. He kept on working out the second year until his oldest daughter was born in September. Meanwhile, he had to support his wife's parents, paying her father 75 cents a day for planting corn and in like ratio for other work, until they moved to their own claim The Johnsons had many bitter experiences, not the least of which were the annoyances they suffered from the mosquitoes, which were at times almost blinding to them.

The industrious pioneer kept on clearing his land doing part of the work himself and hiring other men for some. He and his wife bore their privations bravely and made the beat of their hard situation. Her wedding gifts were an overall dress, a pair of wooden shoes and a hoe, and even these were valued as highly useful and even necessary articles.

When the Indian outbreak came they left the farm, hiding their household effects in the woods. Three times the Indians sought them, but they escaped. At the beginning of the Civil War many of the young men in the neighborhood enlisted. The drain continued during the contest, and in 1864 he was obliged to pay $60 as his share of the cost of sending seventeen men to the army from Watertown. At the last call for volunteers, which came in February, 1865, he and twelve others, the only able bodied men left in the township, enlisted, and at this time (1914) only four of the thirteen are living Mr. Johnson, Alfred J. Brown, John Oberg and Jonas P. Akins.

Mr. Johnson has lived fifty-seven years on his farm, but about twenty years ago be sold it to his son Frederick. He preempted 120 acres in the first place and later added forty acres more, and about one-half was cleared when he turned the farm over to his son. In the days of activity he worked at his trade as a carpenter, as well as on his farm, helping to build the Catholic church at Watertown and many other structures. For a few years after the war he was an invalid from exposure in his army service, and during that period he did not do much hard work of any kind.

He and his wife were among the first members of the Swedish Lutheran church, and he was its first deacon and Sunday school superintendent. As deacon, Sunday school superintendent and church secretary he hardly ever missed a service in fifty years of constant devotion to the interests of the church. In company with Olof Anderson, Charles Raak, and Lars Justis, he put up the first school house in Watertown township. It was located, near Swede lake, and they asked no pay for their work in building it. Others helped to put on the roof and do the finishing. This was erected in the spring of 1859, and there they started their Sunday school. In the winter before several men from Watertown started to help how the logs for the school house, but when they wanted whiskey and Mr. Anderson objected to their having it, as the building was to be used for church purposes, they left and never came back, but they started a free church, as they called it, which afterward, received the name of "Morrison's church."

It took Mr. Johnson four years to become the owner of a team of oxen. The first election in the township was held at Helvetia. In 1861 or 1862, at an election held at the Swede lake school house Mr. Johnson was chosen township supervisor. He served two years and in later years was again elected, and for many years he served on the township board. He-has always been a Republican, always been an advocate of temperance and always a strong advocate of public improvements, helping to lay out many new roads and do other work in the way of development. His wife died October 4, 1906, after nearly forty-nine years of married life. They were the parents of four children. Florence Johnson is living with her brother Frederick. Alfred P. conducts a meat market in Minneapolis. David B. is also living on the home farm. The father is now living retired in his old frame house, around which he has reserved three-quarters of an acre of ground, and boards with his son Fred.

FREDERICK N. JOHNSON, the youngest son and child of Philip O., now owns the home farm and has recently erected a fine dwelling house and barn on it. His first marriage was to Miss Christine Hareldson, and they had one daughter, Hannah Myrtle, who is now a nurse in the Swedish hospital in Minneapolis.

Mr. Johnson's second marriage was to Miss Mary Swanson, a sister of Mrs. Edward E. Holmgren. Their off spring number seven, Lillian, Evelyn, Inez, Violet and Viola (twins), Theodore and Dolores.

Page 296

DANIEL IUSTUS.

This honored pioneer of Carver county, Minnesota, who died October 15, 1885, after a highly serviceable residence in this county extending over almost thirty years, and who located at Swede lake in the summer of 1856, was the first actual settler in Watertown township. The village of Watertown, three miles northwest of his place, founded by Isaac Lewis, was not started until the following winter, and it was some months after it was started when Mr. Iustus first learned of its existence.

Mr. Iustus was born and reared in Sweden, and there he was married to Miss Anna Olson. They emigrated to this country and lived for some years in Pennsylvania, and in the spring in 1856 the family came West to friends at Scandia, south of Lake Clearwater, near where Waconia now stands. The father of the family was shown over the country by ox teams, and selected site for his future home on the shores, of a beautiful lake eight miles northwest of Scandia. The lake was not then named and the name given to it originated from the Swedish settlement on its border, other families of his nativity soon following Mr. Instus to the neighborhood, notably that of Charles Swanson, a sketch of whom appears in this work.

It was five miles to Mr. Iustus' nearest neighbor, and after paying him to haul logs together for a house the new settler had only 50 cents in money. He realized that be must make a living for his family without capital, for awhile at least, and he busied himself in search for opportunities. He obtained work at Shakopee, twenty miles distant, and thus got a start. Shakopee was the trading point for the neighborhood, and De Los and Peter, the older sons of the household, carried flour and other necessaries on their backs from that point to their homes, although they were only boys in their teens as yet. De Los died in a hospital at Bowling Green, Kentucky, during the Civil War, in which he was a Union soldier.

Peter Iustus was also a soldier and veteran in the Civil War and served in Company 1, Second Minnesota Volunteers, throughout the whole of that memorable contest and received an honorable discharge in 1865. The third child was Anna, who is now the widow of Andrew G. Miller, of Watertown, whose vivid recollections of the early days are given briefly in a sketch of Mr. Miller in another part of this history. Another daughter died at the age of nineteen, and Ferdinand, the youngest son, is a resident of Delano, in the adjoining county of Wright.

Daniel and Ann Iustus did much toward the development and improvement of this part of the state. Their modest, one-room log house was the stopping place for numbers of persons who were seeking land, and at one time some twenty boarded with them, sleeping on the floor of the loft. They were instrumental in starting a church, the first services probably being held in their own home. Every other interest of the neighborhood received attention of a serviceable and productive kind from them, and they are justly entitled to be regarded as the real founders and parents of the township.

Early in the Civil war Daniel Iustus enlisted in Company B, Ninth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, with a number of other persons from Watertown, but after two years service he was discharged for disability. His wife died in October, 1880, and he survived her five years, passing away, October 15, 1885, as has been noted above.

PETER IUSTUS, the second son of Daniel and Anna Iustus, was born in Sweden, July 2, 1840, and came to America with his parents in 1851. Peter had probably the most varied and interesting career of any resident of Watertown. He was a skillful hunter and during the first winter of his residence in Carver county he killed thirty-two deer. He was also a friend and companion of the Indiana, often made his home with them several months at a time. On one occasion he took one (Charlie Minnetonka) home with him, and the visitor remained several weeks with the family. This Indian, however, afterward made a bad record. He enlisted in he Union army and soon afterward deserted, and later he was one of the instigators of the uprising at Hutchinson and among the thirty-eight leaders who were hanged at Mankato, December 26, 1862.

Peter Iustus married Miss Anna Peterson, a daughter of Peter and Christina Peterson, July 31, 1867. The Peterson family were also pioneers in this county. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Iustus settled down on the old homestead formerly owned by Daniel Iustus, his father, and there spent the greater part of their remaining years.

Peter Iustus was an active and industrious farmer. He was also a skillful mechanic and as a first class carpenter and blacksmith and the neighborhood always found in him a ready and helping hand.

Mr. and Mrs. Iustus were active members of the Swedish Lutheran Church at Watertown from the early days of its organization till their death.

Mrs. Iustus died September 3, 1905, and her husband June 20, 1909. His farm of 160 acres included the farm now owned by his son George on the border of Swede lake. Peter and his wife were the parents of seven children. James is a farmer near Delano, Wright county. Henry is a mechanic and lives at Chaska. Selma, who became the wife of S. L. Anderson, died at the age of thirty-four. Laura is the wife of J. P. Newman, and has her home near Waverly, in Wright county. Adelaide is the wife of John Eckmund, and lives on her father's homestead, and Elmer resides near Waverly.

GEORGE E. IUSTUS, the third son and child of Peter and Anna (Peterson) Iustus, was born on his father's farm near Swede lake, January 19, 1874. He remained at home until his marriage, September 23, 1903, to Miss Anna Johnson, a daughter of Lars A. and Anna (Olson) Johnson, of Hollywood township, this county. After his marriage George took up his residence on the farm he now owns and occupies, which was once owned by his grandfather, Daniel Iustus. It contains seventy-one and a half acres, borders on the southern side of Swede lake, and is improved with a good dwelling house, barn and other necessary structures. He carries on an active and progressive general farming industry, and has recently started a herd of Guernsey cattle. Two children have been born of his marriage, Anna Mildred Eleanor, aged ten, and Arlis Adeline Rosalie, aged three. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown, a Republican in politics, and the present road overseer of Watertown township in official life. He has also served two years as township treasurer.

LARS A. JOHNSON, the father of Mrs. George E. Iustus, who is now living retired at Watertown, was born in Sweden in 1846, and came to Minnesota in 1876, after spending four years in the copper mines in Michigan. He bought eighty acres of wild timberland in Hollywood township, and on that land he lived twenty-four years, converting it into a first rate and valuable farm. In 1900 he sold it and bought forty acres near Watertown, which he improved and occupied eleven years. He then sold this farm also and moved into the village.

Mr. Johnsen was married in Sweden to Miss Anna Olson, who died in Hollywood township, leaving one child, her daughter Anna, who is now Mrs. George E. Iustus. The father's second marriage was with Mrs. Sophia Peterson, a widow. They have no children.

Page 297

MILTON JADWIN.

Having come to Watertown township as one of the pioneers, having borne his full share of the labor and care, privation and suffering, danger and disappointment involved in redeeming the region from the wilderness, and having passed even the limit of human life suggested by the psalmist, Milton Jadwin, at the age of eighty-two, has witnessed and taken part in the whole development of Carver county from the dawn of its civilization to its present state of advancement and abundant productiveness, and he is held in high esteem as an important factor in such development.

Mr. Jadwin was born in Perry county, Ohio, November 22, 1832, and at the age of four -was taken to the adjoining county of Hocking, and there grow to manhood, obtained a limited education, was married at the age of twenty-five, and began his long career of useful labor. After his father's death when he was twelve years old, he was obliged to make his own way, doing farm work at $12 or $13 per month. On March 12, 1857, he was married to Miss Hannah Campbell, who was born in Indiana, but reared in Hocking-county, Ohio.

He had saved $400 and soon after marriage the young couple resolved to dare the hazard of the wilderness, starting down the Ohio river for Missouri. The account of Minnesota made by a traveling companion determined them to continue their journey to St. Paul. Reaching Wayzata by teams, he and two other men traveled on foot to Watertown,. arriving May 7, 1857. They found three shanties built the fall before, a sawmill operated by Mr. Dow, a stock of provisions, two or three primitive dwelling houses add a number of tents in which people were living.

He soon took up land in section 12, on the Minneapolis road, two miles and a half east of Watertown, with Benjamin F. Light as his nearest neighbor and several German families to the South, the only settlers in that direction between his land and the Minnesota river. Getting his wife from Wayzata he began building a log cabin. They used a dry goods box for a table, split basswood logs for seats, and other household articles constructed or adapted in the same crude way.

He secured his first cow by cutting and stacking eleven tons of hay, the cost of the cow at that rate being over $100. He sold her and her calf two years later for $40, with which he bought two wild steers at a butcher yard in St. Paul. He broke them and used a sled or stone boat for conveyance, there being no wagon in the neighborhood for several years later. His first crops were produced with ax and hoe. He felled the trees, burnt the brush and planted potatoes between the fallen logs, a generous crop resulting.

These hardy pioneers were obliged to grind corn by hand for bread, and privations in other respects were onerous. In planting he broke his hoe, and cried out to his wife, in the agony of distress "For God's sake, what shall I do I have no money and no credit" His wife called his attention to the ginseng, which grew wild in abundance, and told him what it was. He dug up a quantity with a sharpened stake, and with the sale of that bought another hoe. He then continued to dig and sell this valuable herb, it helping him and his family over many a hard place. Whenever he had fifty or sixty pounds of it collected he would lug it to a store 2 1/2 miles distant and exchange it for flour and other necessities.

In time live stock multiplied and he acquired some good brood mares from which he raised draft horses, which sold at good prices. Later he raised horses from imported Shire and Percheron stock, being the first man in the township to use such a class of stock. He began to raise cows of good strains and bought stock in the Co-operative Creamery, which turned out to be profitable in connection with the products of his herd. He cleared up parts of three farms, the last being the one on Oak lake on which he lived from 1862 to 1913, fifty-one years. He improved it with good buildings and developed it into one of the best farms in the township.

In the early days Mr. Jadwin was accustomed to take contracts for clearing land, and often had to walk four miles to and from his work, for which he was paid $1 a day. At the time of the Indian uprising in 1862 his wife went to St. Anthony but. he remained on his farm, and, as he owned horses carried messages and mail between different points, once taking mail to Hutchinson, about twenty-five miles from Watertown, which had been without mail for two weeks. He also helped to build a stockade at Watertown and another on the Ruder farm. Mrs. Christian Singley, the mother of Matthias Singley, was the only woman who remained in the neighborhood during the Indian trouble, she showing courage equal to that of any of the men.

Mr. Jadwin has always been a Democrat, but never an extreme partisan. He has been deeply interested in the welfare of his township, and has frequently voted for Republicans when he deemed them the best men for the positions sought. Neither has he ever been desirous of holding office, or ever accepted any except minor ones, such as school director or the like. His wife died January 3, 1908, after being in an invalid condition for several months. They became the parents of eleven children. Nine of them grew to maturity and eight, are still living, four sons and four daughters. George is a fruit grower in Oregon. Francis Marion resides at Watertown, and his father has his home with him. Jasper Allen is a former at. Lyndale. Benjamin Franklin is an engineer at Waconia. Emma is the wife of Ansil Barker, of Minneapolis, state weighmaster in an elevator. Diann is the wife of Artlitir Crawford, a teamster in Minneapolis. She was a school teacher for seventeen years. Dianthe, twin sister of Diana, is a maiden lady and lives at Maple Plain. Belle is the wife of Jefferson Sterman and has her home in Idaho. Mr. Jadwin was made a Freemason in Watertown Lodge in the early days of the county's history and has adhered to the fraternity and his lodge ever since, with loyal devotion to it and earnest interest in its welfare.

Page 298

CARL G. JOHNSON.

Since he was four years old Carl G. Johnson, president of the Co-operative Creamery company at Watertown, this county, has been a resident of the United States, and since he was eight he has lived in the state of Minnesota, most of the time in Carver county. He was born August 11, 1865, at the town of Jareda, in the province of Kalmarlan, Sweden, and in May, 1869, came to this country with his parents, Carl M. and Anna Louise (nee Haraldson) Johnson. The family located at New Windsor, Illinois, and there the father worked four years at farming and coal mining. In the fall of 1873 he moved to Minneapolis, where he was employed during the next four years in lumber yards and superintending the loading of lumber on railroad cars.

In the spring of 1877 he took up his residence on a farm three miles south of Watertown, where he remained two years. At the end of that period he bought the farm on which his son Carl G. now lives, one mile southwest of Watertown. This was when he bought it, eighty acres of wild timber land, and he agreed to pay $450 for it, going in debt for the whole amount. His first dwelling house on this farm was a log cabin 16 by 24 feet in dimensions, a part of which is incorporated in the residence now standing on the same site.

The father carried on the farm until 1902, when he turned it over to his son, Carl G. The latter has since done a considerable amount of tile draining, having put in about 3,000 feet of tiling in the last two years. This method of drainage has been in use only for about that length of time in this neighborhood, Mr. Johnson being one of the first men in Watertown township to use it. Others have followed his enterprising example, and the system has proven to be of great and permanent benefit to the land of all who have introduced it.

Carl M. Johnson died May 26, 1913, aged eighty-one years. During the last seven years of his life he was blind and lived with his son Carl. His wife died at the age of sixty-four. Both belonged to the Swedish Lutheran church and were devout and active members of it. Their offspring numbered four, one son and two daughters besides Carl G. John Peter, the first born, died in Illinois, in boyhood. Mary L. died a maiden lady at the age of forty. The whole of her life was passed on the family homestead, Sarah A., the youngest, died at the age of eleven.

Carl G. Johnson was about twelve years old when he became a resident of Watertown township, and since he reached the age of fifteen he has lived on the farm which is now his home. He helped to clear it, like his father working out in exchange for aid in the clearing operation. The son also worked at the carpenter trade for nine seasons, making his home with the family. He attended school only one winter after coming to Carver county, but during his residence in Minneapolis he had passed to the Seventh grade in the old Washington school kept on the site of the present city hall and courthouse in that city, and famous in its day for good instruction and strict discipline.

Mr. Johnson worked through fourteen seasons for the late Andrew G. Miller, of Watertown, in his threshing outfit, having charge of the feeding apparatus and the separator. In 1902 he took charge of the home farm, buying out his sister's interest in it. He has made many valuable improvements on it and converted it largely into a dairy farm, making the production of milk for the co-operative creamery his chief industry on it, although he also engages extensively in general farming, rotating his crops so as to keep his fields in good condition all the time. His herd of milk cows numbers regularly about ten, and all of their product goes to the use of the Co-operative Creamery company, of which he is president, and which now has 215 patrons.

The welfare of his township has been a matter of earnest interest to Mr. Johnson, and he has rendered the public good service in several local offices of importance. He has been supervisor and chairman and town clerk of the township board, for fourteen years in succession, until the spring of 1914. In the fall of 1914 he was elected a member of the board of county commissioners for a full term of four years. He is a Republican in political faith and allegiance, and has long been active in the service of his party, serving as a delegate to county conventions, as township chairman and by energetic and effective work in the campaigns. His religious connection is with the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown, of which he has been one of the trustees and the treasurer for fifteen years. On May 26, 1892, Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Ella Miller, a daughter of Andrew G. and Anna (Justus) Miller. Five children have been born of the union: Alice, Esther, Harald Elizabeth and Melvin, all of whom are still living at home with their parents.

Page 299

Henry H. Karels

Henry H. Karels, a well known farmer of Hollywood township, is a native of Carver county, born in the same township where he now lives, December 31, 1876; son of Ludwig and Francisca (Knott) Karels. He is one of a family of eighteen children. Ludwig Karels was prominently associated with the business activities of the county through the several branches of commercial enterprise in which he engaged with notable success; as a merchant, he operated a general store at New Germany; in the stock business he handled a large business as buyer and shipper and also shipped wood, cut from the new land, to the city fuel market; as a farmer and landholder he owned nine hundred acres of farm and timberland. Henry Karels spent the early years of his life working with his father, receiving a thorough training in the energetic and thrifty business methods of the latter. He was employed in the general store which was stocked with the view of providing for all demands of farm trade and retailed everything from agricultural implements to household supplies. He also assisted in the shipping business, especially in the shipping of wood, an enterprise which assumed large proportions because of the constant clearing of land for cultivation and which required a crew of workmen for the cutting and hauling. In one year they hauled three hundred carloads of wood, selling at Minneapolis and the Chaska brick yards. In 1898, in his twenty-third year, he became the owner of his present farm and since that time has devoted all his time and interest to the business of farming. But thirty acres of his new property was cleared and the place was equipped with two small buildings, the present prosperous farm attests to the success won by unfailing industry and capable management. Mr. Karels is the type of farmer who applies the most efficient business methods to his work. He has ever been on the alert to everything which would aid his best interests as a farmer. During the year when be was engaged with the clearing of his land he secured a good income selling cordwood. He later added seventy acres to the original tract of one hundred and twenty and has now one hundred acres in cultivation, a large brick residence and modern barns and buildings. A county ditch which was laid through his land, reclaimed a number of acres, a number which has been increased by about a mile of tile drainage which Mr. Karels has installed himself. Mr. Karels is particularity interested in the raising of stock and keeps a large number of dairy cows. He was married May 3, 1898, to Atilla Heiner, who was born in McLeod county, near Lester Prairie December 9, 1876. Their family of eight children, Celia, Augusta, Edwin, Bennie, Johnnie and Leonard, who are twins; Freddie and Hermann, all take an active interest in their farm home.

Page 299

Albert J. Kehrer

Having demonstrated capacity and fitness in the banking business by ten years' previous experience, Albert J. Kehrer was selected for the cashiership of the now bank in Norwood that opened its doors for business, June 20, 1914.

The Citizens State Bank has a capital of $15,000, a surplus of $3,000 and deposits rapidly increasing in magnitude. The original stockholders are Peter Frank and Christian Effertz, Julius Pieper, H. G. Lenzen, Edward Bauermeister, Henry Klosterman and Albert J. Kehrer. Peter Effertz is president and Frank Effertz vice president. All these men are well known for integrity, business capacity and superior judgment, and their standing in the community gives assurance that the bank will be conducted along conservative lines.

Albert J. Kehrer, was born at New Prague, Le Sueur county, in 1880, being the son of A. W. and Mary (Holzer) Kehrer, now residents of Glencoe, where the father was in the cigar business for twenty years. The son was educated in the parochial school at Glencoe, and at the age of twenty-four came to Young America, being employed in the State Bank for a number of years. He was cashier of the bank at Hamburg two years and a half and was assistant cashier in the bank at Hector, Renville county, during the succeeding six years.

On January 28, 1908, Mr. Kehrer was united in marriage with Margaret Effertz, daughter of Peter Effertz, president of the bank. They have two children, Fabian and Marie Elizabeth. They are members of the Church of the Ascension, and he belongs to the Knights of Columbus, at Green Isle, in Sibley county,

Page 299

Matthew Kelly

Matthew Kelly, one of the first settlers in Hollywood township, was born in Ireland, County Kildare, September 24, 1825. On coming to this country he lived for some time at Albany, New York, where he worked in a foundry and from there moved to Cleveland, keeping a store in the latter city. He then came to St. Anthony, Minnesota, where he found employment as a stone mason, helping in the erection of some of the large mills. During his residence in St. Anthony he took up land, a quarter section in what became Hollywood township. The old parchment of the grant dated March 3, 1855, and signed by President Pierce is still in the possession of his family. Some time in 1857, the same year in which Michael Burns settled on the land adjoining his, Mr. Kelly with his wife and three small children moved into the log house on his uncultivated tract and began the task of winning from it the present prosperous farm land. During the first years be worked at the digging of ginseng and various employment, giving what attention he could to his farm; but in a few years he had sufficient land cleared and under cultivation to yield him a competent living. His capable management and unfailing industry brought steady success and he added an adjoining one hundred and twenty acres to his farm and built a frame house on the site of the present residence which was erected by his son, John Kelly. He was of the first members of the Watertown Catholic church and before its establishment, there being no church organization in that vicinity, he was one who attended the mass when celebrated by Father, now Bishop Ireland at the home of John Madden. He took no pleasure in the sport of hunting, not even in the days when game was plentiful; when deer grazed with his cattle and the stock was molested by bear. In those days Indiana were frequent visitors at his house and during the exciting tine when they threatened the safety of the white settlers and the latter were compelled to flee to the villages for protection, Mr. Kelly was one of the men who built the fort at Watertown. From the first meeting of the township which he was instrumental in organizing, he took a keen and active interest in its affairs, giving his time and services freely, to promote the public welfare. It is to him that the township owes its name of Hollywood. For over forty years he was justice of peace and in the able discharge of his duties was enabled to settle many neighborly disputes. He gave further official service as township clerk and for twelve years was county commissioner. In 1872, he was sent to the state legislature by his fellow voters. His death occurred July 8, 1904, at his home in Hollywood. He was married in Albany, New York, to Bridget Hunt a native of Ireland, born March 14, 1827, in County Fermanagh. She died September 10, 1899. They had five children, Mary, Mrs. D. W. Gallagher of Minnetonka, Minnesota.; Margaret, who married John Lynch, a farmer of Hollywood township; Rose, the wife of Thomas Sexton also a farmer in Hollywood; John and Catherine. John Kelly and his sister Catherine live on the farm which was their birthplace and where they have spent their entire lives. They own the two hundred and forty acres of the original homestead, a prosperous stock and grain farm. They are members of the Catholic church at Watertown.

Page 300

Henry L. Kelm

Henry L. Kelm, who is now the cashier of the Chanhassen State Bank, has had a varied, busy and somewhat eventful career. He has fully met the requirements of any situation in which he found or placed himself, and has won a gratifying success in whatever he has undertaken. He seems at length to have found a field of labor for which he has special fitness and an assignment to duties which he is highly qualified to perform with credit to himself and benefit to the interests he has in charge and the community in which they operate.

The Chanhassen State Bank was chartered April 14, 1914, and opened for business on the fourth day of the following month, with a capital of $10,000 and an official staff composed of Roy Quimby, of Minneapolis, president; Matthew Bongard ,vice president, and H. L. Kelm, cashier. The bank built and is occupying, its own banking house, and its surplus has already reached a total of $2,500, and its business and popularity in the community are steadily increasing.

Henry L. Kelm, the courteous and capable cashier, is a native of Chanhassen, where his life began November 5, 1869. He is a son of Frederick and Ann Kelm, who were born and reared in Germany and came to the United States in 1861 or 1862. At first they located in the copper mining region in Michigan, where the father worked in the mines. In 1865 they became residents of Minnesota making their home in Carver county, near the village of Chanhassen, where the father, by industry, thrift and good management became the owner of two farms, both of which he cultivated.

The father died in 1894 aged sixty-six, but the mother survives, and has her home with a son at Augusta. Their offspring numbered nine, seven of whom are living, three of the sons being residents of Carver county, Henry L., Frederick and Gust. The last named is operating one of the home farm's, the first one owned by his parents, which adjoins the village of Chanhassen, and Frederick is farming near the village of Augusta.

Henry L. Kelm obtained his education in a school kept at his home, which he attended three months in the year for a few years. At the age of twenty-one he learned telegraphy, and followed that line of endeavor until he was twenty-five. He was then, September 1, 1893, placed in charge of the Chanhassen office of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad as station agent, which he filled with great acceptability until the bank was organized and he was selected as its cashier. For eight years he was also a merchant and the postmaster of Chanhassen.

Mr. Kelm is a stockholder in the bank and a stockholder and director in the Mortgage Security company of Minneapolis. For a number of years he has devoted his vacations to deer hunting trips in the northern woods, in which he finds great enjoyment. On July 19, 1898, he was united in marriage with Miss Rosa Geiser, a daughter of F. A. Geiser, the well known merchant and butter dealer of Chanhassen, where she was born. Two children have been born of the union, Elmer and Vernis. All the members of the family belong to St. Hubertus Catholic church at Chanhassen. In political faith and allegiance Mr. Kelm is a Republican.

Page 300

Gerhard Kimpel

Having passed his life until 1910 on a farm, engaged in productive industry and doing his full share of conducting local affairs of the public in various township and county offices, Hon. Gerhard Kimpel, representative of the Twenty-fifth legislative district during the years 1913 and 1914, has proven himself intelligently and helpfully interested in the welfare of his home county.

Mr. Kimpel was born in Young America township, September 12, 1861, and is a son of Gerhard and Elizabeth (Iven) Kimpel, natives of Rhine province, Germany, who reached Carver county July 4, 1858.. They had six children, five accompanying them to their new home, six more being born here.

The first residence was on land purchased from the railroad company in section 29, on which they lived until 1880. He then sold that farm and bought another of 200 acres in section 31 of Camden township, and on this he passed the rest of life, dying in 1895. He organized school district number 40 and was long active in school work, serving as clerk of the board as also in other positions. He was a zealous church worker, being one of the founders of the Lutheran church at Hamburg. For a number of years he was supervisor, as such rendering excellent service. His widow survived him thirteen years, passing away in 1908.

Eleven of their twelve children grow to maturity, nine of whom are living. Katharine, the wife of Henry Voss, died in North Dakota in. 1909. Anna, the wife of Wm. Burton, died at her Home in Aberdeen, South Dakota. Jacob was a furniture and implement dealer in McLeod county, now living at Hingham, Montana, as does Fred, who was engaged in hardware and implement trade in Sibley county. Henry is the secretary and treasurer of the Northwestern Construction Company, of Houghton, Michigan. William since 1878 is a fruit grower in the state of Washington. John is an architect and contractor in Milwaukee. Eliza is the wife of Frederick Gasow, a farmer near Gaylord. Maria is the wife of D. Graupmann, a retired business man in 'McLeod county. Dietrich is an extensive carpenter and contractor.

Gerhard Kimpel received a common school education, but long continued habits of study and observation have made him well informed. He purchased the home farm in 1883, and there made his home until 1910. He has been actively engaged in politics for twenty-five years, serving as clerk of the school board for that length of time, as county commissioner twelve years, and in other public capacities. In 1912 he was elected a member of the house of representatives, serving the regular session of 1913, serving on committees of state prisons, roads and bridges, compensation of public officials, and others.

His religious connection is with the Evangelical Lutheran church, and he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, being a charter member of the Camp at Plato. He was married in 1887 to Miss Christina Bohnen, of McLeod county. They have had seven children. Gerhard, Jr., is cashier of the bank at Lester Prairie. Jacob died in 1905 at the age of sixteen. The others are, Henry, Elizabeth, Margretha, William and Christina.

Page 301

HON. CHARLES H. KLEIN.

Manufacturer, banker, legislator and influential force in promoting the progress and improvement of the section of the state in which he lives along all lines of genuine and permanent advancement, Hon. Charles H. Klein, one of leading business men of Chaska, Carver county, has long exemplified in his career the best attributes of elevated and useful American citizenship and the most commendable trials in many lines of serviceable endeavor and been found true of lofty ideals and sound principles in all.

Mr. Klein was born in Benton township, Carver county, Minnesota, June 2, 1872, and is a son of George and Mary (Herrmeyer) Klein, the former a native of Alsace-Lorraine, and the later of Hanover, Germany, but married in this country, and in the township which has ever since been their home. In 1856 the father, George Klein, came with his parents, Adam and Magdalena (Hoch) Klein, to this country from their native land and located on a tract of land in Benton township which Adam pre-empted soon after his arrival. They were pioneers here and called upon to undergo all the privations and hardships of frontier life. But they adapted themselves to their situation and made the most of it. Adam kept a store on his farm and he and his wife lived on it during the remainder of their lives, the father passing away at the age of fifty-eight and the mother at that of eighty-eight.

After the death of his father George carried on the operation of the farm, and this he continued to do until he died in February, 1912, at the age of sixty-six. He was long a member of the township board and its chairman for a number of years. His widow, who still has her home in Benton township, is a member of the Lutheran church to which he belonged, and of which his father and mother were the first members. George's brother Adam was a farmer near Mankato, where he died a number of years ago. George and his wife were the parents of four children, of whom Charles was the second in the order of birth. The others are: Paulina, who is the wife of Nicholas Munsch, of Wood Lake, Minnesota; Emily, who is the wife of William Bussman, of Benton township, this county, and Christian P.

Charles H. Klein remained on the farm with his parents until he reached the age of eighteen. In 1890 he pursued a course of business training at the Curtis Business College in St. Paul, and for two years thereafter he was employed as a bookkeeper in that city. During the next three years he taught school in his native township, and in 1895 began manufacturing brick at Chaska in partnership with his brother Christian. They bought an old brickyard at Chaska, and at the beginning of the business employed forty men. Now they employ, in the several industries which they conduct, 350 men and pay out in wages $100,000 a year. During the first year of their operations they made 2,000,000 brick, and in each of the several years since they have turned out more than 51,000,000. In the three companies Mr. Klein is connected with the amount of money invested is a quarter of a million dollars.

The three companies alluded to are the Chaska Brick and Tile company, in which Mr. Klein is associated with J. W. L. Corning, of St. Paul; the C. H. Klein Brick company, of Chaska, in which his partner is his brother Christian, and the brick manufacturing firm of Klein Bros., in which also he is in partnership with Christian. In addition, he is president of the First National Bank of Chaska and the Victoria State Bank at the village of that name, having filled that office in the latter from the time of its organization. The First National Bank of Chaska was founded in September, 1906, by John G. Lund. In January, 1907, it was bought by the Kleins, Charles H. becoming president and Christian P. vice president.

Mr. Klein is a Republican in politics and has always taken an active interest in the affairs of his party. In the fall of 1902 he was elected to the state house of representatives, and in 1904 he was re-elected. In his last session he was chairman of the committee on manufactures. In 1910 he was elected senator from Carver county, which was the whole senatorial district, and in the senate he was again chairman of the committee on manufactures. One term in the senate filled the measure of his ambition for legislative honors, and in 1914 he declined to be a candidate for re-election.

On December 15, 1897, Mr. Klein was married to Miss Matilda A. Bauermeister of Norwood, this county, a daughter of Otto and Sophia Bauermeister, pioneers of Carver county and Benton township, both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Klein have no children. They are members of the Lutheran church, and Mr. Klein is a valued member of the local school board, on which he has rendered the people of the township appreciated service for several years. He is widely known and highly esteemed as one of the most substantial, enterprising and useful citizens of Carver county, and one of the truly representative men of the state of Minnesota.

Page 301

ANTON KNOBLAUCH.

During his continuous residence of fifty-eight years in Minnesota and Carver county Anton Knoblauch, of the village of Carver, has tried his hand at several lines of business enterprise with success in all, and has built up for himself a fine reputation as a general merchant, manufacturer, real estate dealer and banker of superior capacity and a citizen of pronounced public spirit and enterprise in reference to the general welfare and steady progress and improvement of the community in which he lives.

Mr. Knoblauch was born in the province of Wurtemberg, Germany, August 24, 1835, and was reared to the age of eighteen and educated in his native place. In 1854 be came to the United States and located in the state of Ohio, where he remained two years. About the end of that period there was a strong tide of immigration to this state and Mr. Knoblauch joined it, coming direct to Carver county in 1856. For eight years after his arrival here he clerked in the store of E. Walton at Carver. He then went into general merchandising on his own account, erecting a building for the purpose which he still owns, and for twelve years was one of the most progressive and successful merchants in the county. He also bought and sold grain, and during that period and since handled land in considerable quantities.

During the last thirty years Mr. Knoblauch has been conducting a private banking business at Carver, but he has also manufactured brick extensively, and built and operated grain elevators, which he owned until recently. He has had an extensive and varied business experience, and is one of the best known men in Carver county. In religious connection he is a member of the Catholic church and active in promoting the welfare of the parish to which he belongs, as he is in aiding the activities of all agencies working in the community for its good.

Mr. Knoblauch was married in 1864 to Miss Anna Johnson, of Carver. They, have had four children, three of whom are living: William, who owns and manages a fruit farm near Excelsior, Hennepin county; George, who is dealing in real estate in Chicago., and Ada, who is the wife of C. A. Rickett, of Minneapolis, city salesman of the National Biscuit company. In politics Mr. Knoblauch is a staunch Republican. He has kept out of general political contests, but has filled several local offices with credit to himself and benefit to the public, exhibiting both ability and conscientiousness in the performance of every public duty.

Page 302

CHARLES KRAUSE.

The late, Charles Krause, of Watertown township, who was one of the enterprising and progressive farmers of Carver county, died November 6, 1903, on the farm on which he first settled with his parents, August and Mary Krause, in the fall of 1856. He was a brother of Justus Krause, whose fine farm in this township is located in section 27, on the Watertown road, and whose life story is briefly told in this work. His father, August Krause, was postmaster at Redfield, or Krause's post office for a number of years in the early days, the mails being brought to that point from Watertown and Chaska by stage. August Krause was also locally prominent as a nurseryman in those days, having a large orchard of apple, plum and other fruit trees, and producing young stock of these and grape vines in quantities for sale to the farmers in his neighborhood and elsewhere in the Northwest. He made displays of his products at county fairs at Carver and Chaska, and won many first premiums for their excellence.

Charles Krause followed the family vocation of tilling the soil with success to the end of his life. His widow is still living and has her home at Waconia. They became the parents of ten children, the younger ones of whom are living with her. Two of the sons, Adolph and Arthur, have the home farm, Adolph owning the homestead part and Arthur the part which belonged to their uncle, Hermann Krause, who died some years ago. The uncle built the dwelling house on his farm, but Arthur Krause has erected the barn on it. Both brothers keep cows and furnish milk to the co-operative creamery.

ARTHUR KRAUSE, the younger of the two brothers, was born on his father's farm June 9, 1884, the fifth in the order of birth of the ten children of the household of his parents. For two years after his father's death he conducted the operations of the farm for his mother, and during another year he and his brother Adolph carried them on in partnership. At the end of this period they became the owners of the land and divided it between them, as indicated above.

On November 5, 1912, Arthur Krause was united in marriage with Miss Alvina Zahrendt, a daughter of Louis Zahrendt, an auctioneer for thirty years in Hennepin county, where he is now living retired from active pursuits. Mrs. Krause is a native of that county, and was reared and educated in it. She and her husband have no children. He is a Republican in political faith and adherence, but has never been an active partisan. His religious connection is with the German Lutheran church at Waconia, His farm duties claim his whole attention except what he gives to the requirements of good citizenship, and these he never, on any account, neglects. He is earnestly interested in the welfare of his township and active in promoting it.

Page 302

JACOB D. KRAUSE.

This esteemed citizen, successful businessman and public official, who has been a resident of Carver county for forty-seven years and of Norwood thirty-nine, was born in Washington county, Wisconsin, August 10, 1850. He is a son of William and Minnie (Peterman) Krause, natives of Pommern, Germany, who came to this country with their parents, at the age of eighteen and ten respectively. In 1838 a colony of Lutherans, accompanied by a minister and a teacher, came to America, and, after passing one year in Buffalo, settled in the wildest part of Wisconsin, in the midst of Indians, twelve miles from the even then flourishing town of Milwaukee.

William Krause, who was working in Milwaukee, hearing of this colony joined it. He bought forty acres of land, and there he and Miss Peterman, who had been employed in Milwaukee, were married.. A little while afterward they moved to Benton township, this county, and bought a partially improved farm near Cologne, some eight miles east of Norwood. Miss Peterman's father had been inspector on a stock farm in Germany, and when he decided to come to the United States had barely money enough to pay passage and buy some little equipment for farm work. They had a voyage of alternate calm and storm, enduring great hardships on the ocean, the vessel being finally wrecked. They reached their destination in a destitute condition, but received help in advances from church societies, as many other immigrants did, paying these back in later years.

William Krause lived on the Benton township farm about seven yearn, removing to near Ponca, Dixon county, Nebraska, having a preference for prairie land. There the mother died at the age of seventy-six and the father at eighty-one.

Some of his five sons took up homesteads in Nebraska, but after a short residence in that state Jacob returned to Carver county. He came originally to this county with his parents, and with his brother John cleared the greater part of the home farm, besides which they worked out at clearing and other farm labor until they went to Nebraska in 1874.

Returning from Nebraska, Jacob joined John Hobeisen in the hardware trade. Mr. Hebeisen had a store at Carver, and now opened one at Norwood with Mr. Krause in charge, although his previous experience in the business was as a clerk for one year in Milwaukee. This partnership continued for sixteen years, during which they did the leading hardware and agricultural implement business in this section, conducting branch stores also at Arlington and Lester Prairie with annual sales of $25,000.

Mr. Krause found himself in failing health owing to close confinement for so many years, and his condition required outdoor exercise and life as much as possible. He sold pumps, wind wills and lightning rods for some years, and in 1897 he was appointed postmaster at Norwood by President McKinley, and held this office until after his election as a representative in the Legislature in 1908. He was in the sessions of 1909 and 1910, was a member of six important committees, and took an active part in the debates in the house, striving for the state's best interests. It was his custom to read every bill that he might vote intelligently, and often offered amendments to objectionable features, sometimes thereby suffering the loss of personal friendships. One bill to which he objected but failed to have amended was vetoed by governor Johnson on his representations.

Mr. Krause declined to be a candidate for re-election, although he has always been an active Republican, going as a delegate to conventions and working for party success in all campaigns. He started his present business in partnership with G. Pieper, under the firm name of Pieper & Krause. They built a garage and began dealing in automobiles and carry on a general repair shop.

Mr. Krause is a large owner of real estate. He has land in Northern Minnesota, which he sells to actual settlers, and land in several different localities. He helped to organize the Haskins-Seubert Land and Lumber company, Cologne, Minn., being its president for a number of years. This company owns 19,000 acres of Louisiana timber land, which it is holding as an investment, and which Mr. Krause was instrumental in securing. He has been a member of the village council, village president, village treasurer, a member of the school board and a justice of the peace; but at his election to the legislature resigned every other office.

In the interest of church work, Mr. Krause has ever been active in zeal, energy and enterprise. He organized the German Evangelical Lutheran church and erected the building at a small cost to its members. It is a fine church edifice and the congregation is prosperous and making steady growth. While in no sense a sporting man, Mr. Krause is fond of hunting, and takes trips every year in quest of ducks, prairie chickens and deer and other game.

Page 303

JUSTUS KRAUSE.

Justus Krause, one of the enterprising and progressive farmers of Watertown township, whose farm is in section 27, on the road between Waconia and Watertown, was born November 28, 1843, at Spottsberg, Rodelstadt, Germany, and at the age of thirteen years came to this country with his parents, August and Mary Krause. The family located at Watertown, Jefferson county, Wisconsin, for a few months, but in the fall of the same year came to Minnesota, making the journey with a two yoke ox wagon. A Mr. Carlson and a Mr. Burget came with them, each of these men having one ox. They came by way of La Crosse, which then consisted of only a few shanties.

They met a Mr. Schardt, who showed them several tracts of land in this county, and they selected the tract on which Adolph and Otto Krause, the sons of Charles Krause, now live, the farm then being 160 acres in extent. August Krause died on that farm aged sixty-eight, and his widow also passed away there at about the same age. They were among the original members of the Lutheran church at Waconia. Krause's post office, on the stage line between Carver and Watertown, was kept in their house until Mr. Krause died, when it was abandoned. Their children numbered six besides Justus. Louis is a resident of Watertown. Charles died on the old homestead. Herman died in middle life. Oscar has his home in Superior, Wisconsin. Fredericka became the wife of Charles Gatz and died young, and Crystal died at the age of 16.

After his arrival in Carver county in the fall of 1856, Justus Krause worked out on neighboring farms and at whatever else he found to do, as he did in Wisconsin while he lived in that state. He then operated threshing machines for more than twenty years, using horsepower for the purpose, and for a time working in this line of endeavor for Joseph Dean, of Minneapolis. He was one of the best known thresher men in this part of the country, knowing all about his outfit and able to repair or readjust any part of it that got out of order. In the course of a few years he bought his present farm of eighty acres near his old home, paying $400 for his purchase.

Mr. Krause was married November 27, 1874, to Miss Selma Ketcher, a daughter of Michael and Augusta Ketcher, who was born in Minnesota in 1857 and was seventeen years old when she was married. Her parents took up a tract of government land, the one on which their son Louis now lives, and there they passed the remainder of their lives the mother dying young and the father at the age of about seventy. They were members of the Lutheran church, and of their offspring three daughters and four sons are living at this time (1914).

Mr. Krause's father was a carpenter and brought his tools with him from Germany, where he learned his trade. He built a log house in which he lived until his death. His son has since erected first class buildings on his farm, of which he has about forty acres under cultivation in general farming. He has taken an active part in local public affairs, having served as a juryman spring and fall for twenty-one years, as a member of the township board several terms and for over twenty years as road bow, winning great popularity for his work, especially in the capacity last named.

In politics Mr. Krause has always voted with the Republican party, and his religious connection is with the Lutheran church at Waconia, of which he is one of the oldest members now living. He and his wife are the parents of three children: Otto, who is living on the adjoining farm; August, who operates the home farm, and Verney, who is living at home with his parents. The father helped to organize the Laketown Mutual Insurance company and has belonged to it for twenty-eight years and been one of its officers for twenty-one. He has been particularly active in bringing in new members.

Page 304

FRANK KUNTZ.

Frank Kuntz, one of the progressive and, prosperous farmers of Watertown township was born September 4, 1858, on the farm on which he now lives. He is a son of Henry and Helen (Schilling) Kuntz, the former a native of Bavaria and the latter of Baden, Germany. They came to the United States in early life, and were married in New Orleans about 1850. They later moved to Cairo, Illinois, and in 1857 became residents of Minnesota. Frank's grandfather was an extensive wine grower in Germany, with large vineyard and storage cellars, the son, Henry, being employed in the store in his earlier years.

He obtained land from the government, preempting the southwest quarter of section 33, adding by purchase until he owned 240 acres. In 1881 he built the dwelling house, and in that he passed the remaining years of life, dying December 9, 1885, aged sixty-two. The mother survived him only two or three years. He cleared about 100 acres and put them under cultivation. His widow continued farming operations until her death, willing the farm to the two sons, Frank and Albert, The other living children are: Lena, wife of Deitrich Classen, of Hollywood; Emma C., wife of Dr. Henry R. Diessener, of Waconia; Oscar, a traveling salesman, at Willmar, Minnesota; William, a merchant at Waconia, present representative in the legislature; Otto, a shoe merchant and Postmaster at Waconia; Louisa, wife of Albert Beiresdorf, hardware merchant at New Germany. A son, Henry, died at the age of thirty. The parents were members of the Lutheran church at Waconia. The father was a stanch Democrat and served for years as township supervisor, being also a member of the school board for a long time.

Frank Kuntz has passed the whole of life on the farm which he now owns. He inherited from his parents 120 acres of the homestead, which he has improved with large new barns and other buildings. He is a grower and feeder of hogs, annually fattening forty to fifty in addition to general farming operations. Although deeply and intelligently interested in the general welfare he has no taste for public life and has never sought an office but he is a firm and loyal Democrat and zealous in devotion to party principles.

On September 11, 1889, Mr. Kuntz was united in marriage with Miss Alice Weinheimer, a daughter of Fritz and Margaret Weinheimer, and a native of Wisconsin, but brought to Minnesota in her childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Kuntz have four children: Emma, wife of Christ Lindner, of Ego, Minnesota; Frederick, who is married and a drayman at Ego; and William and Louisa. The family attends the Lutheran church at Waconia.

Page 304

HON. WILLIAM J. KUNTZ.

Hon. William J. Kuntz, who, at the time of this writing, is one of the representatives of Carver county in the state legislature, has long been prominently engaged in general merchandising at Waconia and for many years has taken an active part in the public life of the county. He was born on the old family homestead in Watertown township, seven miles northwest of Waconia, which is now owned and occupied by his brother, Frank Kuntz, mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume.

Mr. Kuntz is a son of Henry and Helen (Schilling) Kuntz, and was reared on the farm and educated in the district schools and at the St. Cloud State Normal school. At the age of twenty-one he began his business career as a clerk in a store at Glencoe, where he remained three or four years. In March, 1894, he started on a small scale the business which he is now conducting at Waconia, and has had steady and expanding success in it ever since, building up a large trade which has been constantly increasing and enlarging his facilities and operations to meet the requirements as they grew greater. His present store building, which is 28 by 90 feet in dimensions, was erected in 1913, and his business occupies all of it.

In addition to his mercantile business Mr. Kuntz has an interest in the Farmers' State Bank of Waconia, of which he is a director, and is also clerk of the school board, He has served as president of this board and been village recorder and president of the village council. At the election of 1914 he was chosen a member of the state house of representatives. He was married in 1897 to Miss Anna Zrust, a daughter of Alois Zrust, who is living retired from active business at Waconia. Mrs. Kuntz was born in Hennepin

county and reared at Waconia. They have two children, Clarence and Helen. Mr. Kuntz is president of the Norwood - Waconia Hunt club and frequently makes trips to the northern Woods on hunting expeditions. He also finds enjoyable recreation in the pleasures afforded by Lake Clearwater.

Page 304

HENRY G. LENZEN.

This enterprising resident and business man of Norwood is a native of Carver County in which he has passed the whole of his life. He has been engaged in farming and merchandising, and his industry and management has made him successful in each line of endeavor. His interest in the general welfare has won him high regard and given him recognition as one of the most useful and representative citizens.

He was born May 29, 1873, near the village of Carver, being the son of Paul Gerhard and Elizabeth Lenzen. His grandfather, Tilman Lenzen, was a native of Germany, and came to this county in its early period, pre-empting land, on which he passed many years in useful labor, He now has his home in Sibley county with his granddaughter, Gertrude and husband, Godfrey Kroels. He and wife were the parents of three children, Hannah, wife of John Kaufman, near Brewster; Agnes, wife of Frederick Meyer, in Wadena county, and Paul Gerhard, who remained on the home farm until recently, and is now living retired at Augusta.

Henry G. Lenzen has two brothers and five sisters. They are Tilman, a grain dealer at Young America; Gerhard, Jr. His sisters are: Margaret, wife of O. E. Wolf, merchant at Augusta; Gertrude, wife of Godfrey Kroels, a merchant of Sibley county; Lizzie, a milliner at Norwood; Hannah, the widow of Oscar Severson of Augusta, who died in 1913; and Sophia, wife of Henry Luthy, a farmer near Chaska.

For a number of years after attaining manhood Henry G. Lenzen followed farming with enterprise and success. In 1899 be bought the farm of Henry Lindert, seven years later selling it and moved to Norwood, where be has since been successfully engaged in the grain, four and feed trade in partnership with Henry Bergmann, having a branch also at Young America. He also deals in furniture having bought the stock and business of Garrett Perbix at Norwood in 1910. He is a stockholder and director in the Citizens State Bank of Norwood, and for five years was the secretary of the Norwood fire department. His religious affiliation is with the Evangelical Lutheran church.

Mr. Lenzen was married in the fall of 1898 to his second cousin, Margaret Lenzen, a daughter of Dietrich Lenzen, one of the early settlers west of the Mississippi. He came to this county in the early days of its history in company with Peter Butendorf and William Freukens. They were for years three of the best known men in the county, especially around Carver and Chaska, their services in opening up the country and establishing civilization being of the greatest importance. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lenzen have five children: Emma, Gerhard, Lydia, Cora, and Clarice.

Page 305

Joel B. Light

The story of this enterprising farmer and esteemed citizen of Watertown township, coupled with that of his father, Benjamin F. Light, is coextensive with the history of Carver county itself, and connects in an unbroken chain the present day development and advanced condition with the dawn of its history.

Joel B. Light was born August 10, 1861, on the farm which he now owns and occupies, and the whole of his life except three years, when working in a hotel at Faribault, has been here passed. Benjamin P. and Esther (Dehaven) Light were natives of Frederick county, Virginia, he born in 1823 and she in 1824. The son, Joel B., was educated in the common schools, and at the age of twenty-four was united in marriage with Miss Mary E. Bradford, daughter of George and Helen Bradford, pioneers of western Hennepin county, and where her brother, M. L. Bradford, now residing at Minneapolis, was also born and reared, and where others of the family are living.

Mr. Light has admirably supplemented the work of his father by adding sixty-five acres to the cultivated land, and making other improvements. He purchased the interests of the other heirs of the estate in 1895. He has ever taken an interest in public affairs, serving as township trustee and for ten years wag a justice of the peace. He has also served on the school board for a number of years. In polities he trains with the Democratic party, being an energetic and effective worker from early manhood. He is a Freemason, Woodman and an Odd Fellow. In the last he has passed the chairs in Watertown Lodge No. 50, and been its representative in the Grand Lodge. He and his wife are parents of eight children: William W., Winnie, Nellie, Myrtle, Jennie, Frank, Wilbur and Alice. Winnie is the wife of Clair Stangland, of Minneapolis. The others are at home.

Benjamin P. Light, with his wife and two children, left his native state in young manhood and went to what was then the Far West, near Indianapolis, Indiana, where for one year he worked at his trade of cabinetmaker. Learning that desirable land could be had cheap in Minnesota, he journeyed to this state with ox teams, accompanied by Lyman Locke, who located on a preemption just east of Mr. Light in section 2, Watertown township. Frank P. Crawford, a neighbor is the son of another pioneer.

The patent for Mr. Light's land was signed by President James Buchanan. He was one of the first to settle here, and as, he owned two yoke of oxen, he was able to make some money by breaking land for others. Ginseng grew wild abundantly, and this afforded additional revenue. The first year he planted a crop without breaking the land, there being no sod and little brush.

Mr. Light was obliged to work at his trade, the community needing his services, and he needing what could be thus earned. He helped to build many houses in Watertown for Isaac Lewis, doing most of the finishing work. He also did hauling of material and goods from Minneapolis for Mr. Lewis. At the same time he kept clearing, getting under cultivation about forty acres, and in 1861 built the dwelling which is still in use and is one of the oldest in this section.

There was no settlement for nine miles between Watertown and Greenwood, now Rockford. Two days were consumed in making a trip, and three were required to go to the nearest flour mill there and back. Mr. Light's land reached to Lake Okey, on whose shores Indiana were accustomed to camp. Deer were plentiful he killing many with a shot gun, and on one occasion he killed a bear with an ax.

He took an active part in public affairs and served as representative from Carver county in the legislature. He was township supervisor for a continuous period of fifteen years. He served in the war in the Second Minnesota Cavalry from 1863 till the final discharge. In polities he was an enthusiastic Democrat. In religion he was a Methodist at Watertown. He died December 8, 1896, aged seventy-three, his widow dying December 29, 1899, aged seventy-five They rest in Oakland cemetery, Hennepin county. They had nine children, six of whom are living: Sarah V. is the wife of A. J. Tarvin and lives in Indiana; Martha A. is the wife of E. H. Edwards, of Minneapolis; Esther A. is the wife of Isaac Shane, of Nashville, Tennessee; Joel B.; Julia E. is the wife of Mort L. Bradford, of Minneapolis, and Susan M. is the wife of F. W. Walquist, also in Minneapolis. John G., who was a farmer near Grand Forks, North Dakota, died in 1912, and Charles B. and Isabella I. in childhood.

Page 305

HUBERT LOHMAR.

Hubert Lohmar, a farmer of Laketown township and secretary of the Waconia Cooperative Creamery Company, is a native of the county, born on the farm where he now lives, November 15,1863. His parents, Hubert and Regnia (Kirsch) Lohmar, were early settlers in Laketown township and were natives of Germany; he of Prussia and his wife of Loraine. They were married in Illinois and came to Minnesota in 1857 and located on the quarter section of land two miles east of Waconia which was their home during the remainder of their lives. The land was a wild and undeveloped tract and had been occupied by a squatter who had cleared a half acre and built a small shanty. Mr. Lohmar bought his rights for two hundred dollars and entered on the arduous task of pioneer farmers. He later sold fifty acres of the land. He put forty-five acres under cultivation before his retirement from active farming in 1886 when his son Hubert succeeded him in the management of the place. He was killed in the cyclone of August, 1904, during the wrecking of his home by the storm which swept the farm of all the buildings. He was in the house with his son and daughter-in-law but was the only one injured. His wife's death occurred the previous year in February. Two children survive them, John, who is a merchant in north Minneapolis and Hubert. The third son, Jacob, was a farmer in Watertown township and died at the age of forty-eight. Hubert Lohmar grew to manhood on his father's farm and has since devoted all his attention to its interests of which he has had the entire direction for almost thirty years. He has continued the clearing of the land and had reclaimed a number of acres with ditches and tile drainage. The destroying of the buildings in the disaster of 1904 caused a loss of some three thousand dollars but the wreckage was soon replaced by good modern buildings which include a tank barn and ample granaries. Mr. Lohmar has always devoted special attention to dairy farming, keeping a number of cows and engaged quite extensively in butter making before the Co-operative Creamery began its operations. This company was incorporated in 1908 with a capital of four thousand dollars and with Frank Peterson and Andrew Anderson, Mr. Lohmar was associated with the initial movement for its organization. He has ever since been prominently identified with management and increasing prosperity of the enterprise as secretary. This cooperative plan for the benefit of the many producers of dairy products in the county has met with well deserved success and in six years the number of shareholders has grown from forty to seventy. It now numbers one hundred patrons and markets the cream in St. Paul under New York market prices. The receipts from the transactions of its first year of business reached thirty-five thousand dollars and the annual report of 1913 placed that year's receipts at $77,391.04, the yearly expenditure for the operation of the plant is from eighteen hundred to two thousand dollars. The company has erected a now building at Waconia with ample and efficient accommodations. Mr. Lohmar is also a member and stock holder in the Waconia Fair Association, another popular local institution. He was married in 1907 to Alma Weise, whose sister is the wife of Herman Schwitzenberg. They have two sons and a daughter, Alfred, Leona and Kermit. Mr. Lohmar is a member of the Lutheran church at Waconia.

Page 306

FRANK A. LUETKE.

This gentleman occupies a prominent position among the farmers of Watertown township, being the owner and operator of Overview Farm, in section 36, which is one of the beat farms in the township and has been his home from his birth. His life began on this farm May 11, 1872, and he is the son of Carl and Caroline (nee Levin) Luetke, natives of the province of Pomerania, Germany, where the father was born August 29, 1830, and the mother July 17, 1828, and where they were reared and married. They came to the United States and Carver county, Minnesota, In 1865, and obtained a part of a school section of land.

For many years this thrifty and industrious couple lived in a little log cabin without a ceiling. The father worked at day labor in his native land and saved a little money, but he was forced to work hard for a living here. On one occasion, he carried flour from Minneapolis to his farm on his back, and until his own land became productive worked for his neighbors, cutting cord-wood, mowing grass, cradling grain, and doing whatever else they had for him to do. He also took contracts for grubbing land for others, and kept on clearing his own as rapidly as he could. At one time he walked three, miles to and from his work cutting cord-wood, and later he was able to sell quantities of such wood from his own trees..

In 1890 and 1892 the elder Mr. Luetke erected first-class buildings on his farm, to which he had added another tract. He carried on general farming but gave his attention mainly to raising grain. His death occurred August 6, 1913, when he was just eighty-two years, eleven months and twenty-three days old. His wife died in September, 1900. They were members of the Lutheran church at Waconia, and the father was one of its oldest members at his death. All his energies were devoted to the improvement of his farm, but he served for years as a member of the school board of his district and gave the school interests close and fruitful attention. The children of the household were Frank and his three sisters. Bertha was the wife of Rudolph Hilk, of Waconia township. Anna married William Luebke, and died at the age of forty-two, and Augusta is the wife of Herman Vollrath, a farmer in Hennepin county, this state.

Frank A. Luetke grew to manhood on the home farm and obtained his education in the public school in the neighborhood. He took over the management of the farm in 1897, and has since carried on a vigorous industry in general farming, raising alfalfa and fodder corn, principally food for his dairy, but has made dairying his principal concern, keeping regularly not less than twelve cows for milk and sometimes more which number he will increase. He has enlarged the farm by the purchase of thirteen additional acres, and has improved it further by building additions to the dwelling house and barn and putting up a windpump and other desirable structures, has put in a water system and made other improvements in his dwelling house and in his barn.

Mr. Luetke is now (1914) serving his sixth year as township supervisor and for sixteen years he gave the school district excellent service as its clerk, which position he is now holding. He has frequently been called upon to act as administrator or executor in settling up estates and as guardian, for orphan children. He has long been a director of the Laketown Mutual Insurance company, and for a number of years was its vice president 1912-13 he was elected president of the company by the directors. In 1914 he was elected president by a direct vote of the members. In politics he is a Republican, but liberal in voting, and in religious affiliation is connected with the Lutheran church at Waconia. On May 25, 1897, he- was married to Miss Amanda Krause, a daughter of Charles Krause,' a sketch of whom will be found in this work, and, born on the old Krause homestead February 19, 1876. They have eight children, all of whom are living at home with their parents. They are, Edna, Loida, Herbert, Cora, Adella, Gladys, Allen and Lucille. Mr. Luetke is an enterprising and progressive farmer and a public spirited and useful citizen, and is held in well-deserved esteem throughout his and in other parts of the county.

In the last two years he has laid considerable tile for drainage purpose which he says every farmer should do who is in a position that it can be done. He is just beginning in the raising of full blooded stock.

Page 307

FRANK G. LUNDSTEN.

Frank G. Lundsten, farmer of Laketown and township clerk, is a native of the county, born on the farm where he now lives, June 9, 1857, the son of John and Malissa Lundsten. His life has been devoted to his farm and to the interests of the community in which his parents were pioneer settlers. He has watched and shared in the growth and development of the county and recalls many experiences of the early days. Perhaps the most vivid recollection of his childhood is of the visits of the Indians at his home and of the outbreak of 1862 when the white settlers sought protection on the island in Clearwater lake. He grew to manhood on the farm and became apprenticed to the carpentering trade and for fifteen years was a local contractor and builder, engaged for the most part in erecting farm buildings, houses and barns. In 1882 he returned to the farm and has since given most of his attention to its management and is constantly adding to the improvements of a stock farm already well equipped and developed. He has erected new buildings and installed quite an extensive tile drainage system in the low land. His comfortable farm home is situated about a quarter of a mile from the main road from Minneapolis to Waconia and stands on it pleasant elevation. Mr. Lundsten is starting to raise thoroughbred stock and is also a dairy farmer. He is a shareholder in the Co-operative Creamery Co. at Waconia. He is a member of the Swedish Baptist church, of which he has been an active and faithful supporter for years. In 1883 he succeeded his father as superintendent of the Sunday school and has ever since continued to discharge the duties of that position and is still holding the office of church clerk. In his political belief he is an earnest advocate of the principles of the Prohibition party and has been prominently identified with the activities of the organization and a frequent member of its conventions. He has given efficient service as clerk of the district schools for over thirty years and for the past three years has held the office of township clerk. Mr. Lundsten was married in 1884 to Miss Mary Hawkins, of Grove City, Minnesota,. She is a native of the state, born in Red Wing, Goodhue county. Nine children were born to this union, of whom eight survive: Clarence, a railway mail clerk, residing at Jamestown, North Dakota; Amy, living at home; Mabel and Rhoda, who are both teachers in the county; Esther, at present a student in the agricultural college of Minnesota, and Everett, Hazel and Frank, who are still with their parents. Frances Lundstan died when twenty-two years of age and was attending Hamline University at the time of her death.

Page 307

JOHN LUNDSTEN.

John Lundsten, for many years a prominent farmer of the county, was a pioneer of Laketown township and died on his farm there, March 20, 1892. He was a native of Sweden and accompanied by his wife, Malissa Lundsten, came to the United States in 1854 and located in Illinois. For a time he worked at his trade of tailoring in Andover in that state. In 1855, Frederick O. Nelson, the missionary pastor who established the Swedish Baptist church at Scandia, came from Minnesota with a report of the new country which was being opened up and its opportunities and a number resolved to try their for tunes in the northwest. Among them were John Lundsten and his brother-in-law; John Broberg, who went in that same year to Red Wing, Minnesota, where they found employment in cutting wood for river steamers. In the spring of the following year they went to St. Paul and here they heard of the Swedish settlement near Clearwater lake which had been founded by Andrew Bergquist in 1853 and in June, 1856, they set out for Carver county with a yoke of steers and wagon which Broberg had bought. At St. Anthony Falls, the owner of St. Anthony island proposed the exchange of his island for the steers but the sandy soil appeared to be an unpromising investment and the trade was refused. John Lundsten arrived at his destination with a capital of one dollar but he preempted an eighty-acre claim and secured a sack of flour from a merchant in Chaska on credit and began the arduous task of winning a home from the wilderness. He built a shanty and broke some land, exchanging work for the use of Mr. Broberg's team. The first years were attended by the hardships and privations of pioneer life and required perseverance and thrifty management. His first grain crop was destroyed by the grass- hoppers and during that winter he provided for his family by working at sawing wood in St. Paul. In 1858 he bought part of the farm which is now managed by his son, Frank G. Lundsten, and here developed a fine firm property, putting about forty acres of the land under cultivation in his lifetime. He was actively identified with the early history of the Swedish Baptist church and continued to devote every effort to its interests throughout his life and the memory of his services will long be cherished by its members. He was instrumental in starting the Sunday school and was its superintendent for some time and was ever an interested worker in the Sunday school. He also served as moderator in the church for a number of years and took charge of the devotional meetings in the absence of the minister. This Swedish Baptist church was the second of the denomination to be established in this country and was organized by Rev. Frederick O. Nelson, August 1, 1855. The charter members had belonged to the first church at Burlington, Iowa, and were among the first settlers of the Scandinavian settlement near Clearwater lake: P. D. Anderson, Andrew Mattson, Alexander Johnson, Jonas P. Johnson and John Anderson. And on the old records of the church may be found the names of the other pioneers of this vicinity, recorded as joining the organization in 1856. Among them were Andrew Peterson, Andrew Bergquist, Peter Swansen, Engir Bergquist, Alfred Johnson, Swen Bangston, Mangus Johnson and John Lundsten and wife, who joined August 3, 1856. Of the families of these men who helped found the prosperity of this county, only four are now represented in Laketown township, those of Andrew Peterson, Peter Anderson, John Lundsten and John Broberg. Mr. Lundsten was active in all matters of public interest and was elected township treasurer and held this office for four years. His death occurred in his sixty-sixth year. His wife died in 1913, after fifty-seven years spent on the Laketown farm. Five children survive them, Frank G., whose sketch appears in this work; Otto N.; Oscar; Alice, the wife of Rev. L. M. Linder, pastor of the Swedish Baptist church at Duluth, and Emily, who married J. H. Schreiner, now of Pelican Rapids, Minnesota. Otto N. Lundsten was reared on the farm and at eighteen went to Waconia and was employed for a time as a clerk and then accepted a position in the bank at that place. Subsequently he was associated with George A. Du Toit in the Carver County Bank at Chaska, Minn., and then organized and became cashier of the State Bank of Lester Prairie, Minn., where he remained for fourteen years, and in which institution he is still a director. In 1907 he purchased control of the Bank of Hutchinson at Hutchinson, Minnesota, and is the president of that institution. Oscar Lundsten is the manager of the Lundsten Lumber Company at Delano, Minnesota, the Lundsten family being the share holders in the corporation.

Page 308

EPHRIAM F. LUNDSTROM.

Ephriam P. Lundstrom, Hollywood township, was born in Sweden, February 27, 1854. In 1869, a lad of fifteen, he came to the United States with his parents, Andrew and Battri Lundstrom. Having heard of Carver county through friends who had preceded them and were then living in Watertown, they come to Minnesota and located in Hollywood township, where Andrew Lundstrom rented land for a few years, finding employment in farm work. In 1871 he bought eighty acres of new land and began the laborious task of preparing it for cultivation and in the remaining eight years of his life achieved the development of a good fare. He died here in 1879, fifty-four years of age, his wife's death occurring six years later. He had two sons, William, who is the present owner of his father's farm, and Ephriam Lundstrom. The latter assisted his father in the clearing and tilling of his land and worked as a farm laborer at wages which varied from twenty to thirty-five dollars a month. When he was twenty-one years of age he married Annie Swanson, who lived in Hancock township and is a native of Sweden. For a year after his marriage he rented land and then purchased forty acres, much of which was wild land but this his training and experience enabled him to put under cultivation. Besides the arduous work on his farm he spent eleven seasons with the threshing crew employed by Gus Miller of Watertown. After nine years possession of his farm, which had greatly increased in value under his management, he sold it and became the owner of his present property, eighty acres, seven miles south of Waverly in the northern part of Carver county. Here he assumed again the task of developing new land, for only twenty acres of the tract had been worked. He owned a good team of oxen and with these cleared his land and cutting the timber into cordwood, hauled it to Waverly where he sold it for two dollars and a half a cord. He has added steadily to the improvements of the place and has now a prosperous farm, equipped with modern buildings, with forty-five acres under cultivation. He has ever been on the alert for progressive agricultural methods and was the first to demonstrate to his neighbors the feasibility of reclaiming marsh land by draining with tile and in this way has secured some of the richest acres on his farm. He engages in grain raising and also keeps a number of cows, selling milk to the Hutchinson Creamery, Co. Mr. Lundstrom is a member of the Republican party and has taken an active part in the public business of the township, serving on the school board and in other offices. He has a family of five children; Oscar L., clerk of the courts in Carver county and a graduate of the University Of Minnesota; George W., an electrician who is in business in Minneapolis; Edward, who lives on the farm; Florence, the wife of John Monroe, a dealer in agricultural implements in Wright county, and Walter, a student in the state university. Mr. Lundstrom is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church and is a trustee in the church of that denomination at Victor in Wright county.

Page 308

OSCAR L. LUNDSTROM

Oscar L. Lundstrom, the capable and obliging clerk of the district court for Carver county, who was elected on November 3, 1914, to his second term of four years in that office, is a native of Carver county,, born in Watertown township September 19, 1875. His parents, E. F. and Anna (Swanson) Lundstrom, were born in the province of Skaraborg, Sweden, and came to this country with their parents in early life, the father when he was sixteen years old and the mother when she was three. Her parents arrived and located at West Union, Hancock township, in 1857, and the father's family became residents of Watertown township in 1868. The parents in both families died in this county, the mother's father having been burned to death about twenty years ago at the home of his son-in-law, Gus Johnson, with whom he was living at the time.

E. F. Lundstrom, the father of Oscar L., remained in Watertown township until 1884, when he moved to Hollywood township, where he has since been living. He has devoted himself wholly to farming as an occupation, and has won two good farms from the wilderness. He has also taken an active interest in public local affairs and given the. people good service as a member of the school and township boards of Hollywood township. He is a Republican in political affiliation and a Lutheran in religious belief. He has belonged to the Gotha Holm Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown, but is now a member of the Nylunda church at Lake Mary. He and his wife became the parents of five children, all of whom are living. Oscar L. is the immediate subject of this review. George William deals in electrical fixtures in Minneapolis. Edward is cultivating the home farm. Walter is a student at the State University, and Florence is the wife of J. H. Monroe, a. machinist, and resides in Victor township, Wright county, Minnesota.

Oscar L. Lundstrom obtained his academic education in the public schools and the Minneapolis Normal College, and later pursued a course of instruction in pedagogy at the State University. At the age of nineteen he began teaching in country schools, and this occupation he followed for five years in Carver and Wright counties. At the end of that period he was appointed principal of a semi-graded school at Mayer, in which capacity he continued for three years. From 1906 to 1910 he was principal of a four room school at Plato. In the meantime he pursued special work in the line of psychology at the university.

Mr. Lundstrom has served as township assessor, and in the fall of 1910 was elected clerk of the district court. He was the Republican nominee at the primaries, but had two opponents at the election and won the office only after a very warm campaign. At the election of 1914 he was chosen for a second term without any signs of a diminution of his popularity. He has introduced a simplified system of indexing court costs, using two books for the purpose instead of the seven formerly used. . This is a great convenience to his own office and subordinates, the court and the general public, and the system has been adopted in several other counties.

Mr. Lundstrom knows much of the uncertainties of political life and does not depend on a continuance in public office for his career. He is a student of law and expects to practice that as his profession. He is also president of the Sugar City Realty company, which carries on a general real estate business. From his boyhood he has been ardently devoted to athletic sports and for years has encouraged their use in connection with the schools. He plays basketball and is coach for the basket ball team in his home town. Under his guidance and instruction this team played thirty-eight games in a three state tour without losing one, and closed the season by defeating the world's champions, the Oswegos of the state of New York. Mr. Lundstrom is unmarried, but he is not less earnestly and practically interested in the welfare of Carver county, and does his full share of the work of promoting every agency laboring in his community for the good of its people and is an influential force in helping forward all judicious public improvements. He is a genial and upright man and a very useful citizen, and is highly esteemed as such.

Page 309

JOHN LYNCH.

John Lynch, proprietor of the Morning Glory Stock farm in Hollywood township, was born at Belle Plaine, Scott county,, Minnesota, March 3, 1860, of Irish parentage. His parents, Thomas and Ellen (Manley) Lynch, came to the United States in 1854, locating in Scott county, Minnesota, where Thomas Lynch took up government land. This farm was his home until his death March 10, 1881. His wife survived him until January 3, 1914, spending the later years of her life with her son, John Lynch. They had a family of three sons, John, Patrick, a building contractor in Scott county, and Daniel, a farmer in Scott county. John Lynch was reared on his father's farm and there spent his early manhood, engaged in agricultural pursuits. In March, 1900, he came to Carver county and located on school land in Hollywood township. To his original farm he has added until his present property comprises one hundred and sixty acres of fine land, well cultivated, with large modern buildings and every improvement. The rail fences have been replaced by wire and he has dug some three miles of drainage ditches which drain his fields through a dredged ditch into Cruikshank lake. He meets with the same success, through his enterprising methods, in the management of the farm as in its development and engages in both grain and stock farming, keeping a number of cows. In 1891 he was married to Ellen McCarthy of LeSueur county. She died March 15, 1897, leaving two children, Mary Agnes and John Joseph. On September 24, 1900, Mr. Lynch married Margaret Kelly, born at Cleveland, Ohio. Her father, Matthew Kelly, was one of the first settlers of Carver county, coming in 1857 and prominently identified with the early history of Hollywood township. They are members of the Church of the Immaculate Conception at Watertown.

Page 309

PATRICK McGILL

Patrick McGill was one of the early settlers of Carver county, whose farm is now owned by his adopted son, Edward Shovelain, a prosperous farmer of Hollywood township. Mr. McGill was a native of Ireland and for a number of years after coming to this country lived in Pennsylvania where he was employed as a canal boat driver. A man of thrifty habits with ambition, he saved quite a sum from his earnings, with this he made a loan which proved a bad business investment but was the means of his coming to Minnesota. In 1857 he followed the man to whom he had made the loan to St. Paul where he was still unable to secure a settlement but he decided to try his fortunes in this now country and took a preemption claim of eighty acres in Carver county. Here he erected a log house and cleared out part of the farm. Under the homestead law of 1863 he took more land, continuing the improvement of his property and replacing the log house with the home which is the present residence of Mr. Shovelain. He was a man of great industry and native ability who busied himself with his own affairs and found life too strict a taskmaster to permit the securing of much education in his youth or in the participation of public matters in his later years. He died in 1885, seventy-five years of age. His wife was Celia Mulhorm, also a native of Ireland, whom he had married in Pennsylvania. She was married the second time to Michel Campbell, whose son, John H. Campbell, is a resident of Watertown township, but spent the last year of her life in her old home where she died in her seventy-ninth year. Mr. McGill and his wife were among the earliest members of the Catholic church at Watertown. No children were born to them but they reared Edward Shovelain from infancy as their own child and made him the heir of their estate, The latter was born in Minneapolis, December 13, 1858. His father had lost his life in the Mississippi river before his birth. He was reared on the farm of his foster-father and there has always made his home. He has continued the work of developing and improving the property, finding a good revenue in the selling of wood and timber from the cleared land although he suffered the loss of his finest timber through fire. He now has eighty acres under cultivation and good meadow land a prosperous farm well equipped with good buildings which include a large basement barn. Mr. Shovelain recently purchased another farm of eighty acres which he has given to his eldest son, Patrick Shovelain. His marriage to Crascensia Miller occurred December 9, 1886. She was born in Hollywood township, on a farm near her present home, the daughter of Anton and Agathon Miller. The former wag a native of Germany who lived in Carver county several years and later removed to McLeod county. Mr. Shovelain and his wife have eight children, Patrick, who married Louisa Houseladen; Mary, the wife of James O'Hagen of Lester Prairie, Minnesota, and Leo, Frank, Matt, Agatha, Evangeline and Evelain, living at the old home,. Mr. Shovelain and his family are members of the Catholic church at Watertown. His political affiliations are with the Democratic party although he has never sought active participation in political affairs.

Page 309

BENEDICT MAISER.

Having retired from all active industrial pursuits in 1900, after a continuous stretch of useful labor, arduous in its exactions and fruitful in its results, covering a period of forty-six years in this country, Benedict Maiser, one of the leading citizens of Waconia, is enjoying the Products of his toil and rejoicing in the progress and improvement around him, to the development of which his efforts have essentially and substantially contributed.

Mr. Maiser was born in the kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, March 22, 1830, and grow to manhood and obtained his education in his native land, where he also learned the trade of lockmaker. In 1854 he came to the United States and located in Pennsylvania. There he remained six months, employed as a blacksmith, then moved to Hope, Bartholomew county, Indiana, where he worked for two years and a half at the forge. Late in 1857 he came to Minnesota to buy some land for his brother Michael, who was living in New Jersey and who came to this country three years before Benedict. In 1859 he bought eighty acres at Waconia which then consisted of two residences and two stores, and determined to open a blacksmith shop at that place. He did not carry this purpose into effect for some time, however, and in the meantime continued to carry on a blacksmithing business in St. Paul, which he had started soon after his arrival.

In 1863 Benedict changed his residence to Waconia, opening a blacksmith shop, which he conducted for sixteen years. His brother Michael joined him at Waconia but did not remain long. He soon secured employment in the railroad shops in St. Paul and so continued until his death in 1910. They had also a brother Xavier, who was a tinsmith in Philadelphia. Benedict carried on an extensive business at Waconia, making new wagons, sleighs and other such products, employing several journeymen and keeping pace in his operations with the progress of the locality and the demands of an expanding trade. He also bought a saloon, which he conducted for four years.

In 1884 Mr. Maiser sold his blacksmithing business to his son-in-law and took charge of the grist mill, which he had secured under a mortgage sale. He employed a skillful miller and operated the mill during the next sixteen years, rebuilding it three times and enlarging its capacity to 75 barrels a day, installing the roller process of manufacture, which he was among the first to introduce into Minnesota. When the railroad was constructed through Waconia he converted the mill into a merchant mill and continued to so operate it until 1900, when he sold to his son, the present proprietor. He also erected several houses in the village.

Mr. Maiser has always taken an active interest in the public affairs of his home community. He was one of the original incorporators and served as president of the village of Waconia three terms and was treasurer of the school board ten years. He was a Republican in political faith and allegiance in earlier years, but of late has been independent in political affairs. He has no church affiliation and no sporting tendencies, but is attentive to all the claims of good citizenship, and performs all its duties with intelligence and fidelity.

In 1857 Mr. Maiser was married at Hope, Indiana, to Miss Mary Schraefel, who was also a native of Wurtemberg. She died some two years ago, leaving four children: Emily, who is the wife of Daniel Scharmier, of Waconia; Mary, widow of Adam Haberkatten, late proprietor of the hotel at Waconia; Josephine, widow of Anton Kormann, of. California, and Charles, who operates the mill at Waconia.

Page 310

ORLOW W. MAPES

Haying borne the heat and burden of a long day of toil and struggle with the difficulties, of life, accepting trials, winning triumphs, and attaining a substantial and gratifying success, Orlow W. Mapes, one of the respected residents of Watertown, has retired, living at ease on the fruits of labor and secure in the enjoyment of the regard and good will of all who know him.

Mr. Mapes is a native of Greensburg, Trumbull county, Ohio, where he was born November 16, 1844. In the spring of 1855 he came with his parents, George and Serena (Evans) Mapes, to Minnesota and located on Breezy Point, Lake Minnetonka. The father was born in Ohio, the son of Connecticut parents who were pioneers of the Western Reserve. The mother was a native of Vermont whence her parents also moved to Ohio.

The family lived on Breezy Point two years, moving to Watertown township in 1857, securing the farm on which Orlow now lives, being the first settler in the neighborhood. This land was then wild and heavily timbered and belonged to the railroad company, of which it was purchased. In 1856 he had worked at the incipient village of Watertown, helping to construct the first road into it and to erect the first buildings, working for Isaac Lewis who was the leader of the enterprise.

After getting his land Mr. Mapes' energies were devoted to the conversion of it into a farm. He passed the remainder of his days here, putting about twenty acres under cultivation making such other improvements as circumstances and opportunities allowed. His wife died in March, 1879, at the age of sixty years, and here his life also ended on January 24, 1883, aged seventy-six. He had no inclination to official life and never sought or desired a public office. In politics he was a Republican and in religious affiliation a Baptist, but there was no church of his denomination in the neighborhood.

Of the children two died in childhood and one was drowned at the age of twelve. Six reached maturity, the oldest growing to womanhood and marrying in Ohio. The others were: George, who at twenty enlisted in Company D, Ninth Minnesota Infantry, nearly half of that company being volunteers from Watertown. The company was assigned to duty on the frontier, and George was drowned while swimming in the Minnesota river at St. Peter. Mary M. married Hiram McKee and died on the home farm. Zilpha married the late James Young and died in Watertown September 11, 1914. Emma, wife of Henry Clyde, died on their homestead in Morrison county.

Orlow W. Mapes has lived on the present f arm since he was thirteen. He obtained a fair common school education, and assumed the management of the farm in young manhood. He attended the first school taught at Watertown, in 1858, the teacher being William Buck, who afterward enlisted and never returned from the war. Young Mapes' father would not consent to his enlistment, and so, when all his young associates went to the war, he remained on the home farm, and as the result of constant devotion and fidelity became its owner. It adjoins the village of Watertown on the north and has become highly valuable. He has added to it at different times, his whole time and energy for fifty-seven years having been devoted to its cultivation and improvement, and erected the presant dwelling in 1881.

His father helped organize the township and he has himself served ten years as supervisor. He was also for five years a member of the board of county commissioners, having been first appointed to fill out an unexpired term and elected twice with an interval of two years between the terms. His political faith is that of the Republican party, he frequently being a delegate to its conventions. He was made a Free-mason in Watertown Lodge, now being its oldest member he has filled several of its official positions, and has ever been ardently devoted to its welfare.

October 27, 1880, he was married to Miss Betsey, daughter of Edward and Sally (Biggs) Hamlin, pioneers who settled in Carver county in 1857, and five years later moved a short distance into Wright county, where the mother died at the age of seventy-three. The father died in Florida, aged seventy- seven. Two sons of the family, Wellington and Perry, are residents of Florida as is their maiden sister Mary. Mr. and Mrs. Mapes have four children. Chester operates the farm; Addie and Myrtle are Carver county teachers, and George assists his brother.

Page 311

FRANK A. MATTSON.

During the last seven years, beginning in 1907, this enterprising and progressive farmer and dairyman of Watertown township has been the secretary and general manager of the Co-operative Creamery company of Watertown, one of the leading industrial institutions in this part of Carver county. Prior to his selection for the important position he holds in connection with this industry Mr. Mattson had fully demonstrated his fitness for it by the enterprise and success with which he managed his own business eked the earnest and serviceable interest he showed in the welfare of his township and county and all classes of their residents.

Mr. Mattson was born on a farm partly west of and partly in Watertown township about forty years ago. He is a son of Nels and Christine (Moody) Mattson, both born in Sweden. The father came to this country in 1854 and located for a short time in Illinois. He then came to Minnesota, as is shown in the "History of the Minnesota Valley," and was soon afterward married to Miss Moody in Watertown, she being at the time of the marriage a resident of Scandia, a village of the early days near where Waeonia has since been built. During the boyhood of Frank A. the father bought the farm on which the son now lives, and all the subsequent years of the latter's life have been connected with it as his home.

When the father bought the farm it was partially cleared and under cultivation. It was 160 acres in extent, lying one mile southeast of Watertown, and he paid $3,000 for it By the time of his death, which occurred on the farm in 1890, when he was sixty-three years old, he had the greater part of the land yielding good crops. His widow survived him a few years and then she too passed away at about the age of sixty-nine. They were the parents of five children. The first born, John P., was born in Illinois and graduated from the State Normal School at Winona. He taught in the public schools of Carver and Wright counties and also at Hope Academy in Moorhead. He is now the proprietor and editor of "The Warren Sheaf," published at Warren, Marshall county, this state, and has been doing editorial work for twenty years. He is a man of strong local influence in the councils of the Republican party. Huldah, the second child, became the wife of P. T. Nelson, and lives at Cokato, Minnesota. Charles Albert lives on a part of the family homestead, and Anna is an invalid and unmarried.

Frank A. Mattson has taught school about twenty terms, about half of the time in Carver county and the other half in Marshall county, keeping up his connection with this industry until about thirteen years ago, and all the time maintaining his home at the family residence of his parents. While he was teaching he attended summer schools several terms, being eager for his own improvement and to keep up with the progress of his profession. About twenty-five years ago he and his brother Charles bought the old home, and then Frank began to give his attention exclusively to farming. Subsequently the brothers divided the farm, Frank taking 105 acres and the family residence as his share, and his brother Charles getting the remainder.

Since the division of the place Frank has rebuilt the dwelling house, making a commodious and attractive residence of it, and has brought his farm to such an advanced state of improvement that it is one of the best in the township. He was among the first men in the neighborhood to put in tile draining, and has laid about 2,000 feet of it. By this means he drained a pond and reclaimed about fifteen acres of land, which is now some of the best he has. His farm is now very productive and furnishes a fine illustration of the value of tile, draining, and this has induced other farmers to follow his example in this respect.

Mr. Mattson follows general farming, rotating his crops with a view to the best results, but his principal industry on his farm is an active and extensive production of milk for the Co-operative Creamery company of Watertown, of which he has been secretary and manager for the last seven years. Politically he is classed as an independent, and his religious affiliation is with the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown. He was married September 7, 1899, to Miss Selma C. Pearson, a daughter of Swan and Lovisa Pearson, born in Watertown township and educated in its district schools. Seven children have been born of the union. They are Edna E., Cyrus M., Lilsy L., Wilma C., Anna A., N. Orville, and Ruby L.

Page 311

FRANK S. MAYER.

The State Bank of Young America, which is a flourishing and progressive institution, was opened for business on July 2, 1900, with a capital stock of $10,000 and the following officials: August P. Truwe, president; Henry L. Simons, vice president, and F. S. Mayer, cashier. The accumulated surplus is now $10,000 and the deposits aggregate $250,000. It is well managed, giving strong proofs of progressiveness and public spirit.

F. S. Mayer, the capable, accommodating cashier and controlling spirit of the bank, was born at Jordan, Scott county, October 13, 1880, a son of Albert and Emma (Bell) Mayer, who kept the City hotel and American house at Glencoe for twenty-five years. He died about nine years ago. Ten children were born in the family, and nearly all of them as also the mother are now living in St, Paul.

F. S. Mayer was educated in the public schools assisting his parents in their business during his boyhood. At an early age he began to take an earnest interest and an active part in local public affairs, his merit being recognized by his election as village treasurer of Young America, in which he served ten years, and also bv his being chosen clerk of the consolidated school board of Young America and Norwood. He was the founder and is now the general manager of the Eagle Publishing company, of Young America, and is vice president of the State Bank of Hamburg.

For two years Mr. Mayer was employed in the Bank of Norwood and afterward in the First National Bank of Glencoe. He was then cashier of the bank of Plato f or one year and a half. When the State Bank of Young America was started in 1900 he was selected as its cashier, and this position he has filled since. He was married June 4, 1903, to Miss Hulda Lambert, a daughter of Charles A. Lambert, of Young America. They have one child, Francis L., who was born in January, 1906. A daughter, Elizabeth Marie, died in infancy.

Page 312

WILLIAM C. MEULENERS.

Representing the second generation of usefulness to Carver county, and especially to the township of Dahlgren, and being active, energetic and useful in many ways, William C. Meuleners is a credit to citizenship, an effective force in public affairs and an example and a stimulus to farmers in enterprise and progressiveness.

Mr. Meuleners was born in Carver county March 30, 1866, and here has passed the whole of his life. He is a son of Peter Joseph Meuleners, a native of Holland, who came to this country in 1862, thus becoming one of the first settlers in Carver county. He was actively engaged in farming and ever took an interest in the affairs of his township to near his death when he was about ninety-eight years of age.

William owns 214 acres of fertile land, which is one of the best and most productive farms in Dahlgren township. He has erected good buildings and other improvements, it being now one of the county's desirable and attractive country homes. He has been active in all the deities of citizenship, taking part in the affairs of the township as its treasurer for several terms and always manifesting a cordial activity in all lines of development and improvement. He has also rendered valuable service to the industry as president of the Farmers' Creamery association at Cologne.

For several years he served as director of the Laketown Mutual Fire Insurance Company and has also been its general agent. Ever since twenty-one he served on the school board nine years as director and eighteen as clerk, a position he still holds.

Mr. Meuleners was married February 4, 1890, to Miss Catherine Schug,. the daughter of Lawrence and Margaret (Mohrbacher) Schug, who was also born and reared in Carver county. They have six children, Peter J., Lawrence W., Margaret A., Sophia G., Francis W. and Clara A. The religious faith of the family is that of the catholic church, holding membership in St. Bernards at Cologne.

Page 312

ALBERT MEYER.

In a country in which the voice of the people is the controlling force in governmental affairs communities are judge as frequently by the character and capacity of their public officials as in any other way. The men they select to conduct their public business must in the long run be typical of themselves and truly represent their trend, aspirations and achievements. Tried by this standard the residents of Carver county may safely challenge comparison with the people of any other section of the country in all fundamental and essential requirements.

One of the officials on whom they may rely with full confidence to sustain high rank in manhood and citizenship is Albert Meyer, register of deeds, who has been thoroughly tried and never been found wanting in any element of genuine worth, native and acquired ability or devotion to the public weal. In November, 1894, he was elected to the office he has so long and so acceptably filled for his ninth consecutive term. In length of continuous service he is the oldest public official in the county, and in all particulars he is one of the best known and most highly esteemed men in the county by both its own people and those in other parts of the state.

Mr. Meyer is a native of Hanover, Germany, where his life began in August, 1854. His father was a merchant and the president of a bank, and the son was reared amid surroundings of more than ordinary comfort and liberality. He attended good schools including a course of special training in a gymnasium. When the Franco-Prussian war began he was eager to enlist on the side of his country, but his wish was not gratified. He passed much of the way period at Bremerhaven, and there saw 3,000 French prisoners in captivity and under military guard.

Mr. Meyer prepared for the university but was not able to follow the course. His brother George did, however, and he is now editor of the Freie Presse in Lincoln, Nebraska. When Albert was approaching the seventeenth anniversary of his birth, after which he would have been subject to military duty, he emigrated to the United States and obtained employment in a store in Now York city. A few months later, before the end of 1872, he came to Minnesota under the advice of a physician, who told him the climate of Canada or this state would be beneficial to his health. In this part of the world he roughed it without shirking, doing railroad work in Manitoba, lumbering in the woods of Northern Wisconsin, and other strenuous tasks as opportunity offered or circumstances required. The work was hard but it gave strength to his sinews and flexibility to all his faculties.

At length he obtained a position in a store at Young America, which he filled for a year. He next passed one year in Northern California, mining and doing whatever else came to his hand. He was invited back to take charge of a store in Norwood and a few months later purchased the business with money obtained from his old home in Germany. His capital was limited and the credit system prevailed almost universally, so he sold his store and began buying grain and operating elevators. This line of merchandising he continued until 1882, when he took charge of the Union hotel at Norwood, which he conducted for seventeen years.

In November, 1898, Mr. Meyer was elected register of deeds for Carver county, and he has held the office ever since, being reelected at the end of every term. He is a Republican, but has never been an offensive partisan although an active worker for the success of his party. His successive re-elections have been due to his superior fitness for the office, his devotion to its duties, his genial manner and obliging disposition.

Mr. Meyer was married at Norwood in 1877 to Miss Lizzie Fabel, who died in 1904, aged forty-five years. Eight of their children are living. Henry D. is editor of the Journal Review of Carver. George is manager of a cigar factory at Chaska. Two other sons are in the county and two of their fathers sisters reside at Chaska. He has another sister living at Excelsior, and his brother Ernest is a resident of Norwood.

Page 313

JOHN MEYER.

This enterprising and esteemed citizen of Carver county, who died in his home in the village of Watertown, November 23, 1904, at the age of seventy-five years, was born in the department of Trier, Rhine province, Germany, in August, 1829, and came to the United States in 1857, locating in Wisconsin. In the spring of 1858 he came to the village of Watertown, and for one month worked for Isaac Lewis here. At the end of that period he took up a pre-emption claim, paying the government of $1.25 an acre for his land. He at once put up a log cabin, in which he lived alone until fall.

Having everything ready as far as possible to start a home, in the fall of 1858 Mr. Meyer returned to Wisconsin, and in Madison, the capital of that state, he was married to Miss Mary Leifermann, who was born in Westphalia, Germany, December 17, 1834, and had come with her parents also to Wisconsin. Her father spent his latter years at Mankato, in this state, and during the latter part of the year her husband was in the war be was on the farm with her in Watertown township.

For two or three years after his marriage Mr. Meyer did not clear much of his land, because he did not have the facilities for the work nor money to pay for having it done. In fact, he was obliged to dig ginseng root as a means of providing for the needs of his family. In the spring of 1859 lie bought a two year old heifer, and she afterward had a male calf. He then bought another male calf, and when the two were a year and a half old he broke them to the yoke and so acquired his first ox team. After his return from the war he sold that team for use in the pineries for $200. He then also sold a cow, getting $50 for her, and with the $230 he finished paying for his land, which he at one time greatly feared be would lose by default.

Mr. Meyer enlisted in the Union army early in 1864, and after an ordinary soldier's life of about a year and a half he was discharged in July, 1865. He at once returned to his Minnesota home and began a more extensive clearing of his farm. He exchanged work with his neighbors, getting the use of their ox teams for logging and other heavy labor, got in good crops and thereafter made a living on his farm. He raised wheat and hogs for the market, taking what he bad to sell to Minneapolis and consuming four days on a trip with ox teams. Mr. Clawson, an old army comrade, lived on the road, and Mr. Meyer was accustomed to pass the nights with him when he made these trips to and from Minneapolis.

In the course of a few years Mr. Meyer built a larger and better log house on his farm, and about 1881 he erected the building which is now the home of two of his sons and was remodeled and enlarged by them in 1911. He turned the farm over to them in March, 1888, and they have since built the barn which now adds much to its value. Before selling the farm to his sons, however, the father added forty acres to its size and put it all under cultivation, devoting it to general farming and raising live stock for beef. He also set out an orchard of 500 fruit trees of choice varieties, and this has since yielded valuable crops for many years. Mr. Meyer bought a house and lot in the village of Watertown and into which he and his wife moved in June, 1895, and where he lived until his death, his wife still living there until January, 1909, when her health failed and she went to live with her sons on the f arm until she died.

Mr. Meyer was an active citizen, energetic in connection with public improvements but never an officeholder. He adhered to the Democratic party until after the Civil war and. then became a staunch Republican. In his native land he belonged to the Catholic church in which he was reared, but after coming to America he gave little attention to church matters. He was not a hunter by inclination, although in his early years here he killed game to supply his table, but after he began to raise his own meat he laid his gun aside, saying that hunting and farming do not go well together. To the last, however, he was fond of good horses and knew their points, having been a teamster in early life, and even in his old age would insist on going with his sons when they went to buy horses and prevail on thorn to abide by his judgment in making their purchases.

He died, as has been stated, on November 23, 1904, and his wife died on April 9, 1909, aged seventy years. They were the parents of seven children: John and Henry, who, now own and live on the family homestead; Jane, who is the wife of John Rumpza, of Watertown; Frank, who lives at Dent, in Ottertail county, this state; Casper, who is also an Ottertail county farmer; Albert, who died in 1891, it the age of twenty-one, and August, who owns another farm in Ottertail county. Their father gave these three, Frank, Casper and August, a section of wild land in that county, and they still own it.

In 1888 John and Henry Meyer bought the homestead of their father for $3,500, and since that time they have conducted all their business in partnership. They have bought an additional tract of eighty acres in Wright county, two miles distant from their home, and both farms are devoted mainly to raising cattle for beef and milk. They keep regularly about twenty cows for milk for the creameries and also fatten beeves, selling about $1,000 worth a year on an average. They breed from the best bred bulls for beef cattle available to them, and take every precaution to get the best results. For a number of years they have used mules in doing their farm work instead of oxen or horses.

JOHN MEYER, the older of the two brothers, was born October 20, 1859, and at the age of thirty-three married Miss Wilbelmina Zuege. They have three children living, all at home, Henry, Willie and August. John Meyer, the father of these children, has long been a stockholder in the Co-operative Creamery company, and he is now and has been for some years, one of its leading and most energetic officials.

HENRY MEYER, the younger brother, was born October 21, 1862. He was married at the age of twenty-nine to Miss Martha Zuege, a sister to his brother John's wife. Their children, seven in number, are also all at home. They are Mary, Emma, John, Carl, Albert, Wilhelmina and Franck. The brothers are wide-awake, earnest and progressive citizens, as well as enterprising business men, and take a serviceable interest in the welfare of their community.

Page 313

FRANK MIESELER.

A native of Carver county and ever actively devoted to its welfare and advancement, Frank Mieselor of Dahlgren township, has made his citizenship useful, his record giving him a high place in the esteem and good will of the general public.

Mr. Mieseler was born in the town of Chaska November 6, 1861, and is a son of Frank and Katharine (Wagner) Mieseler, the former born near Cologne, Prussia, and the latter in Pennsylvania. Coming to Carver county in early life they were married here. Their first home was in Chaska, where the father worked several years at his trade of blacksmith. He then bought a tract of land in the northwestern part of Dahlgren township, which he sold after farming and improving it for five or six years. He then purchased a farm near Chaska on which he passed the remainder of life, dying December 26, 1907. The mother's death occurred July 13, 1909. Five of their children grew to maturity, and of these Frank was the oldest.

Frank Mieseler was reared and educated in Carver county, where his life has been passed as a successful farmer. He has taken an active part in the public affairs of Dahlgren township, having served as township clerk and for ten years was school treasurer. He was one of the promoters of the Carver County Creamery company at Augusta, of which he has been president, and which he has served as secretary and manager during the last fourteen years. The creamery was purchased in 1898 from the Poppitz company, and under a progressive and vigorous management has been conducted successfully ever since.

Mr. Mieseler owns two farms amounting to 256 acres of good land in Dahlgren and Chaska townships, which he has brought to a high state of cultivation and productiveness and, improved with good buildings. He was married in Carver, Minnesota, in May, 1887, to Miss Crescentia Gestach, who was born in Dahlgren township December 16, 1863, and is a daughter of John and Afra (Schneider) Gestach. Mr. and Mrs. Mieseler have four children, Frank J., John A., George H. and Edmund J. All are members of Guardian Angel Catholic church at Chaska.

Page 314

ANDREW G. MILLER.

The late Andrew G. Miller, who died at Watertown, December 9, 1911, after a residence of fifty-four years in Carver county, was one of the pioneers of 1857 and from his arrival to the end of life he was of great progressiveness and usefulness, being a leader in some lines of activity and a helpful force in others. He was born in Sweden April 20, 1845, and came to this country in 1853 with his parents, John and Marie Catherine Miller, locating in Warren county, Pennsylvania, and coming to Carver county in 1857.

Andrew came with A. J. Brown and Peter Monson, sketches of whom will be found in this work. He and young Brown were boys and Mr. Monson was married, and the boys drove ox teams all the way except when on the lakes or river. John Miller preempted land on Swede lake, and there both parents died, the father attaining the age of eighty years. Andrew was one of three sons, the others being John P. and Charles. John served in the Civil war, and died at Watertown in 1910. Charles is still living on the old homestead near Jonas P. Akins.

Andrew G. Miller. helped to clear the homestead and clerked in John A. C. Flood's store at Watertown until after the beginning of the war, when he enlisted in Company B, Ninth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, in which several other young man at Watertown were enrolled. He remained in the army to the end of the war, having been owing to physical disability, assigned to duty as ward master at Fort Snelling, there receiving his discharge. On March 11, 1865, while he was still at the Fort, he was married to Miss Anna Justus, a daughter of Daniel and Anna (Olson) Justus, of whom more extended mention is made elsewhere. She was their third child and was nine years old when she came to Minnesota.

Her parents were really the first settlers in Watertown township, the village of Watertown not being started until the winter following their arrival on Swede lake three miles southeast of where the present village stands. Her recollections of early days are vivid and embrace thrilling incidents. Her parents lived six weeks under a bark covered shack before a log house was completed, during which period her mother nursed an infant. The first night the rain fell in torrents and they taking refuge under an umbrella and an ironwood tree. She recalls having seen as many as fourteen deer hanging on that tree at one time, all having deer killed by her brother Peter, who was a very skillful hunter.

A part of her duty was to hunt the cows in the woods, suffering terribly from mosquito's, but, although often kept out until after dark, she was never molested by Indians or wild beasts. The first winter was very lonely and dreary, and during it a Mr. Abraham Hokimson left home and became lost. The neighbors fired guns to attract him, but he wandered on and at length reached Watertown, where a few shacks had recently been erected. The next morning he returned and told of the discovery of the new village. John P. Miller and Philip O. Johnson built houses in the neighborhood the next spring, other settlers coming shortly.

Mrs. Miller had lived five years as a child in the family of a physician at Zanesville and Etna, Ohio, thereby almost losing the knowledge of her mother tongue. Site was liberally supplied with good clothes. But they were destroyed in a fire which burned the upper part of their new house, the bedding of the family and transient land seekers or settlers being destroyed. She dug ginseng and selling it to Isaac Lewis, thus partially replenishing her wardrobe. Her parents helped to start the Swedish Lutheran church and took an earnest interest in school affairs, but her father was averse to public office and never held an official position.

Her first visit to Minneapolis was with Christine Anderson, Catherine Tinnerstett, Andrew G. Miller, and Olof and Andrew Anderson, his son, they mainly constituting the first class confirmed in the church. They were from six o'clock in the morning to six in the evening walking the thirty-three miles. She now makes the trip over this Luce railway line in a little over one hour. Indians often came to her father's house and could not be satisfied without food, and they always ate all that was given. Her brother Peter once spent five months with them and was given up as lost, but returned bringing a man, "Charley Indian," with him. He wished the young girl to marry him, being so persistent that she was obliged to leave home. He afterward enlisted with her brothers, but soon deserted, and took, part in the uprising, being one of the thirty-eight who were hanged at Mankato December 26, 1862.

At the Indian outbreak Mrs. Miller's mother took refuge on the island in Oakey lake. The daughter worked in the family of General Van Cleve, in Minneapolis, about a year, and then taught the school at Swede lake three terms; and, after her marriage, she taught the first school in the new home district. She was married on the eighteenth anniversary of her birth, her husband soon buying a farm of 160 acres on the Mayer road one mile and a half south of Watertown.

The young couple built a log house in which they lived nearly twenty years. In 1884 they built the present house, he hauling all the lumber for its two stories from Minneapolis through severe storms. Mrs. Miller has been in the church since her confirmation at the age of fourteen.

Mr. and Mrs. Miller became the parents of twelve children. George U., who was proprietor of the Market hotel, Minneapolis, died May 2, 1900. Addison C. died in infancy. Ella A. is the wife of Charles G. Johnson, of near Watertown. Amanda is the wife of E. J. Akins, proprietor of Union View stock farm. Julia L. died aged twelve. Alvin C. is a resident of Watertown. Walter L. is a farmer in Watertown township and the son-in-law of Alfred J. Brown. Clarence T. lives in Moscow, Idaho. Victor E. is a mechanic and lives with his mother. Cordelia E. died March 3, 1908, aged twenty-one. Herbert G. is at home, and Anna B. O. is a nurse.

Mr. Miller had been township assessor twenty-one years and school clerk for as long. He was earnestly interested in all local affairs and zealous in promoting the welfare of his township. For a continuous period of forty-four years, as long as he was physically able, he operated threshing outfits, introducing the first one used in the county in 1865, and al- ways obtaining the latest improvements as soon as their value was established.

Page 315

PAUL MOHRBACHER.

This esteemed resident of Cologne is one of those who have known the village and taken part in its activities throughout its whole existence. He is one of those who presided at its birth, watched over and protected it in childhood, and have contributed to its advancement through all its subsequent career. Mr. Mohrbacher, in fact, laid out the village and his father built the first house within its limits, a house that is still standing in good preservation, and which is now his own home.

Mr. Mohrbacher was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1847, March 6, and came to the United States and Carver county in 1856, with his parents, Adam and Josephine (Kling) Mohrbacher, The father preempted the land on which the village of Cologne now stands, and lived on the farm he redeemed from the wilderness until his death in 1889. The mother died in 1861. Besides Paul, who was the fifth, their children were: Mary, who became the wife of George Gutler, who was at one time proprietor of the local mill. She died in 1907. Katherine married William Gehlen, of Young America, and died at Glencoe in 1911. Margaret is the wife of Lawrence Schug, a farmer of Benton township. Elizabeth is the wife of Frank Wickgenhauser also of Benton township. Adam has been for many years proprietor of the hotel and saloon in Cologne. The father was a farmer and, being a shoemaker, was the first of that craft in Benton township.

Paul Mohrbacher has been engaged in farming all his life. He now owns the greater part of the land that belonged to his father. Some of it, however, has been laid out in town lots and sold as such. He also owned the first saloon in the town, and was its proprietor for forty-one years. He next opened a general store in company with his father-in-law, Henry Meuwissen. They were thus associated for a number of years, but is now the head of the general store of Mohrbacher & Son.

Some years ago Mr. Mohrbacher, Mr. Meuwissen, Mr. Guettler and Bongard united and started a flour mill in the village, he being connected with this mill for a period of ten years. It is now under the proprietorship of Mr. Guettler's sons, operated by George Philip and Edward. In company with Mr. Meuwiseen Mr. Mohrbacher was also engaged in the lumber trade for a number of years.

Mr. Mohrbacher was mayor of Cologne two years and treasurer of the village and township two years. He was married in 1872 to Miss Gertrude Meuwissen, a daughter of Henry Meuwissen, with whom he was so closely associated in business. Fourteen children were born of the union. Anna married Joseph Willems, a harness maker at Cologne. Henry married Mary Hochhaussen, and is now conducting her father's former saloon in company with his brother James. Edward married Thracy Schepers, and is in the store with his father. James married Josephine Schepers and is a partner with Henry in the saloon. Margaret died in 1908, the wife of Hooper Hoen. Elizabeth is the wife of William Willems. Katharine is the wife of Peter Schepers. Peter Paul died in youth. Gottfried, who was with his father in the store and for some years a salesman on the road, died in 1907. Caroline was the wife, of Arthur Bruers, railroad agent at Cologne, and died in October, 1912. Bernardt died young. Paul, Jr., married Minnie Wittsack and is associated with his father. Anna Gertrude died young.

Page 315

CARL FREDERICK. MONSON

Carl Frederick Monson, for many years a prominent farmer of Hollywood township, whose place is now owned by his grandson, G. A. Sandquist, was born in Sweden, February 27, 1824. He came to the United States and to Minnesota in 1868 and in the fall of that year bought one hundred and twenty acres of timber land In Hollywood township. Here he erected a small house which was incorporated in the present farm residence as a kitchen. His first barn is also part of the farm equipment, being used as a shed. During the first years he divided his time and labors between the arduous task of clearing the land and working at his trade of blacksmith, operating a shop on his place. His unfailing industry accomplished the clearing and cultivation of fifty acres and he bought another tract of land which he sold a little later. He died May 29, 1911, at the close of a long career of honorable and well earned success. He was married in Sweden to Christina Johnson, who is still living on the old place in the home of her grandson, Mr. Sandquist. They had two daughters. Sophia Monson died in her thirty-fifth year and was survived by her husband C. M. Anderson, of Hollywood, and nine children, Minnie, Ella, Nellie, Ida, Emil, Freddie, Clara and Amanda Anderson. The younger daughter, Ida, married John Sandquist and they had one son, G. Algart. They lived with her father until the death of Mr. Sandquist in 1882, just two years after their marriage. She later married John Samuelson and lived in Hollywood, where she died in 1893. Three children were born to this second marriage, two of whom, Eddie and Esther Samuelson, are living, Victor . dying at the age of eleven years. George Algart Sandquist, with the exception of a few years, has always lived in his present home, his birthplace. He was born April 1, 1882, and was reared in the home of his grandfather. When he was twenty-three years of age he bought a farm in Wright county and spent some four years there, returning in 1910 to his old home where he has since resided. Mr. Sandquist is one of the younger generation of farmers in Hollywood who are capably continuing the great work of agricultural development started in the pioneer days and his farm, known as the Breezy Hill Stock Farm, attests to efficiency and native ability in his chosen career. He has reclaimed some low land, having laid some five hundred feet of tile and is still extending his drainage system. As a stock farmer he is particularly interested in raising Holstein cattle and in dairy farming. He is a shareholder in the Co-operative Creamery company at Watertown and a member of the board of directors. As a good citizen he takes an active interest in matters of public import and is a progressive member of the school board. His political affiliations are with the Republican party. Mr. Sandquist was married September 27, 1905, to Alma Cederstrom, who was born on her father's farm in Hollywood where her parents, Elias and Albertina Cederstrom now live. Mrs. Sandquist enjoys a wide circle of friends in the county and is a woman of charm and culture and unusual intellectual attainments. They have a family of two sons, John Walter Melvin and Howard Addison. Mr. Sandquist and his family are members of the Swedish Lutheran church.

Page 316

FRIEND L. WILLIAMS

Friend L. Williams, who has been filling the position of superintendent of the public schools of Carver county with credit to himself and benefit to the schools for the last twelve years, was born near Salesville, Ohio, August 30, 1872. His father's people were of the staid Quaker families of New Jersey, and his mother's people were of New England parentage. Representatives of both families were among the early residents of Ohio.

Professor Williams was born and reared on a farm and began his education in a country school. After completing its course of instruction he entered the Quaker City High School, and from that institution he was graduated in the class of 1893. He then matriculated at the Muskingum College, from which he was graduated in 1896. He has since pursued a postgraduate course at the University of Minnesota.

In the fall of 1896 he began work as a teacher in the schools at Smith lake, Wright county this state, and from there. he was called to the principalship of the schools at Watertown. He held this position four years, or until he was elected, in the fall of 1902, to the superintendency of the Carver county schools, in which capacity he has given the public excellent progressive and stimulating service ever since. He has also been an active and fruitful factor in the general educational work of the state, having held a number of positions of trust and importance in this connection.

As a community worker Professor William has always been zealous and energetic, taking an active part in all work designed to aid in building up community life. He was one of the original incorporators of the Watertown Telephone company, has served on its board of directors from the start, and daring the last five years has been its president.

Page 316

SAMUEL MONSON.

Samuel Monson, who is one of the most highly respected residents of Carver county, is the son of early pioneers in this part of the state and has passed all but the first two years of his busy life on the farm in section 20, Watertown township, which is now his home. He has resided on this farm fifty-seven years, locating on it when it was still a part of the unbroken wilderness and helping through many seasons of arduous labor to develop it to its present state of fruitfulness and value. In fact, as he came to this farm when he was, but two years old, he has never known any other home.

Mr. Monson was born at Pittsfield, Warren county, Pennsylvania, August 21, 1855, a son of Peter and Margaretta. Monson, natives of Sweden, and reared, educated and married in that country. They came to the United States in 1852, and after stopping for a short time at Fall River, Massachusetts, passed two years and a half in the state of Now York and a similar period in Pennsylvania. In 1857 the father brought his family direct to Carver county, Minnesota, and took up the land in the farm now owned and occupied by his son Samuel on a pre-emption claim, but afterward entered it as a homestead.

The first house occupied by the Monson family on this, land was a shack covered with alm bark, and the second was, built of logs hewn on the inside. Some years later the father built a better dwelling at another place on the farm, and finally erected the house in which Samuel now lives intending it as a home for his declining years. He was born August 21, 1816, and died April 1, 1891. His widow survived him a little over thirteen years and died May 4, 1904, aged eighty-eight years, four months and one day, retaining a very unusual state of vigor and activity almost to the last.

Peter Monson came to Minnesota first part of May, 1857, and secured his land then. He returned to Pennsylvania for his family and brought his wife and children direct to their new home, which he had crudely prepared for them on his former visit. Soon afterward he was obliged to go back to Pennsylvania again to dispose of some live stock he had left in that state. He was gone a full month, and his wife and child were alone in the cabin during the whole of that period. When he returned from the East he brought an ox team and a heifer with him, and was accompanied by Alfred J. Brown, of Watertown, who also had an ox team. They made the journey by way of the lakes to Milwaukee and drove their oxen and cattle from that city overland to this county. Mr. Monson reached his cabin in the depth of winter through snow hub deep for his wagon. . The son considers the most agreeable sight of his life that of his father arriving with the outfit.

Before his death the father cleared about sixty acres of his land, and but little if any has been cleared since. He was able to make progress for himself without the aid of his neighbors, and did his trading at Chaska or Carver, twenty miles distant from his home. But he was frequently obliged to go to St. Paul on the steamboat Antelope, making the trip down in the morning and back in the afternoon, driving home at night. The first road crossed near his home, and Philip O. Johnson and Peter Oberg were his nearest neighbors. The early roads wound all around to avoid low places and the danger to be feared in them.

The elder Mr. Monson was an expert with the broadax and helped to build many of the early houses in his neighborhood. He served as township supervisor for a number of years, and also helped to organize title first Lutheran church, but in his later years he belonged to the Mission church at Watertown. In politics he was a Republican. His family consisted of two sons. Peter John Monson, the older of the two, was born in Sweden in 1851. He now lives near Dassell, Meeker county, this state. He grew to manhood on his father's farm and helped to clear it. His father gave him a farm in Wright county, reserving the home place for his second son, Samuel.

Samuel Monson worked with his father from his boyhood on the farm which has been the scene of all his labors and the object of his greatest care. He carries on an active industry in general farming, but for the last fifteen years has kept a tenant to farm the place. He is also interested in the co-operative creamery, and like his father, adheres to the principles and theories of the Republican party, but has never sought or desired a political office. He was married December 31, 1888, to Miss Olivia Christina Sparlund, who was born in Sweden February 23, 1867, and came to Hollywood township, this county, in her childhood, with her parents, John and Catherina Sparlund, who arrived here in 1874 and settled on a farm on which they died, the mother at the age of fifty-seven and the father at that of eighty-four.

Mrs. Monson died February 13, 1914, aged forty-seven years, lacking ten days, and after a little over twenty-five years of married life. By her marriage with Mr. Monson she became the mother of three children. Walter Theodore, the first born, died in childhood. George E. L., aged eighteen, and Mabel Malvina, aged nine, are living at home with their father. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown, to which his wife also belonged during her lifetime.

Page 317

HON. PATRICK WILLIAM MORRISON.

No citizen of Minnesota is more widely or favorably known than Hon. Patrick William Morrison, of Norwood, judge of the Eighth judicial district. He was born March 12, 1866, in Faxon township, Sibley county, eleven miles from his present home and three and one-half miles north of Belle Plaine. His parents were Martin and Mary (Foley) Morrison, the former a native of County Clare, Ireland, and the latter of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, but a daughter of parents who came to the United States from County Kerry, Ireland.

Martin Morrison became a resident of this country in 1848 but lived in Boston until 1855. In that year he married and at once joined the tide of emigration westward and became a resident of Minnesota. In 1856 he pre-empted land in Sibley county, and on that farm the judge was born, the sixth of eleven children. The farm is still in the possession of the Morrison family. The mother died in 1877 and the father on March 13, 1911. In 1862 he enlisted in the First Minnesota Heavy Artillery, under Captain James Egan, and was credited to Carver county. He served in that company to the and of the war, and was not the only member of his family whom patriotism led to the battlefield. His brother Michael served in the Mexican war and in a Missouri regiment in the Civil war, while another brother, Patrick, was in an Ohio regiment in the Civil War, and is supposed to have died in the South.

At the close of his military service Martin Morrison returned to his Minnesota home he was a pioneer in Sibley county and one of the first men there to own horses and a wagon. He helped to organize his township and the county as a private citizen, but afterward filled acceptably a number of local offices. In politics he was a Republican and in religious faith a Catholic, holding membership in St. John's church, and being one of the few of its communicants who was able to assist in erecting the church building. All the members of the family still belong to that church.

Eleven children were born to the parents, seven of whom are living, the three sons besides the judge being, John, a live stock and real estate dealer at Prior Lake, Scott county; Matthew, foreman for the state railroad and warehouse commission at Staples, Minnesota, and Michael, who is living on and farming the old family homestead.

Patrick William Morrison obtained his early education in country schools and at the Belle Plaine and Sauk Center academies, being graduated from the latter. At the age Of seventeen he began teaching school, studying law at night while being so engaged. He completed his preparation for the, bar in the office of W. H. Leman, at Henderson, and was admitted to practice in 1891. He at once located at Norwood and began a professional career, to which his subsequent years have been wholly devoted.

In 1894 Mr. Morrison was elected prosecuting attorney as a Republican, and during eight years tenure of that office he conducted many important prosecutions, including one of a defaulting county treasurer, in which he recovered about $10,000 from the treasurer's bondsman. In 1902 he was a candidate for the Republican nomination for congress, but was beaten at the primaries. Two years later lie was elected judge of the Eighth judicial district, which includes Le Sueur, Sibley, McLeod, Scott and Carver counties, being the Republican nominee and obtaining a handsome majority, and in 1910 he was re-elected without opposition. Appeals have been taken from his decisions in 104 cases, in 83 of which the state supreme court has sustained him, reversing him in 19 and modifying his decisions in 2. This is a record that has probably been surpassed by no other judge in this state.

Judge Morrison's standing as a jurist is such that he is often called upon to preside in other courts. In the winter of 1914 he was requested by the judges of the district court of Ramsey county to try the celebrated police draft case in St. Paul, and his fairness and courtesy in the performance of this delicate duty won him admiration from all concerned. In June, 1914, he was a candidate for nomination as associate justice of the supreme court, but was unsuccessful in the primary election. His reputation as a jurist is firmly fixed; and on many questions his decisions have practically made now law.

In his vacations Judge Morrison finds exhilarating recreation in fishing and hunting big game in the Northern woods. He was married January 29, 1895, to Miss Bridget Agnes Fahey, of St. John's, who was reared in the same neighborhood as himself. They have had nine children, four of whom are living: Ethel, Stella, Gerald and Donald. The members of the family all attend the Catholic church. The judge makes numerous public addresses, and in these ever emphasized the duties of citizenship. He is a member of the State Bar association and the Biographical Committee of the Eighth judicial district.

Page 318

EDWARD MURPHY

Edward Murphy, a farmer in Hollywood township, is a native of Minnesota, born in Minneapolis, May 21, 1859, the son of Edward and Margaret (Wallace) Murphy, who were both natives of the Emerald Isle, the former from County Limerick and his wife from County Carlow. Edward Murphy, the senior, was one of the pioneers of Carver county, settling here in 1860. Prior to this he had lived for several years in New York and New Jersey and had then come west to Dubuque and from there removed to St. Anthony where the family resided for about six years. On locating in Hollywood township he took advantage of preemption rights and secured a homestead, paying one dollar and a quarter an acre. This land was six miles west of Watertown and lay a distance from any highway. Later the Winstead road was built past the farm. He cleared his land which was heavily timbered and had it all under cultivation, developing a fine farm property which is now owned by his son, James Murphy. He was one of the original members of the Catholic church at Watertown. His death occurred in his sixty-third year, May 6, 1890. The death of his wife at sixty-three years of age had preceded his just two years. They had a family of seven children, Mary, who lived at home and died at the age of forty; Katie, the wife of Daniel Keefe of Winstead, Minnesota; Edward John, a farmer in Hollywood township; Martin, for thirty-five years employed as engineer in iron works at Minneapolis; James, living on the old homestead, and Margaret, who married Frank Sexton, a plumber in Minneapolis, the son of Thomas Sexton, one of the early settlers of Carver county and the owner at one time of the present home of Edward Murphy. Edward Murphy was reared on his father's farm and with the exception of five or six years spent in Minneapolis has always lived in Hollywood township. As a young man he was employed in farm work or worked in the pine woods. It was during this period that he was two years in the employ of Thomas Spain, whose only child, Johanna, became his wife. Mrs. Murphy was born March 22, 1870, on the farm which is her present home and there she was reared and married. Her parents, Thomas and Margaret Spain, were both natives of County Tipperary, Ireland, who made their first home in this country in New York state. When the call for troops was made in 1861 Thomas Spain was among the first to go to the aid of his adopted country, and after, three months service as a volunteer, he re-enlisted in the regular army, serving until the close of the war. Soon after this he was married and in 1869 came to Carver county and bought the land in section fifteen, of Hollywood township, which is now occupied by his daughter and son-in-law, Edward Murphy. At the time of his purchase but a few acres of the eighty had been cleared and Mr. Spain gave every effort to the development of his farm and when he had it well under cultivation added another eighty acres to his property. The present farm home was erected by him about twenty years ago. He died April 25, 1909, seventy-five years of age. The death of Mrs. Spain had occurred nine years earlier in her sixty-third year. Mr. Murphy has continued the improvement of the former Spain farm and has erected several new buildings. He conducts a profitable milk business, keeping about twenty cows. Mr. Murphy and his wife are members of the Catholic church at Watertown where their parents were communicants. They have eight children, Thomas, Edward, Michael, Margaret, Mary, Johanna, Katie and Martin.

Page 318

ICHABOD MURPHY.

No citizen of Carver county is more widely or favorably known or more highly esteemed than Ichabod Murphy of Watertown township, who has lived between the Mississippi and the Minnesota rivers for nearly sixty years and in Carver county about forty. His farm is the northeast quarter of section 1, the extreme northeast corner of Watertown township and the county, and is twenty-five miles distant from Minneapolis. It is conveniently located with reference to the older lines of transportation and the new Luce line crosses it directly, giving its owner additional facilities for travel and shipping and greatly increasing its value.

The old homestead of the Murphy family in Wright county was taken up on a pre-emption claim in 1856 by Mr. Murphy's father, James Murphy, who came to this region from Clark county, Illinois, accompanied by his wife, whose maiden name was Hannah Parmenter. Both were born in Ohio, but they were married in Indiana, where Mr. Murphy took up his residence after reaching manhood. Riley Sturman, also of Illinois, came with them and the children they then had. They all traveled overland with teams of horses, and both Mr. Murphy and Mr. Sturman brought cows with them. They came to this state in search of cheap land and spent several weeks in making the trip.

Mr. Sturman had taken up a claim in Wright county in 1855 and had been here to see the country. His report of its promise and possibilities induced Mr. Murphy also to come hither, and after his arrival he too took a claim to 160 acres about a mile from the farm now belonging to his son Ichabod. There were very few settlers in the neighborhood at that time, but many came in 1857 and 1858, and in those years nearly all the idle land was taken up. On the farm on which he then settled the father died in 1902, at the age of sixty-nine, the mother passing away two years later.

At the time of his death the father had about forty acres of his farm under cultivation. His first shelter on it was a bark covered shanty, which the family used until a log cabin could be built. Six or eight years later he built a better cabin of hewn logs, and about two years before he died he erected a fine modern residence. The farm is one of the best in that part of Wright county. The Crow river runs through it, and it has many other natural advantages and has been highly improved by industrious and skillful application of the approved modern methods of farming.

James Murphy was a staunch Democrat in his political faith, but he had no taste for public life and never held a political office. His whole time and energy were devoted to the improvement of his farm and the rearing of his family, except what he gave to the duties of citizenship. His offspring numbered five besides lchabod, who was the second child in the order of birth. Louisa became the wife and is now the widow of Riley Sturman, who accompanied the family from Illinois to this state. She still resides in Wright county Samuel, who was a farmer in Wright county and a Union soldier in the Civil War, died in middle life. John, who was a Hennepin county farmer, also died in middle life. William owns and lives on the old family homestead, and Josephine is the wife of Calvin Stewart and lives on a Wright county farm in the vicinity of the town of Delano.

Ichabod Murphy was born August 10, 1841, in Decatur county, Indiana, and was in his fifteenth year when he came to Minnesota. He helped to clear the home farm, being among those who cut the first timber on it. This consisted of the finest oak, maple, basswood, ash, butternut and other trees, and it was all burned up. At the age of eighteen he began working out on neighboring farms at 50 cents to $1 a day. He also helped to haul provisions from Minneapolis, and did whatever else he found to do. Wild game was abundant so that the farmers were not often at a loss for meat, and the skins of the fur-bearing animals were readily marketable commodities. But the principal resource for cash money, and almost the only one in the neighborhood, was ginseng root, and Mr. Murphy dug and sold quantities of this.

In September, 1862, Mr. Murphy enlisted in the Firth Minnesota Mounted Rangers under Colonel McPhaill, a regiment that was credited to Wright county. He served thirteen months in the Indian campaign. The regiment was divided into four companies, and the one to which he belonged was assigned to escort duty, guarding trains, paymasters and other interests in transit from place to place. At the end of thirteen months of service he was discharged, and he then became possessed of some timberland in Hennepin county on which he made some improvements. In June, 1864, he again enlisted, joining Company F, Eleventh Minnesota Infantry, under Captain John Plummer, which soon became a part of the Army of the Cumberland. Mr. Murphy was again assigned to escort and guard duty, and so was prevented from taking part in any battle, but he was in constant duty and near enough to hear the uproar of the battle of Nashville although not participating in it.

Mr. Murphy was discharged from military service in June, 1865, and at once returned to his farm. This he continued to improve until his marriage on April 7, 1871, to Miss Rhoda Stewart, a sister of Calvin Stewart, the husband of his sister Josephine. His brother, William Murphy, married Clara, another sister of Mr. Stewart. In 1871, after his marriage, Mr. Murphy took up a homestead of 160 acres in Redwood county. Three years later he obtained a clear title to big land and sold it. He then moved to the farm on which he has since made his home and now lives, which he had owned several years.

This farm was formerly owned by Mr. Murphy's father, who had a whole section. When the son became the owner of it only five acres were cleared and there was no house on it. In 1871 he built a part of the present dwelling house and rented the firm. During the next three years the tenant cleared about ten acres more and had it all producing crops. All Mr. Murphy's subsequent years have, been passed on this farm and another near it which he owns also, having about 200 acres in the two. He cut the timber into cordwood, which he hauled six miles to Delano and sold, and thereby helped along the improvement of his land. He now has about 100 acres under cultivation and carries on a very active general farming industry.

For a number of years Mr. Murphy was a stock drover, driving cattle, sheep and hogs to Minneapolis, but during later years he has shipped his stock to market, keeping up an extensive trade in this line.

In political affiliation Mr. Murphy is an active and loyal member of the Democratic party, zealous in its service and influential in its local councils. He frequently goes as a delegate to its conventions and helps to keep it up at all times. Fraternally he is a Master Mason, and belongs to the lodge of the order at Watertown, but he is not a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. His family consists of six children: James, who lives on a farm adjoining his own; Ira, whose home is in Houston, Texas; Hannah, who is the wife of L. H. Baldwin, of Fairmont, Minnesota; Maud, who is I the wife of Arvin Broat, of Martin county, this state; Arvilla, who is the wife of Edward Johnson, a farmer at Mound, in Hennepin county, and Richard, who is still living with his parents at the family home.

Page 319

ANDREW NELSON,

Andrew Nelson, of Hollywood township, was born in Sweden, November 2, 1855, and came to Carver county with his parents, Andrew P. and Anna Louise (Jones) Nelson, when he was but ten years of age. His father came direct to Minneapolis from Sweden in 1865 and a few months later located in Carver county near Watertown. In 1870 he bought eighty acres of timber land in Hollywood township and moved his family into the log house which then occupied his land. He devoted the rest of his life to the development of this farm, clearing the land and erecting new buildings and succeeded in bringing it to its present prosperous condition before his death in 1884. His wife continued to live here until her death some twenty-five years later when the place was sold and is now owned by their daughter, Ida, the widow of J. P. Miller of Watertown. Andrew Nelson and his wife had ten children, six of whom survive them: Andrew and George, who live in Wright county; Ida; Albertine, the wife of Elias Cederstrom, a farmer in Hollywood township; Christine, the wife of A. G. Landberg of Watertown, and Cecilia, who married Nelse Johnson and lives in Wright county. As the oldest son, Andrew Nelson shared with his parents in the hard labor and privations of the early days on the new farm. His education was necessarily sacrificed to the demands of farm work which was the livelihood of the family. He assisted his father in the clearing of the land and remained at the old home until he was twenty-five years of age. He then bought his present farm, which at that time was one hundred acres of wilderness, and entered again into the task of converting a forest into cultivated fields. He worked for the first year with a team of oxen, burning off the timber and later selling some as cord wood at Mayer for a little over a dollar a cord. Under his unfailing industry and well trained management, the work progressed rapidly and in four years the land which he had cleared was producing an average of thirty-three bushels of wheat to the acre and he had a crop of nine hundred bushels of grain. In this year, 1884, he married Anna Louise Swanson, also a native of Sweden, and brought his wife to the log cabin which had been his home for several years. He has met with great success in the business of farming, a success which is the result of many years devoted to work with no shrinking from hard tasks. He now has fifty-five acres of fine land under cultivation and takes a creditable pride in the appearance of this farm which has been his career as well as his home. The present comfortable residence was built about fifteen years ago and a number of good farm buildings furnish ample equipment for a modern farm. He is a Republican but has found little time in his life to take any active participation in political matters. He is a member of the Free Church at Watertown. Mr. Nelson has three children, Esther and Timothy, who live at home, the latter renting the farm, and Sam, who owns a farm near his father's place. Some years ago, Mr. Nelson decided to move farther west and journeyed through the western states with this in view but returned to his Carver county farm, content that this should continue to be his home.

Page 320

EDWARD NEWSTROM.

Edward Newstrom, a farmer in Watertown township, is a native of Carver county, born on the farm where he now lives, May 9, 1872. His parents, Andrew and Ann Eliza (Bjork) Newstrom, came to this country from Sweden in 1863, locating in Watertown township. Edward Newstrom was the youngest in a family of seven children and with the exception of a few years spent in Minneapolis, has always made his home on his father's farm. In his early manhood, he worked for four years in Minneapolis and then returned to Carver county and assumed the management of the farm. After the death of his father in 1899 he became its owner, buying the interests of the other heirs. The estate comprises one hundred acres of fine productive soil which was developed by Andrew Newstrom from its primitive wildness. The pleasant farm home has erected by the latter in 1884 but the large barn and farm buildings and other modern improvements have been added by the present owner. Mr. Newstrom engages in stock and grain farming, meeting with success in both lines of business. He was married June 18, 1910, to Nora Akins, daughter of Jonas P. Akins, and they have two children, Berenice and EIvira. Mr. and Mrs. Newstrom are members of the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown.

Page 320

JOHN AUGUST NEWSTROM.

John August Nowstrom, of Minneapolis, a wholesale and retail produce merchant of that city, was born in Sweden, February 1, 1856, and is the son of Andrew M. Newstrom, for many years a farmer of Watertown township. The latter left Sweden in 1863 and brought his family direct to Carver county, Minnesota, where the parents of his wife, Ann Eliza Bjork, had settled in 1861. Mr. Bjork had come to the United States in 1856 and had spent five years at Batavia, Illinois, before removing to Carver county. Andrew Newstrom and his family experienced much hardship during the long journey to their now home. Eight weeks were spent on the ocean but it was on proceeding west from New York that they encountered the greater difficulties and delays, for the country was then in the throes of the great civil war and the prevailing disturbance held them on the trip up the Mississippi for an indefinite time. The greater part of the journey was made by boat for there were no railroads north of Dubuque and from St Paul they came up the Minnesota river, finally reaching Carver county after six months of tedious travel. Here they found frontier land where the early Indian trails had not yet been replaced by roads and conditions were much disturbed from the Indian outbreak of the year before when the settlers had been forced to take refuge on an island in Clearwater lake. The work of the latter on their farms had received a setback and there lingered a fear of another uprising, but Andrew Newstrom went about the task of winning a home for his family in the wilderness and built a log house on the school land which adjoined the Bjork farm. When this land was put on the market he purchased forty acres at five dollars an acre and later added to this tract, buying school or railroad land at different times until he owned a farm of one hundred and forty acres, most of which he cleared and developed into the fine farm property now owned by his son, Edward Newstrom. In 1880 he erected the present house and some years later bought a home in Watertown, where, after retiring from the farm, he lived but a short time before his death in 1899, at sixty-eight years of age. His wife survived him until her eighty-fourth year, dying in 1913. Her brother, Peter Bjork, who came to this country about the time of the beginning of the civil war, enlisted and served his newly adopted land loyally, during the struggle for its preservation. Seven children were born to Andrew and Ann Eliza Newstrom: John August, of Minneapolis; Andrew Raynold, a traveling salesman, living in Minneapolis; Charles F., who is engaged in the milling business at Lester Prairie in partnership with John A. Newstrom; Hilda Sophia, the wife of Professor Youngquist, a member of the faculty in Gustavus Adolphus college at St. Peter, Minnesota; Emma, whose death occurred soon after her marriage to Mr. Haroldson, now an eminent student and experimenter in agricultural science; Anna Maria, Mrs. Jensen of Minneapolis; and Edward, who is the present owner of his father's farm. John A. Newstrom was but seven years of age when his parents settled in Carver county and he grew to young manhood on the homestead in Watertown township, sharing in the trials and hardships of pioneer life. In 1874, at the age of eighteen, he went to Minneapolis where he has continued to make his home with the exception of two years spent on a farm near Lester Prairie, Minnesota. For twenty-six years he was engaged in the shoe trade and then entered the produce business, selling flour, butter and eggs and operating both a wholesale and retail trade, which have been marked by steady and prosperous growth. He handles most of the output of the Lester Prairie mill in which he is partner and owns a large flour warehouse and a double brick building which he erected in 1913. Mr. Newstrom is a Republican but is most interested politically in local affairs. For four years he has given capable service as assessor of the eleventh ward. He takes active interest in temperance work but is not a Prohibitionist. In this and in all the questions of life, he believes in respecting the right of the individual to his own opinion He carries this liberal persuasion more particularly into his political and religious views and is out of sympathy with any effort to chain the belief a of men to any man made dogma. The residence of Mr. Newstrom is at 1003 East Franklin avenue.

Page 320

AUGUST NOERENBURG.

August Noerenburg, a prominent farmer of Hollywood township, is a native of Germany, born in Prussia, October 7, 1865, and came to Carver county with his parents when he was nine years old. His father, Fred Noerenburg, is a relative of Fred Noerenburg, president of the Minneapolis Brewery Co., find the cousins were childhood companions and schoolmates in the old country. The former came to the United States in 1872 and located in St. Paul where he found employment as a laborer for two years and then decided to invest in some of the new uncultivated land which was offering great opportunity to the ambitious and persevering settler. In 1874 he came to Carver county and became the owner of sixty-acres of school land in Hollywood township for which he paid six hundred dollars. This tract had no buildings on it and but three or four acres cleared. A few years later he purchased forty acres more of wild land and so entered on the laborious work of winning a farm from one hundred acres of wilderness. He bought another forty acres in 1884, paying over eleven hundred dollars but this last addition was partially improved before his purchase. During the earlier years while he was clearing his place he made his living in various ways, working as a laborer on other farms and selling cord wood and timber cut from his land. He has continued the improvement of his farm throughout the years of his occupation, putting some forty acres under cultivation himself and adding new buildings from time to time. He is now living in his seventy-fourth year on this place which has been his home for forty years. His interests, politically, have always been with the Republican party. He is a deacon in the Lutheran church at Hollywood where he has been a devout member for many years'. He was married in Germany to Fredericka Hatz, who died October 29, 1906, aged seventy-two years. They had six children, four of whom are living in Carver county: William, who lives on the old farm; August; Augusta, the wife of Carl Bauman of Hollywood and Lena, the wife of Carl Ludka of New Germany. The eldest son, Albert, left Minnesota a number of years ago and is thought to be living in California. The other daughter, Emily, married Frank Heather and lives near St. Bonifacius, Minnesota. August Noerenburg, has been a resident of Hollywood township since childhood and was reared on his father's farm where he assisted in the clearing of the land and received a thorough training in farm work and management. Since 1889 he has lived on his present farm of one hundred and ton acres. Part of this was included in the old homestead and was land from which he had removed the timber and prepared for cultivation during his years at home. He has engaged in mixed farming and keeps a number of dairy cows and has been eminently successful in all his agricultural ventures. His farm is equipped with an attractive home and fine large barn. Through his great interest in the public welfare of the community which is his home Mr. Noerenburg has always been actively identified with the affairs of the county, giving valuable service in a number of offices. For six years he was township supervisor and for two years chairman of the board of supervisors. He served as road overseer for several years and is the present supervisor of roads in Hollywood township. He is a member of the Republican party. He married Emma Luebke, April 26, 1889. She was born in Watertown township, the daughter of Henry Luebke. They have ten children, an interesting family who have all revealed unusual native ability for mechanical inventiveness and occupations. Two of the older sons, Otto and Fred, are employed in garages, the former in New Germany and Fred at Glenwood City, Wisconsin. John Noerenburg, the oldest of the family, is a teacher in Claremont, Minnesota, and the other children, Lillie, August, Louis, Herts, Edna, Rueben and Elnora are at home. Mr. Noerenburg and his family are members of the Lutheran church at Hollywood.

Page 321

ARNOLD NOTERMANN.

Arnold Notermann, a prominent farmer and businessman of Chanhassen township, was born in Limburg, Holland, August 15, 1847, son of Theodore and Elizabeth Notermann. In 1863, a lad of sixteen, he accompanied his parents to the United States. Theodore Notermann, who had been a farmer in the old country, brought his family directly to Carver county, which he had heard of through friends who had located here, and invested his capital of five hundred dollars in forty acres of wild land. With the assistance of his son, Arnold Notermann, fields were cleared and cultivated and capable management and diligent labor enabled them in a few years to add eighty acres more to the farm. For this they paid eleven hundred dollars, just double the amount which would have purchased the tract two years earlier. Theodore Notermann died here in 1883, aged eighty-one years and his wife survived him until 1895, making her home with her son, Arnold. There were three children in their family, Arnold, Reinhear, who settled on a neighboring farm and lived there until his death about twenty years ago, and Gertrude, who married John Derhaag and lives in Chanhassen township. For a number of years previous to his death, Theodore Notermann had been unable to share in the farm work and to Arnold and his sister, Gertrude, fell the task clearing the wilderness and developing the farm. The sale of the timber as cordwood gave financial aid in the struggle of the first years. But thrift and unfailing industry were met with steady prosperity, and after putting eighty acres in cultivation, Arnold Notermann added another forty acre tract to the estate. For some time his principal farming interest was in wheat raising but of later years he has engaged extensively in dairy farming. He is a share holder and for eleven years was a director of the Co-operative Creamery Company at Victoria. With Henry Rietz he was instrumental in starting the co-operative creamery station at Victoria, the first meeting for its organization resulting from their efforts. Soon after the incorporation of this industry, in 1895, Mr. Notermann established the first store in Victoria, in company with his father-in-law, Charles Diethelm and the latter's son, Michael Diethelm. Two years later the elder Diethelm withdrew from the firm and Mr. Notermann's son, Michael, who had been employed as clerk in the store, became a partner and has since, with his father, bought out other interests and is the owner of the business which conducts a large and successful trade in this vicinity. Michael Notermann was born in 1878 and as a young man has displayed commendable ability in his business career. His brother, Frank Notermann, is associated with him in the management of the store representing the interests of his father. Arnold Notermann was married in November, 1875, to Theresa Diethelm, daughter of Charles Diethelm, a worthy pioneer of Laketown township, whose sketch appears in this work. Nine children were born to this union, John, who was a farmer in Wisconsin and died in 1910; Carol; Joseph, living at home, a thrashing machine operator, and also a proficient workman at the trades of blacksmith, carpenter and mason; Charles, the manager of the home farm; Mary, who married Matthias Schneider, October 27, 1914, and lives on a farm in Chanhassen township; Frank; and Andrew, Susan and Frances, still residing with their parents. Mr. Notermann and his family are communicants in the Catholic church at Victoria, in which his father and mother were early members. He takes an active interest in political questions and is an ardent supporter of the Democratic party.

Page 322

JOHN A. OBERG.

Having reached the age of seventy-seven, passing nearly all of them in useful labor, through which he accumulated a competence and won the enduring respect and good will of all, John A. Oberg, one of the successful and prosperous farmers of Watertown, is living retired enjoying the calm evening of life on the excellent farm he redeemed from the wilderness.

He was born in Smoland, Sweden, June 16, 1837, and was reared on a farm obtaining a common school education. In the summer of 1858, with his parents, Peter and Catherine (Isaacson) Oberg, he came to and located in Watertown township. The father bought a pre-emption right to 160 acres, his title coming direct from the government. Edward Akins now owns this land, which, through industry, has been converted into a productive and valuable farm and an attractive rural home.

Peter and Catherine Oberg passed twenty years of their subsequent life on that farm, but finally died at Watertown in old age, he surviving his life companion but a few months. Peter cleared and put under cultivation thirty-five acres, burning the finest timber. They were among the original members of the Swedish Lutheran church. The children besides John A., were Johanna, who became the wife of J. P. Akins and died in 1880. Isaac is a retired farmer at Ironton, Minnesota. Adolph P. died July 19, 1914. A further account of his life will be found elsewhere in this volume. Matilda is the wife of Alfred J. Brown, of Watertown. Gustavus F. was killed in California by an electric light wire in November, 1912, at the age of sixty-two.

John A. Oberg was twenty-one when he came to Minnesota. He worked for others until April 15, 1865, when he enlisted in the Minnesota Heavy Artillery, with Alfred J. Brown and eleven other men of the township, and is one of the four survivors of the number, Mr. Brown, Jonas P. Akins and P. O. Johnson being the others. In the winter of 1866 he was married to Miss Anna Anderson, a native of Sweden and the daughter of Olaf and Kajsa Anderson, who came to Watertown in 1858, a young woman, with her parents, who located in section 22 on the south side of Swede lake. There the father died at the age of fifty-one and the mother at sixty- five. Four of their daughters are living, none, however, being in Carver county. Mrs. Oberg died April 29, 1905.

After marriage Mr. Oberg paid $400 for 160 acres of wild land to a man who claimed title to it but had cleared only half an acre and had no buildings. Mr. Oberg has cleared some forty acres of this and erected a house in 1905 to take the place of the dwelling he put up soon after acquiring the land. He has also bought an adjoining eighty acres, now having one of the township's choicest and most valuable farms. Ho carries on a general farming and a dairying industry.

Mr. Oberg has taken no interest in public life except to aid in the selection of the best men for the various official positions. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church at Watertown, in whose affairs he takes an earnest interest and an active part. He and wife became the parents of six children, one of whom died in infancy and another at the age of eleven. Of the four living daughters, three are still members of the family circle. They are: Malvina, who was a Carver county teacher for a number of years, and Alma and Hannah. Anna, the second of the four, is the wife of Swan Freed. All these ladies are zealous in the service of the Young People's Society of the church.

Page 322

Adolph P. Oberg

Adolph P. Oberg, who died on his farm at Watertown in 1914 at the age of sixty-nine, was born in Sweden June 10, 1845, and crossed the ocean in 1858 with his parents and family including a brother, John A. Oberg, a sketch of whom appears on another page. He was a strong and active youth of thirteen and soon found plenty of work in the pine woods, on the log drive in the spring and in the industries in Minneapolis. He was for some time in the employ of a Mr. Judd, one of the leading men of that city; and, saving his earnings, bought a tract of wild land at $10 an acre. Later upon inheriting about $1,000 from his father's estate, he bought more, making 115 acres, part being within the corporate limits of Watertown. Mr. Oberg conducted this farm unti1 1905, resigning the management to his son, Edgar T., the present proprietor.

Mr. Oberg was married in Minneapolis to Miss Sophia Forsberg, also a native of Sweden. She came to the United States in young womanhood, and is still living on the family homestead. Her husband erected the buildings, the dwelling being one of the oldest in Watertown. He followed general farming and early engaged in producing milk for the Co-operative Creamery, in which he was a shareholder. Their family consisting of two sons and one daughter are Anton C., a graduate of the University in the class of 1907, and now a mining engineer in Duluth; Edgar T., and Edith C.

EDGAR T. OBERG has a well founded reputation as one of the progressive farmers and wide awake and resourceful businessmen of Carver county. He was born in the house in which he now lives October 7, 1879. He was graduated from the State Agricultural College in 1901, and at once took charge of his father's farm, though for four years working under his father's direction.

He early manifested an intelligent interest in the Farmers, Co-operative Creamery, being in 1904 elected secretary and manager, a position he filled for about two years and a half with credit to himself and benefit to all concerned, since then he has continued his interest as a stockholder, and producer of milk. He keeps twelve to fourteen cows regularly, a fine large bank barn with atone foundation, built by his father. In 1897, much facilitating the advantages of dairying.

Mr. Oberg is clerk of Watertown township as he was once before; also served one term as township assessor. He is a Republican, working earnestly for his party, as he does on behalf of all worthy undertakings On November 8, 1905, he was united in marriage with Miss Alice E. Swanson, a daughter of Charles and Caroline M. (Miller) Swanson whose life story is briefly told on another page. Two sons and one daughter result from the union, Curtiss Roland, Erwin Leroy and Dalice Louana.

Mr. Oberg and wife are active workers in behalf of the Young People's Society of the. Swedish Lutheran church, and all the beneficent agencies connected therewith, as is Mr. Oberg's mother and as was his father.

Page 323

THOMAS O'GARA.

Thomas O'Gara, who settled in Hollywood township during the early days, is one of the few survivors among the pioneer farmers of this vicinity. He is a native of Ireland, born in County Roscommon in 1830 and came to the United States in 1848 after sharing in the sufferings inflicted by the famine in his native land. For several years he worked on farms in Ohio and Illinois and in the fall of 1855 came to St. Paul where he expected to join Patrick McDermott, an old friend, whose sister had married a brother of O'Gara's. Mr. McDermott was not in St. Paul but had gone up the Minnesota river to take a claim and Thomas 0 'Gara followed him and spent the next few years working in Stillwater and along the river. Patrick McDermott was killed near St. Peter by a failing tree. In the spring of 1856, Mr. O 'Gara came to Carver county to look at the new land and choose a claim. He was accompanied by Thomas and Edward Murphy, Lawrence Connolly, Con Shevelin, Patrick Hutch and Harry and James O'Hagan and they made the trip on foot over the primitive trails of the wild country,. Jim Burns, an early settler, who met his death through an accident soon after this, acted as their guide over the territory. All the members of the party took claims but Mr. O'Gara was one of the few who retained permanent possession of their preemption rights. Thomas and Edward Murphy finally shared one quarter section and Lawrence Connolly continued to hold his land although he did not make his home there until 1868. Thomas O'Gara moved on his homestead in 1858 and became one of the small band of men who were building up the farm land of what was later Hollywood township. In his home in this present prosperous agricultural district, he recalls the many hardships and arduous labors of the frontier life when the farms were far from any highway and the stock was stolen by bears. There was plentiful sport for the hunter in these days. Mr. O'Gara had no gun for deer hunting, but enjoyed the duck shooting. When he cleared his first acres he owned no team and would pay for the use of oxen for one day with three days of his own labor at splitting rails or rolling logs. His first team was a pair of three year old, black steers which he bought in Minneapolis for sixty dollars and broke for farm work himself, their first yoke and harness still hang in his barn and from his first purchase he has always considered a Studebaker wagon an indispensable part of the equipment of his farm. He built a small bark covered shanty for the first home, but soon replaced this with a larger house which has since been remodeled for a barn. His present residence was erected in 1870. He now owns one hundred and forty acres of good farm land, eighty acres of which is part of the homestead, the remainder being railroad land which he bought later, and has seventy-five acres under cultivation. He encountered the difficulties and hard work of his early life with native energy and remarkable endurance. During the first years on his farm, he was accustomed to walk the thirty-six miles to Minneapolis, carrying his shoes over his shoulder, and worked as hod carrier for the city contractors. Mr. O'Gara has always been actively identified with the of the township and with Michael Burns survives among the twelve men who met at Helvetia when the township was organized and give, the name of Hollywood by Matthew Kelly. These two pioneers and Patrick Craven, Lawrence Connolly and James McKindly all lived on farms adjoining his. He is a member of the Catholic church at Watertown and attended the first Catholic services held in the neighborhood, in the log cabin of William Welch. Mr. O'Gara was married in St. Anthony, August 4, 1857, to Catherine Connolly, sister of Lawrence Connolly. She was his faithful companion throughout the forty-two years of their life together and died April 22, 1899. They had a family of eight children, Rosa, a maiden of Minneapolis; Mary, who married William Orr and died at forty-two years of age; Maggie, the wife of Norman Bebo of Edmonton, Canada; Jane, living in Minneapolis, the wife of J. C. Sharon; Bridget, who married Gus Butterfield, also a resident of Minneapolis; Thomas; Garrett and Larry, who both live at Edmonton, Canada. Thomas O'Gara lives on his father's farm which he manages. He married Ellen Herron, who is a native of Hollywood, born on the old Herron place near her present home. They have six children, Catherine, William Michael, Margaret, Thomas, Nellie and Mary.

Page 323

OLOF M. OLSON.

Olof M. Olson, a farmer in Hollywood township, is a native of Sweden, born in Vermland, October 20, 1854. He has been a resident of Carver county and a farmer in Hollywood since he was sixteen years old. His father died in his childhood and in 1870 he, with his mother and older brother, Halvord Olson, came to the United States and joined friends in Carver county. The latter bought eighty acres of wild land in Hollywood township and here the family made their home. Olof assisting his brother in the clearing of the land. Some years later, Halvord Olson took a claim in Renville county but after proving up on the land he returned to his Carver county farm, where he is now living. He has never married and his mother made her home with him until her death in 1886. During Halvord's residence in Renville county, Olof Olson took charge of the farm and managed it until 1882 when he bought his present place, paying twelve hundred dollars for a quarter section of timber land in section 6. The land adjoined his brother's farm and had been the property of Judge Van Derbergh for a number of years. The present prosperous farm is the result of many years of untiring effort and thrifty management. Mr. Olson has devoted his life since his sixteenth year to the business of farming. He received his only schooling in the old country, the many duties of farm life in the wilderness preventing him continuing his education. He cleared much of the land on the first farm and has put sixty acres under cultivation on his own place and has reclaimed low land with a drainage system which he is extending and improving. He sold some of his land and now owns sixty acres. In addition to farming this, he has for a number of years had the management of the Halvord Olson farm. He has engaged in both grain and stock farming, keeping a number of cattle and hogs. Mr. Olson is a Republican and interested in public affairs. He has given capable service in the offices of road supervisor and school trustee. He was one of the organizers of first Swedish Lutheran church in this vicinity of which he has always been a faithful supporter. His first marriage was with Carrie Nimquist of Wright county in 1882. She died five years later, leaving one daughter, Ella. Mr. Olson was married in 1892 to Augusta Nelson, a native of Sweden and the daughter of Olof Nelson. Her parents are now living near the Olson farm. Four children have been born to this second marriage, Rainie, Nellie, Elphie and Lydia. Rainie Olson lives on the home farm and is a partner with his father in his farming interests. He married Ellen Eklund and has two children, Ruby and Troy.

Page 324

GEORGE OTTINGER.

George Ottinger, proprietor of the Minnehaha Source Stock Farm, was born in Laketown township, January 13, 1862. His father, Tobias Ottinger and Michael Wasserman, who accompanied him to Minnesota, were the first settlers in Laketown township. Tobias Ottinger was a native of Bavaria, born near Munich, October 24, 1824, and came to this country in 1848. For several years he journeyed over the middle and southern states as a peddler and then determined to go to Minnesota. In Illinois he married Catherina Baser, a native of Prussia and she accompanied him in his westward journey. On May 10, 1852, they located on the land which is now the property of their son, George Ottinger. To this tract in the wilderness, Tobias Ottinger devoted the rest of his life, meeting the vicissitudes of the early days with the hardy spirit of the pioneer and developing a valuable farm property. Through thrifty management during the few years spent as a peddler he had accumulated a capital of some seven hundred dollars and this aided him in the clearing of his land and the erection of a home, but he experienced all the inconveniences of the times. In company with a neighbor, Mr. Winkel, he at different times walked to St. Paul to secure provisions and on one of these trips bought a team of horses and became the victim of the horse dealer's dishonesty, the horses proving of little value. But native ability and industry brought success and he accomplished the cultivation of the greater part of the one hundred and fifty-four acres and engaged quite extensively in stock raising. He was prominently associated with public interests and sought to promote the welfare of the community in which he lived. In political matters he was a loyal member of the Republican party. He died October 27, 1893, and his wife's death occurred some three years, earlier. They had a family of six children.

Page 324

HENRY PETERMAN.

Henry Peterman, a prominent farmer of Laketown township, came to Minnesota in 1867 and has been most notably identified with the prosperity of the county as the organizer and promoter of the Co-operative Creamery Company at Waconia. He was born at Buffalo, Now York, August 9, 1841, the son of John and Erna Peterman, natives of Prussia, who had come to the United States in 1836. John Peterman spent several years on a farm in New York state and then removed to Jackson county, Wisconsin, where there was a German settlement. Here he purchased a tract of timber land which he cleared and put under cultivation. Henry Peterman was reared on the Wisconsin farm and received his education iii the German school of the Lutheran church. For a short time he attended the public schools but the greater part of his instruction was received in the foreign language. In 1867, the farm was sold and the family came to Minnesota and Henry Peterman, after traveling over the state, chose Carver county as their future home. He bought the farm of John Matzholt in Laketown township, paying $3,300 and including in his purchase the stock and other personal property. About twenty acres of the quarter section had been cleared and a few buildings erected and Mr. Peterman set about the clearing and development of the timberland. He hauled the wood to Chaska where he received three dollars and a quarter per cord and the money thus accumulated assisted him in the improvement of his property. He put eighty acres under cultivation and reclaimed some low land by drainage. In 1875 he replaced the first log house with the present residence and a few years later erected now barns. His parents lived here until their deaths at advanced ages. He has devoted his life to the management of this farm and has met with eminent success in all his undertakings. He has engaged in both grain and dairy farming, giving particular attention to the latter and was among the first to appreciate the value of this business to the local farmers. Believing that a creamery owned by the producers would prove of great profit to them, he suggested the plan of a co-operative creamery at Waconia. A promoter offered to organize the company if Waconia would provide a bonus, but Mr. Peterman assumed the risk of the enterprise, erected the building and financed the first operations. This required an investment of $4,000 and a great deal of effort devoted to the encouragement of dairy farming in this vicinity. During the first years when butter sold for twelve cents a pound, the success of the company demanded keen business management and careful attention, but rising prices brought growing prosperity and it is now one of the thriving industries of the county. Dairy farming has become one of the most important enterprises and almost every farmer gives some attention to it. Mr. Peterman also built a creamery at Hamburg, which he sold three years later. His initiative and generous support in this field were recognized by the farmers and his assistance was sought in the establishment of like companies in other parts of the county. He still retains his creamery interests but of later years confined his active work to his f arm, where he is assisted by his son, John Peterman.

He became the owner of another farm of one hundred and ten acres which he later gave to a son, Otto Peterman. Mr. Peterman is a member of the Lutheran church at Waconia and served as trustee for a number of years. His political affiliations were with the Republican party. He was married in 1868 to Amelia Zeaman, daughter of John Zeaman, a farmer of Laketown township. She is a native of Prussia and came to Carver county with her parents in 1863. They have a family of eight children: Minnie, the wife of P. Pelz of Blackley, Minnesota; William, the manager of Co-operative Creamery at Waconia; Henry, who is a dealer in agricultural implements in Red Wood Falls, Minnesota; Otto, a farmer in Laketown township, John, manager of the home farm ,Emma, who married George Dorr of Wood Lake, Minnesota; Annie, living in Hutchinson, Minnesota, and Ida, the wife of George Bancker and residing in Minneapolis.

Page 325

WILLIAM HENRY PETERMAN.

Proprietor of one of the most progressive and best managed creameries in this part of the country; a stockholder in the local bank; one of the promoters of the Norwood-Young America Telephone company through his locality; a public official of excellent standing and wide popularity, and an active participant in every enterprise designed to advance the interests and hasten the improvement of his home town and county, William H. Peterman, of Waconia is one of Carver county's most progressive and useful citizens.

Mr. Peterman is the sole proprietor of the Peternian creamery at Waconia, which was built in 1896 by his father, Henry Peterman, and conducted by him until he sold it to his son William in 1912. The monthly output of the industry has averaged for some years about $3,000, but during the best months of the present year (1914) the products of the business have run to $8,000 a month, and there is a continued increase in prospect. In March, 1913, the creamery was converted largely into a condensing plant, and nearly all the milk it now handles is worked into the condensed form, and the product is used in bulk in the ice-cream trade.

The Peterman creamery was the first condenser plant in Minnesota, and there is only one other yet in operation in this state, although a third is in course of erection. The money invested in the plant is $12,000 to $14,000 and its regular and constant patrons number more than seventy-five. William H. Peterman entered the business in 1897 as an employee of his father, and has therefore been engaged in it for seventeen years continuously. The enterprise has proven profitable, the amount of milk handled having nearly trebled, and this creamery is probably the first wholly and continuously successful one in Carver county. But its progress has not been made without difficulty and opposition, and its promoters and proprietors have not wholly escaped underhand assaults and misrepresentations.

When they were boys William H. Peterman and his brother Henry. R. hauled cordwood from their father's farm to Waconia, a distance of four miles, while the neighboring farmers were hauling milk to Chaska, eight miles away. The Peterman family were making 150 to 300 pounds of butter a week, which was sold to the Berkeley hotel in Minneapolis. The sons conceived that a creamery might be made profitable in their neighborhood, but the capital was not available for starting one. They discussed with the village council a proposal to take a bonus of $500 and build a creamery with a saloon attached in the village. They had observed that frequently the milk farmers returned from their trips to Chaska somewhat overstimulated by drink and made great boasts about the profits in creameries, and they concluded that a saloon near the creamery they thought of building would help to mike the business pay. Other men had offered to start a creamery at Waconia for a bonus of $1,000. At this juncture the older Mr. Peterman came forward and told the council he would build and operate one without any bonus at all, and at once put up his factory.

The Chaska men, who desired to control the enterprise at Waconia offered Mr. Peterman first $1,000 then $1,500 if he would withdraw, but he refused. Afterward an opposition creamery passed into the hands of farmers who organized a co-operative association, and even before this, efforts were frequently made to buy the Peterman plant. Then the underhand work and misrepresentation became active, and Peterman patrons grow fewer. But the Peterman plant weathered the storm without serious effect on its prosperity, and now nearly all of its old patrons have returned and numbers of new ones have been procured. It is equipped with every modern device and appliance of the most approved pattern, has a deep well of unfailing strength and superior excellence of water, and many other superior facilities. Its products have always been made with the utmost care and studious attention to detail, and they have always sold at the highest prices.

William H. Peterman was born on his father's farm four miles from Waconia, in Laketown township, February 11, 1872, a son of Henry and Emilie (Zieman) Peterman, the former born in the United States and the latter in Germany. The son remained on the farm and took part in the labor of cultivating it until he became connected with the creamery. He owns stock in the Norwood-Young America Telephone company, and is also a stockholder in the Farmers State Bank of Waconia. At the time of this writing (1914) he is a member of the village council, and also belongs to the Norwood- Waconia Hunting club, whose outings in the northern part of the state he thoroughly enjoys, as he does local hunting and fishing, for which the proximity of Clearwater lake furnishes abundant facilities. He is a Lutheran in church connection and a Republican in political affiliation. May 24, 1899, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Schraan, also a native of Laketown township, whose parents, Andrew and Bertha (Schwitchemberg) Schraan, are now living retired in Waconia. Mr. and Mrs. Peterman have two children, Dorothy and Gladys.

Page 325

ANDREW PETERSON,

Andrew Peterson, for many years a prominent farmer of Carver county, was born in Sweden, October 20, 1818, and died at his home in Laketown township, March 31, 1897. He came to this county in 1853, in the earliest days of its settlement and during his life witnessed its rapid development and prosperous growth and was himself actively identified with every phase of its progress. In 1850 with his brother and a sister, Christina, he came to the United States and located at Burlington, Iowa, where Christina Peterson became the wife of John Anderson. They remained in Burlington until 1853 when Andrew Peterson and Mr. Anderson decided to seek a home in Minnesota and came to Carver. Here they heard of Andrew Bergquist, a fellow countryman, and his claim on the banks of Clearwater lake and set out on the twelve mile tramp through the forests to his place. Andrew Bergquist was the first settler in what is now Laketown township and they found him living in the wilderness and the home that sheltered him, an improvised tent formed of blankets spread over the branches of trees. The richness of the land and the natural attractiveness of its location near the lake which is one of the most beautiful bodies of water in this part of the state, made their location here permanent. Their first intention had been to secure meadow land but on examining the soils, they decided in favor of the heavily timbered land, accepting the greater labor of clearing in consideration of its superior fertility. They each took preemption claims of one hundred and sixty acres and then returned to Iowa to complete the arrangements for their removal to the new home. The quarter section belonging to Andrew Peterson lay a mile and a half east of Clearwater lake and on this side of the lake, during the next few years, a number of pioneers located, forming the Swedish settlement of Scandia. In 1855 a claimant for his land appeared and Mr. Peterson was compelled to pay him twenty dollars, his entire capital at that time, to induce the man to leave him in undisputed possession. His first house was a bark covered shanty, in which he laid a floor of hewed logs. Into this home in 1858, he took his young bride and here they experienced all the trials and privations and hard won triumphs of pioneer life. He put some forty-five acres under cultivation, and in 1869 erected a house of hewed logs, the most pretentious home of its time in this vicinity. This substantial structure has since been added to and remodeled into a modern frame house and is the present farm residence. It occupies an eminence which command an enjoyable view of the surrounding country. Mr. Peterson combined the sturdy qualities of the pioneer with the initiative and ability of the natural scientist and the state of Minnesota is greatly indebted to him for his experiments and discoveries in its horticultural possibilities. Having been employed in a nursery in Iowa, his interest was immediately challenged by the problem of providing this new country with orchards and through the government he secured many varieties of apples from Russia and other foreign countries, which he tested in the soil and climate of Minnesota. At one time he is said to have had two hundred varieties of apples in his orchards and frequently exhibited as many as forty varieties of apples at the state fair or at horticultural exhibits. His experiments and successful demonstration of fruit growing brought him widespread fame and his orchards were visited by the leading horticultural experts of neighboring states who recognized him as an authority in apple culture. The same qualities which marked his private enterprises distinguished his activities in all walks of life and he gave ready co-operation and able service in all matters of public welfare. Although he had been unable to secure educational advantages in his youth, he obtained a good education through extensive reading and took a keen interest in the questions of the world and was especially well informed in the science of horticulture. A most interesting document is his diary, it dates from the time spent in Burlington, Iowa, and the last entry was made just a few days before his death. It is a record of a full and useful life that through active and unselfish relation with other lives, is in reality a history the growth of the community. One of his greatest interests was in the progress and rapid development of his adopted country and in remarking the changes of his time and he enjoyed comparing one of the railroads in the country on which he rode in 1850, on a cattle train between Now York and Albany, with the road which was built across his farm and the present railroad system. He became a member of the Baptist church in Burlington, Iowa, and was one of the starter members of the Swedish Baptist church at Scandia, the second church of this sect organized in America, which was established by former members of the church at Burlington. Throughout his life he was a devout supporter of this church and earnestly sought to fix the principles of his faith in his daily acts. He was a Republican and interested in the cause of prohibition. His marriage to Elsie Anderson was solemnized September 15, 1858. She is a native of Sweden who came to Minnesota with her mother and sisters a short time before her marriage. She lives in the old home in Laketown township and is the only survivor of the charter members of the church at Scandia. Of the family of nine children, six survive. Three daughters are dead, lda, Annie and Josephine, who was the wife of Nels Carlson. John, Frank and Oscar Peterson and their sister Emma have remained on the farm, capably assuming its management since the death of their father, George and Charley Peterson are engaged in farming near Maynard, Minnesota. The members of this family have followed in the footsteps of the father, accepting his broad views of life and of the responsibilities of American citizenship and have won the esteem and high regard of the community.

Page 326

PAUL POFAHL.

Paul Pofahl, a farmer of Laketown township, is a native of Germany, born in Pomerania, Prussia, November 22, 1858. He came to this country with his parents, August and Augusta Pofahl in 1868. August Pofahl brought his family to Carver county where friends from the old country had preceded him. He was a tailor by trade but here became a f armor, buying one hundred and forty acres near the present property of his son, Paul. Here he engaged in farming during the rest of his life and developed a good farm property, putting some thirty acres of his land under cultivation and replacing the log house with a modern brick residence. He became a member of the Republican party and was a communicant in the Lutheran church at Waconia. He died in 1906 at the age of seventy-six. His wife survived him eight years, her death occurring in May, 1914. Of their family of nine children, five are now living. Edward Pofahl is the present proprietor of his father's farm. Paul Pofahl was reared on the old place and there made his home until he purchased the one hundred and forty acres known as the Jenny farm. For this he paid six thousand dollars, half of which his capital enabled him to pay at once. Efficient farming and able management have brought steady prosperity to his investment. He now has eighty acres under cultivation and has erected a pleasant farm home and good basement barn. He raises grain and engages extensively in dairy business. Mr. Pofahl was one of the original shareholders in the Co-operative Creamery Company. He was married in 1886 to Mary Schwitzenberg, the daughter of Louis Schwitzenberg, who was a neighboring farmer. They have seven children, Arthur, who lives in Waconia, and Raymond, Johnnie, Roy, Myrtle, Severa and Allegra, who live at home. Mr. Pofahl is a Republican but the interest which he takes in political matters has never led him into any active participation in public affairs. He is a member of the Lutheran church at Waconia, in which organization he gives faithful service as a trustee.

Page 326

AUGUST PRETZEL.

This enterprising and public spirited farmer Watertown township, who has lived in Carver county and on the beautiful farm which is now his home for more than half a century, was born in Germany, fifteen miles from the city of Berlin, March 15, 1850, and in 1861 came to the United States and this county with his parents, Carl and Mina Pretzel. The father had learned the trade of harness maker in his native land, and he had also served three years as a soldier there. But when he reached this country his heart was set on farming, and here he followed that industry to the end of his life of seventy-four years.

Soon after his arrival in Carver county the father bought eighty acres of the land now owned and cultivated by his son August for $185. The land was wild and heavily timbered, and there was nothing on it in the form of a dwelling. But he set himself resolutely to the work of clearing the land, and built a log cabin as a home for himself and his family. He passed the remainder of his days on this farm, dying in 1882 at the age of seventy-four. The mother lived seven years longer, and was seventy-two when her life ended, and her record of devoted usefulness was complete.

The elder Mr. Pretzel cleared fifty acres of his land and reduced it to generous productiveness. In 1881 he built the dwelling house which now enriches the farm, and set out a row of trees along the road. The son has extended this improvement until there is now about an acre in trees about the place, and from them it has derived its name of "Roadside Park Farm." The parents were original members of the Evangelical Association church at Mayer, and their remains are buried in the burying ground attached to it. The first services of the congregation were held in their old log cabin, and it was used as the meeting place for a number of years until the church edifice was erected. All the children of the household were reared in a spirit of loyalty and devotion to it, and the son, August, is still one of its most staunch and serviceable members. Six children were born in the family, and five of them are living. Henrietta is the wife of John Krindbrink, of Watertown township. Mina is the wife of Rev. William Sydow, of Fairmont, Minnesota. Rika is the wife of Hermann Mass, of St. Bonifacius, Hennepin county. Carl, who lived on a f arm near the home place, died at the age of fifty-five, and Hermann is a retired farmer living at Glencoe, McLeod county.

August Pretzel, the other child of the household, has passed the whole of his life in the United States on the farm redeemed from the wilderness by his father, and took charge of the cultivation of it as a young man. Some years ago he became the owner of it, buying the interests of the other children, and since then he has built a now barn, remodeled the dwelling house and made other improvements. He has about the same acreage in cultivation that his father had, the rest of his land being meadow and grazing ground. His farming is general in its scope, and he always keeps eight or ten cows, furnishing quantities of milk to the co-operative creamery. His farm is one of the most attractive rural homes in the township.

In 1882 Mr. Pretzel was married to Miss Helena Long, of Hollywood township. She died January 25, 1888, after only six years of married life, leaving two children, Lydia, who is now keeping house for her father, and Elsie, who is employed in the establishment of Messrs. Wyman, Partridge & Company, Minneapolis. Mr. Pretzel's second marriage was with Miss Lena Kenehl, of Wright county. She died August 16, 1910, leaving one child, Walter, who now conducts the operations of the farm.

Page 327

JACOB RADDE.

This skillful, enterprising and progressive mechanic and esteemed citizen of Waconia is a native of West Prussia, where he was born September 15, 1855. He came to the United States in 1862 with his parents, Gottleib and Mary Radde, who were farmers in their native land and expected to follow the same occupation here. They located in the village of Carver, where two days later, while the father was bathing in the Minnesota river, he was drowned. He was about forty years old and left his widow with four small children. She moved to Waconia, and before the end of the year was married to August Hetke.

After her marriage to Mr. Hetke the mother bought a farm three miles south of Waconia, on which she died about fourteen years ago, her second husband having passed away one year before. They had no children. The Radde children were Gottleib, John, Carl and Jacob, the last named being the youngest and the only one of the four now living (1914). Gottleib died in April, 1914, at the old family home three miles south of Waconia. John died at Waconia ten years ago. Carl was a blacksmith at Waconia, and died there about twelve years ago, or two years prior to the death of John.

Jacob Radde remained at home until he reached the age of twenty years. In his boyhood he assisted his brother Carl in the blacksmith shop. When he was twenty he started to learn his trade of wagon maker under the direction of Peter Yetzer, with whom he remained a year and a half, receiving for his services no compensation but his board. He was allowed, however, to work before seven o'clock in the morning and after seven in the evening to earn a little spending money. His education was obtained at the Lutheran parochial school at Waconia. After severing his connection with Mr. Yetzer he turned his attention to carpentering and worked at that for a time. He then, in 1876, started his present business of making and repairing wagons and other road vehicles, in which he has built up a large trade.

In his mechanical and manufacturing enterprise Mr. Radde struck out a new line. He made a specialty of constructing wagons to order on designs selected particularly for the purpose for which the wagons were intended. He became wholly devoted to this kind of work and originated many improvements himself which were suggested by his close and critical study of the conditions and requirements of the locality and its activities. His establishment is still in full operation, as it has been from the time when he opened it for business, and it is one of the best known and most highly, appreciated industrial institutions in this part of the county,.

Mr. Radde was married in 1878 to Miss Matilda Hetke, a daughter of Jacob Hetke, of Laketown township, but born in Germany. They have five sons and one daughter. The parents are members of the Lutheran church at Waconia, which the father has served as a trustee for eighteen years. He was also township treasurer for two years and for nineteen has been treasurer of the school board, having also served it three years as clerk. He has therefore been connected with the management of school affairs for a continuous period of twenty-two years. He is widely and favorably known and universally esteemed as an excellent citizen and a true and upright man in all the relations of life.

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PAUL A. RADDE.

This estimable citizen and capable business man of Waconia is best known and most highly appreciated by his position as cashier of the Waconia State Bank and his excellent work in helping to build up and popularize that young but enterprising and progressive institution, which is rendering good service to the community and making steady and substantial advance.

The Waconia State Bank was opened for business January 25, 1912, with a capital of $10,000. Its surplus is $1,500 and its deposits amount to $115,000. It built and owns its banking house, and one-half of its capital stock is held by residents of Waconia. The officers of the bank are: Roy Quimby, president; Dr. Henry R. Diessner, vice president, and Paul A. Radde, cashier. The management of its affairs shows a judicious blending of the progressive and the conservative spirit, and, although it does all approved kinds of banking business suitable to present-day methods, it carefully eschews every form of speculative or visionary fiscal transactions. It is safe and sound, and the men in charge are conducting it in a manner that demonstrates their purpose and capacity to keep it so.

Paul A. Radde, the capable and accommodating cashier of the bank, was born at Waconia September 8, 1885, a son of Jacob and Matilda (Hetke) Radde, a sketch of whom will be found in this volume. He obtained a high school education and in April, 1904, entered the employ of the Farmers State Bank as bookkeeper. Two years later he left the Farmers Bank and became bookkeeper in the State Bank at Hector, which he served in that capacity three and one-half years. He next passed some years as assistant cashier of banks at McClusky and Underwood, North Dakota, giving him ten years experience in the banking business, thus acquiring a thorough familiarity with the subject, so that he was well qualified for the duties when he helped to organize the Waconia State Bank as one of its stockholders and became its cashier in January, 1912.

Mr. Radde has taken an earnest interest and an active part in the public affairs of his town and is now serving as village recorder. He is a member of the Lutheran church and a helpful participant in its activities for the good of the community, as he is in the work of all improving agencies. He is unmarried.

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REV. HENRY RAEDEKE.

Throughout the last forty-three years this devout and zealous ambassador of Christ and estimable and useful citizen has ministered to the spiritual welfare and guidance of the congregation of Trinity Evangelical Lutheran church in Carver, and he has performed his duties with such ability, industry and effectiveness that the whole population of the village esteem him most highly and hold him in genuine reverence. He has been at the service of every comer or call to duty at any hour of the, day or night, and has always been altogether obliging and considerate.

Mr. Raedeke is a native of Hanover, Germany, where his life began May 2, 1848. When he was twenty he came to the United States, the mission service of his sect sending him to Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri, to obtain a theological education. He pursued a three years course at the seminary, and in 1871 accepted a call to the church at Carver which had been built by Rev. Victor Both three years before. When Mr. Raedeke took charge of the congregation it included about fifty families, among them twenty residing at Chaska.

Mr. Raedeke was ordained in his own church at Carver, August 28, 1871, and has served it with unfailing fidelity as a faithful pastor and successful servant of the Master. The congregation at Chaska was organized and its church built by him in 1885, from then until 1898 he served that church also. In the year last named his son, Rev. H, J. Raedeke, became his assistant at Chaska, so continuing during the next ten, years. In 1885 the two congregations contained some sixty families, which in ten years increased to about 160. There were 200 pupils in the schools most of the time, and the father and daughter alternated in teaching them until 1908. The father and son also alternated between Carver and Chaska in their preaching and other pastoral work.

Rev. H. J. Raedeke is now pastor of the church at Holloway, Swift county, Minnesota, and his father, during the last six years, has devoted his energies wholly to the needs of the church at Carver. The present congregation, which numbers about fifty families, has recently erected a fine new church, which is a credit to the congregation and an ornament to the community.

For fifteen years Mr. Raedeke also served a congregation in Scott county, helping to build its first church. In his church and school work he has used the German language, the children learning English in the public schools. His life has been wholly devoted to his sacred calling, and in a long course of ministry he has missed but some ten Sundays either from illness or other causes. He has also taught music in his churches, and for twenty-five years played the organ in one of them. His services have been and are highly appreciated by the beneficiaries, who have made this fact known in many ways. One of the most conspicuous and impressive manifestations of it was a tribute paid to him on the fortieth anniversary of his marriage and the beginning of his pastorate at Carver.

On Sunday, November 19, 1911, arrangements were made that at the close of the regular morning service the church bell should ring to announce the beginning of a second service of which Rev. Mr. Rehwald, of Chaska, was to have charge. The regular pastor and his wife took their places with the congregation, and Mr. Rehwald tendered them, in a felicitous and impressive address, the congratulations and best wishes of the people and voiced the high esteem in which they were held for their personal worth and for the eminent usefulness which had characterized the forty years of service during which he had baptized 1,385 persons, confirmed 736, married 300 couples and officiated at 438 funerals. After the services were concluded a bountiful luncheon was served, and the pastor received generous financial contributions.

Mr. Raedeke was married in St. Paul, on November 19, 1871, to Miss Amelia Meyer, who, Me himself, was born in Hanover, Germany, and who came to this country especially to join him in his pastoral work. Of the nine children born of their union seven are living. Two of the sons, H. J. and Frederick, are ministers; and both were educated for their professional work at the Concordia Seminary in St. Louis. John is a teacher in the public school and the parochial school at Courtland, Minnesota. The oldest daughter, Amelia, married William Teske, a feed merchant at Chaska, and died two years afterward. Her only child, Louise, has since been reared by her grandparents. Louise, another daughter, has an assistant in the parochial school at Chaska for twelve years. Her compensation was meager, but she was impelled to it as help in educating the children in the church. She is now conducting a millinery establishment at Chaska. Helena and Lydia live with their parents. The former is a dressmaker and the latter is the organist of the church. Martha has been a teacher in the public schools for eight years, now being employed in the high school at Raymond.

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HENRY RIETZ.

Henry Rietz, a retired farmer of Laketown township, now residing in Waconia, was born in New Bavaria, Germany, February 25, 1839, son of Henry and Mary Rietz. When a lad of eleven years, his parents came to the United States and settled in Tuscarawas county, Ohio. Here Henry Rietz was reared and spent his early manhood. In October, 1869, he left Ohio and came to Carver county and began a successful career as a farmer in Laketown township. He bought the northwest quarter of section fifteen, paying eighteen hundred dollars for the farm, which had but eighteen acres of cleared land with a small frame shanty and straw covered stable on it. Soon after this he also purchased a one hundred and twenty, acre tract which was situated about a mile distant from his property. He did not move on his land for about three years and was busily engaged meanwhile teaching school in the winters, in clearing away the heavy timber and converting the wild land into cultivated fields. This task, he managed with marked efficiency and soon built up a thriving farm, which he endeavored to equip with every convenience of advanced methods. He cleared all of his land, putting the most of it under cultivation and reserving some of the meadow land which had been developed by drainage, for pasturage. The spacious brick residence and large barn with a cement basement helped to make this place the model and progressive farm of the township, at the time of their erection. Before the installation of a tubular well with a wind mill he contrived to pump water for the stock into large tanks in the barn by using a shallow well and dog power. The same initiative and ability, which brought him success in his private enterprises, inevitably brought him into prominent association with the affairs of the community in which he lives. He was one of the first promoters of the Cooperative Creamery Company at Victoria and of the Laketown Mutual Fire Insurance Company, two local corporations which have met with rapid growth and prosperity and have also proved a profit and convenience to the farmers of the district. The latter company was incorporated in 1888, with the privilege of operating in Carver and in part of Hennepin county. Mr. Rietz prepared its by laws and gave much time and effort to securing cooperation for its organization and for four years continued active in its management as secretary. The company now numbers some two thousand policy holders and has had

neighboring competitor in the fire insurance company which was organized in the same year at West Union. Mr. Rietz is a Democrat, but draws no strict party lines and although he declined the chairmanship of the township board, when it was given him a few months after his coming to Laketown township, he subsequently gave twenty-six years of capable service as a public official, twenty-three years as chairman of the township board and three years as assessor. In 1912, he retired from the farm and has since resided in Waconia where in 1914 he erected his present home. Since his retirement the Laketown farm has been under the management of his sons, J. H. and O. A. Rietz. later moving to their own homes, they were succeeded by Elmer J. Rietz. Henry Rietz was married in Indiana at the age of twenty-three to Miss Caroline Bachmann, daughter of Rev. Henry C. Bachmann, at that time the pastor of the Moravian church at Hope, Indiana. They have a family of seven sons, their only daughter, Mary, who was a teacher in the Carver county schools, died at the age of twenty-three; two sons, George and Albert, also deceased. The surviving children are Henry C., a farmer near Riebeling, Montana; Edwin, a retired farmer, living at Aberdeen, South Dakota; John, engaged in farming near Pelican Rapids, Minnesota; Charles, a lumberman at Bristol, South Dakota; Oliver, who is employed by the John Tuttle Lumber Company of Sioux Falls, one of the large lumber companies of South Dakota; Alfred, an attorney at Farmington, Minnesota and Elmer, who is a carpenter by trade, but is now farming on the home farm. Mr. Rietz is an active member and faithful supporter of the Moravian church at Laketown where for a number of years he served as an elder.

Page 329

ANDREW F. SCHUTZ.

But few of the present population of Minneapolis, and perhaps none of the thousands of visitors, who enjoy the beauties and entertainments of Coney Island, in Clearwater lake, know what it was when Andrew F. Schutz took hold of it in 1877 to convert it into a pleasure resort. What it is now is manifest enough a triumph of art and taste applied with energy and skill to one of nature's beauty spots for the enjoyment of mankind. But when Mr. Schutz bought and settled down in a little hotel at Waconia thirty-seven years age the island was a wilderness. This he converted into a favorite summer resort and picnic ground, made it extensively popular, and, with constant attention to the growing requirements, developed its possibilities with great enterprise. The island is now privately owned, but contains a fine hotel and is enriched with a number of beautiful villas.

Andrew F. Schutz was born in the kingdom of Saxony, Germany, April 9, 1839, and in 1854 came to the United States with his Parents, Andrew and Johannah Schutz, who, with eight of their nine children, located at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, then a very small and primitive place, and which they reached by team from Milwaukee. Two years later the family moved to a farm in Waupaca county, and there both of the parents died after many years of productive labor.

Andrew was placed at work in a furniture finishing paint shop, having acquired a knowledge of the trade at Fond du Lac, When the Civil War began he tried to enlist in the Union army but was rejected on account of a minor disability. In 1865 he came to Minnesota, and worked in a furniture factory and a chair factory, and for seven years was foreman in a furniture finishing room. This was in St. Paul, where he passed twelve years in this employment. Health failing from close confinement and the nature of his work, he had to give up his job to save his life, then, in 1877, buying a small hotel at Waconia.

In 1867 Mr. Schutz was married in St. Paul to Miss Mary L. Muller, daughter of Robert and Anne Katharine (Claesgens) Muller, of Benton township, Carver county, where they settled in the fall of 1854. The father came from the province of Baden, Germany, near Lake Constance, and located at Utica, New York, in 1846. There he met and married his wife, and for at number of years followed cabinet making on the Mohawk River. Later he moved to Danesville, New York, and in 1854 came to Minnesota, taxing a preemption claim in what is now Benton township. He helped to organize the township, and being able to read and write, was a man of force and influence in the early days, naming the township in honor of Senator Thomas H. Benton, of Missouri, then prominent in the national councils.

Mr. Muller's claim was just one mile north of the Catholic church at Cologne and he worked at his trade, making all the early coffins in the neighborhood, assisted by his daughter Mary, now Mrs. Schutz, built houses, and did other similar work. For many years he was a justice of the peace, and he was also one of the first county commissioners of Carver county, and helped to organize it. He died at Young America at the age of seventy-one, and his wife passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Schutz, at the age of sixty-six. They were the parents of ten children, nine of whom reached maturity. Six are living now (1914). They are: Mary, now Mrs. Schutz; Josephine, widow of the late Francis Hassenstab, who lives at Wabasso, Redwood county; Alexander, who con- ducts a furniture and undertaking business at Maple Lake, Wright county; Anna, the wife of Theodore Molitor, of Young America; Otto, a carpenter and saw mill operator in the state of Washington, and Frank, a telegraph operator, now residing in Chicago. Robert, who was also a telegraph operator, was killed in his young manhood, and Albert, who was a collar maker, died in the fifties.

Mr. Schutz kept his hotel, the Lake House, at Waconia, nearly thirty years, retiring in 1906. Ho enlarged the building to what it is at present, and won wide popularity as a landlord. He started a livery and made Clearwater lake a resort, as has been shown. Coney Island was first taken up as a preemption claim by Frank Hassenstab, a brother-in-law of Mr. Schutz, who swam to it, a distance of three-quarters of a mile. But Mr. Schutz made it known as a pleasure resort. He advertised it extensively as a good place for hunting and fishing, his hotel being often more than filled with guests during the resort or hunting season. In 1883 he built the Niagara, a steamboat capable of carrying 300 passengers, a Mr. Remington being his partner in the enterprise. About this time the railroad was built and a hotel was erected on the island, and the excursion trade was very. large until picnics were barred from the island. After that the Niagara lay at her wharf "as idle as a painted ship upon a painted ocean" until she was destroyed by the cyclone of 1904.

When Mr. Schutz gave up his hotel business he retired to his present beautiful home, which borders the lake he has enlarged the dwelling House, adorned the grounds and in many ways made the place very attractive. He raises fruit, flowers, vegetables and other garden products, and made retired life very enjoyable. His orchard is extensive and filled with trees of choice varieties. He has a photograph of one apple tree which produced fifteen bushels of apples, but which was destroyed by a cyclone two weeks later, the storm doing other serious damage to his property.

Mr. Schultz, Albert Kohler and Benedict Maiser had the village of Waconia organized in 1883, he becoming its first president, and serving in that capacity five or six terms. He also served twelve years on the school board, six as director and six as clerk. In 1891 and 1893 he was chosen on of the county commissioners, being selected as chairman of the board by the popular vote. His associates on the board were John Boylan, Frederick Iltis, August Witsack and Peter Nord. In political faith and affiliations Mr. Schutz has always belonged to the Democratic party. He and his wife have had five children, only one of whom is living, Mollie, the wife of Fletcher H. Fankhauser, superintendent of the Palace Clothing House, of Minneapolis. Andrew died at the age of thirty-eight, and his widow now conducts the Lake House. Julius died at the age of fifteen, Robert in infancy, and Josephine at twenty-four when still a member of the parental family circle.

Page 330

HELMUTH R. SELL.

Proprietor of Pleasant Grove farm, located nine miles from Chaska, and treasurer of Carver county, Helmuth B. Sell combines in his activities two of the beat functions of useful citizenship that of producing from the fertile soil supplies for the sustenance and enjoyment of mankind and that of caring for and holding for proper purposes the common fund of all the people designed to provide for the management of their local governmental affairs and the improvement of the county in which they live and to whose on during welfare they are all devoted.

Mr. Sell is a native of Laketown township, where his life began in the wilderness January 23, 1873, the place of his birth being his present home two miles and a half southeast of Waconia. He is a son of Ludwig and Johanna (Voigt) Sell, natives of Pomerania, Germany, who came to the United States in 1868, and, moving on to Minnesota, took up their residence for a short time at Carver. The father was a brickmaker and had worked at the trade from his boyhood. He was here so employed for a short time, but before the end of his first year in America he felt the "call of the wild," and bought eighty acres of land in the woods, which is a part of his son Helmuth's present farm, paying $1,800 for the tract out of money he brought with him from the old country.

The elder Mr. Sell was not a farmer by either taste or training, but he applied himself diligently to getting his land cleared and under cultivation; and as a source of revenue for the needs of his family and in his operations he burned charcoal of the wood he cut on his land and marketed his product at Carver and Chaska. His land was heavily wooded with maple, elm and basswood, and it yielded him a steady income from his hard work. He passed the remainder of his days on that farm and brought it nearly all under cultivation, as and there his useful life ended on October 3, 1909, at the age of eighty-one years seven months twenty-four days. His widow died August 2, 1914, aged seventy-two years seven months thirteen days. They had seven children, four of whom are alive and contributing to the advancement of the country as the present time (1915). The father was a devout Lutheran and an original member of the church of his denomination at Waconia, which he helped to build.

Helmuth R. Sell remained at home and worked for his father until he reached the age of twenty-four. He then took charge of the home place and has since purchased the interests of the other heirs in it. His education was obtained in the district schools and the Lutheran parochial school at Waconia. He passed the whole of his life to the present

day on the farm, and has made it one of the beat and most attractive rural homes in his township, as well as one of the most productive and most highly improved tracts of land in the county. The old dwelling built by his father in the early days is still standing, a venerable landmark in the neighborhood.

Mr. Sell began at an early ago to take an important part in the public affairs of his township. When he was but twenty-two he was elected clerk of the school district, and his services in that office lasted nine years. At the age of twenty-five he was chosen township clerk, and he held that office eleven years. In November, 1912, he was the choice of the people for county treasurer, and so well and ably did he discharge the duties of this important position that in the fall of 1914 he was re-elected to it without opposition.

In political allegiance Mr. Sell is a Republican and his been a zealous worker in the party harness since the dawn of his manhood. His religious affiliation is with the Zoar Moravian church in Laketown township. On November 23, 1897, he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Trende, a sister of Frank Trende, a member of the board of county commissioners of Carver county, a sketch of whom will be found in this volume. Mr. and Mrs. Sell have three children, Esther, Dora and Myrtle. Mr. Sell is fond of hunting and fishing, and these pursuits form his only lines of recreation in the way of sport, but he indulges his taste for them in the proper seasons when he has no serious duties to interfere. During the last five years Mr. Sells has been president of the Laketown Mutual Fire Insurance company, the leading company of the kind in Carver county, it having more than 1,800 members, and the number increases at a steady progress year after year, as the excellent management of the company commends it to the approval of the people.

Page 331

THOMAS SEXTON.

Thomas Sexton, of Hollywood township, was born at Milford, Penobscot county, Maine, December 15, 1850. His parents, Thomas and Ellen (Haley) Sexton, were natives of Ireland, both born in County Clare. They came to America in 1846 and located at Quebec, where they lived but a short time and then left Canada for the United States, coming to Penobscot county, Maine, where he was employed as a lumberman for a number of years. In 1857 they removed to Waukesha county, Wisconsin. This same year, his brothers, James and John Sexton, and a cousin, Patrick Craven, were among the first settlers in Hollywood township and in 1862 they were joined by Thomas Sexton. He secured railroad land but soon sold this and took a homestead in section 19. He cleared this land and engaged in farming here for a number of years. He later retired and lived in Watertown until his death at the age of eighty-six. His wife died there two years later. They are survived by seven children, Michael, a miner in Oregon; Thomas; Austin, a carpenter, living at St. Mary's, Idaho; Frank in Minneapolis where he is engaged in the plumbing business; William, for many years a miner in the West, now living at Seattle; Patrick, who is the present marshal of Watertown, and Ellen, the wife of Joseph Connolly, auditor of Carver county. Two sons died after reaching maturity, John and Dan. The former served in the Civil War, enlisting from Carver county in Company G. of the Minnesota Heavy Artillery, and died in his sixty-fourth year in the Soldiers' Home. Thomas Sexton was twelve Years Old when his father located on the claim in Hollywood and there he grew to manhood, assisting on the farm and working with his brothers in the lumber woods and mills. He spent six years as a lumberman, driving the logs on the river and employed in saw mills, working the greater part of this time for W. H. Lawrence. He then began farming on land in section 21 of Hollywood and a little later, in 1883, bought his present farm, the southwest quarter of section 2. This was the preemption claim of James McKinly but had little cleared land on it. Mr. Sexton now has sixty acres tender cultivation and has developed one of the fine farm properties of the county. He has improved some land by drainage and has equipped his place with good modern buildings. He has been a successful stock raiser for years, keeping fine cattle, and is well known among stock farmers as a breeder of Poland China hogs. Mr. Sexton is a member of the Democratic party and has served as supervisor on the town board. He was married to Rose Kelly, January 11, 1881. Her father, Matthew Kelly, settled in Hollywood in 1857 and was for many years an influential citizen of that township. They have eight children, four of whom live with their parents, Maurice, Thomas, Bernadette and Catherine Lauretta. Mary is a teacher in the county schools and Bernadette is a student in the Watertown high school. Two sons, Matthew anti Patrick, are employed in the Western Union Telegraph Co. in Minneapolis and the other sons are farmers, Maurice lives on a farm in Hollywood, and John in Rosseau county, Minnesota. Mr. Sexton and his family are members of the Catholic church at Watertown.

Page 331

MATTHIAS SINGLEY.

An esteemed resident of Watertown, where he is retired from active pursuits after many years of useful and productive labor, Matt Singley has passed nearly the whole of his life in this country, being loyal and devoted to its institutions. He has taken part in the affairs of the community as one of the substantial citizens. His life has also been of importance along material lines, as he conducted successful farming operations for a third of a century.

Mr. Singley was born in Wittenberg, Germany, June 4, 1853, the son of Christian and Christine (Stause) Singley. The following year the family located at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and in 1857 came direct to Watertown, traveling up the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers to Chaska. The father had previously looked the country over and now took up a preemption claim of 160 acres three miles east of Watertown and there remained until the spring of 1860, when he moved to the village. He kept the first saloon in the village for six years, although in the spring of 1865 he enlisted in a battery, and in this he served to the close of the Civil war. In 1866 he obtained a farm two miles east of the village and gave attention to its cultivation. In 1877 he bought an adjoining eighty acres in addition for $1,225.

Since Matthias Singley has owned the property he has bought more land, owning at one time 240 acres, but has since sold 140 acres. He has an attractive and comfortable home in the village and keeps horses, cows, pigs, and chickens to occupy his attention. He lived on the farm from 1866 to 19l3 and cultivated and improved it for thirty-two years. His father moved to the village many years ago and died there in old age about 1889. The mother died some years later at the home of a daughter at Carver. The father was a stonemason and helped to build the first courthouse at Chaska and many other structures in the county. He was a Democrat but never hold or sought a public office. His children are Matthias and two daughters. Christina is the wife of William Japs at Hopkins, Minnesota. Mary is the wife of Ludwig Kloak, a farmer living near the old Singley home.

Matthias Singley was married in 1881 to Miss Annie Tesch, a daughter of Henry and Minnie (Bannick) Tesch, of Watertown. Her mother died in 1881 and her father some twenty years later. Mrs. Singley herself died May 20, 1914, after thirty-three years and one mouth of married life. She was the mother of twelve children, ten of whom are living. They are: Henry, a motorman in Minneapolis; Mary, the wife of John D. Van Krevlin, of Lyndale; Matthias, who is farming the old family homestead; Annie, the wife of Charles Schmitt, a farmer near her old home; Emma, the wife of Hermann Wink, also a motorman in Minneapolis; Matilda, who is living at home with her father; Alma, the wife of Henry Schaffer, a farmer in Hennepin county; and Louisa, Lydia and Agnes, all of whom are still at home. I

Mr. Singley has always taken an active part in local affairs. He was chairman of the township board for a number of years and also served on the creamery board. He was reared a Democrat, but of late years has trained with the Republicans. His religious connection is with the Lutheran church, taking a serviceable part in all its activities.

Page 332

ALBERT ANDREW SKARLUND.

Albert Andrew Skarlund, a farmer of Hollywood township, was born in Carver county on his father's farm, one mile east of Watertown, March 30, 1870, the son of Andrew M. and Sophia (Shelgren) Skarlund. Andrew Skarlund was born in Sweden in 1829. He spent his early manhood in his native land, working during this time in the copper mines. In 1865, just after the close of the Civil War, he came to the United States and located in Fillmore county, Minnesota, where he lived for about two years and then removed to Carver county where he spent the rest of his life. He was accompanied to Carver county by his brother, Gust Skarlund, who settled on a farm near Watertown and in 1880 moved to Watertown, where he died February 22, 1899. Andrew Skarlund purchased the farm one mile east of Watertown which was the birthplace of his son Albert and lived there for four years, until 1872, when he bought 80 acres in section 12, Hollywood township, the present home of Albert Skarlund. Andrew Skarlund operated this farm during twenty-four years of careful and successful management. Much of the land, when he first gained its possession was low and of no value, this he reclaimed for cultivation by drainage through open ditches., He replaced the small house on the place with a comfortable home and added other buildings. He retired from the farm in 1896 and made his home in Watertown until his death, January 14, 1910, his wife's death preceding his by less than a month. He was married in Sweden to Sophia Shelgren, who was born in 1832. They had four children, Kate, the wife of Ole Noven of Crookston, Minnesota; John, whose farm adjoins that of his brother, Albert; Annie, who married C. J. Cornell and lives on the old Skarlund farm east of Watertown and Albert A. Albert A. Skarlund has lived in his present home since infancy with the exception of two years when he was employed in the northern lumber camps in the winters and worked in Minneapolis during the summer months. In 1896 when his father left the farm he became the renter of it and assumed its management and six years ago bought the laud. He has continued the work of development and improvement, having laid some thousand feet of tile in replacing the open ditches and erected a fine barn. In farm work he has occupied himself particularly in the milk or creamery business, keeping from eight to ten cows. He is a shareholder of the Co-operative Creamery company, a corporation which has proved of great benefit and profit to its patrons. Mr. Skarlund served for five years as assessor of Hollywood township and for eleven years has been an efficient member of the school board. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church in Watertown. He was married November 21, 1896, to Magnhild Nystrom, who was born in Sweden and is the daughter of C. V. Nystrom. They have two children, Evelyn, aged eleven years and Harriet, aged six years.

Page 332

JOHN GUSTAV SKARLUND

John Gustav Skarlund, a successful farmer of Hollywood township, is a native of Sweden, born November 17, 1859, the son of Andrew M. and Sophia (Shelgren) Skarlund. He accompanied his parents to this country when he was six years old, the family first locating in Fillmore county, Minnesota. In 1867 they removed to a farm in Carver county, near Watertown, where they lived until 1872 when his father bought the farm now owned by Albert Skarlund which adjoins that of John Skarlund. John Skarlund spent the earlier years of his life on his father's farm, receiving a thorough training in agricultural pursuits. When he was twenty years of age, he went to Crookston, Minnesota, where he spent two years engaged in farm work. While in the north part of the state he chose a homestead on present site of Thief River Falls; simply filed on it, but it was so wild and so covered with water he did not return to it, and it was thirty-three years before he revisited that spot, where he found a city of 8,000 on the very land he had chosen. It was then five miles or more to the nearest house, located on a dam on the land called Indian Fish Dam. He returned to Carver county and married Lena Mild, a native of Sweden, on April 6, 1882, and soon after this marriage, settled on eighty acres of land in section twelve of Hollywood township, which he had previously purchased. This was timber and marsh and at the time of his purchase only one-half acre had been cleared and the first home was a small log house. To the development of this land he has given his keenest interest, experienced training and steady labor and the result atests to his thrifty management. His system of drainage has converted the marsh into valuable meadow land and the timber has been cleared from thirty acres, although he could realize no great profit from the timber at the time it was cut, having to sell it at a very low price. The present farm comprises one hundred and sixty acres, another eighty acres having been added to the original tract. The improvement of the buildings has kept pace with the improvement of the land, a large bank barn, constructed from his own timber has been erected and a comfortable farm home has replaced the first dwelling. Mr. Skarlund is a Republican and although he has been so busily engaged with his farm work, has found time to serve as supervisor of the township. In 1884 his wife died leaving him with two small children, Emil Henry and Alma Rosanda. He was married the second time to Adalina Nelson of Hollywood township anti they have eight children, Anna Laurie, who lives in Minneapolis; Selma, the wife of Fred Hennebaugh of Minneapolis; Albert, a blacksmith, at Bird Island; and George, Robert, Mabel, Myrtle and Adelaide who are at home. Mr. Skarlund and his family are member of the Swedish Lutheran church of Watertown.

Page 333

ANDREW L. SKOOG.

Farmer, traveling salesman, merchant, importer of superior strains of live stock, and local public official for many years, Andrew L. Skoog, one of the prominent residents of Carver, has exemplified manhood of in admirable order in many lines of activity showing masterly capacity and genuine worth. He was born in Wester Gothland, Sweden, in 1846 a son of Lars and Mary (Brynglson) Skoog and a grandson of Johannes Anderson Skoog, all of the same nativity as himself. These representatives of three generations came to the United States and Minnesota in the late fifties and located near East Union, in this county.

The voyage of nine weeks across the Atlantic was made in a sailing vessel, the Minona. The vessel was chartered by a company of colonists consisting of the neighbors and friends of the Skoogs and they all located near East Union, where many of their descendants now live. They reached their destination in the spring of 1858, and soon thereafter Lars Skoog preempted a claim on which he established his home. When the Civil War began he enlisted in Company M, First Minnesota Heavy Artillery, and to the end of the momentous sectional conflict was engaged in active military service.

At the close of the war he returned to his home and once more devoted his energies to the development and improvement of his farm. He also carried on blacksmithing for twenty-five years, prospering in both departments and winning the enduring respect of the whole community. His industrious and worthy life ended on August 3, 1907, while that of his father, Johannes Anderson Skoog, in his 93rd year, on December 25, 1879. Lars was very active in church work, helping to build the church edifice for the congregation of which Rev. Peter Carlson was the first pastor. Four of the eight children born in his household grew to maturity, and of these, three are now living (1915): John, a contractor in Durango, Colorado, and who married Miss Augusta Borg. Their son, Andrew L. Skoog, M. D., who was reared in the family till seventeen, being educated in Swedish, English and German, is at the present writing superintendent of La Petrie Institute at Paris, France; Alfred J., who is a resident of Carver, whose wife was Miss Dora Sieverson, and Andrew L. Anna, who died when she was nineteen, was the youngest of the four.

Andrew L. Skoog remained with his parents on the farm most of the time until 1874. He then bought 210 acres, one half of the homestead, to the operation of which he has ever since given supervision. He has made a specialty of breeding high grade live stock, introducing the first shorthorn cattle into Carver county. He also introduced draft and trotting horses, importing a stallion from France. He also brought in the first Poland China hogs known in this vicinity.

Soon after purchasing one-half of his father's farm Mr. Skoog reitted his portion to a tenant and started an enterprise in general merchandising at East Union, building the first store in the village. A little later he became a traveling salesman for the Buckeye Machine company of Canton, Ohio, and thus won the distinction of being the first traveling salesman of Swedish nativity in Minnesota. He remained in the em- ploy of the Buckeye company four years, then passed one year in the lumber trade. From this he turned to dealing in machinery at Worthington, Minnesota, and Grand Forks, North Dakota. In 1880 he started a business in machinery at Carver, and later made his establishment there a general store. This he sold to his brother Alfred in 1909.

Mr. Skoog began to take an earnest interest and an active part in the public affairs of his home community at an early age. When he was but twenty-two he was assessor for Dahlgren township, and for many years was the clerk of that township. He also served five and one-half years as treasurer of Carver county and has been secretary and treasurer of the Swedish Lutheran church, secretary of the fire department and secretary of the Commercial Club of Carver. In 1893 he was married to Miss Emily Lundeen, of St. Peter, Minnesota. They have two children, Esther Hildegard and John Lundeen, a student in the junior class of Carver high school. Esther is a student in the college at St. Peter, in the class of 1916, Mrs. Skoog's brother, Col. John A. Lundeen, is a retired colonel in the United States regular army. He was commandant at the Presido, San Francisco, for four years, and was in later service in the Philippines. Also a nephew of Mrs. Skoog, Elmer A. Turner, is traveling secretary of the Y. M. C. A., in the foreign work, with his present office at Omaha, Neb.

Page 333

JOHN ELFRED SOPER, M. D.

Thrown upon his own resources at an early age, Dr. John Elfred Soper, one of the leading physicians of Carver county and president of the village of Norwood, has wrought out a creditable career in citizenship and professional life.

He was born in London, England, July 15, 1866, being the son of a civil engineer, who was afterward employed professionally by Prince Bariotinski in Russia, and who died in Petrograd. The academic education of John E. was begun in his native city, but which he left at the age of ten. In 1888 he came to Minnesota as an immigrant, with five cents as the sum of his wordly wealth, but deeply impressed, by his own convictions and admonitions of others that it was best for a young man to work his own way in the world.

The young wanderer stopped in Minneapolis and soon found employment in the horticultural department of the State Agricultural school. During the first year of the operation of the school, 1888, he served as janitor, operating the heating plant while attending school. After six months he entered the Minneapolis Academy under President Holmes, intending to prepare himself for the Episcopal ministry. But early in his student life he changed his mind deciding to give the science of medicine a trial, and for one year devoted himself to that ,study as an experiment. He found it to his taste, and in 1893 entered the medical department of the University of Minnesota, from which he was graduated in 1896, with the degree of M. D.

He next passed some months at Delano, and in 1899 located at Norwood, where he has been engaged in a large and growing practice for sixteen years. His practice extends over Carver and Scott counties and he is frequently called to cases in other counties. He is a member of the State Medical Society, the American Medical Association and the Society of American Railway Surgeons, and is surgeon for the Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad at Norwood. He has also served three terms as coroner.

Dr. Soper is a Republican, but has not been an active partisan. He is devoted to the general welfare rather than to any specific class or organization, and in this spirit for five years has rendered excellent service as village president. It was almost wholly through his influence and energetic action that the Norwood Commercial club was started in 1914 with nearly all the business men of the town on its roll of membership. This is a very useful organization, the members all working together for better creamery facilities by inducing the farmers to produce greater quantities of milk, and for other business improvements.

Under judicious and capable management, Norwood owns a fine gas fire engine and is well protected against loss by fire. The doctor was married in 1896 to Miss M. E. Lawrence, a daughter of the laundryman, William M. Lawrence, of Minneapolis, where Mrs. Soper was reared and obtained a high school education.

Mrs. Soper is organist in the Methodist Episcopal church, and the doctor was a singer in the church choir for a number of years. He was reared in the Episcopal church and still adheres to it, but is not a member of any of the fraternal and beneficial organizations so numerous among men. In his practice he favors obstetrics, but gives attention to all claims on his skill and learning, as he does to elevating social interests, in and out of his pleasant home, and to all agencies that work for good in his community.

Page 334

CHARLES SWANSON.

Charles Swanson, who was one of the pioneers of Watertown township and one of its sturdiest and most successful farmers and stock breeders, was born in Elleholm, Blekinge province, Sweden, April 27, 1824, and died at Lyndale, Hennepin county, Minnesota, April 28, 1910, aged seventy-six years and one day. He came to the United States in 1854, and, after passing three years at Galesburg, Illinois, located in this county in 1857. On March 7, 1858, he married Miss Caroline M. Miller, also a native of Sweden, born December 16, 1840, And a daughter of J. P. and Maria (Katherine) Miller. She came to this country in 1852 and from Pennsylvania to Watertown in 1857. She died at the home of her daughter at Lyndale, May 15, 1907.

Mr. Swanson took up a tract of government land by preemption in Section 27, the patent for his tract, dated September 5, 1861, being signed by President Lincoln. He built part of the house now standing on the farm, that part being one of the oldest in Carver county. He brought about 120 acres under cultivation, but sold one-half of his tract and afterward bought another of 160 acres, maintaining his residence, however, on the land he first owned. He engaged actively in raising live stock, especially sheep and cattle. In boyhood he followed fishing to earn money to bring him to the United States. He arrived here penniless, and what he accumulated was acquired by hard work and good management.

Mr. Swanson voted with the Republican party but he was never an active partisan. His religious connection was with the Lutheran church. He was studious and thoughtful in his habits and always well informed on matters of importance. He and his wife were the parents of ten children, two of whom died in infancy and a daughter, Annie Christine, at the age of twenty-two. Of the seven who are living Aaron Edward is a retired farmer at Watertown. Fred is a retired farmer at River Falls, Wisconsin. Ellen is the widow of the late Elias Anderson, of Minneapolis. Augusta W. is the wife of John P. Dahlin, of Watertown. Mary is the wife of Fred Johnson, a Watertown township farmer. Alice is the wife of E. T. Oberg, of near Watertown, and Mabel is the wife of Edward Holmgren and lives on the old family homestead.

EDWARD HOLMGREN, who now owns the Swanson home, was born in the village of Carver June 17, 1874, a son of N. J. and Christina Holmgren, mention of whom is made elsewhere in this work. Edward remained at home until his marriage at the age of twenty-eight, soon after which he bought his father's farm. In 1914 he purchased the Swanson farm, which comprises 200 acres and is highly productive. His experience, enterprise and scientific methods of farming enable him to add constantly to the fruitfulness and value of his land and the force of his example as a progressive agriculturist.

Mr. Holmgren was clerk of Hollywood township for ten years and for a number of years he was also a member of the school board of District No. 48, Carver county. His political allegiance is given to the Republican party and he serves it well by attending conventions and working for its success and advancement. On January 28, 1903, he was married to Miss Mabel Swanson. Five children have been born of the union, two of them dying in infancy. The three living are Leslie Alden, Verdella Theodora and Kermit Edward. The parents are members of the Lutheran church at Watertown, Minnesota.

Page 334

JOHN SWANSON.

John Swanson, of Waconia, was born in Smoland, Sweden, October 24, 1859, and came to the United States in 1884 in company with his brother, Frank Swanson. On the eighth of July they reached Carver county and the home of their uncle, John Broberg, a pioneer farmer of Laketown township. Their first employment was in the lumber yards in Minneapolis and this work continued to be the chief interest of their business careers. At the end of two years they were joined by their brother, Charley E. Swanson and the following year the parents were sent f or and a home was established on the land where John Swanson now resides. His father and mother spent the remainder of their lives in Carver county and were members of the Baptist church at Scandia. The mother died in May, 1912, aged seventy-eight years and her husband's death occurred just two months later in his eight-first year. Both are buried in the Scandia cemetery. For ton yearn, John Swanson remained in the employ of the Smith Lumber Company of Minneapolis and here also Frank Swanson worked until his untimely death through an accident in the lumber woods. Charley Swanson became a carpenter in Minneapolis where he is still employed in the trade. In the lumber business, John Swanson has met with marked success and his ability was rewarded by rapid progress in the commercial world. On leaving the Smith Company, he became an independent dealer as a member of the firm of the Western Lumber company in Hopkins, Minnesota, and was associated with this firm for a number of years. In 1897 he bought his present lumber interests which are located at St. Bonifacius in Hennepin county and he has since devoted his efforts to this prosperous enterprise, dealing in building material and a general line of lumber. Aside from the demands of his private transactions, Mr. Swanson has found time for cooperation with other branches of industry, he was one of the original shareholders in the Minnetonka Cannery Company at St. Bonifacius and is a shareholder in the Cooperative Creamery Company at Waconia. He has never interested himself in political matters but takes a keen and active interest in the promotion of the welfare of the community in which he lives. He was married December 27, 1911, to Miss Isabelle Anderson, daughter of Peter D. Anderson, a well known farmer of Laketown township. Since 1897, Mr. Swanson has made his home on his father's old place near Waconia. He has added to the original tract and has erected an attractive house which adds to the natural beauty of the location on the banks of Clearwater lake. He has also taken advantage of the recreation offered by the pleasant situation of his home and beside the fishing on the lake enjoys the use of a launch. Mr. Swanson is a supporter of the Swedish Baptist church of which his wife is a member.

Page 335

EMIL TESCH.

This enterprising proprietor of Highland Farm, farmer and stock man, has special interest in Carver county and Watertown township, for he was born, reared, educated and married in the township, and he has lived in it all his life, employing his energies in promoting its welfare along with his own. His life began September 29, 1862, on his father's farm in section 28, Watertown township, he being the son of Henry and Minnie (Barnick) Tesch, natives of Prussia, who in 1858 came to St. Paul, where he worked two years as a day laborer.

In 1860, for $420, he bought the 160 acres of land on which Emil was born and proceeded to convert it into a productive and valuable farm. There the mother died in 1882, aged about forty-nine years, and there the father also died, in 1900, at the age of seventy-six. He started in life in this country empty handed and accumulated a competence by steady industry and good management. When he and his wife took up their residence on the farm he carried groceries and other provisions for their sustenance from St. Paul on his back. He put about eighty acres of his land tinder cultivation and enriched it with good buildings, making it in time one of the beat farms in the township. He had no inclination to public life and never hold or sought a political office. He and wife were among the original members of the Lutheran church at Waconia.

These sturdy people became the parents of seven children. Annie became the wife of Matthias Singley, a sketch of whom will be found in this volume, and died May 20, 1914. Ewalt farmed the home place until his death in 1909, when the farm was sold. Bertha is the wife of William West, of Waconia. Lena is the wife of Henry Dressel, of Minneapolis, and Mary is the wife of George Niccum, of Eureka, Hennepin county.

Emil Tesch, the third child, remained at home until his marriage at the age of thirty, to Miss Alma Dressel, a sister of Henry Dressel and a daughter of Peter and Margaret (Schunk) Dressel, who came to Watertown township as pioneers but a little later than the Tesch family. Mr. Dressel enlisted during the Civil War and served until the close of that sanguinary contest. He died February 1, 1909, at the age of 80 years. His widow still owns the f arm, her son carrying on its operations.

Mr. and Mrs. Tesch have nine children: Margaret, is the wife of William Niccum. The others are: Walter, George, Ruth, Harry and Lizzie (twins), Ellen and Helen (twins), and Robert. Mr. Tesch bought the farm he now owns and occupies in 1902. It was taken up as a homestead by John Crawford and later owned by Peter Burke. The farm embraces 120 acres and Mr. Tesch has made all the improvements now on it. The dwelling house is a brick veneered structure, and the other buildings are in keeping with it. The place is the seat of vigorous general farming operations and an active live stock breeding industry, the latter being the chief object of interest and attention for the proprietor. He has served as township supervisor for eleven consecutive years and as a member of the school board and its treasurer for about the same length of time. He is a Republican in politics and belongs to the German Lutheran church at Watertown. In the proper seasons he seeks recreation in hunting trips to the northern woods. He is skillful in the chase and has many fine trophies of his prowess in this respect mounted at his home.

Page 335

HERMAN F. TESCH.

Herman F. Teach, a farmer of Hollywood township, was born in Pomerania, Germany, October 14, 1859. He came to the United States with his parents, Ferdinand and Frederika Tesch, in 1867, a lad of eight years and since that time has been a resident of Carver county. Ferdinand Teach settled in Hollywood township where he bought eighty acres of school land and later purchased another eighty which was covered with timber. He built a log house and engaged in the task of converting wild and wooded land into cultivated fields. He continued the work of improvement until his retirement from active farming and developed the fine farm property now owned by his son, Herman Tesch. The present farm home was erected by Ferdinand Tesch about twenty-five years ago. He is a Republican and throughout the many years of his residence in the county has always taken a marked interest in the public welfare and has served as a member of the school board. He is now in his eighty-fifth year and since the death of his wife in 1901, has made his home with his son on the old farm. When he was twenty-one years of age, Herman Tesch took the eighty acres which his father had first worked and assumed the management of the whole farm. Later he sold twenty-live acres of the original tract and for a number of years has made his home on the other property, where he has erected new farm buildings including a large barn with unusual accommodations for stock. He engages in both grain and stock farming and is interested in the creamery business, as a shareholder in the Cooperative creamery at Mayer and keeps from twelve to fifteen fine dairy cows on his place. In 1883, he was married to Bertha Conrad, who died twelve years later and was survived by five children. Ellen, the wife of Henry Mix of Oskasis, Minnesota; Reuben, who lives in Helvetia, Minnesota; Willie, living in Hollywood township, and Aaron and Alma, who are at home. Mr. Tesch contracted his second marriage with Lydia Bunse, May 20, 1898. She was born at Council Bluffs, Iowa, and is a daughter of Rev. Herman Bunse, a retired minister of the Evangelical Association. Mr. Bunse is a native of Germany and came to this country when he was fourteen years of age. He entered the ministry when he was twenty years old and gave fifty years of devoted and efficient service in that work. He was prominently associated with his denomination in the north-west, being located for the most part in Minnesota and Iowa. He served as presiding elder and for a number of years preached in St. Paul and Minneapolis, and has also occupied the pastorate in Hutchinson, Chaska and Montrose, Minnesota, and for three years was in the church at Mayer, where he now makes his home, resting from the labors of a long and useful career. Three children have been born to Mr. Tesch and his wife, Harris, Carl and Florence. Mr. Tesch is a member and zealous worker in the Evangelical Association at Mayer, where his parents were members of the first congregation. He is actively identified with all branches of the church work and is a trustee and class leader. His political affiliations are with the Republican party.

Page 336

FRANK TRENDE.

This capable member of the board of county commission era was born on the farm which he now occupies in Dahlgren township, November 14, 1874. He is a son of Ernest and Johannah (Puschelke) Trende, who were born, reared and married in the province of Pomerania, Germany. In May1873, they arrived in the United States.

The father bought eighty acres of wild woodland in Dahlgren township for the sum of $1,400, and located on it as a future home. He afterward increased his farm to 240 acres, and there he passed the remainder of life, dying on Christmas day, 1913, at the age of eighty years. His widow and two sons survive and are living on the old place, which is owned by the sons, Frank and Albert, the latter occupying the old homestead part. There are also three daughters. Bertha is the wife of Herman Ehrenberg, of Laketown township. Minnie is the widow of William Ehrenberg, also living in Laketown township and Elizabeth is the wife of Helmuth B. Sell, treasurer of Carver county, a sketch of whom is to be found in this work. She is a twin sister of Frank, they being the only children of the family born in this country.

Frank Trende obtained his education in the country school and at the age of twenty-four married Miss Bertha Zimmerman, step-daughter of August Splettstoeser. They have two children living, Orville and Clara, both attending school.

At the ago of twenty-two Mr. Trende was elected a member of the township board, thus serving six years. He was then assessor for seven years, and in 1910 was elected a member of the board of county commissioners. His services in this office were such that he was reelected in 1914. He has also been clerk of the school district from the age of twenty-one, and is the secretary treasurer and the general manager of the Farmers Creamery Association at Cologne, of which he was one of the principal originators and promoters. This creamery has over 100 patrons and in the year 1913 it transacted a business amounting to $65,000. It is located in a dairy country of unusual productiveness, and has done excellent work in the demonstration of the value of dairy farming.

Mr. Trende is a Republican, being a zealous worker for the success of his party. His religious connection is with the Moravian church, in whose service he is active, taking a part in all its work, as he does in that of every agency for good in the community. He is an energetic, enterprising and public spirited citizen, being one of the widely and favorably known citizens.

Page 336

AUGUST F. TRUWE.

This estimable citizen of Young America, is a son of John and Elizabeth (Moery) Truwe and the third of six children. The father became a resident of Carver county in 1857. He was a tailor and worked at his trade a number of years after preempting 160 acres of government land six miles north of Young America. He cleared the greater part of it, reducing if to productiveness, thereby making a valuable and attractive country home.

In 1876 he gave up active work on the farm and opened a general store in company with Ackerman Bros. He retired from business in 1888, and has since passed most of his time in California. The mother belonged to a family long resident in Iowa. She died July 7, 1896. They became the parents of six children. Louisa, is the wife of Henry Perchon, manager of the gas plant in the village of Young America. John Henry died in 1876. August F. Albert J. kept a general store at Hamburg, until his death in January, 1914. Emma was the wife of Emil Bachman, druggist in Young America, and Julius, of Young America, is a railways mail clerk.

August F. Truwe grew to manhood on the farm and obtained his education in the public schools. He has engaged in various occupations and when the State Bank of Young America was organized in 1900 was chosen its president, a position he has hold ever since. He was married in 1882 to Miss Anna Rath, a daughter of Andrew and Mary Rath. Their five children are: Oscar J., who married Miss Pauline Eckardt, of Sibley county, and is associated with his father; Emma, is the wife of Louis De Rieux residing in California; Emil is a resident of St. Paul; George P. is assistant cashier of the State Bank of Young America; and Julia is at home.

August F. Truwe became a partner in his father's mercantile business in 1881, to which he has since devoted attention. He has served fourteen years as postmaster of Young America, four years being during the presidency of Grover Cleveland. He was president of the village council fifteen years and chairman of the board of county commissioners for four years. In connection with the public schools he has given the community valuable service for thirty years, being now president of the high school board. He is a thirty-second degree Freemason, a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, and a member of the Order of Sons of Hermann and the Modern Woodmen. He was also one of the leading forces in organizing the village fire department.

Page 337

AUGUST VOLLRATH

Approaching the end of his eighty-sixth year, and having been a resident of the United States for sixty-six years August Vollrath, a prosperous farmer living two miles west of St. Bonifacius, in Watertown township, has used his opportunities to good advantage, and at the same time he contributed full measure to advancement of county, state and nation. He was born in Saxony, Germany, November 2 1828, and in 1848 came to Philadelphia. In a short time, he went to New Jersey and worked in a brickyard two year then came west to Wisconsin, but on account of the climate moved to St. Louis, Missouri. He there worked as a gardener at $8 a month, then going to Platte county, Missouri, was employed as a stonemason on bridge work during the next year.

The next step in Mr. Vollrath's life of change and incident was a trip to California with a drove of cattle and sheep, wintering in Salt Lake City, and after completing the trip passed nearly three years in California. After one winter in Germany, he returned in 1856 accompanied by his sister Mary, who married August Krause, a pioneer resident of Watertown.

Mr. Vollrath, in 1858 or 1859, married Miss Augusta Lupnow, who died in 1862, leaving eight children, Frank, at Arlington, Minnesota; Louisa, now residing at Six Mile Creek near Lake Minnetonka, the wife of Ferdinand Bise; Augusta, Mrs. Henry Vogler, at Young America; Fredericka, the wife of Paul Zinter, a railroad man; Anna S., wife of Rye Holcomb who resides near Plymouth; August, Jr., who is also a farmer near Plymouth; Erma, the wife of Herman Luebke, a poultry dealer at Arlington; Bertha, who lives in the same neighborhood and is the wife of Albert Luebke.

Mr. Vollrath was again married after his return from California, his choice being Miss Justina Bise. She died in 1878, leaving three children; Hermann, a farmer in Minne Trista township, Hennepin county; Edward, who operates the home farm; Otto, connected with the creamery at Carve Edward Vollrath married Miss Albertina Stalke, a daughter of Ernest Stalke, of Carver. They have no children. August Vollrath belongs to the Lutheran church at Waconia. He has served on the school board and filled other local offices with credit to himself and benefit to his township. He is wide known and highly esteemed as a man and as a citizen.

Page 337

OSCAR VOLLRATH

For a continuous period of forty-six years Oscar Vollrath, one of the enterprising farmers of Watertown township, Carver county, Minnesota, has been a resident of this part of the state, and during most of the time an active and energetic contributor to its further development and progress He was born at Thierungen, Germany, August 30, 1859, and in 1868 came to the United States and Carver county, Minnesota, with his parents Jacob and Johanna Vollrath, also natives of that part of the fatherland, and reared and educated there

After reaching St. Paul, in this state, the family journey by rail to Shakopee, and from there to Chaska by livery service. The members of it went to the home of August Krause Sr., and his father and lived there until their own house could be built. As soon as this was completed they located in it on section 34, Watertown township, in which the father bought 160 acres, making his purchase of Christian Beck of St. Paul. The father, with the aid of his sons, cleared the land and converted it into a good farm. On it he passed the remainder of his life, dying in 1901, thirteen years after the death of the mother.

Seven children were born in the family and four of that are living at the present time (1914). Hermann resides on a farm of 160 acres three miles south of Waconia. Augusta, who is the widow of the late Xavier Denzel has her home with her daughter, a milliner at Watertown. Wilhelmina is the wife of Julius Ketcher, who formerly lived across the road from the farm of her brother Oscar, but their home is now on a farm three miles north of St. Bonifacius, in Hennepin county. Charles died young in Germany, before the parents left that country, and August and Gustave also have died.

Oscar Vollrath, the third of his parents' children, remained on the farm with the father until the death of the latter and ever since owned and cultivated it. He does general farming and raises live stock, making specialties of Holstein cattle and White Jersey hogs. He also raises poultry on a moderate scale, and furnishes milk to the co-operative creamery. His present attractive and commodious dwelling house built of buff brick, was erected by him in 1905, and his large barn was built in 1909. In addition to the home farm he owns eighty acres which he purchased of Julius Ketcher, his brother-in-law, a number of years ago.

Mr. Vollrath was reared in the faith of the Lutheran church to which his parents belonged, and he still adheres to it and renders it good service in an official position which he has filled with acceptability for eleven years. He was married November 13, 1885, to Miss Bertha Domres, a daughter Christ and Mollia Domres. They have had nine children. Clara is the wife of Hermann Molnau, the son of old residents in the neighborhood of Waconia, and is, living on farm near that village. John is assisting his father in the management of the farm. Amiel died at the age of eleven . Martha is living at home. Elenora is the wife of Harvey Holmes, an insurance agent and farmer living at Princeton, this state. Herbert, Louisa, Laura and Arlys are still members of the parental family circle and assistants in the farm and household work.

Page 337

REV. JOHN A. WAGNER.

For a little more than half of his life Rev. John A. Wagner, pastor of Gothaholm Swedish Evangelical Lutheran church at Watertown, has been active in the Christian ministry, all but two of his twenty-three years of service at the sacred desk having been passed in this state, ministering to the spiritual welfare of its people, sustaining church organizations, building church edifices and other structures for Christian use and performing important official duties in connection with the government of his denomination.

Mr. Wagner is a native of Upsala, Sweden, where his life began July 6, 1869. He obtained a good academic education and having, early in life, determined to enter the ministry, bent his studies toward that end. He pursued a thorough course in theology at the Methodist Theological Seminary with special courses in the celebrated university of his native city, and soon thereafter came to the United States, being then but twenty-two years of age. He was ordained for the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church, entering the Northwestern Swedish Conference. His first pastorate was in Keokuk, Iowa, a charge that he filled for two years.

For twenty years this zealous and industrious preacher of the gospel of peace and good will toward men remained in the Methodist Episcopal church, passing eighteen years of the period in this state, nine of them at Atwater, in Kandiyohi county. During this long consecration of service to that church he performed important duties as secretary of the conference, chairman of the board of conference examiners, chairman of the board of trustees in charge of church property, member of the hymnal committee, director of the Swedish Methodist Book Concern, and a director of the Hamline University Post Graduate Institute.

From 1906 to 1908 Mr. Wagner was district superintendent of the Minneapolis district, with residence at Stillwater. For three years he was pastor of the First Swedish Methodist Episcopal church in St. Paul. Affiliating with the Lutheran church he took charge of the church he is now serving so zealously, his pastorate beginning October 12, 1911; and in accordance to his own desire, he was re-ordained in the regular Lutheran form, the ceremony taking place in Chicago, June 16, 1912.

Since taking charge of the Gothaholm congregation Mr. Wagner has built, at a cost of $4,000, the Young People's Hall, a place for general assemblages, and for religious, social and educational purposes. The Young People's Society has an orchestra of fourteen instruments and gives numerous public entertainments, which are highly enjoyable and warmly appreciated by the public. Mr. Wagner is also pastor of the church at Lyndale and the Gothalund church at Maple Plain. The Young People's Society at Lyndale also has a hall, the church basement, finished at a cost of $1,200. Extensive improvements are also being made in the church at Watertown, one of which is the erection of a beautiful hand-carved altar, at a cost of about $500.

Mr. Wagner was married at Keokuk, Iowa, September 20, 1893, to Miss Anna Sophia Lind, a native of Illinois, but of Norwegian parentage. They have nine children, Ruth Rosalie, Alice Victoria, Florence Evangeline, Milburn Wesley, Mildred Sophia, Philip Asbury, Eveline Lutine, Fulton Alexander and Grace Junatte, Alice, Florence and Milburn being students at the high school.

Page 338

HENRY WELTERS.

This valued citizen, whose home is at the village of Cologne, was born on his father's farm about two miles and a half from the village, September 30, 1879. He is a son of John and Helena (Huben) Welters, the former a native of the city of Limburg, Hesse Nassau. John came to Carver county with his father, Hubert, mother and sister in 1862, the parents residing near their, son John, there passing the rest of life.

John Welters first owned eighty acres of land near Cologne, afterward adding sixty acres more. About twenty-five years ago he gave up active farm work and turned his attention to mercantile life, keeping a store and a saloon. He also for twenty years engaged in buying and selling grain. He and wife were the parents of three sons, Henry, Matthew and Gerard. Matthew was a teacher in the Carer county public schools for fourteen years and died in 1912. Gerard died when he was eighteen years old. There are also four living daughters, Lizzie, Kate, Annie, and Caroline. Lizzie is the wife of Leonard Vos; Kate of Anton Van Kempen; Annie of Pat Coyle; Caroline of Joseph Muhlberger.

Henry Welter remained at home until the age of twenty-four. He then worked three years in a saloon, when he took up a homestead in Canada, which he occupied four years and which he still owns. Resuming saloon work at Cologne he remained there steadily until May, 1914, when he was chosen cashier of the Farmers State Bank at Cologne, a position he still holds, and in which he is rendering excellent and appreciated service.

This bank was founded in May, 1914. Its directorate consisted of Roy Quimby, Minneapolis, president; Henry Pfeghaar, vice presidents Henry Welters, cashier; additional directors being William Pfleghaar, William Jaspers, Leonard Vos and Dr. H.R. Diessner. These were also the original stock holders and incorporators of the institution, which has a capital of $12,000 and a surplus of $3,000. Mr. Welters is a member of the Catholic church and unmarried.

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DIETRICH F. WESTERMAN.

Dietrich F. Westerman, a prominent farmer of Hollywood township, has been a resident of Carver county since 1859. Ho was born at Hanover, Germany, November 38, 1852; son of Gottlieb and Mary Westerman. When six years of age, his parents came to this country and located in Camden township, Carver county, buying eighty acres of primitive timber land from the government. Here the family experienced all the hardships and difficult labor of pioneer life. Gottlieb Westerman worked at the arduous task of clearing his land, supporting his family, meanwhile, with whatever employment he could find. He dug ginseng and for a time split rails for a daily wage of fifty cents, boarding himself, and was cheated of even this meager pay. For over a year the wife and children were alone on the farm while he fought for the Union in the great civil conflict. He enlisted in the Fifth Minnesota regiment and was wounded in one of the engagements of the southern campaign, but on recovery returned to his regiment and served until the close of the war. He then returned to his farm, where he continued the improving of his land and also operated turning lathes, that having been his trade in the old country. He spent the remainder of his life here, a prosperous, farmer and public spirited citizen. He took a patriotic and intelligent interest in all public affairs and served in a number of township offices. His political affiliations were with the Republican party. Gottlieb Westerman was a member of the Lutheran church of Waconia for a number of years and later placed in membership with the same denomination in Mayer, where he is buried, his death occurring March 22, 1907. His wife had died some time before, leaving six children, Fred, who owned his father's farm and died at the age of sixty-two; Dietrich F.; George, a farmer in Camden township, who died in his fifty-fifth year; Dorothy, the wife of August Farber, living in Oklahoma; Mary, who married Gus Schwartz of Camden township, and Louisa, also residing in Camden township, the wife of Rudolf Boemke. Julius Westerman, the son of Fred Westerman, lives on the old Westerman farm in Camden township, the home of his father and grandfather. Dietrich F. Westerman spent his early life on his father's place, assisting him in his work until he was twenty years of age and then found employment on other farms. After three years of this work, he bought a tract of partially improved land in Waconia township and began to farm in his own interest. His sister acted as housekeeper in his newly established home until his marriage a few years later. He was married, January 7, 1879, to Louisa Merkle, then eighteen .years of age and born in Hollywood township, December 11, 1860. Her parents, Joseph and Caroline (Kieseli) Merkle, were natives of Germany and among the earliest settlers of Carver county, locating on government land in Hollywood township in 1857. Joseph Merkle made his home here until the death of his wife, when he removed to Shakopee, where lie resided for a number of years. He is now living at the advanced age of eighty-four and of later years has made his home for the most part with his daughter, Louisa, who is the only surviving member of his family. The other daughter, Caroline Merkle, who married Jacob Fletcher, died at the age of thirty-seven. In 1882 Mr. Westerman left Waconia township and bought eighty acres of land in Hollywood township, where he has lived since, his present property including forty more acres which previously belonged to the Merkle homestead, His place had but a few acres of cleared land and he entered again upon the pioneer farmer's task of farm building. The lowland has been reclaimed by the installing of a drainage system and the first log buildings replaced by a comfortable modern house and fine barns. He has interested himself in dairy farming and stock raising and has met with marked success in these enterprises. He is actively identified with the public interests of the township of which he has been a resident for over thirty years and has served as supervisor and as a member of the 'school board for a number of years. Mr. Westerman and his wife have a family of eight: Fred, a farmer in Wright county; George, employed in a creamery in Polk county; Helen, the wife of John Cook of Buffalo Lake, Minnesota; Ludwig, Edwald and Lorena, living at home, and Eddie and Agnes, who make their home with their brother, Fred Westerman.

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WILLIAM F. WETTER

William P. Wetter, a well-known farmer of Hollywood township, was born on the farm where he now lives, December 24, 1860. His father, John Abraham Wetter, was one of the first settlers in Hollywood and his first home, the birthplace of William, is probably the oldest landmark of pioneer days in the township. John Wetter was a native of Elberfeld, Rhine Province, Germany, and after coming to this country lived for some time in Chicago. He came west at an early date, desiring to secure land, and was accompanied by two comrades who had been with him in Chicago, but they became discouraged by the difficulties encountered in the new and unsettled country and John Wetter was the only one who persevered in his determination and finally achieved his purpose, establishing himself as a farmer. He was a baker by trade and engaged in this employment in Chaska for some time, and his skill won him such success that after leaving the bakery he was often called to Chaska to help prepare for occasions that demanded fine confections. He was married there in 1857 to Anna Maria Walch, a native of Bavaria, whom he had known in Chicago and who was then living in Chaska. Soon after this he moved on his preemption claim, making his home in the old log house which still stands on the place and has subsequently served the community as church and school house. In 1867 it housed the first school that was held in this vicinity; the teacher was Katie Sexton, who married James McLennon and died in 1913. At this time, Mr. Wetter was living on a homestead claim adjoining his place, but after several years here he again made his home on the first farm, clearing the timber land and continuing the improvement of this property. He put sixty acres under cultivation and in 1875 built the house now occupied by his son William, who took charge of the farm in 1885 when his father retired. The latter at that time built a smaller home where his widow now lives in her eightieth year. He was a Republican and took a keen and active interest in public affairs and in the welfare of the township from the time of its organization at old Helvetia. He was a member of the Evangelical church and was a zealous worker in its interests. He was instrumental in establishing the congregation in the neighborhood and the first services were held in his log house. His death occurred October 9, 1898, soon after he had celebrated his seventy-sixth birthday. He had a family of six children, one of whom, Gottlieb, died in childhood. The other children are: John, who is a contractor and carpenter in Corning, California; William; Anna, the wife of Fred Gloege of Hollywood; and David, who is a farmer near Princeton, Minnesota. Another son, Paul, was a farmer, owning part of his father's place and died, aged thirty. William Wetter was reared on the farm and as a lad revealed natural aptitude and interest in agricultural pursuits and assumed the management of the farm under the direction of his father, when he was fourteen years old. This business has been his career and the old home his residence with the exception of three years spent as dealer in agricultural implements in New Germany. He has continued the improvement of the property, which now includes one hundred and fifty acres of the original claim, the homestead land having been sold, and has drained some marsh land. He has added to the farm buildings and the barn with ample stabling capacity was erected in 1906. He has interested himself particularly in blooded cattle and keeps a large herd of cows. He was married to Hulda Kraus, a native of Carver county, in 1887. Her father, Henry Kraus, is a veteran of the Civil war and located in this county soon after the close of the war. He, is now living at Hutchinson, Minnesota. They have ten children, all living at home with the exception of the oldest daughter, Olive, who married Fred Kottke and lives at Hutchinson. Odella is a teacher in the local schools and the other children are Mabel, Daisy Wilmar, Leila, Milford, Gilbert, Leander and Verna. A daughter, Sadie, died when eight years of age. Mr. Wetter is a faithful and generous supporter of the Evangelical church association with which his father was prominently identified and is president of the board of trustees. The presiding minister is Rev. B. Simon, the son of another pioneer farmer. Mr. Wetter is a Republican and an active participant in political work and township affairs and has given able service in a number of local offices.

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REV. THEODORE ROLF

Rev. Theodore Rolf, pastor of the St. John's Evangelical Lutheran church at Hollywood, is a native of Minnesota, born in St. Paul, May 9, 1874. His father was Rev. E. Rolf and prominently identified with the history of the Evangelical Lutheran church in this state. He was born in Hanover, Germany, June 20, 1837 and received his education and theological training in the Concordia Seminary at Ft. Wayne, Indiana. In 1857, he was ordained and accepted his first charges at Sheybogan Falls and Plymouth, Wisconsin, and here organized and established a church. From there he was called to Columbus, Indiana, where he remained until 1863. In that year he went to St. Paul and organized the Zion Lutheran church, the first church of the denomination in the city and was the first resident minister there. He devoted the rest of his life to the pioneer work of the church in this field and was eminently successful in the organization of congregations, establishing churches in the surrounding counties and also at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Can., and engaging in missionary work in this synod. For a number of y6ars he traveled over the territory, visiting the congregations as a representative of the synod. He organized the Zion Lutheran church in St. Paul with a congregation composed of four families and held his first meetings in the old court house, and left it in 1891, a thriving church, with five hundred members. From St. Paul he went to the St. John's Lutheran church at Hollywood, of which his son is now pastor and served here until his death in 1900. The church building had been erected and a school started and through his unfailing efforts for the advancement of this church, a building was provided for the school and during, his ministry, the membership was doubled. He was a proficient theologian and enjoyed the debating of doctrinal questions. He held a number of offices in the synod and for twenty-five years was a member of the missionary board. In the annals of the church and the memories of the people to whom he ministered, he has left a lasting monument in a life of consecrated and zealous service. He was married in Cleveland, Ohio, to Elizabeth Henke, who was at that time employed as a governess in the family of Dr. Swan, president of the synod of the Evangelical Lutheran church. She died in 1881, leaving seven children, August, Christian, Regnina, Elizabeth, Anna, Theodore and Agnes, who are all, with the exception of Theodore Rolf, living in St. Paul. Rev. Rolf contracted a second marriage with Caroline Rullmann of Milwaukee and two sons were born to this union, Louis, a teacher at Gaylord, Minnesota, and Walter, who is a minister at Dodge Centre, Minnesota, and with whom his mother makes her home. Theodore Rolf was reared in St. Paul and received his early education in the city schools, later becoming a student in the Concordia College at Milwaukee. He completed his theological course in the seminary at St. Louis and was ordained June 27, 1896. His father being in failing health at that time, he came to Hollywood as his assistant and served in that capacity until his father's death when he was chosen as his successor. During this time he also ministered to the Crow River congregation in Camden township and still maintains his interest in this church, devoting two days in each week to the school there. Under his charge the St. John's church has steadily grown in strength and influence and in its service to the community. The school, which is maintained in connection with the church, one of its notable and worthy enterprises, now enrolls eighty-two pupils and employs several teachers. Theodore Rolf was married July 27, 1904, to Miss Clara Hertwig of Gaylord, Minnesota, formerly engaged in teaching school and they have three children, Roland, Olivia and Marcella.

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